Et Alors? Magazine 1

julianboom

Et Alors? Magazine is an ongoing research project, focused on documenting contemporary queer art and LGBT creativity, solely written and designed by Fleur Pierets & Julian P. Boom. Married and female. By using the conventional magazine format as a creative platform to publish in-depth interviews and positive portraits on musicians, visual artists, writers and performers, they challenge and expand the mainstream understandings on the specific niche of queer art. The project both highlights contemporary artists and the many creative individuals who have put their unique stamp on art history. Et Alors? Magazine is a time document that continually captures the zeitgeist of a changing world, supporting the creation, the research and the development of projects that explore diversity, gender, feminism and queer topics on an optimistic, cultural, artistic and intellectual level.

ET ALORS?

A F L A M B O Y A N T M A G A Z I N E

EUR 20€ - UK 17£ - USA 27$


editorial 01

Dear reader,

It feels so great to be writing this editorial because it means that we did it;

we created the magazine we always wanted to read ourselves. Hurray!

Let me start by telling you why we feel the world is in need of yet another

magazine.

When you search for gay magazines, you will notice that they are for men

or women only. When you look for specific sexual preferences you will

merely find porn and when you want fetish you have to settle for fashion

magazines floating on the gorgeous trend of being a bit naughty.

So we started putting together our own perfect and unique mix, sprinkled

a cultural coating on top and labelled it Et Alors?

Et Alors? as in: So What? So what if you are a guy who loves dressing up as

a woman or vice versa. So what if you like the whispering rustle of a flogger

or a cat-o’-nine every once in a while. And if you have a fetish – and let me

tell you, most people do – so what? Et Alors?

In our first issue we proudly present artists who found their inspiration

in the unusual and beneath the surface of the obvious. Like this girl from

Canada who took her camera and moved into the biggest BDSM hotel

in Tokyo or one of our personal heroes, who paved the way for a radiant

group of drag queens and –kings in Amsterdam. Furthermore we pay

homage to the London party kids in the noughties & show you a glimpse

on today’s Betty Page.

You will find this and much more in our very first flamboyant style magazine

on fun, fashion, fetish, art, gender, BDSM, literature, gay, culture, glamour

and icons without any boundaries.

To have, to hold, to read and to treasure because Et Alors? presents a fresh,

uncensored perspective on a world filled with diversity.

It’s all about celebrating! Celebrating life, celebrating who you are, celebrating

the right to be whoever you want to be.

Thank you, to all the great artists, photographers and writers who made

this issue possible, let’s toast on making this the first out of many more to

come.

Love,

Fleur Pierets & Julian P. Boom

ET ALORS? 005


EDITOR IN CHIEF FLEUR PIERETS

ART DIRECTOR JULIAN P. BOOM

COVER

DESIGN VICKY BUYENS PHOTO & RETOUCHE ELLIE VDB AT IC-UC

HAIR & MAKE UP JUDITH VAN DONGEN

GLOVES ‘THE MUTANT MODEL’ BY SILVIA B

MODELS FLEUR PIERETS & JULIAN P. BOOM

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

AKIM A.J. WILLEMS DIRK STEENHAUT FLEUR PIERETS JOSIE PYKE

NIKKI HEARTACHE OGGY YORDANOV YASHA YOUNG

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

ANDREA BA BALDRIGHI ANGELA TELLIER ALYZ BRAM DE CEURT

DORALBA PICERNO HUGO ROURKE IZASKUN GONZALEZ JAMES

AND JAMES JAMES BROWN JESSICA EVANS JULIAN P. BOOM KATJA

EHRHARDT MARC SOBCZAK MOUS LAMRABAT NATHALIE DAOUST

OGGY YORDANOV PAUL REINQUIN PRIMER FOTOGRAFIE REBECCA

SEAL-DAVIS ROWAN MURRAY SHAMI KIELY SLINKACHU SCOTT IRVINE

THOMAS BURGGRAF

CONTRIBUTING ARTISTS

ALISON BRADY CHARLIE LE MINDU COPPELIA PIQUE ELANA FAJT

GREGORY & DEAN IRIS SCHIEFERSTEIN JUDITH VAN DONGEN MAISON

MARTIN MARGIELA NICK ANDREWS POLLY VAN DER GLAS SILVIA B

STEPHANE DUSSART VIVIAN KRAMER GEZEGD FREHER

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EDITOR IN CHIEF FLEUR PIERETS

WEB DESIGN JULIAN P. BOOM

WEB DEVELOPER JIM CABUS JULIAN P. BOOM

ET ALORS? MAGAZINE IS PUBLISHED BY

LMDP MEDIA GROUP BVBA

2011 - ISSN 2034-5429

T +32 (0) 477881752

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ET ALORS? IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK. ALL OF THE ET ALORS?’s

CONTRIBUTORS ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR AND RETAIN THE REPRODUCTION

RIGHTS OF THEIR OWN WORDS AND IMAGES. REPRODUCTIONS OF ANY

KIND ARE PROHIBITED WITHOUT THE EXPRESS PERMISSION OF THE EDITOR

AND EACH CONTRIBUTOR.

PRINTED BY GEERS OFFSET

006 ET ALORS?


table of contents

EDITORIAL 003

CONTRIBUTORS 006

Newclubkids Oggy Yordanov 008

The dark angel Josie Pyke 024

Tribute to Betty Page Jessica Evans 026

Yasha Young Column 042

Schwarzer Reiter We Love 046

Little People Slinkachu 048

The Fetishistas We Love 056

On bows and hats Saint Marteau 058

‘t Verschil We Love 076

welcome to the dollhouse Beatrice Morabito 078

MARIA’S kaffee Absinthe 088

Dez Mona Sàga 094

Schloss Greifenhain We Love 100

Hair 102

Marnie Scarlet the Scarlet Diva of fetish cabaret 122

ONE OYSTER & A piece of chicken Column Nikki Heartache 130

THE TOKYO HOTEL STORY Nathalie Daoust 132

SM & Fetishism in Literature by Akim A. J. Willems 156

H Alyz 168

Mount Gay Rum & De Sade We Love 196

the art of being Hopelezz Jennifer Hopelezz 199

EvelynEvelyn 236

Pin ups 238

Feast your eyes issue 1 on film 256

Websites 258

SPECIAL THANKS TO

VICKY BUYENS FOR DESIGNING THE COVER AND HELPING OUT JULIAN TO SET UP THE LAYOUT YASHA YOUNG FOR ORGANISING THE LAUNCH

OF THIS ISSUE IN STRYCHNIN GALLERY (BERLIN) WHEN THERE WAS MERELY AN IDEA OF A MAGAZINE JOSY PYKE WHICH WE COULDN’T GET TIRED

WITH ALL THE TEXT REVISIONS HAN HOOGERBRUGGE FOR BELIEVING RENATE BREUER BART VANDERBIESEN & GEOFFREY DE BEER FOR TAKING

THEIR TIME TO PREVIEW ALL OF OUR CONTENT AND NOT BEING ABLE TO FIND ANYTHING THEY COULD DISSAPROVE ON ARIE BOOM WHO COULD

DISSAPROVE ON SOMETHING: THE COVER PHOTO (TOO MUCH ‘TIT EXPOSURE’) INGRID VAN DEn BOSSCHE FOR OVERALL SUPPORT AND THINKING OF

A MILLION WAYS TO GET THIS MAGAZINE PAYED FOR ALL THOSE GREAT PEOPLE OUT THERE – YES WE ARE TALKING TO YOU! – WHO GOT THEMSELVES

A COPY OF THIS FIRST ISSUE SO WE CAN GO ON AND MAKE A SECOND ONE LAST BUT NOT LEAST A BILLION KISSES TOWARDS THE GREAT WRITERS,

PHOTOGRAPHERS, STYLISTS, MAKE UP ARTISTS, MODELS AND FRIENDS WHO MADE THIS DREAM POSSIBLE!

ET ALORS? 007


When ALYZ got her diploma of International Trade in Paris, La Sorbonne, Alyz

went in for a career in cultural and musical journalism. However, when she got

a golden opportunity to grasp a camera, she did. Her visions are characterised

by the words ‘Dream’ and ‘Strangeness’. Alyz created the fashion shoot ‘H’

on page 168.

www.visualyz.com

OGGY YORDANOV is a Bulgarian-born photographer who has lived in London’s

Soho district since 2001. As a party kid himself he was inspired by the

exuberance and avant-garde fashion of the London club underground. Oggy

took the pictures and wrote the article ‘New Club Kids’ on page 008.

www.oyordanov.com

An angry ex said AKIM A.J. WILLEMS is “an egocentric borderliner with an

attention deficit hyperactivity disorder”. Akim A.J.Willems, however, claims

“just to be an author, bibliophile, artist & stand-up comedian”. Akim wrote

the article ‘Sadomasochism & fetishism in popular and classic literature’ on

page 156.

www.akimwillems.be

JESSICA EVANS is a transplanted American photographer who has travelled

throughout the world capturing the personalities and timeless memories of

her grateful clients. The past 3 years she has resided in the Netherlands and

has established herself as a fashion and glamour photographer. Jessica shot

‘Tribute to Betty Page’ on page 026.

www.jessica-evans.nl

After even more than 15 years in graphic arts, Vicky Buyens still gets

wildly enthusiastic on new assignments. She simply loves to hover between

all of her passions such as photography, illustration, typography and many

more. Cause she gets inspired by those who bomb the world with innovating

ideas and pioneering thoughts, she was honoured to assist and guide us

through the graphic language of making a magazine.

www.missV.BE

008 ET ALORS?


CONTRIBUTORS

YASHA YOUNG shares some of the most beautiful, enticing, stimulating,

darkest art and creations with us. Things which she has encountered during

her career as the owner of Strychnin Gallery Berlin, London, NYC. She invites

you to take a closer look and hopefully be as speechless, excited or amused as

she was. You can read Yasha’s column on page 042.

www.strychnin.com

Originally from the UK, JOSIE PYKE thoroughly enjoys the research and

analysis that comes with journalism and loves to document and explore different

views within her writing. She likes to create empathy and debates. As an

aspiring lingerie model, she has a great interest in beauty. She writes an online

blog: http://amodelsbeautyblog.wordpress.com. Josie wrote the article

‘The Dark Angel: Life and times of Betty Page’ on page 024.

NIKKI HEARTACHE has toured the globe with bands such as Lords Of Acid

and Praga Khan. A few years ago she decided to collect and share her memoirs

with the world. Draped over a chaise longue she dictates her wild adventures

to her blushing secretary whilst nipping on a trendy cocktail. You can read

Nikki’s column on page 130.

www.darlingnikkie.com

BRAM DE CEURT is an artist focusing on erotic graffiti art and photography.

He’s organising national and international graffiti events, exhibitions and

competitions worldwide. Recently his focus has shifted towards photography

in the erotic but stylish atmosphere. Bram shot ‘The art of being hopelezz’ on

page 199.

www.bramdeceurt.com

With her company “Slightly-Sarcastic” VIVIAN KRAMER GEZEGD FREHER

provides styling and/or creative directions to create looks that last. She gets

inspired by pin-up’s, (old) movies, music, the people around her, city’s like

London, Berlin and she secretly loves clichés. Her style is to define as elegant,

edgy and fun with a little hint of sarcasm. Vivian styled ‘Tribute to Betty Page‘

on page 026.

www.slightly-sarcastic.nl

ET ALORS? 009


The Noughties saw the rise of a new generation of Club Kids following in the

footsteps of their predecessors – the original Club Kids of New York City, who, in

turn, had followed London’s Blitz generation. In the early 1980’s, the Blitz Club

in London’s Covent Garden became the focal point for an alternative club scene–

frequented by Adam Ant, Boy George, Siouxsie Sioux and Steve Strange–which

spawned even more radical clubs such as Leigh Bowery’s infamous Taboo club

in London’s Leicester Square. Bowery famously enjoined, ‘Dress as though your

life depends on it or don’t bother’, a mantra the new Club Kids have adopted as

their own. They dress outrageously, with a penchant for kitsch and anti-fashion.

Often with a mixture of their own self-made outfits and carefully selected labels

(predominantly Vivienne Westwood), oversized accessories, excessive amounts

of make-up and frequently highly androgynous looks, these flamboyant clubbers

have created a vibrant New Club Kids’ scene in London’s bohemian nightlife

underground. Fabulous or trashy, beautiful or scary, glamorous or freaky.

ET ALORS? 013


Bulgarian-born photographer Oggy Yordanov has lived in London’s

Soho district since 2001. As a party kid himself he was

so inspired by the exuberance and avant-garde fashion of the

London club underground, that he decided to make a unique

time document:

“While selecting the photographs for this book, I reviewed

thousands of images shot over the past decade. The incredible

memories flooded back, all those parties and amazing people

that made my years in the great city of London so phenomenal.

I wanted to share those memories.”

At the time I moved to London, in early 2001, the party scene

was still dominated by the super-clubs – places like Fabric,

Ministry of Sound, Fridge, Heaven and Turnmills – providing

a vibrant playground for the young clubber. These were huge

capacity venues with great DJ line-ups that pulled in massive

crowds of energetic party-goers, but one breed of party

animal was missing – the club kid. It was the time of “less is

more” and dressing down was the ongoing trend. For a while I

believed that the avant-garde fashion of the real underground

London had disappeared, somehow vanished with the modern

transformation of clubland. Thankfully, things were starting to

change.

In 2002, the musical “Taboo” opened in Leicester Square, Boy

George’s tribute to a bygone era – the New Romantics – London’s

original “dressers”.

The New Romantics were a group of creative and very ambitious

individuals, bored with the Punk that had ruled the

London scene since the mid 70’s – these kids were looking for

something new and different. What started as “Bowie Night”,

a small gathering at Billy’s in Soho, quickly progressed into a

new wave of party style.

In 1979 it moved to the now legendary Blitz Club in Covent

Garden. Started by Steve Strange of Visage, Blitz became a

hotspot for new talent and attracted a great deal of attention

from both media and the music world. With their outrageous

dress-sense, black lipstick, heavy eyeliner and asymmetric

014 ET ALORS?


ET ALORS? 015


016 ET ALORS?


hairdos, the Blitz Kids started a nightclub revolution. They

drew inspiration from the unlikeliest of places and would go

to extraordinary lengths to look different, anything to stay

ahead of the pack. The musical “Taboo” did much more than

revive the New Romantics. It centred around one of the most

eminent figures of 80’s nightlife, the very heart and soul of

London’s alternative fashion scene – Leigh Bowery.

As a true innovator – performance artist, club promoter, model,

fashion designer – Leigh started the now infamous polysexual

club, Taboo, in 1985. It quickly established itself as the wildest,

most fashionable night in town. With his body-morphing

costumes, a taste for the bizarre and a deep desire to shock,

Bowery radically challenged the boundaries between figure,

gender, fashion, beauty and art. With his premature death in

the early 90’s, London lost its brightest, most extraordinary

star and arguably the single-most influential figure for the

New Club Kid generation.

A year after “Taboo – the musical”, a movie about the New

York Club Kids hit the big screens worldwide. “Party Monster”

brought to life the most outrageous and daring party

characters from across the Atlantic, in all their glory and

hedonistic debauchery. Partly influenced and often joined by

Leigh, these kids took the scene to new heights. They partied

harder, dressed wilder, became the underground superstars to

a generation worldwide and coined the term Club Kids.

At this point London had already witnessed the first signs of

a new wave of underground “art-clubbing”. Nag Nag Nag, a

mid-week mash-up at the small Soho backstreet club, “The

Ghetto”, and the more challenging Kashpoint, were both

gaining popularity. Kashpoint, with its very strict door policy,

encouraged extreme dress-up and reignited London’s alternative

clubbing. Suddenly the New London Club Kids generation

had arrived.

Kashpoint attracted some of the original founders of the

New Romantics scene, along with fresh new artists, fashion

students and up-and-coming musicians – the usual bunch.

ET ALORS? 017


“It’s a platform for some of the

most radical, experimental and

risqué

performances

imaginable.”


020 ET ALORS?


ET ALORS? 021


Not surprisingly, its most memorable night was a Leigh Bowery tribute –

imagine a club packed with hundreds of Boweries. The scene was thriving

and an array of new clubs were popping up on a weekly basis. Kashpoint

and Nag Nag Nag championed a low-fi, electoclash sound which soon

became synonymous with the scene. Johny Slut told The Guardian in

2005 “One reason I started Nag Nag Nag was that music was becoming

more interesting again. Anyone who thinks club culture is dead should

come and see the queue on Wednesday night.

Another breakthrough club that started around the same time was Act

Art, which focused on live performances merging art, fashion, pop and

club culture. It established itself as the ultimate underground event to

challenge creativity and make people feel like they belonged.

It is, to this day, a platform for emerging artists showcasing some of the

most radical, experimental and risqué performances imaginable.

ET ALORS? 023


The mid-noughties were the new 80’s. Music and fashion

were reviving the styles of the decade in its entirety and

inevitably, it reflected on the club-scene. There were the

Neo-Romantics, the New Punks and the Voguers but

perhaps the most original of all revivals was the Nu Rave,

advocating DIY style over fashion. Though short-lived, it

made its mark on the scene.

Labels were being ripped off in favour of personally customized

outfits. Plastic neon toys became the ultra-chic,

must-have accessory, matched with brightly coloured

jeans and gold trainers.

Throughout 2006-2008 London was overtaken by the

Voguing revival. Though started as an underground

dance movement in 80’s New York, it was brought to

the mainstream with Madonna’s 1990 hit single ‘Vogue’.

Almost completely wiped out by the AIDS epidemic in

the 90’s, Voguing was brought back to life on this side of

the Atlantic through the advanced popularity of YouTube

and the documentary “Paris Is Burning”.

Voguing “Houses” were formed and for a couple of years

many Voguing Ball’s and dance-off’s took place around

London.

The Club Kids were getting serious attention from the

media, a lot were casted in music videos and commercials,

others kick-started their careers as fashion designers,

stylists, make-up artists, musicians or DJs. Some

started their own club-nights, most famously Jodie

Harsh, who emerged in 2006 with Circus, and Daniel

Lismore, whose latest venture Shabba Dabba Daa has

just made ID Magazine’s “Hottest Night in Town” list.

Fashion has always walked hand in hand with music and

London has a rich history for dressing-up. Club Kids or

“dressers”, as some would prefer, encapsulate the creative

London as I know it. Fabulous, yet trashy, beautiful

and scary, glamorous or freaky – meet the New London

Club Kids.”

Embracing this amalgam of styles – old and new, was

the club Boombox, based in the new fashion hot-spot of

Hoxton in the East End. It was the brainchild of Richard

Mortimer and just like its predecessor ‘Family’, it was

never advertised but always spoken about. Boombox

attracted a cult following and became the hottest ticket

in town. It was particularly favoured by the youth ‘bible’ –

ID magazine - and regularly featured in their pages. With

its eclectic style and iconic status Boombox became the

symbol of the contemporary London look. Favoured for

spotting new talent, it was the place to be seen and soon

magazines from all over the world were referencing the

scene. Editorials in V magazine, WAD and POP magazine

followed, but by far the most serious recognition of their

fashion came when Italian Vogue “borrowed” Molaroid’s

signature disco ball accessory for their cover.

New Club Kids: London Party Fashion in the Noughties

By Oggy Yordanov

Publication date: April 2011, £16.99, Paperback

304 pages with 300 colour illustrations

13 x 19 cm

ISBN 978-3-7913-4554-3

www.prestel.com

024 ET ALORS?


BETTIE PAGE

The Dark Angel

The life and times of the ultimate fetish pin up

Nowadays the name “Bettie Page” is infamous. Some may

relate her to coinciding pin-ups such as Marilyn Monroe or even

present day icons such as Dita Von Teese, others may recall her

more x-rated work, however despite all this, what Miss Page did

have was something that the standard 50’s pin-up did not. Page

was a highly educated, creative and innovative woman. A playful

mistress of temptation, a taboo turned Monroe. Quite simply the

queen of fetish pin-up.

On April 22nd 1923, Nashville Tennessee had its first glimpse of

the jet-black hair and blue eyes that would soon make history.

Bettie Mae Page was born the eldest of six children. Sadly the

family circle she was born into was far from perfect. Page and

her family were extremely poor, causing her and her two sisters

to stay in an orphanage. Her father had been labelled a thief

and a womaniser resulting in a divorce from her mother. Things

worsened as shockingly Page claimed to have suffered molestation

from her father at the mere age of thirteen.

Although her traumatising childhood was a struggle, Page found

refuge in her studies; she was a top student at school and graduated

with a scholarship. She also spent a lot of time with her sisters

dressing up and practicing hair and make-up to resemble

their favourite movie stars. Page also learnt how to sew; little

did she know that this talent would be an important part of her

future.

Fundamentally, Page wanted to become an actress, she graduated

from college with a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1944 then

moved to New York to pursue it. However, things took a turn

when she fortuitously met a police officer with a passion for photography:

Page created her first portfolio, which made her think

twice about her aspirations...

Page entered the field of modelling; her lack of inhibition, daring

poses and carefree ways made her a hit within the erotic photography

industry. Bettie Page quickly became a recognised name,

an underground sensation. In 1951 her fresh and alluring images

began appearing in well-known men’s magazines.

Page had a beautiful hourglass figure. She stood at 5ft 5” with well

proportioned measurements of 36-23-36.5. This wonderfully slim

but curvaceous form is often strived for nowadays and usually

only acquired through plastic surgery.

Page excelled with bondage and sadomasochistic themes, the

images she created were “out of the box” and seen as somewhat

controversial. These themes helped create Page’s reputation

as the first bondage model. Some of her most eminent work

appeared in fetish photographer and filmmaker Irving Klaw’s

short black and white movies, showing Page being spanked,

tied and dominated. However the content wasn’t as explicit as

it sounds. Quoted from Page herself, it was “gentle” during filming

and photo shoots and the “ropes were never tied too tight”.

Klaw was the only photographer Page would do bondage for,

and although the themes may have been shocking and amatory,

nudity or explicit content was never involved. That applied for all

of Page’s work. Who said bondage had to be vulgar?

026 ET ALORS?


Though not exploited through the majority of her work, casual

nudist Page had no objection to being nude in everyday life. “I

like to go cavorting in the nude in the forests. It is just another

world. You’re free as a bird!”

After the peak of bondage and fetish, Page took acting classes,

which earned her role in 1953 burlesque film Striporama; it was

during this role that Page’s voice, for the only time in her career,

was ever captured on film. It featured exotic dance routines and

vignettes, accompanied by a touch of humour.

The year of 1954, Bettie Page is New York’s top pin-up model.

The celebrated “Jungle Bettie” photo’s are released, showing

fearless Page, clad in her own handmade garments, posing with

two fully grown cheetahs. It was thanks to the photographer,

Bunny Yeager that Page landed a deal with notorious men’s magazine

Playboy. Yeager sent several shots to founder Hugh Hefner,

who then crowned her 1955’s Playmate of the Month. He chose

a photo of Page sitting nude, with the exception of a Christmas

hat, decorating a tree, playfully winking at the camera, entirely

defining the phrase “naughty but nice”.

Page was always proud of all her work “I never thought it was

shameful. It was much better than pounding a typewriter eight

hours a day which gets monotonous”.

Later in the year, Page won Miss Pin Up Girl of the World and

acquired herself the titles The Queen of Curves, The Dark Angel

and The Tease from Tennessee.

It is quite obvious that 21st Century burlesque queen Dita Von

Teese is a present day product of Page, channelling both themes

of burlesque and fetish, however not fully grasping that innocent

free spirit which Page so famously delivered. In her later years,

after a one time encounter with Dita, Page actually branded her

“attractive” but a “poor mimic” of herself!

Accounts of her departure from modelling vary. Some rumours

say Page was slated for inspiring members of the public to practice

various acts of bondage as shown in her photos, causing

one young man to lose his life. Others say it was her sudden and

somewhat unexpected conversion to Christianity in 1959.

Her later years grew more turbulent. Swamped by schizophrenia,

divorces and insecurity about her once perfect figure, Page

mysteriously disappeared from the public eye. She died aged 85

in Los Angeles, 2008.

From Page’s life, we are left a motif of beauty, enticement and

freewill that has inspired and influenced many. Yes she was sexy

and erotic, but there was a freshness and innocence about Miss

Page that seems to not exist in the 21st century, something that

perhaps has become unattainable. She made sex appeal pure

and approachable, something that we rarely see now.

Her career will continue to inspire fashion, photography, modelling

and art industries globally and will remain a symbol of 1950’s

innovation and beauty.

TEXT JOSIE PYKE

ET ALORS? 027


A TRIBUTE TO

BETTY PAGE

PHOTO’S

STYLING

MODELS

JESSICA EVANS

VIVIAN KRAMER GEZEGD FREHER

DENA MASSQUE

RACHAEL V

TRIANGLE BRA PLEASUREMENTS

KNICKERS MAITRESSE, JOLLY JANE NYLONS

STOCKINGS STYLIST’S OWN

SHOES MODELS OWN


BULLET BRA MAITRESSE, JOLLY JANE NYLONS

KNICKERS MAITRESSE, JOLLY JANE NYLONS

SUSPENDER BELT MAITRESSE, JOLLY JANE NYLONS

GLOVES, STOCKINGS AND SHOES MODELS OWN


DENA:

CORSET JEROEN VAN DER KLIS, BIZARRE DESIGN

KNICKERS MAITRESSE, JOLLYJANE NYLONS

SUSPENDER MAITRESSE, JOLLY JANE NYLONS

GLOVES STYLIST’S OWN

STOCKINGS AND SHOES MODELS OWN

RACHAEL:

CORSET JEROEN VAN DER KLISS, BIZARRE DESIGN

KNICKERS RAGO, SUZET

SUSPENDER BELT MAITRESSE, SUZET

STOCKINGS AND SHOES MODELS OWN


DENA:

BULLET BRA LULU, JOLLY JANE NYLONS

KNICKERS LULU, JOLLY JANE NYLONS

SUSPENDER BELT LULU, JOLLY JANE NYLONS

GLOVES, STOCKINGS AND SHOES MODELS OWN

RACHAEL:

BULLET BRA CABARET, SUZET

KNICKERS MAITRESSE, SUZET

SUSPENDER BELT MAITRESSE, SUZET

STOCKINGS AND SHOES MODELS OWN


SPREAD

DENA:

BRA SWISS DOT, JOLLY JANE NYLONS

KNICKERS SWISS DOT, JOLLY JANE NYLONS

WASPIE SWISS DOT, JOLLY JANE NYLONS

STOC KINGS AND SHOES MODELS OWN

RACHAEL:

BRA HARLOW, JOLLY JANE NYLONS

KNICKERS HARLOW, JOLLY JANE NYLONS

SUSPENDER BELT HARLOW, JOLLY JANE NYLONS

STOCKINGS AND SHOES MODELS OWN

DENA:

BRA CABARET, JOLLY JANE NYLONS

KINICKERS MAITRESSE, JOLLY JANE NYLONS

FRENCH KNICKERS CABARET, JOLLY JANE NYLONS

RACHAEL:

BUULET BRA JENNIFER, SUZET

STEP-IN FLIRT, SUZET

STOCKINGS MODELS OWN


DENA:

BULLET BRA HARLOW, JOLLY JANE NYLONS

KNICKERS HARLOW, JOLLY JANE NYLONS

SHOES MODELS OWN

RACHAEL:

CORSET JEROEN VAN DER KLISS, BIZARRE DESIGN

KNICKERS RAGO, SUZET

SUSPENDER BELT MAITRESSE, SUZET

GLOVES, STOCKINGS AND SHOES MODELS OWN


SPREAD

LEATHER BODY PLEASUREMENTS

SHOES MODELS OWN

BULLET BRA MAITRESSE, JOLLY JANE NYLONS

KNICKERS MAITRESSE, JOLLY JANE NYLONS

SUSPENDER BELT MAITRESSE, JOLY JANE NYLONS

GLOVES, STOCKINGS AND SHOES MODELS OWN


PHOTO Mark SOBCZAK


asha

COLUMN

YYoung

“A dreamer is one who can only find his way by moonlight, and his punishment is

that he sees the dawn before the rest of the world.” Oscar Wilde

I have always been fascinated with the beautiful, the dark and the utter unexplainable.

Things that aren’t the norm are for me what makes life exciting. I am

used to seeing things that are slightly off the beaten path, a little too bright,

a little too dark, a little too this or a lot too that. There is a certain magic in

myths and the brief moment in which one realizes that whatever is before

ones eyes bares any obvious explanation and leaves the viewer speechless. In

my personal opinion it does not always have to be the beauty we have been

taught to admire by society but the beauty that I find in unexpected places,

art or people I encounter. Now and by the invitation of this beautiful magazine

I am excited to share some of the most beautiful, enticing, stimulating, darkest

art and creations with you issue after issue in my little column, all things

which I have encountered during my career as the owner of Strychnin Gallery

Berlin, London, NYC and thus invite you to take a closer look and hopefully be

as speechless, excited or amused as I was.

When I travelled to Russia last spring the beauty I wanted to find seemed hidden

to the naked eye. It was cold, dark and rather unfriendly. I had the feeling people

wanted something from me at a relentless pace and I couldn’t quite figure out

how to respond. However I had scheduled a meeting with two young artists, two

sisters to be correct that had written me a letter about their work and the online

translator had made it impossible to find out what the reason for their letter

might have been originally. But the picture they attached to the email made

words unnecessary and me, for a brief moment, speechless. I felt as though I had

just taken a glimpse at one of my childhood memories of fairytale creatures come

to life as dolls made out of porcelain by Elena and Ekaterina Popovy.

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Old Russian folklore tales take their roots in pagan beliefs

of ancient Slavs and is until now represented in the Russian

Fairytales which are amongst the most mysterious and dark

fairy tales in literature. The sisters born and raised in one of

the most desolate suburbs of Moscow manage to capture

the spirit of those old folktales that have been part of their

childhood and combine it with their character’s magical

expressions. As colourful as their culture and as mystical as

its history, the dolls that they create - although rather small

almost miniature in size - are of powerful impact. Weather

we compare them to the long limbed, fragile dancers of

the Bolshoi Ballet those beautiful creatures with enormous

power and sacrifice create the ultimate illusion of lightness

and emotion, or we see in them the warriors of the Mongol

Nations strong and with powerful weapons, the incredible

detail and soul within them is remarkable. Using Porcelain

which is fired and hand carved and their extensive background

in fashion design - I seriously want every single outfit

and accessory that these dolls are dressed up in - the sisters

let their imagination run wild inviting us on a sensual journey

through their minds. Leather, lace, corsetry and masks make

each character unique not to speak of the beautiful hats and

hair creations.

The other quite interesting thing is that the dolls can be

positioned in life-like action as if frozen in a moment of

intense motion or emotion. Luring the viewer into their

story. Sometimes ready to attack, viciously sometimes to

seduce. The paint and the skin tones are as close to flesh and

real skin as you can get and when looking in their manmade

eyes one can’t avoid the thought “What if she would wink at

me now?....or ....is she looking at me? “. This perfection and

sometimes deliberate imperfection adds a layer of realism

to the sculptures which is eerie and yet strangely inviting. I

remember the Nutcracker when the toys come alive at night

and when looking at the sisters doll creations I can’t help but

feel that this is exactly what will happen when I turn off the

light in the gallery and lock the door behind me in the evening.......

Velvet Embraces....

YY

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WE LOVE

SCHWARZER REITER

WHY

Schwarzer Reiter is a beautiful, stylish shop

run by Sabine Schwarz who has a great point

of view: “It’s not because you like BDSM that

you are a pervert or weird”. Hallelujah!

WHAT

Schwarzer Reiter aims to make a mix between

fashion/couture and BDSM. By creating fashionable

tools to use in submissive and dominant

role play, they reach a focus group who

want something different than the common

tools which are considered being quite hard

and rough.

They offer packages which contain several

toys to take on a play night but they also have

starters kits for those who like to experiment,

but don’t know how to communicate those

feelings to their partner.

The online concept appeared to be bulls eye

and in 2009 Sabine opened the shop in Berlin

and made couturier Edin DeSosa, head of

designers.


PHILOSOPHY

Sabine: “We try to take away the fear of

BDSM. A lot of people are curious but scared.

We talk to them. We say that it’s normal to

have bruises when you get whipped for the

first time, that’s it’s not going to feel comfortable.

We explain that they are going to have a

lot of questions like ‘What have I done? Why

do I like it? Am I a pervert?’

As time goes by it looks like we are able to

clear the air. By talking, advising and handing

straight answers. Because let’s face it, there’s

nothing more satisfying than happy people.”

WHERE

Schwarzer Reiter

TorStrasse 3 – Berlin (Germany)

www.schwarzer-reiter.com


Little people

UK based artist Slinkachu is abandoning little people on

the streets since 2006. Come again?

“My ‘Little People Project’ started in 2006. It involves the

remodelling and painting of miniature model train set characters,

which I then place and leave on the street. It is both

a street art installation project and a photography project.

The street-based side of my work plays with the notion of

surprise and I aim to encourage city-dwellers to be more

aware of their surroundings. The scenes I set up, more

evident through the photography, and the titles I give these

scenes aim to reflect the loneliness and melancholy of living

in a big city, almost being lost and overwhelmed. But underneath

this, there is always humour. I want people to be able to

empathise with the tiny people in my works.”


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Where do you get your ‘little people’?Many of the little

people live under my bed where I force them in to hard labour

cleaning crumbs from my floor. Others are made by German

company Preiser and can be bought in model shops and on

the net. Google is your friend.

Do your ‘little people’ come ready made?To an extent.

Most are unpainted. I often remodel the characters, adding

new features such as hoods with modelling clay, or changing

arm and leg positions. I paint the characters and, if needed,

find props. Some undergo a lot of modification, such as the

super hero characters from my Whatever Happened to the

Men of Tomorrow? series.

Where do you get your props?Many different sources such

as model shops, online model railway sites and often ebay.

I also use a lot of found materials, such as litter and insects.

Manchester, Stavanger (Norway), Amsterdam, Rotterdam,

Barcelona, Athens, Marrakech and Grottaglie in Italy.

Where do you get your ideas?Like most people, ideas come

from my head through a process called ‘thinking’. I also spend

a lot of time sitting in coffee shops people-watching, reading

the news and doodling in a sketchbook.

Where can I purchase your prints?Check out my website to

see galleries that stock my work. If you contact them they will

be able to help you further.

Can I commission you for my ad campaign / album cover

/ decorative tea set?I usually avoid allowing my work to be

used for commercial means, but would be open to commissions

if the brief / end product / event is good (it would have

to be a damn good tea set).

Are you a professional photographer?I didn’t train professionally

as a photographer - I am mainly self-taught.

Can I collaborate with you on some work?Possibly - and I

always love seeing new work so just drop me a line.

What camera do you use?I use a Canon 5D mk2. When I first

started I just used a simple point-and-click digital camera and

then later a Canon 400D.

Do you have a mailing list?If you email me at slinkachu@

yahoo.co.uk I will add you to my mailing list and keep you

updated with future shows, releases and happenings.

Have you done/would you do installations in other cities

or countries?So far I have done installations in London,

www.slinkachu.com

WWW.little-people.blogspot.com

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WE LOVE

THE FETISHISTAS

WHAT

The Fetishistas is a high quality free online magazine

covering fetish and alternative fashion and culture — published

and edited from London by Tony Mitchell.

WHEN

Tony launched his online venture in 2007 after leaving the

editorship of Skin Two magazine and more than 20 years as

a director of various Skin Two companies.

In less than five years, The Fetishistas has become well

established as an international fetish media brand, and is

now regarded as the single most authoritative fetish fashion

resource — with special expertise in the area of latex

fashion.

PHILOSOPHY

The magazine presents a monthly selection of fetish talent

— designers, photographers and models — in major portfolio

articles and interviews featuring the scene’s biggest

names and most promising newcomers.

It runs extensive event photo-reports, reviews, columns

from guest contributors and a range of news and gossip

items likely to appeal to fetish tastes.

The Fetishistas is also known for its campaigning coverage

of the scene’s big issues, such as the surge in cheap latex

copies from the Far East currently causing a headache for

western designers.

WHERE

www.thefetishistas.com


Saint-Marteau

on bows and hats


in an era

where much of the contemporary music has been sampled or ripped-off

from past sounds, there’s a man working the stage dressed in but a jaunty

straw hat, a bow tie and golden knickers. His lively, roguish manner of

performing sets a whole new view on today’s live concerts.

Born in Belgium in a family of artists, Saint-Marteau seemed predestined

to become a painter but found himself behind the keyboards of a rock

band at the age of 16.

Some unmentionable years later, he’s looking his audience straight in the

eye and blossoms as a showman and a performer, bringing a truly unique,

flamboyant repertoire, between rock and music hall, with songs that aim

straight for the heart.

At the moment Saint-Marteau is touring with a theatrical show called

“Saint-Marteau se fait Gainsbourg”, which is built entirely around songs

by the great Serge Gainsbourg.

Let’s get to the bottom of it!


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About his personae.

The old adage goes that good things are worth the wait so it took

me some time to discover my voice and the magical world of the

spotlight.

I created Saint-Marteau from scratch. He is a man with no past.

A performer who sings in French and loves a good show. He’s

definitely both a child of the 80’s and 20’s and likes to dress up

as a mix between Maurice Chevalier en Vanity 6.

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About performing on stage.

Let’s face it, Grunge killed glamour.

It fills me with the utmost dismay to watch a singer behind his

microphone, murmuring about how badly he has slept or how

tormented he really is. You know why? Because I don’t care.

When I take the effort of going to a concert and buying a ticket,

I want to be entertained, I want to see an act. When you are

performing, a discussion of motives is besides the point. You

have to entertain your audience. When you’re rolling over the

stage in misery, make sure your rolling is interesting enough to

look at.

So to disrupt the deathly boredom of most live concerts, I opted

for cliché’s.

As a performer I see myself as some kind of superhero/singer, a

cartoon character who brings his fantasy world into the spotlights.

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About being influenced by French songs

from the 1920’s and 1930’s.

I love the old French chansonniers who were characterized by their suave manner and using a cane

and tilted straw hat as their trademarks. Maurice Chevalier, Charles Trenet, they gained international

fame as stage personalities because their shows were universal. They were as much suited for

Tokyo as for London. Despite the fact that they where singing in French because that kind of stage

communication goes beyond words or language.

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About todays cHANSON.

In the current generation of French singers I’m missing the edginess, the humour and the unusual.

The things that are happening in France, on a musical level, are quite intimate and inwardly. I wanted

to break through that trend with a show that goes way back in time but wanted to sauce it with some

contemporary music elements.

When you are performing with a boater or a cane, everybody knows where you’re heading at.

It’s securely etched upon people’s memory. But when you mix that sort of entertainment with a rock

band, it starts to get interesting.

I feel very comfortable singing French chansons, I feel at home in the tradition of the revues, the

cabaret. But that doesn’t mean I have to play the accordion with a bottle of wine next to me. It all lies

in finding the right mix.

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About his audience.

Everybody is who he is and I’m certainly never going to hide my

sexual preferences but I’m not aiming for a certaintype of audience,

on the contrary. That would be too narrow minded.

When I’m on stage I see all different kind of ages looking up and

that makes me more than happy. The tongue-in-cheek aspect of my

shows could cause eyebrows to be raised, but it doesn’t. It shows that

good entertainment tickles all ages. Point taken.

About being politically

correct.

I don’t have a political agenda and I certainly don’t have ‘a message’.

I love l’art pour l’art. By doing what I’m doing and by really going for

it, I think I might be more engaged then someone who fulminates

against the whole system.

Especially in times like this - with false morality and where they

forbid grown up people to smoke - I think following your intuition is

the perfect antidote against this childish approach. It’s even more

effective then any political or social statement. You don’t have to start

kicking at things to make a strong point.

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About having fun.

About discipline.

My shows are spicy in an old fashioned way. That’s much more

pleasant then trying to shock with explicit details.

After several decades of stage actors taking off their clothes every two

minutes, we’ve seen it all and there’s nothing more to add to it. So it’s

much more interesting to suggest things. To have fun. Having fun is

much more daring these days then going naked.

I love partying, I love putting together fantastic outfits to set the room

on fire until 6 in the morning, but I also love the obviousness of work.

Because performing is a job, you have to be in shape. I have a very

worked out physique and I do a lot of mental preparation before

I step into a tour. When I’m on stage I don’t want to get stuck on

having to improvise. I aim for a strict choreography and that needs

the necessary discipline.

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About Gainsbourg.

I’m not the kind of artist who swims into the tribute-circuit but I have a

strong bond with the songs of Gainsbourg. I went through his complete

oeuvre. There were almost 600 songs from which I chose the ones who

resemble my own style.

You have to see it as the opposite of a tribute. It’s more like shamelessly

using someone else’s work for own purposes.

I’m not a fan of Gainsbourg as a singer. He had a grand charisma but his

live recordings are exuberantly bad and I’m not a fan of his murmuring,

clumsy way of performing.

But I truly adore him as a composer and a writer. His music.

Gainsbourg is such a rich character. He’s Parisian but also a Russian

jew. He was a kinky womaniser but also a grand poet and very funny.

He was everything at the same time but I’m going to work with his lyrics,

his music and transform it into a Saint-Marteau show. So don’t expect

Gitanes and a five o’clock shadow.

About the future.

Despite the fact that I consider Belgium a nice place to live and work,

I might be ending up living in Paris or Marseilles. Who knows? As long

as I can keep on doing what I’m doing because I love my life and I hope

to take more advantage of it. But time will tell and you never know how

the world will look in about 20 years from now.

www.saint-marteau.com

Photo’s Julian P. Boom

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Espace a vendre

2, rue Vernier, 06000 Nice

espace-avendre.com

The line, Collective exhibition

Paris & Nice

December 2011 > January 2012

Le Cabinet

bertrand baraudou

62, rue St Sabin, 75011 Paris

le-cabinet.com


WE LOVE

GAYSTORE ‘T VERSCHIL

WHY

Because it’s a large yet cozy store, in the old

city center of Antwerp, where you can browse

through GLBT-books and DVDs, or read free

magazines, while you take a sip of a delicious

cup of coffee.

Besides books and DVDs they also sell underwear

for men, swim wear, sex toys, postcards,

magazines, photo books, second hand books,

condoms, and all kinds of lube.

WHAT

In 1996 the owner, Bart De Smedt, started a

small bookstore with a coffee corner, selling

books and videos with a gay or lesbian theme.

Open only on weekends at first, the shop kept

growing and eventually moved to a bigger

location across the street in 2007.

On the ground floor you’ll mainly find books by

and for lesbians, gay men and transgenders,

underwear for men, and sex toys for anyone.

There’s also a non-fiction section, with a selection

of books on BDSM.

The enormous basement, with its cozy

rounded ceilings, contains a large collection of

gay hardcore DVDs, photo books and second

hand books.


PHILOSOPHY

Johanna: “We want to create an open atmosphere

to make people feel at ease. Our personnel

is unprejudiced and open to everything.

Due to its accessibility our store is often the

first place where people can talk about their

preferences without feeling ashamed. In addition

to our large collection of books and movies

we also provide free information (flyers of

GLBT-organizations and stores, posters, gay

city maps of various cities, as well as regular

tourist information). People can ask us any

question on the things we sell… and most

often we know the answer. You only remember

the theme song of a GLBT-movie you desperately

want to find? Try us!”

WHERE

’t Verschil

Minderbroedersrui 33 – Antwerp (Belgium)

www.verschil.be


BEATRICE MORABITO

Welcome To The dollhouse


What do Barbie’s friends do behind closed doors? Apparently, someone knows, and it’s pretty kinky. Beatrice Morabito is an

Italian female artist, living and working in Genoa, Italy. She is known for creating sets for dolls she has styled to act as her

current alter-ego.

Morabito considers her doll pictures being a secret diary, based

on a language of images and not words. “They are a reflection of

my feelings, dreams and my life events, I do freeze frame them

in a picture but instead of locking them up, I expose them. It’s a

hard task to communicate feelings with a doll, but I love the challenge:

A doll can not move by itself, cannot smile, cry, change the

position of her body, the expression of the face and so on. What

you capture in your picture is what you forced them to express. It

is you doing all these things in her place, so she can simply be an

object depicting an extension of myself.”

The artist quotes Freud’s belief that if you scratch the

surface of every virtue, you will find the vice and vice versa.

“Away from concepts and away from perfection, I show a secret

world where the subconscious lives and where every desire can

become a reality. Sometimes the dolls are my alter-ego and

sometimes I am the alter-ego of the dolls. Love, passion, sadism,

masochism, sorrow, pleasure, hate, hunger, rage, regret, fetishism:

they’re all part of being human.”

But it’s not just doll bondage over at Morabito’s. Some dolls

look ready for the runway. Strutting their stuff in haute couture

dresses. Feminine but creepy, Oyster Dreams is kind of like Cindy

Sherman’s doll pieces, only way more glamorous and kinky.

www.oyster-dreams.com

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make-up artist

www.judithvandongen.com


Maria’s Kaffee Absinthe

Once a month a little bar in Brugge transforms into an

absinthe bar. Almost 40 brands of real absinthe (artisanal

distilled, no colour-, taste-, or other additives), served the

authentic way in a cosy atmosphere with music you rarely

hear in any other bar and a gorgeous boy called Maria

Kleopatra behind the counter. Hurray!!

Wormwood (or absinthe, as the herb is called in French) and

its properties have been known to mankind for thousands of

years, but it was only in the late eighteenth century, with the

discovery of alcoholic distillation, that it would gain the infamous

status it has today.

According to legend, in 1797, French doctor Pierre Ordinaire

bought a recipe for a herbal liquor from an old ‘wise woman’

while living in the Swiss Mountains. With the recipe, he

started producing a drink he called ‘Absinthe’ after its main

ingredient.


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The story is probably false, and was invented by the French,

to add a patriotic touch to a Swiss invention. The drink was

most likely invented by the Henriod sisters, who sold their

recipe to Major Dubied, who opened the first absinthe distillery,

with his son and son-in law, Henry-Louis Pernod. In

1805, Pernod opened his own distillery, and the new drink

soon gathered fans, but the real popularity was yet to come.

In the 1840s, the French troops received absinthe to dissolve

in their drinking water while they were waging war in Algeria,

to prevent illness, most notably malaria, since quinine

was too expensive.

When these soldiers returned home, they had gotten a taste

for the drink, and started asking for it in bars. Café owners,

eager to please their victorious army started to serve

absinthe, which became popular with all kinds of people,

trying to share in the victory of the troops.

By the end of the nineteenth century, the drink was the

most popular aperitif around, not only with the aristocracy,

bourgeoisie and commoners, but most famously with great

artists, such as Rimbaud, Verlaine, Wilde, Van Gogh, Picasso,

Baudelaire and many more.

Time had developed a certain ritual (using a lump of sugar

on a specially designed spoon, slowly dissolved by ice-cold

water from a so-called absinthe fountain) which only added

to the magic of the green fairy, as it had become known. Five

o’clock was now called “l’heure verte”, and the boulevards of

the cities smelled of absinthe at that hour.

But then everything turned bad. Due to bad grape harvests,

absinthe had outselled wine, and the wine-lobby drew the

government’s attention to the growing group of alcohol

addicts in France, blaming absinthe, which they called the

green devil, witch, or death.

The final drop came in 1905, when a Swiss man, Jean Lanfray,

murdered his entire family with an axe after drinking

two glasses of absinthe. It was proven, the green liquor

drove you mad.

What the police and reporters almost all failed to report

however, was that Lanfray had also consumed several bottles

of wine and cognac, and was known as a drunk and violent

man in general.

and the growing alcohol problem, spurred several governments

to ban absinthe.

By 1914, it became a forbidden drink in most countries

where it had a popular status.

In the early nineties, after the fall of the iron curtain, western

tourists rediscovered eastern Europe, and absinthe, where it

had never been forbidden. This led to a first absinthe revival,

with, alas, a massive amount of fake ‘absinthes’, produced

to lure tourists.

Lucky for us, there were others – most notably Marie-Claude

Delahaye – who gained an interest in absinthe, and began

promoting the genuine product. This led to a lift of the prohibition

in 2005, which makes it possible for all of us to enjoy

this charming, magical wonder of the past.

Join Maria Kleopatra and Maria’s Kaffee Absinthe bar on

Facebook and learn more about these unique evenings.

These events, together with the pressure of the wine lobby

Photo’s primer fotografie

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Hardcover

978-90-5544-984-2

30,5 x 24 cm

192 pp.

English

39,90 euro

www.ronaldstoops.com

www.ingegrognard.com

www.ludion.be


D E Z M O N A

SÁGA

Text Dirk steenhaut

Photo’s Mous Lamrabat Cover Artwork Nick Andrews

In recent years Antwerp based Dez Mona have made a name for themselves in Belgium

and beyond. They’re known for their acoustic music based on a combination of jazz,

gospel, tango and torch songs, but it’s Gregory Frateur’s mind-blowing vocal abilities

that really deliver the goods.

These days however, the collective has come up with a surprising new project. ‘Sága’

stands midway between a modern opera and a song cycle, and deals with ‘homecoming’

as its main theme. The songs emanate from the continuous search for ideal geographical

and spiritual surroundings. By looking into the past, Dez Mona tries to explain

the current state of affairs. But more than anything, their latest work is a poetic

reflection on what is happening here and now.

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“We are convinced there are

no limitations to what

an artist can do

if he puts his mind to it.”

Gregory Frateur


Gregory Frateur and double bass player Nicolas Rombouts, who

have been the core members of Dez Mona since they released

their first album ‘Pursued Sinner’ in 2003, have recently given

up on the idea of a band with a fixed line-up. After successful

records such as ‘Moments of Dejection and Despondency’

(2007) and ‘Hilfe Kommt’ (2009) - the latter was produced by

Paul ‘Rustin Man’ Webb of Talk Talk fame - they have decided

to collaborate with different musicians for each new project.

“This is a radical new step for us”, Frateur says. “But if Nicolas

and I decide we want to work without any pianos or drums for a

change, we should be able to do so.”

‘Sága’ springs from an alliance with BOX, a classically trained

ensemble that almost exclusively makes use of baroque instruments.

The latter yield sounds and textures seldomly heard

in contemporary popular music. But even though the harpsichord,

viola da gamba, baroque harp and theorbe (a lute like,

stringed instrument) play a prominent role in the songs, to most

listeners Dez Mona’s musical universe will remain familiar. “It

was very exciting to join forces with musicians whose views and

backgrounds were totally different from ours”, Frateur offers.

“But we did not want the collaboration to become some kind of

gimmick. We are convinced there are no limitations to what an

artist can do if he puts his mind to it. What Nicolas and I were

after was a clash between seeming opposites. This explains

why we still use an accordeon, a trombone, an electric guitar

and tubular bells as well.”

In fact, this is not the first time Dez Mona have shared the

stage with BOX. Some years ago, when theorbe player Pieter

Theuns was the curator of a local festival, he invited Gregory

Frateur and Nicolas Rombouts to join him on stage and play a

few songs with harp player Jutta Troch and accordeonist Roel

Van Camp. The unusual combination of instruments seemed

to work rather well and fired the imaginations of everyone

involved. At this point the musicians agreed to embark on a

more extensive collaboration sometime in the future.

The fourteen songs which now make up the ‘Sága’ cycle were

written by Frateur, Rombouts and Van Camp, but the arrangements

were all developed during weeks of rehearsals in the

Antwerp based arts centre deSingel. “It was quite an organic

process”, the singer explains. “And all members of the collective

contributed to the opera in equal measure.”

The title refers to the well-known epic tales composed in Iceland

and Greenland some time between the 12th and 14th centuries,

and also to Sága: in Norse mythology she is the goddess of

history and storytelling. She is known as Odin’s daughter, lives

in a crystal palace and celebrates the past, present and future

of the world in song. “The album deals with the way we live our

lives in current times”, Gregory Frateur says. “But all tracks, all

stories stand on their own. You can definitely perceive a development

as you listen to the cycle, but it is not so much in the

narrative as in the music.”

On the album as well as on stage, ‘Sága’ is meant to be

presented as a well-rounded whole. Especially during the

concert tour, it will become clear the project is about much

more than just music. That is why the members of Dez Mona

call it a ‘Gesammtkunstwerk’, the result of a cross-fertilization

between various artistic disciplines. Light designer Jan Pauwels

has made an art installation which is to serve as a décor during

the shows and reknowned fashion designer Veronique Branquinho

has come up with some special stage outfits for the

musicians. Hence, ‘Sága’ will be a tickling musical and visual

experience with a slight theatrical edge. It is by no means a

coincidence that the Dez Mona moniker was derived from

Desdemona, a character from Shakespeare’s ‘Othello’.

The new album comes in two different forms. Especially

for die-hards, there will be a limited, deluxe version will be

released in the format of a vinyl lp, accompanied by a lavishly

illustrated book documenting the creative process in minute

detail. It gives a clear insight into the contributions of everyone

involved in the project and offers a collage of photographs,

lyrics, drawings, paintings and a fairy tale by Jeroen Olyslaegers

about the blind prophet Tiresias, specially written to coincide

with the Sága theme. A few weeks later, a regular version of the

cd will be shipped to the stores.

www.dezmona.com

ET ALORS? 099


WE LOVE

SCHLOSS GREIFENHAIN

WHY

Not only do we fancy the fairy tale environment

but we most of all love the way Yvette

and Anne run the place; with an open-heartedness

towards all different kinds of people and

groups.

WHAT

Built in 1780 and situated between Berlin and

Dresden, Schloss Greifenhain is set in 15,000

square meters (about 130,000 square feet)

of magnificent natural and peaceful space.

Schloss Greifenhain contains, in addition to

Anne and Yvette`s private quarters, a number

of guest rooms, each with its own bathroom.

The rooms are “themed” and variously priced,

the “Bridal Suite”, with its own balcony above

the main entrance, being “top of the bill.”

Yvette is serving her guests a variety of excellent

cuisine, including, of course, German specialities.

It is their desire and intention to make

the Schloss Greifenhain a by-word for good

taste and quality, requirements or requests.

For those with taste and style, an enjoyment

of what life has to offer, an open enquiring

mind, and a willingness to try new and different

experiences, but with a respect for the differing

ways and opinions of others, the Schloss

Greifenhain is a rewarding experience.

By virtue of the agreeable climate it is a perfect

place to escape from the rigours of daily life,

an environment where you can relax and be

yourself.


The atmosphere is very liberate, you will be

able to meet and enjoy the company of other

like-minded people.

PHILOSOPHY

Yvette is from Belgium and Anne is a native

of Friesland, a province of The Netherlands.

Together they see the Schloss Greifenhain as

the realisation of a dream, the opportunity to

offer their clientele hospitality of the highest

order. Yvette has spent her entire adult life

in catering, achieving a high level of skill and

artistry in fine cuisine - if you enjoy good food,

expertly prepared and served, you will not be

disappointed.

Anne is a “nuts-and-bolts” man with considerable

experience in many areas of expertise,

including mechanical repair and service, and

building work. His skills will ensure that the

Schloss is prepared and maintained to very

high standards.

Belgian hospitality and fine cuisine coupled

with Frisian reliability and inventiveness,

a solid combination of skills and talents -

between them, Anne and Yvette will ensure

that your stay will be a happy and rewarding

experience.

WHERE

Schloss Greifenhain

Radensdorf 39 - Drebkau (Germany)

www.schlossgreifenhain.eu


Hair


(DORAPHOBIA): ‘Fear of fur’ is an abnormal

and persistent fear of fur-bearing animals. This

phobic seems often to be brought back to the

early childhood stories about “the big bad wolf”

and other fur-bearing predators.

Cover Silvia B www.silvia-b.com ‘Sweet Honey’


Left-Righ t Polly van der Glas www.pollyvanderglas.com.au

“The Duchess!

The Duchess!

Oh my dear paws!

Oh my fur and whiskers!

Lewis Caroll


ET ALORS? 107


Maison Martin Margiela www.maisonmartinmargiela.com

108 ET ALORS?


Long hair fetishism is quite common,

since there are hundreds of websites and

forums all over the world devoted to that

form of fetishism. On the other hand, the

haircut fetish is apparently a secret,

largely unknown or little discussed by the

media, or even acknowledged in Western

culture.

The American Tribal Love-Rock Musical

HAIR is a product of the hippie counterculture

and sexual revolution of the 1960s.

Hair tells the story of the “tribe”, a

group of politically active, long-haired

hippies of the “Age of Aquarius” living

a bohemian life in New York City and

fighting against conscription into the

Vietnam War. Hair had it’s Broadway debut

in October ’67.

“Hair is vitally personal to children.

They weep vigorously when it is cut for

the first time; no matter how it grows,

bushy, straight or curly, they feel

they are being shorn of a part of their

personality.”

Charles Chaplin.


Left–Right Gregory & Dean www.gregorydean.co.uk photo’s James Brown

110 ET ALORS?


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Left–Right ALISON BRADY www.ALISONBRADY.com

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Iris Schieferstein www.iris-schieferstein.de ‘Horseshoe 2006’

In the mythology and fairytales

of Rapunzel, Lorelei, Sif and Lady

Godiva, Samson and Delilah, strength and/

or beauty is associated with long hair.


Iris Schieferstein www.iris-schieferstein.de ‘VegaGirl’

“Because the heart beats under a covering

of hair, of fur, feathers, or wings, it

is, for that reason, to be of no account?”

Jean Paul

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(TRICHOPHILIA): ’hair partialism or hair fetishism’

in which one becomes sexually aroused by

(or is extremely fond of) human hair. Arousal may occur

from imagery and physical contact of hair, this includes

head hair, pubic hair and fur.



Through tattered clothes small vices appear;

Robes and fur’d gowns hide them all.

William Shakespeare


ET ALORS? 117


Left–Right Elena Fajt www.elenafajt.net ‘Best Before: December 1st’

The movie “Fur” is a fictional account and

tribute to Diane Arbus, the photographer who

shocked and impressed with pictures of people

and things that were out of the ordinary.


(HYPERTRICHOSIS):‘Human Werewolf Syndrome’

is a condition marked by excessive body hair,

literally creating a blanket of hair across

the body’s surface. 1 in 10 billion people is

born with it.



The cat is a dilettante in fur.

Theophile Gautier


Charlie Le Mindu www.charlielemindu.com

ET ALORS? 121


MARNIE SCARLET

The Scarlet Diva of Fetish- Cabaret

Although the definition of Burlesque says “a literary,

dramatic or musical work intended to cause laughter by

caricaturing the manner or spirit of serious works, or by

ludicrous treatment of their subjects”, one cannot erase

the image of Von Teese having a bath in a champagne

glass or cuties twirling around the stage wearing nothing

more then nipple pasties.

Nevertheless, that was before we saw Marnie Scarlet

perform in a combining mix between fetish and performance

art, between burlesque and a touch of cabaret.

With her fabulously larger-than-life latex outfits and

wittedly deviant shows, Marnie will shock and tantalise

in a vortex of surrealism.


PHOTO ANDREA BA BALDRIGHI

From SMack! in New York to TG and Club Anti-Christ in the

UK and even the Cannes Film festival, Marnie has performed

all over the world at fetish and cabaret events, her style

appealing both to fetish and cabaret audiences.

“Besides the fact that I have elements of burlesque and striptease

in my shows, I do not conform to traditional burlesque

standards. It’s not that I don’t like a well produced burlesque

night; some of them are really great, having circus and body

acts instead of only striptease, but it’s just not me. My performance

is something I myself would like to watch. A bit different

and hopefully something that hasn’t been done before.

Put fetish, burlesque and performance art in a large bowl and

shake it all up. Throw a nice hat on it, a collar and some heels

and go out there to grab the world by the balls and chuck it

on stage”

Marnie creates all her outfits herself, favouring raunchy

rubber, but not afraid to add some fine fabrics into the mix.

From coats made out of hair-extensions to meters of beautiful

lace laid over latex. Categorizing Marnie is not possible.

She’s everything but ordinary, showing herself off in such a

terrific way but also as a designer for Libidex UK. The oneeyed

soldier, a bride corpse, a bloodthirsty nurse, a crazy

clown – every detail of her costumes is perfectly composed.

“The whole show starts with the costumes. It always starts

with something I made and the thought about what that personae

would do.”

Some of her acts like Poison Ivy and Voodoo Apocalypse

incorporate body piercing and culminate in setting fire to

sparklers connected to the piercings in her body. “When I

made that Poison Ivy dress I thought to myself ‘What does

Poison Ivy do?’. Well, she stings, so I created a piercing show.“

ET ALORS? 125


PHOTO DORALBA PICERNO WWW.DORALBA.COM


PHOTO REBECCA SEAL-DAVIS AT AMPLIFIEDPULSE.COM

By being a strong, independent woman, Marnie could almost

be considered a role model but she’s not out there to make

a strong statement. “I’m just being me when I’m on stage.

It’s very basic. When I was starting I had so many ideas and

I wanted so eagerly to put myself on a stage, that any audience

was suitable. As long as I could do what I had to do.”

Nevertheless she’s not afraid to make a point, to make people

think. Her Tin Soldier act is an averment against war without

making a big point of it. Once you come to understand her

show, these moments of explicitness blend into the overall

of the act.

Because Marnie looks like a work of art, a resemblance

with Leigh Bowery comes to mind but it’s more a way of

life instead of an act. “Putting on clothes always makes me

feel good. With a touch of make up and a dress, you can be

another person. I always loved dressing up. When I was little

I had a dress up box but when I grew up people told me I

couldn’t do that anymore. So I decided never to grow up. It

worked.”

When asked about her future plans, one can only wear

shades because of the brightness. “I have recently done the

Red Exhibition at the Cultivate Vyner street Gallery (my red

latex Clown Stilettos went on display there) and will put a bull

skull that I have decorated and worn for a shoot/performance

in an exhibition called Mexico Sienestro, at the Resistance

Gallery. I have a lot of exciting gigs lined up which you can

check on my website but amongst others, I’m performing my

Apocalyptic Voodoo show at the infamous Torture Garden on

New years Eve in London!!! You see, I love my life and it is safe

to say I’m living the full on Fetish La Vida Loca!!”

www.libidex.com

www.scarlet-diva.com

ET ALORS? 127


PHOTO DORALBA PICERNO WWW.DORALBA.COM


PHOTO IZASKUN GONZALEZ WWW.COMPULSIVEBEHAVIOUR.NET


Artbrokerage


COLUMN BY

NIKKI

HEARTACHE

Nikki Heartache (aka Cornelia van Lierop, Jade 4u, Darling

Nikkie) has toured the globe with bands such as Lords Of Acid

and Praga Khan.

Leaving the dance scene behind as a thing of the past, this

singer/producer is back in the studio working on new material.

A few years ago she decided to collect and share her

memoirs with the world. Draped over a chaise longue she

dictates her wild adventures to her blushing secretary whilst

nipping on a trendy cocktail. This is one of her stories.

One Oyster

Joanne cleans out a chicken. Expertly she tears out its guts and

chops it into pieces. She then holds the parts with skin on them over

the cooker to burn away any leftover feathers and such.

I enjoy watching her cook. It takes long, but it’s always worth the

wait. In the meantime we drink tea, lots of it. That be my job: make

sure our cups don’t stay empty for long. Three sugars for her, two

for me, and milk. After all we are in the UK, Birmingham to be precise.

Soul music blasts from her boom box. We sing and dance along to

our favorite songs, occasionally throwing our arms in the air for dramatic

effect when the lyrics require such behavior.

It was always like that between us, from day one, although none

of us remember when day one happened, or how. There was an

instant click that made us friends for life. Sisters. You’d never see

one without the other. Joanne is Jamaican and has beautiful brown

skin. I am Dutch, pale and tend to turn almost transparent in winter.

By some we are, in fact, also known as the black bag and the white

bag. Don’t ask me why. Some things just are.

“Hey Nik, I want to ask you a strange question”, she says as she

cuts an onion into rings, “Promise not to laugh.” She makes me

cross my heart and hope to die. I don’t think she realizes, but she’s

pointing her knife in my direction. “Do you think it’s possible that

some men think a pussy is actually beautiful?” I nearly choke on a

biscuit. Lucky for me I can hide my laughter in a coughing fit. It’s not

that we don’t talk about sex, but Joanne is usually not this explicit.

I mean, the woman doesn’t swear, either. The times I’ve had to bite

my tongue not to say ‘fuck’ or something like that are numerous.

“Yes I do”, I finally reply as she puts a pan on the stove.

“I don’t get it…” she says.

“Why not? Have you never looked at yours?” I ask. She turns to look

me in the eye.


& a Piece of Chicken

She bounces the ball right back at me, “What, you have?”

I’m guessing that means she hasn’t.

Quickly my mind drifts back to the day I got curious about this

myself, a few years prior to this conversation. I too wanted to

know why some men adore the Flower, the Gate To Heaven,

the Entrance to the Goddesses’ Cave. That day I held a mirror

between my thighs to have a closer look, doing a scientific

research of the cunt, so to speak. I have to admit it was...

instructive. Not an easy thing to do, it seemed, because I only

had the one hand explore with. The other one had to keep

the mirror in place. Now that must’ve been a funny sight

to see, because I needed to shed some light on things for

better studying, if you know what I mean, and the flashlight

wouldn’t obey my command to just lie still. At first I couldn’t

see what the excitement was all about, but eventually I did.

“Yes, I have.” I say, chopping some garlic. She throws some

herbs in the hot oil where they start to sizzle instantly. The

smell makes my mouth water.

“And?” she demands to know, “Do you think it’s pretty? Or

are these guys just talking nonsense?”

“Not in particular, no, but I don’t think it’s ugly, either. Try to

look at it as though it were an oyster…” I say.

“Aw, Nikki, that’s disgusting! I hate oysters!” she laughs. I

continue, “So do I, but watching men eat the soft white flesh

out of its shell always sends a pleasant shiver to my poompoom.”

More laughter, I’m on a roll here. “They don’t just

sink their teeth in there, as they would in a steak. No, they

marvel at the salty aroma first, you know, taking the smell

in real deep, then tip the shell, slowly let the meat slide over

their tongues and finally swallow it with all its delicate juices

bursting into their mouths and throats. In the end they lick

their lips as if to make sure they don’t waste a single drop

that might spill on their lips in the process. True, I don’t eat

oysters, but it doesn’t take a lot of imagination to make a

comparison here.”

She can’t stop laughing now, even though her belly aches.

She then manages to say: “I still don’t understand how

anyone can put their mouths down there.”

“Really?” I ask, “I’m glad they can because in my opinion

nothing beats a good tongue. If my man thinks my pussy is

the most beautiful thing on this Earth I’m not going to disagree

or try to change his mind about it, you dig, girlfriend?

He can look at it, sniff it, sing to it, praise, tease and please it

as much as he likes. As long as he knows what he’s doing, of

course. Besides, I like a good, cunning linguist, so he can call

it any name he likes, too.”

She hits me over the head with a tea towel.

“Come on, Jo, I say all girls should do it at least once. Look at

their vagina in a mirror, I mean. Study it, touch it and maybe

even talk dirty to it!”

“Alright already, stop it, you silly cow! Now go make us

another cup of tea!” she yells and returns to her cooking pots.

Could it be I’ve given her food for thought just now?

Not two minutes later we’re singing and dancing to Marvin

Gaye’s ‘Sexual Healing’. By the time Jill Scott coos ‘Crown

Royal’, we laugh and dance the way lovers do, or the way only

best friends can.

Two hours later the dinner finally lands on our plates. I watch

how she sucks on a piece of chicken with her slender fingers

and big lips all greasy. In a flash my male energy kicks in and

just for two seconds I can’t help wondering if she gives good

head.

Didn’t dare to ask. Perhaps I should have.

ET ALORS? 133


NATHALIE

DAOUST

The Tokyo Hotel story


“I’m always curious about

the dark side of things

because it ‘s often not as dark,

as it seems to from the

outside.”

136 ET ALORS?


Photographer Nathalie Daoust first broke onto the scene

in 1997 while photographing the themed rooms of the

Carlton Arms Hotel in New York. This project, her first

solo exhibition, was published into a book, New York

Hotel Story. Since then, Daoust has created several new

conceptual projects that have taken her all over the world,

from the love hotels of Tokyo, to a brothel in Brazil, a

darkroom in Sydney and the dreamy landscape of the

snow-capped Swiss Alps. Her objective as an artist is to

push the boundaries of photography through experimental

methods. While working with new mediums and

discovering new techniques, Daoust explores the indefinable

realm between truth, fantasy and the human desire

to escape.

Nathalie Daoust’s latest project, Tokyo Hotel Story, continues

her exploration of female sexuality and subversion

of gender stereotypes. Spending several months

in the Alpha-In, one of the biggest S&M “love hotels” in

Japan, Daoust photographed 39 women of all ages in

their private rooms, surrounded by the specialist equipment

and dressed in the regalia that helps define their

trade of Dominatrix. Her aim is to give a different insight

into women as dominating beings, which conflicts with

the Japanese image of femininity, in which women have

become more passive beauties. Daoust believes that

numerous challenges still exist in terms of confronting

deep-rooted stereotypes of gender-roles, not only in

Japan but also in the rest of the world. Her work helps

her to delve beyond taboos while showing the universal

human desire to create fantasy worlds that often oscillate

between dream, reality and perversion. Tokyo Hotel Story

is a series of photographs that underline Daoust’s passion

for the surreal and the sensual, and that shines a light into

the darker shadows, not only of femininity but of human

sexuality in general.

Where did you get the idea for your fIrst hotel project?

I always wanted to live in New York and when the people

from the Carlton Arms asked me to decorate a room,

I took the opportunity and went.

The hotel is quite famous for artists so after spending a

few months there I realized what a special place it was.

I asked the owners if I could stay a little longer to photograph

each room and make a project on the hotel. A few

months turned into 2 years.

I met artists from all over the world and the hotel quickly

became my home, the staff my family. There was so much

creativity roaming around that it was easy to get inspired.

There’s a big difference between the Carlton Arms and

the Alpha-In in Tokyo. What triggered this step?

They are both hotels where a fantasy world is created and

I like dealing with places where people go to escape reality.

I could say that the main part of my art is dealing with

escapism and I am interested in documenting people that

pursue that feeling. The places they go to and people they

pay in order to reach this getaway. I always wondered if

ET ALORS? 137


an environment like that gets real when you are a part of

it. And it does. It becomes quite normal. In the Carlton

Arms I talked to the people who work there, the tourists,

the artists that decorated the rooms. Before that, a hotel

was just a space to sleep overnight. After living there for

two years I wanted to find other similar places like this. So

when a Japanese tourist told me about the “Theme Love

Hotels” in Japan, I decided I had to see it for myself and

moved to Tokyo.

How did you convince the owners and the girls for

shooting at the Alpha-In?

I was in Japan doing a documentary on “love hotels” and

one of them was the Alpha-In, the most famous S&M

hotel in Japan. The owner was very kind and showed me

each room and told me lots of stories – why people go

there, who works there, the tools, toys, the family history

of the hotel. His stories were so interesting and since I

knew nothing about S&M, I wanted to learn more about

it on a sociological level. Seven years later I went back to

Japan and finally did this project. At first the owner didn’t

want me to take photographs but after a lot of begging,

I got the permission. As for the girls, as soon as the hotel

said yes, they welcomed me with open arms.

What’s your opinion on S&M?

When I first started this project I only had a stereotyped

vision on the subject matter. Now I know that there’s a

whole world behind those two initials.

There are a number of reasons commonly given for why

someone finds the practice of S&M enjoyable, and the

answer is largely dependent on the individual.

It looks like everybody in the scene knows each other in

Tokyo. Like a little family they are expanding their borders

of thinking, feeling and their sensuality.

I often got the impression that it was some sort of religion.

You worked with dominatrices, what about the cliché

saying Japanese women being submissive?

I don’t like clichés but of course I have preconceived

opinions, just like everybody else. I try to make a twist

by thinking on a logical level, but deep down they stay

there until my mind actually changes by experiencing it

first hand. Then again, sometimes these clichés are true.

Yes, the women in “Tokyo Hotel Story” are dominatrices

and yes, they seem to be the opposite of passive Japanese

beauties, but in daily life they are not. For example, I have

seen women meeting their customers in front of the hotel.

The dominatrice does her traditional bow and lets the

man go first. She is extremely polite. Head down, laughing

at his jokes – everything very traditional. But once the

room is paid and the doors are closed, the roles change.

She becomes powerful and takes control. That was an

extraordinary experience. And although I was expecting

hard dominatrices, they were the sweetest, most lovely

women to work with. For me it was important to live and

experience this first hand.

Do you feel connected with those women?

I am going to Tokyo in two weeks to meet up with a few of

them that have now become good friends.

140 ET ALORS?


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“I like dealing with places

where people go to

escape reality.”


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“From what I have seen it was more of a

performance than prostitution.”


Can you imagine being one of these girls?

Yes, but I can also imagine being a doctor.

Most of the women I met wanted to make it clear that they are not prostitutes.

That they were paid to dominate the client and not to have sexual intercourse.

From what I have seen it was more of a performance than prostitution.

What attracts you to the world of sexworkers?

It’s something that I’ve always been attracted to. It’s a world that most people

only see from the outside. Therefore most of us form a stereotypical judgment

on the subject matter.

I was also interested to learn about this type of ‘fantasy’ places and why people

need them. I didn’t have the intention of making a subjective assessment nor

wanted to represent them as being good or bad. I just wanted to show how these

girls lived, what they loved.

For example, in “Tokyo Hotel Story” I didn’t want to present S&M in a sensational

form of sex, but I looked behind the façade. Where does the action take place?

When you talk about a love hotel - specialized in S&M, filled with tools – who are

the people who work there?

Bottom-line, the main reason was to break my own preconceived notion of S&M

and of the women working in that sort of environment. I entered the place with a

certain idea, and left with the opposite feeling.

Do you always photograph women?

The last project that I did was on a Chinese man who thinks he is Mao Ze Dong.

The project was all about mental escapism.

But yes, in general I like photographing women.

Are you a feminist?

Not in my everyday life and only when I meet narrow minded people. I can’t help

it but have to speak up when I hear a sexist comment. Some people might see

that as being a feminist, I see it as opening up the mind of an ignorant person.

When it comes to the women I am photographing, I’m just trying to understand

and respect their choices. People in Japan are not poor. That means that most of

the women are not forced into this work.

ET ALORS? 153


In Brazil I photographed one of the poorest brothels

in one of the worst areas of Rio de Janeiro. Were these

women forced? How did they deal with the work? Each

had their own story and my concern was to make people

understand.

Do these subjects satisfy your dark side?

I’m always curious about the dark side of things because

it’s often not as dark, as it seems to from the outside. But

I don’t try to provoke. I just want to share.

The photographs look extremely surreal. How do you

explain that?

Darkroom!

I spend hours in the darkroom. When I photograph people

there is often a feeling that is not visible on the actual

image.

So I manipulate it in the darkroom until this feeling is there.

For the Tokyo project I even went all the way to Brazil to

find a good colour darkroom. Darkrooms are slowly disappearing

since the rise and shine of digital technology.

Why did you choose the medium photography to tell

your stories?

As a photographer, you easily get access to special places

or situations that where previously hidden or never showcased.

It’s a perfect tool to capture reality. Once in the darkroom

you can interpret this reality and make a reflexion on what

you felt the day you were there.

Let’s say my camera gives me the confidence to do what

I do and allows me to see all that I want to see. I’m quite

shy and sometimes I feel like I only use photography as

an excuse to get into these worlds. I would not be able to

meet all these women and get to know them on a personal

level if it was not for my camera. I am not a man and

do not have the money to pay these women.

There would be no other way to get to know them.

Are you a voyeur?

Yes, yes, yes..

Where do you feel most at home?

I adapt pretty easily to new life styles and take great pleasure

out of it.

Over the past 13 years I have been travelling all over the

world and many of these public spaces became my home.

For the moment my habitat lies in Berlin but when I live

somewhere for a longer period, then that’s home.

What’s your next project?

I’m going to make a film about the Alpha-In hotel.

The fairy godmother offers you three wishes. What do

you wish for?

Health.. that’s all there is to it.

www.daoustnathalie.com

www.galleryconnexion.ca

Interview Fleur Pierets


ET ALORS? 155


WWW.IC-UC.BE

CREATIVE PHOTOGRAPHY


AKIM A.J. WILLEMS

158 ET ALORS?


&

SADOMASOCHISM

FETISHISM

in popular and classic literature

ET ALORS? 159


160 ET ALORS?


HELL IS HEAVEN

The Middle Ages are coming to an end when, in 1439, Johannes

Gensfleisch zur Laden zum Gutenberg (1398-1468) starts using

movable type printing and a printing press. Modern book printing

was born. And along came tougher censorship. Hardly one

century after the printing of the first Gutenberg Bible a group of

‘wise men’ gathers at the Theology Faculty of the University of

Paris to put together a first, hand written, Index Librorum Prohibitorum

or list of forbidden books. The second edition (1542)

contains sixty-five titles. By the time the first printed Index sees

the light (1544) two hundred thirty writers and books have been

banned by the church. Two years later that number has more

than doubled. Most of these forbidden books were burned. In

later times they were no longer burned but excommunicated to

the ‘enfer’ of a (national) library; ‘enfer’ (French for ‘hell’) refers

to the first European monastery libraries where books on topics

that would send you straight to hell were kept in separate and

restricted library rooms. Interesting is that a large percentage

of the forbidden books are erotic books. Most of these collections

have in the meanwhile been opened to the public. Only one

remains closed: that of the Vatican.

In my Bibliotheca Studentica & Erotica I have created a private

‘hell’; a heaven on earth for a book fetishist like me. As I am

writing this article I am surrounded by books. I adore books. Old

books in particular; although new books will not be discriminated.

I like to run my finger tips over the pages and covers to

feel all those other fingers that caressed the book in the past. I

smell them and let the scent of old paper tell me secret stories

about previous owners. Dirty stories! Oh, man, I love dirty stories.

My own ‘enfer’, just like any other, is filled with erotic and

pornographic books. A lot of them - not just sleazy or modern

publications - are directly or indirectly referring to sadomasochism

and all kinds of fetishes.

Contrary to the pope I am not a censorship fetishist. So let me

guide you around and pull some books of the shelf to have a

closer look!

THE 3 TENORS

Next time you are in a pub with friends, on the train to work

with your colleagues or taking a shower with your team mates

after sporting ask a random person the following: “If I say ‘sadomasochism’

and ‘literature’…which writers come to mind?” It is

very likely that the answer is “de Sade”, “von Sacher-Masoch” or

“Réage”. Even the pope has read one of their books. Or at least

has heard about these ‘Three Tenors’ of sadomasochistic literature.

I first discovered the works of Donatien Alphonse François de

Sade (1740-1814) - his official title was ‘Comte’ (i.e. Grave), but

he was nicknamed ‘Marquis’ - who lend his name to the term

‘sadism’ at the age of eighteen, during my first year at university.

In a book shop around the corner of my faculty I bought a copy of

Les 120 journées de Sodome, ou l’École du libertinage. It tells the

story of four wealthy libertines that lock themselves and fortysix

sex victims away in a castle for one hundred twenty days in

search of all kinds of sexual and sadistic gratification. The Marquis

finished writing this novel in 1785 while being imprisoned in

the Bastille in Paris, but it was only published a first time almost

one hundred twenty years later. I started reading eagerly that

same day, but I must confess I never finished the book. Come to

think of it: I never finished any de Sade book. Not (only) because

I needed to masturbate every time I had read twenty pages of

his pornographic exposés, but because his books, despite their

notorious reputation, are a bit boring.

Marquis de Sade wrote numerous essays, plays, short stories and

- being a child of his pre-revolutionary times - even political pamphlets,

but today he is best known for his erotic works: Justine.

Les Infortunes de la vertu (1787), Justine ou les Malheurs de la

ET ALORS? 161


vertu (1788; second version of the previous novel), La Philosophie

dans le boudoir (1795), La Nouvelle Justine, ou les Malheurs

de la vertu (1797-1801; third version of the first novel mentioned),

Histoire de Juliette, ou les Prospérités du vice (1797-1801; sequel

to the previous title) and Les 120 journées. In a nut shell these

novels all boil down to the same old story of power, of the powerful

and the powerless. But de Sade has two tricks up his sleeve

to turn this ancient theme into something new and unseen. The

first trick is sex. The powerful like to torment the powerless and

it turns them on! Sex is the essence of power in de Sade’s erotic

writings. The second trick is foul language. The combination if

this classic theme and the use of an explicit, pornographic vocabulary

merges into a literary philosophy that defies the Christian

morality and censorship of de Sade’s days. That combination

makes de Sade exceptional. The Marquis not onlys want to tell

us that he gets a Boner with a capital B by being a cruel sadist, he

also explains why. And he does so in extenso: the original combined

publication of Justine and Juliette consisted of ten book

bands. And that, like I said before, makes his original texts also

extremely boring. In recent editions of his works the philosophy

was omitted. Only the pornographic cruelties were kept - sex

sells! - in thin pocket editions like the one I bought ages ago.

Contrary to his French predecessor Leopold von Sacher-Masoch

(1836-1895) does not focus on (abuse of) power. His central

theme is love. The love of a man for his woman. That woman is

not a sex victim, but a strong independent woman, a shrew even,

dressed in fur and boots. And her man becomes her adoring slave

that kisses her feet and crawls like a dog for her. Although von

Sacher-Masoch already wrote several historical books before,

his literary fame first came with the publication of Don Juan

von Kolomea (1866) in which he starts exploring his literary

fantasies about suffering and submissive men. A dominating

woman (Wanda) and her slave (Severin) are the protagonists in

his best known work Venus im Pfelz (1870). The Austrian knight

does not write in foul language about masturbation, homosexual

escapades, incest, paedophilia, sadistic orgies and so on. Von

Sacher-Masoch describes the relational phenomena of the desire

to suffer and to be dominated, to submit to a woman and the

mystical emotions linked to that.

Histoire d’O (1954) may be considered the sadomasochistic

classic of the twentieth century. It combines the philosophies

of de Sade and von Sacher-Masoch and links them to a female

protagonist. The book was written in an era of female sexual

exploration, a time in which women discover they can define

their own destiny, be free and make their own choices. In the

case of O: the choice of not being free at all. Histoire d’O is one

of my favourite erotic books. Not only because of the story it

tells, but also because of the ‘petit histoire’ that tells the birth

of this publication. It is an example that you can (ab)use to be of

the unpopular opinion that it is good to be a male chauvinist pig

every now and then. It is very likely that this book never would

have been written if French writer, essayist, journalist and publicist

Jean Paulhan (1884-1968) had not told his female colleague

and lover Dominique Aury (pseudonym for Anne Desclos; 1907-

1998) that “women are not capable of writing erotic books”. To

prove her lover wrong Desclos wrote Histoire d’O using the ‘nom

de plumes’ Pauline Réage. For four decades people assumed the

book had been written by a male writer using a female pseudonym.

Paulhan was the prime suspect as he had written the introduction

to this book. It was not until 1994 - after her mother had

died; she wanted to spare her the scandal - Desclos revealed to

the world that she had written the book. But let’s go back to the

year before the first publication of this remarkable love story. In

1953 Jean Paulhan, who is also a member of the Académie Française,

offers Réage’s manuscript to his publisher and employer

Gallimard. Gallimard refuses to publish it. Eventually Paulhan

finds a brother-in-arms in Jean-Jacques Pauvert (°1926). Pauvert

- only twenty-six years old at the time, but already notorious -

had already published de Sade’s L’Histoire de Juliette, ou les

Prospérités du vice (a complete edition in ten volumes), Les 120

Journées de Sodom (a complete edition in four volumes) and La

Philosophie dans la Boudoire by the time he printed the first edition

of Histoire d’O in 1954. There is no clarity about the number

of books printed of this very first edition. Some sources “men-

162 ET ALORS?


tion 480 items on vergé paper” (that were distributed to book

shops to be sold) and “another 100 items” that were meant to be

sent to literary critics writing for news papers and magazines. A

majority of sources agrees upon “600 books”. A number of those

- depending on the source between twenty and sixty - have an

etching by the French-German artist Hans Bellmer (1902-1975)

on the title page. Just so you know in case you would accidentally

come across a first edition in your grandma’s attic: without

the Bellmer etching it would nowadays cost about 1.500 EUR. A

copy with the etching - ever since I started collecting erotica I

only once saw a copy being offered at an auction; the opening

bid was set at multiple times that price - will cost you an arm and

a leg! Despite being a notorious publisher of erotic books Pauvert

was very careful and modest when he decided to print only 600

copies at first. The Bibliotheca Studentica & Erotica has several

editions of this book. The oldest was also printed in 1954. It is

number 788 out of 1000 prints of the fourth edition. This means

the book became so extremely popular in a very short timeframe

that Pauvert needed to print multiple editions or a couple of

thousand additional books in the same year. Uncountable copies

have been sold since.

beautiful mistress who asks him to have sex with her. Impotence

however prevents Encolpius from doing his duty. In order to find

a cure for his problem Encolpius goes to the temple of Priapus,

the Greek god of fertility and protector of male genitalia, to pray.

After accidentally killing one of the temple’s sacred geese he

gets molested by the priestess Oenothea: she sticks a leather

‘dildo’ rubbed in irritating substances in his anus and tickles

his penis with nettles. So, remember: when in Rome, do as the

Romans do!

In the course of the fourth century the Hindu philosopher Vatsyayana

writes one of the standard works on human sexual

behaviour: the Kama Sutra. In his verses, in Sanskrit, he also

speaks about four different ways of slapping or spanking during

love making, about body parts that may or may not be spanked

(in this perspective you could say the Kama Sutra is the first book

ever to mention ‘safety rules’ for SM play) and about the best

way to moan when being spanked. He also warns his readers to

be cautious: not all women like to be spanked, apparently.

“LOVE WELL, WHIP WELL” (BENJAMIN FRANKLIN)

Flagellation or whipping has always been very popular activity in

erotic literature.

history 101

It is no coincidence that the best known sadomasochistic novels

were written in the nineteenth and early twentieth century.

It was the Golden Age of erotic fiction. But the theme was not

new. As long as man has been writing he has been writing erotic

stories; even with a touch of sadomasochism once in a while. Following

ancient classics for example.

Gaius Petronius Arbiter (27-66) was a Roman ‘judge’ in the court

of Nero and, later in his political career, a consul. He is also the

writer of Satyricon, a satirical story in verse and prose telling the

story of Encolpius (a former gladiator) and Giton (a sixteen year

old boy and Encolpius’ lover). Near the end of this story a maid

named Chrysis flirts with Encolpius and introduces him to her

The English poet Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593) fantasizes

in one of his epigrams: “When Francus comes to solace with his

whore / He sends for rods and strips himself stark naked; / For his

lust sleeps, and will not rise before / By whipping of the wench it

be awaked. / I envy him not, but wish I had the power / To make

myself his wench but one half hour”.

In L’Academie des dames, ou les Sept entretiens galants d’Aloisia,

one of the first French erotic classics, Nicolas Chorier (1612-

1692) describes an encounter between an old priest and a young

woman who, voluntarily, drops her pants to receive a good whipping.

The original manuscript of this work was written in Latin

and claimed to be a translation of a Spanish manuscript by Luisa

Siega de Velasco (1522-1566), a well known poetess working and

writing in the court of Maria of Portugal. The Latin translation

ET ALORS? 163


was supposedly done by Johannes Meursius, a Dutch humanist.

The attribution of the work to Siega de Velasco was a lie and

Johannes Meursius was a fictive character Chorier invented to

disguise his own identity as the writer of this explicit novel.

The English play The Virtuoso (1676) by Thomas Shadwell (1642-

1692) - play writer, musician & poet at the King’s court - depicts

a scene in which the character Snarl (The virtuoso’s old uncle, a

‘closet libertine and masochist’) gets whipped by a young prostitute.

The prostitute, Mrs. Figgup, is curious to know: “I wonder

that should please you so much that pleases me so little”. Snarl,

reminiscing about his younger days, tells her the reasons for his

specific preference: “I was so us’d to ‘t at Westminster School I

could never leave it off since.” And to make sure he gets what

he is paying for he encourages Mrs. Figgup: “Very well, my dear

rogue. But dost hear, thou art too gentle. Do not spare thy pains.

I love castigation mightily.”

John Cleland’s (1709-1789) Memoires of a Woman of Pleasure

(1748) is the first English pornographic novel and one of the most

banned and prosecuted books in history. Due to that notorious

reputation and thanks to the numerous recent film and even

musical adaptations Fanny Hill - the shorter, more common title

that is used to refer to this novel - is also the best known English

erotic novel. In the novel an orphaned girl named Frances ‘Fanny’

Hill tells about her life in a London brothel in a series of letters

she writes to an unknown woman. One of Fanny’s customers in

the brothel is Mr. Barvil, a young masochist who requires whipping

to enjoy sex. On a side note: another customer is a hair and

gloves fetishist. Also interesting to know: just like de Sade while

writing Les 120 Journées Cleland was in prison (for not being able

to pay his debts) when he wrote Fanny Hill. Cleland, a free man

again at the time of the first publication of the novel in November

1748, and his publisher get arrested in November 1749. The

charge: corrupting the King’s subjects with their pornographic

novel. Cleland - facing another imprisonment - renounced the

novel in court and charges were withdrawn. Although the book

was forbidden underground pirate editions were very popular

in the nineteenth century. When the first edition was published

in the USA in 1821 it was also immediately banned because of

obscenity. Even as recent as 1963 another edition was banned in

the US; the publisher however won that court appeal against the

state of Massachusetts.

IF THE SHOE FITS

A high heeled shoe showing a fine woman’s ankle, that is all

Nicolas-Edme Rétif (1734-1806), a French printer and writer

better known as Rétif de la Bretonne, needed to get sexually

aroused. According to Havelock’s Studies in the Psychology

of Sex (Random House, New York, 1942) he was the first documented

case of shoe and foot fetishism. ‘Retifism’ - the fancy

word for a shoe fetish - was derived from his name. It is no

coincidence that Rétif de la Bretonne’s first book - Le Pied de

Fanchette (1796) celebrates the writer’s major erotic fantasy,

but also documents numerous other ‘obsessions’ of an era that

never stopped worshipping women’s feet as an erotic symbol in

literature and other arts. From his massive autobiography Monsieur

Nicolas (published in sixteen volumes between 1794 and

1797) we learn that his love for shoes and feet already existed at

a very early age. When talking about his childhood years and his

view on the girls in Sacy - the little village where he was born -

that teased him by kissing him against his will when he was just

seven years old he writes [translation by myself; AW]: “Soon my

ideas about women became clear: I sensed how charming they

were. But I wanted to kiss them myself instead of being kissed by

them. That submissive role did not fit me. That is why my parents

were convinced I was a good boy […] But I was attracted to them.

And most of all their little shoes drew my attention. Agathe Tilhien,

Reine Miné and especially Madeleine Champeaux were the

most elegant girls at the time; their neat shoes were not tied with

laces, but with blue and red lace knots. The very thought of these

girls excited me […] In those days I noticed a young lady parading

around Sacy. She was wearing fancy shoes like those ladies

164 ET ALORS?


from the big cities. They were light coloured and had clasps with

flickering gems on them. She had a gracious figure. I believed she

was a fairy, as I did not know of the existence of goddesses yet.

As of that day I only dreamed of her, Suzanne Colas. She only

stayed in Sacy for a short while and I forgot about her soon after

she left, but my interest in girls was bigger than ever before” And

a little later Rétif de la Bretonne wonders: “This love for pretty

feet, this love so strong it sexually arouses me, even if the girl is

ugly, is it mere physical or psychological? Those that know this

love know how fierce it can be. How is that possible?”

Rétif de la Bretonne was not the first to give sexual or erotic connotation

to feet in his writings. The Epistolae, 33 love letters, by

Lucius Flavius Philostratus (172-247), a Greek sophist from Athens

who lived and wrote in Rome, may be considered the first example

in Western erotic narrative of foot fetishism. The eighteenth

love letter is addressed to a boy whose feet are sore because of

his pinching new sandals. Philostratus tries to persuade him to

go barefoot and he does not do so purely out of concern for the

boy’s well-being. The letter is a eulogy on naked feet. The thirtysixth

letter is addressed to a woman and starts with following

request: “Do not ever wear shoes or conceal your ankles…” And

although Philostratus would like to see her completely naked, if

she must wear clothes he wants her to uncover her feet at least:

“I wish that all the rest of you were visible, exposing your whole

body […] Be a bit economical of other features if you will, but

leave your feet at least bare…”. The next letter, written for that

same woman, ends with a hint of masochism in addition to the

foot fetishism: “O feet unfettered! O unhampered beauty! Thrice

happy me and blessed, if on me ye tread!”

In 1812 the first edition of the first volume of Kinder- und

Hausmärchen collected by Jacob Ludwig Carl Grimm (1785-1863)

and Wilhelm Carl Grim (1786-1859) - better known as the brothers

Grimm - is published. The twenty-first story in that volume

was that of Aschenputtel. Aschenputtel, she is also often called

Aschenbrödel, is an old fairy tale figure in European folklore that

is mainly remembered because of that Grimm story. In case you

started wondering what old fairy tales have to do with shoe fetishism:

nowadays the old, European Aschenputtel is best known

as her American Disney alter ego Cinderella. If the shoe fits…

LOVE IS IN THE HAIR

“Only God, my dear, could love you for yourself alone and not

your yellow hair”; this quote from William Butler Yeats’ (1865-

1939) poem For Anne Gregory is just one of many examples of

the obsession with hair in literature. Hair is without a doubt the

most spread fetish in the history literature. So many poets and

writers have praised the beauty of a woman’s hair that university

students can acquire a PhD by studying hair as a fetish in

nineteenth century literature and writing a three hundred pages

dissertation on the topic.

And in literature gentlemen prefer blondes as well. Ever since

the Greek poet Homer (800-750 BC) described the goddess of

love’s tresses as ‘xanthe’ (i.e. golden) long, blond hair remained a

literary ideal. Like in this myth about Bernice II of Egypt (267-221

BC), wife of Ptolemy III, in which she cuts of a lock of her hair and

offers it in Aphrodite’s temple for the save return of her husband

who was on an expedition to Syria. For some reason the hair disappears

from the temple. Conon of Samos (280-220 BC), a Greek

astronomer and mathematician explained to his queen that it

had been carried to the heavens and placed amongst the stars.

The Greek poet Callimachus (310-240 BC) wrote a poem about

this transformation of which only a few lines remain. Luckily we

still have the complete Latin translation by Gaius Valerius Catullus

(84-54 BC) that tells the whole story. The name Coma Berenices

(Berenice’s Hair), an astronomical constellation discovered

by Conon of Samos, refers to this myth as well.

But those are just ‘stories about hair’. The real birth of hair fetishism

in literature goes back to Durante degli Alighieri (1265-1321)

or as you might know him better: Dante. In his autobiographic

ET ALORS? 165


prose work La Vita Nuova (1295) and in the highlight of Renaissance

writing La Divina Comedia (1321) he portrays a blond

haired, angelic female protagonist: Beatrice. Dante first met

Beatrice Portinari (1266-1290) at the age of nine, fell in love with

her and remained so for the rest of his life. Although she married

another man and Dante married another woman. But he gave

his first love eternity by writing about her and her blond hair. In

both works Dante’s love for a woman is pure and non-sexual. In

the Rime Petrose Dante shows another face. He gets rough - in

a kind and playful way - with a woman named Petra. Petra is a

cold woman with long braids like whips. And guess what: she is a

blonde! In the fourth ‘canzone’ Dante fantasizes: “Oh, if I could

but seize those lovely tresses / which have become both whip

and lash for me, from very early matins / I’d make them ringing

bells unto the night: / and I would not be pitying or kind, / but like

a playful bear with her I’d play; / and, since Love whips me still, / I

would avenge myself a thousandfold.”

In Francesco Petrarca’s (1304-1374) Il Canzoniere you will also

find a lot of hair references with aesthetic and erotic connotations.

The hair is a ‘pars pro toto’ for a woman; the hair fetish

is the symbol for an ideal, metaphysical, but obsessive love for

that woman. In Petrarca’s case: Laura; a long haired blonde he

first notices in a church in Avignon at the age of twenty-three.

Although little facts are know about this Laura from Petrarca’s

poems it is not unlikely that he wrote about Laura De Noves

(1310-1348) who was married to an ancestor of Marquis de Sade.

More recently the French writer Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880)

had a thing with hair as well. In his debut novel Madame Bovary

(1857) it is said about Emma Bovary: “On eût dit qu’un artiste

habile en corruption avait dispose sur sa nuque la torsade de ses

cheveux: ils s’enroulaient en une masse lourde, négligemment,

et selon les hazards de ‘ladultère, qui les dénouait tous les jours…

Charles, comme aux premiers temps de son marriage, la trouvait

délicieuse et irrésistible.” Emma’s hair becomes an indication

of and symbol for her adultery ; every time she cheats on

her husband she sticks her hair back up (too) loosely (which was

not done for a decent married woman at the time). Her husband

loves it when she wears it like that - because it reminds him of the

days when they were newlyweds - which gives the story a hint of

cuckoldry as well.

Flaubert’s contemporary fellow Frenchman Charles Baudelaire

(1821-1867) focuses on smells and scents; especially on the scent

of a woman’s hair. And especially in the poems he wrote for his

Haitian-French muse: the actress and dancer Jeanne Duval (1820-

1862). La Chevelure - an undated poem, but likely written around

1859, was first published in the second edition of Fleur du mal in

1861 - for example is inspired by Duval who had left him in 1856.

The poem starts: “O fleecy hair, falling in curls to the shoulders!

/ O black locks! O perfume laden with nonchalance! / Ecstasy! To

people the dark alcove tonight / With memories sleeping in that

thick head of hair. / I would like to shake it in the air like a scarf!”

After that Baudelaire paints a detailed picture of the images the

smell of her hair bring to mind: “Sweltering Africa and languorous

Asia, / A whole far-away world, absent, almost defunct, /

Dwells in your depths, aromatic forest…” And also: “Blue-black

hair, pavilion hung with shadows, / You give back to me the blue

of the vast round sky; / In the downy edges of your curling tresses

/ I ardently get drunk with the mingled odors / Of oil of coconut,

of musk and tar.” His muse’s - blue-black coloured for a change -

hair is one big, olfactory trip down memory lane for the poet. In

another poem - Les promesses d’un visage - he gives his poetic

views on pubic hair: “You will find at the tips of two heavy breasts

/ Two slack bronze medallions, / And under a smooth belly, soft as

velvet, / Swarthy as the skin of a Buddhist, / A rich fleece, which

truly is the sister / Of this huge head of hair, / Compliant and curly,

its thickness equals / Black night, night without stars!”

Guy de Maupassant (1850-1893), a protégé of that other hair

fetishist Flaubert, wrote a short story with the title La Chevelure

using the pseudonym Maufrigneuse. In this story we follow the

diary of a mentally disturbed, thirty-two year old fetishist, with a

passion for antiques, who is suffering from a very morbid erotic

delusion. In the diary he writes that one day he buys an antique

piece of furniture. After admiring and touching it for 8 days in

166 ET ALORS?


a row he discovers a secret compartment. In this compartment:

one single long and blond string of hair. For weeks he wonders

and philosophizes why this hair was cut off and hidden there

while touching the string over and over again. He falls in love

with the string of hair. One night he takes the string of hair to

bed, believing that it is the dead body of the woman it belonged

to. When he starts taking the hair/the woman along while going

out in public he is arrested and put away.

Guillaume Apollinaire (1880-1918) - born as Wilhelm Albert

Włodzimierz Apolinary Kostrowicki - is one of my favourite erotic

and pornographic writers. The fact the he wrote Les Onze Mille

Verges (“eleven thousand rods”), one of the wittiest pornographic

novels ever, is one good reason. Another one: Les Onze

Mille Verges - the title is a vulgar parody of the catholic ‘onze

mille vierges’ (“eleven thousand virgins”) - has it all; sadism,

masochism, golden showers, scatophilia, vampirism, paedophilia,

gerontophilia, masturbation, group sex, lesbian sex, gay

sex and so on. It should not come as a surprise it was banned and

forbidden in France, even until forty years ago. Apollinaire has

always denied he was the author of this book that was published

without a name, but just with the initials G.A. Another reason

to love Apollinaire is his fetish poetry. Read his Fusée, La Jolie

Rousse, Poême à Lou or Neuvième Poême Secret and you will

find multiple references to hair. His best known hair fetish poem

is without a doubt Le Deuxième Poème Secret. Apollinaire sent

this ‘second secret poem’ to his fiancé Madeleine Pagès while he

was at battle as a soldier during World War I. It is the only poem

that just has one topic only: hair! Her head hair, eye brows, eye

lashes, the hair in his fiancé’s arm pits and even the pubic hair

on her vagina which he so gently calls a “toison triangle” (i.e.

triangle of fur).

It is unbelievable how many writers and poets are obsessed with

hair in their writings. Perhaps that is because hair is the ultimate

(literary) synthesis of love, life and death; it embodies both Eros

and Thanatos, both powers that determine our lives.

scent of a woman

I already mentioned Baudelaire had a strong focus on smells and

scents in his work. But there are others. I will show you two.

The best known book about a man’s obsession for the way

women smell is Das Parfum (1985) by Patrick Süskind (°1949).

Jean-Baptiste Grenouille, the protagonist of the story, was born

without a body odour of his own, but with an extremely good

scent. One day he falls heavily in love with (the odour of) a young

woman; he gets so obsessed by her smell he kills her. While he

is working as an apprentice perfumer his obsession to have an

own odour turns him into a serial killer: in order to create his own

perfume, his own odour he needs to extract the smell of other

people. In the end he creates a perfume that makes all people

love him to death immediately.

The short story Bitch - first published in Playboy magazine in

1974 - also has an ‘olfactory chemist’ as a protagonist: Henri

Biotte invented a ‘sex perfume’ he named Bitch. Biotte uses his

girlfriend and assistant Simone and an old boxer as human guinea

pigs. He sprinkles his girlfriend with the perfume, puts her in the

same room as the boxer who can’t resist the perfume and fucks

her brains out until the effects of the perfume wear out. Mission

accomplished! The morning after the experiment Simone sprays

the rest of the perfume over her body to seduce her lover Biotte.

They have the wildest sex they ever had, but Biotte - having a

weak heart - died in the act; without ever haven written down

the formula for Bitch. End of that amazing erotic story by that

popular author of children’s books: Roald Dahl (1916-1990). He

wrote three other erotic stories for Playboy that year: The Visitor,

The Great Switcheroo and The last act. All four stories were

published, in the same year, in a book titled Switch Bitch.

ET ALORS? 167


seen the movie?

read the book!

Now run to your library and do read the books! You will like them

better than the movies!

So, you are not a book fetishist? Or not even into reading?

Chances are that you have seen one of the following movies:

FACTA, NON VERBA

The first rule of Fight Club - and we all know that because we

have all seen Brad Pitt in the 1999 movie - is not to talk about

Fight Club. The scene that was cut out also said: unless it is for an

article in Et Alors?. Chuck Palahniuk’s (°1962) debut novel from

1996 has numerous masochistic references that you will not find

in the movie.

The Secretary (2OO2) tells the story of a young woman (released

from a mental hospital) who starts working as a secretary for a

lawyer. Their professional relationship soon turns into a sadomasochistic

one. This classic movie was based on a short story

by Mary Gaitskill (°1954) who writes about sadomasochism or

fetishes in a lot of her stories. Also check A Romantic Weekend,

The Blanket (that deals with role-playing and power exchange)

or The Wrong Thing (lesbian sadomasochism).

9 ½ Weeks (1986) - although a semi-cult classic nowadays - never

was a huge success with the big audience, most likely because of

the sadomasochistic content. It was based on the book with the

same title written by Elizabeth McNeil in 1978. It is supposedly

based on Elizabeth McNeil’s (a pseudonym) own experiences.

Luis Bunuel’s movie Belle De Jour (1967) is a real classic. The

screen play for this movie, written by Jean-Claude Carrière

(°1931) was based on the book with the same title written by

French journalist Joseph Kessel (1898-1979) in 1928 and tells the

story of a woman who can’t fulfil her masochistic needs within

her marriage and chooses to work as a prostitute (that goes by

the name Belle de Jour) in a brothel while her husband is out

working.

A lot of writers and poets wrote about sadomasochism and

fetishes. Some of them - being of the opinion the world needs

deeds, not words (only) - were also living the lifestyle.

From Jean Jacques Rousseau’s (1712-1778) autobiographical Confessions

it is evident that he was a masochist, even since childhood.

In part one, book one he writes about how his teacher Miss

Lambercier, a thirty year old woman, impressed him when he

was eight years old. Her anxiousness when he could not answer

a question and her treats to punish him if he did not learn well

made a deep impression. When one day he had blows at her

hand, with the feeling of pain, he also experienced a sensual

and sexual pleasure that made him desire to be spanked by her

again. Rousseau lived to crawl and obey; it was his most intense

delight as he wrote in his autobiography: “Etre aux genoux d’une

maîtresse impérieuse, obéir à ses ordres, avoir des pardons à lui

demander, étaient pour moi de très douces jouissances.”

From de Sade it is known that he and his servant ordered three

prostitutes to visit them in a house in Marseille on June 27, 1772.

The women were whipped with birch branches and they, on

their turn, whipped both gentlemen during that orgy. De Sade

offered his guests anise flavoured chocolates that contained an

unknown substance - rape drugs avant-la-lettre - making them

very sick and even leading to the death of the eighteen year old

prostitute Marianne Laverne. In September of that year both

men are found guilty of murder by the court.

Von Sacher-Masoch, who married Angelika Aurora Rümelin

(1845-1908) in 1873, tried to inject his fictional ideas into his

168 ET ALORS?


everyday family life. At von Sacher-Masoch’s request Angelika

Aurora changed her name to Wanda. He also urged her to infidelity,

to make him a cuckold.

On February 2, 1882 Irish writer James Augustine Aloysius Joyce

(1882-1941) writes a letter to his girlfriend Nora Barnacle saying

that he would be very pleased if he could feel his skin burn under

her spanking hands, that he wished she would smack him, that

she was strong with big breasts and that she would whip him. In

1909 he wrote a whole series of explicit and pornographic letters

to Nora. Later in life when they were married Nora, asked about

these letters, said: “I don’t know whether my husband is a genius

or not, but he certainly has a dirty mind.” Joyce did not only enjoy

being spanked, he also was an eproctophiliac. He loved to smell

women’s farts.

American author Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald (1896-1940), best

known for his book The Great Gatsby (1925) was a known foot

fetishist. Just like Charles Baudelaire, Giacomo Girolama Casanova

(1725-1789) and many other authors. But F. Scott Fitzgerald

was the only one that was also very neurotic about his own feet:

he could not stand the idea that anybody else would see his

naked feet.

Graham Greene (1904-1991) - writer of, amongst other things,

the sadomasochistic theatre play A House of Reputation (1950) -

and his lover Catherine Walston had a sadomasochistic relationship.

Greene loved to be burned with cigarettes by Catherine.

Japanese nihilist writer Yukio Mishima (1925-1970; pseudonym

for Kimitake Hiraoka) claims he had his first orgasm at the age

of twelve while looking at a painting of Saint-Sebastian being

pierced with arrows. His fetishes included: the hair in men’s

armpits, sweat and white gloves. His biggest erotic, masochistic

fantasy was to die in a bloody and painful way. In 1970 he killed

himself with a Hara-kiri ritual. So be careful what you wish for.

TWO ENCORES

It was my pleasure to guide you around the Bibliotheca Studentica

& Erotica, but before you have to go here are two ‘encores’,

two books I did not show you, but you definitely should read:

In 1992 German journalist Sina-Aline Geissler (°1965) published

Lust an der Unterwerfung; a very open book about her own masochist

feelings, desires and experiences and that of other female

masochists. The book created a little shockwave in the feminist

movement because crawling for your husband or Master wasn’t

a good sign of Girl Power. Little do they know, right?

At the end of the nineteenth century and at the beginning of the

twentieth century a strange phenomena takes place in (mostly

German) scientific research. There is an increased interest for all

things sexual and beyond the ordinary, an increased perversion of

science. Scientists - psychiatrists mostly - start investigating the

“contrary sexual instincts”. And although they are all perversions

according to them it is funny to notice that all these perversion

are studied in depth and described with much gusto in extensive

and explicit case study descriptions. The best know result of that

peculiar scientific field of interest is Psychopathia Sexualis by

Richard von Krafft-Ebing (1840-1902) - born as Richard Fridolin

Joseph Freiherr Krafft von Festenberg auf Frohnberg, genannt

von Ebing - that was first published in 1886 as a clinical-forensic

study. It is an unbelievable catalogue of sexual perversions and

fetishes. I challenge you to read this book and if you have a fetish

that is not listed there I will buy you a beer! Cheers!

ET ALORS? 169


PHOTOGRAPHY BY ALYZ


PHOTO © ALYZ

MODEL FABRICE

MUA STEPHANE DUSSART

STYLING COPPELIA PIQUE


PHOTO © ALYZ

MODEL KENJI

MUA STEPHANE DUSSART

STYLING COPPELIA PIQUE


PHOTO © ALYZ

MODEL NOVIS

MUA STEPHANE DUSSART

LATEX TOP BY MADEMOISELLE ILO


PHOTO © ALYZ

MODEL PAUL TOUPET

MUA STEPHANE DUSSART

JACKET BY COPPELIA PIQUE

CAP BY PAUL TOUPET


WE LOVE

MOUNT GAY RUM & CHAMPAGNE MARQUIS DE SADE

WHAT

The finest, oldest brand of rum in existence,

has been produced on Barbados with passion

and unparalleled excellence since 1703

www.mountgayrum.com

WHERE

We drank it at restaurant-bar-gallery:

Café Des Artistes

Fuggerstrasse 35 – Berlin (Germany)

www.artistico-berlin.de


WHAT

La Maison De Sade creates a world which

reflects The Marquis de Sade’s essential values:

- Epicureanism: as in celebration and pleasure.

- Temptation: as in desire and imagination.

- Insolence: as in freedom of speech.

www.champagne-marquis-de-sade.com

WHERE

We drank it at the 3 floor high fetish store:

Hautnah

Uhlandstraße 170 – Berlin (Germany)

www.hautnahberlin.de


www.fetterati.net


THE ART OF BEING

HOPELEZZ

INTERVIEW FLEUR PIERETS PHOTO’S BRAM DE CEURT

If you’re lucky you can bump into them when in Amsterdam.

Accompanied by a human cluster of flies, they picturesquely

attract and they puzzle.

With their expression of beatific good humour and their

gaily coloured dresses, people are vying for their attention.

With pleasurable interest they pose with them whose age

range from 8 to 88 and go from place to place where their

fancy takes them.

One member of the gang – intelligent, big hair, big ass

and a beard – paved the way for this radiant group of drag

queens and –kings and brought to the surface all the things

that were boiling inside.

With pleasurable interest, Richard Keldoulis tells us about

becoming Jennifer Hopelezz, about his role in the Amsterdam

gay scene and the mere idea of creating a family.

ET ALORS? 201


I grew up in Sydney in a kind of conservative environment.

My grandparents came from Greece, I went to private

schools and lived in the suburbs. My father was a dentist and

everybody around me became a doctor.

So I studied medicine as well. I went straight from school to

university so I was 23 when I finished studying but the last

couple of years I decided that this was not what I wanted to

do. I was kind of strangulated by the environment.

I’ve always been bisexual anyhow but around that time I had

a boyfriend so it stayed that way. Suddenly my whole childhood

world became very narrow.

I finished all the exams, worked for one year in a hospital but

I hated it.

I would probably be alright as a doctor and could have chosen

some field in medicine but I was so over that life. I wanted to

leave it and discover the rest of the world. You have no life

experience, and suddenly you’re in a role where people look

up to you. You see how that changes people. It’s not actually

very good for you. Basically I was too young and wanted to

get away.

So I escaped all that. I moved away from Sydney and I never

went back to live there. I need to roam, that’s my character.

My Chinese sign is tiger and I find it very suffocating

to stay where I’ve grown up. Sydney is a big city, 4 million

people. But when you grow up in the suburbs, everyone lives

there; your friends, your family. So it’s more like living in a

202 ET ALORS?


small town.

At that time, Japan was really booming and there were ads in

all the Australian papers looking for English teachers there. I

applied for a job and got it.

I persuaded my boyfriend, landed in Tokyo and the next day I

had a job and the day after we had an apartment.

We stayed in Tokyo for 1,5 years but I got caught up in that

making money, working system. I remember clearly being on

the train at 8 in the morning, going to work with thousands of

Japanese and I realised it was not what I wanted.

So I left Japan and went to Amsterdam.

What brought me here was the liberal atmosphere. The only

thing I hated was the weather. As an Australian you know

that England has bad weather but you never get to think that

it would be the same in Amsterdam. But then I met my husband

Elard and I never left.

I really feel at home here. I can be who I want to be. It’s a

funny sort of freedom when you live somewhere without

friends of family. Away from where you come from. You are

given the possibility to invent your own personality.

Since organising is a genetic thing I’ve got from my mother,

I soon got involved in all kind of events and exhibitions. We

started to create festivals for the Homomonument and on

Queens day, started Pink Point, an information point for gays

and lesbians and all of a sudden we had a scene.

ET ALORS? 203


Running a sex club.

In 1998 we started organising sex parties on Sunday afternoons.

People were shirtless or nude and went after a few

hours. We hardly did any publicity but it was always full.

Since we were organising more and more parties, we decided

to start our own club. Church. We knew these parties worked,

so we just opened the door. Now it has evolved into a lot of

mixed theme nights- some hardcore men-only events but

also dance parties with drags, trannies and women.

Not the easiest way to go because the public has strict ideas

of what a cruise club should be.

It has to have a cement floor and lots of metal so it was nice

to mix that up too.

One problem is that there’s a thing against sex at the moment

in Amsterdam. I don’t know if it’s a socio-cultural thing but

I think it’s more general. At the end of the 80’s sexual freedom

seemed to peak, and since then it’s been pretty much

all downhill. Young people are quite conservative these days.

They are cleaning up red light districts everywhere because

sex has become somehow very negative. And that’s a pity.

Sexy is okay but sex is not. I have lived here for 20 years now

and in that time 18 darkrooms have disappeared. Church is

the only new one that has opened.

Straight hetero fetish parties are also having a hard time getting

a licence. Such a shame.

When I read about Berlin: being the fetish capital of the

world, I think that’s what Amsterdam is meant to be.

Not the gay capital, but the fetish capital. That is much bigger

and wider. That’s what we once were but not are anymore.

Being gay in Amsterdam.

The Amsterdam gay scene can sometimes be a little misogynous,

so it’s good to stir things up every now and then.

I too live mostly in a world without women but it can in many

ways be quite distorting.

A lot of gay men are more or less anti-lesbian as well. They

still harbour the weirdest clichés about them.

I think it’s much more healthy to mix- apparently businesses

with men and women on the board do much better than

when there are only men.

The gay community is really important, for the visibility of

it, but it’s got a negative side as well. People start to identify

you with your sexuality, your identity becomes your sexual

identity. So gay people are seen like a different kind of thing.

If you look at countries like Morocco, were the gay community

is very low profile, boys have more experimental sex with

other boys because it’s not ‘called’ gay, there’s no label. But

here in the West we have become so labelled. Either you’re

gay or you’re straight – you can’t be bisexual because that’s

apparently weird – and that has a huge downside. People

are scared to experiment with sex because it can lead to an

identity crisis.

My whole life I’ve been working with the gay community and

as I said, it’s important to be visible but the downside is that

we are seen as a totally different animal. Like some special

kind of species.

Gay is a swear word at school, but kids don’t even realise that

gays are even humans.

So you categorise people, it’s ‘them’ and ‘us’. And that’s the

flip side of a strong gay community.

Because of that you live in a cocoon with your gay friends in

your gay world.

But then again at the gay parade in Amsterdam this year, I

saw so many same sex couples holding hands in the streets.

That of course is the positive side of a strong gay community.

The birth of Jenny.

Jennifer was born in 2000. Every year my husband and I go

back to Australia for the holidays and take part in Mardi Gras,

Sydney’s huge gay pride festival.

We’ve entered lots of floats in Mardi Gras, and one year we

went in drag, as a parody of Greek-Australian girls, who coincidentally

are quite similar to Jennifer Lopez.

A little bit too much make-up, tight dresses, custom jewellery.

A bit cheap and very loud.

What I’m doing is a different kind of drag, especially with the

beard and all.

A lot of people like it because it shows that drags are not

always bitchy queens with shaved legs.

ET ALORS? 205


I think that was a bit of an eye opener for people here in Amsterdam,

because it’s done with a lot of humour. I don’t take myself

seriously by trying to look like a beautiful woman and after a while

the beard and the ass even became my trademark.

I like to fuck around with the different ideas on femininity and masculinity

and confuse people with it… a drag with a beard and hairy

legs, a macho guy who likes wearing lipstick. I think it’s empowering

for a lot of people when they realise they don’t have to be a

conventional drag queen or a transvestite but just who they want

to be.

Jennifer goes politics.

I soon discovered that drag queen elections or lip syncing shows

were not really my thing. I tried it but I always seem to come last,

they were still expecting a traditional drag. So I started to get

a little bit bored and wanted to move on, organise new things. I

always knew that drag + lip syncing was no novelty. But drag with

sports or with politics, that would be news.

The Drag Olympics were a great move. No one has ever combined

Drag with sports and we were literally in every newspaper.

And because I like politics on a local level and I already had dealings

with the local council, talking about Pink Point or the Homomonument,

I came up with the idea to run for night mayor. So I thought

it would be a great thing for Jennifer to go into politics.

It’s a kind of ludicrous thing, being a night mayor, since it’s not an

official but a made up position. But even though it’s not a real function,

you can still achieve a lot of things for Amsterdam’s nightlife.

Because of the elections we decided to build a drag family. I never

had the ambition of being well known. The campaign gave me a

reason to push Jennifer as a character.

We had planned a year-long campaign and took it very seriously.

We had a website, facebook group and started making appearances

around town.

The idea of starting a family came quite naturally. Jennifer Lopez

had twins so I wanted twins. It all fitted together easily. Everybody

liked the idea so much that they all hooked up. Suddenly there

were sisters, a nanny for the twins, godparents,...it became so big

that we started the House of Hopelezz. We had to actually, because

by the time we got to ‘the neighbour’s daughter’, nobody could

keep track anymore.

“I think it’s

empowering for a

lot of people when

they realise they don’t

have to be a

conventional

drag queen or a

transvestite but just who

they want to be.”


ET ALORS? 209


210 ET ALORS?


ET ALORS? 211


“The idea of starting a family

came quite naturally.

It all fitted

together easily.

Everybody liked the idea so much

that they all hooked up.”


The woman with the beard.

The election itself ended somehow with a downer. Although we

had over a thousand people there and were overwhelmingly voted

for, we still didn’t get chosen. They didn’t take us seriously. The jury,

a group of 5 people - supposedly artists – couldn’t see through the

make-up.

And that really shocked me. The public voted us first place, the jury

gave us last place- and they ultimately decided.

We were the only ones with a campaign, a website, a 10 page policy,

etc. But they just couldn’t see through the drag thing.

With drag, you get a lot of attention, but it is also a distraction from

your message.

It’s a double-edged sword. As Jennifer, I try to use the attention

to get my message across. Whether it’s effective or not is another

question.

Jennifer versus Richard.

Jennifer is more famous and more liked than Richard. I created the

character of Jennifer in my head. She’s always friendly, she’s positive

and she’s nice. As Richard I’m more businesslike, a bit grumpier,

but when something happens, it always goes through my mind;

how would Jennifer react?

But as time goes by you grow towards each other. Jennifer has

grown a bit more like Richard and the other way around.

I don’t feel like I have two personalities but it’s definitely a part of

my character I didn’t know was there. The whole thing about being

extraverted, being on stage and being all bubbly, that’s something

Richard would never do.

But I notice people are much more open to me as Jennifer. They tell

her things they normally don’t tell Richard. And that’s a good thing.

In that matter she can help people to explore who they really are.

And that’s really cool. I think because I make such a spectacle of

myself as Jenny, people are less inhibited to try things themselves.

I’m very curious as to where it’s all going to.

With Club Church, the members of the House of Hopelezz, the

acceptance of our community,..

But after all, you know that quote from Ru Paul “We are all born

naked and everything else is drag”?

214 ET ALORS?


216 ET ALORS?


Queens Day Birthday of Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands, a hugely

feasted national holiday. Celebrated on the 30th of April.

Homomonument / Gay monument

Drag Olympics

Pinkpoint

www.clubchurch.nl

Monument to honour the gay victims of World War II.

Nowadays it’s a symbol against the repression of both gay

men and lesbian women all over the world.

WWW.homomonument.nl

Sports manifestation for Drag Queens and –Kings. Minimum

requirement: Heels!

WWW.dragqueenolympics.nl

A gay and lesbian information kiosk situated at the Homomonument

on the Amsterdam Westermarkt.

WWW.pinkpoint.org

www.jenniferhopelezz.com and of course you

can find all of the following characters on Facebook.

ET ALORS? 217


ET ALORS? 219


THE HOUSE OF


HOPELEZZ


Jennifer Hopelezz

Mom


Jim Boh

Jennifer’s fiancee


Gina Hopelezz

Jennifer’s daughter - Twin sister of Tina Hopelezz

“I’m so proud that she’s my mother.

She has the most crazy ideas and they

all work out. She supports you in everything

you want to do and is always

positive. Life’s pretty dull when she’s not

around.“


Tina Hopelezz

Jennifer’s daughter - Twin sister of Gina Hopelezz


Eva Vraeghe ‘Necklace’ Hopelezz

Jennifer’s sister - Accident fashion queen


Bunny Hopelezz

Pet of the twin Gina & Tina Hopelezz

“I met Jennifer when co-hosting the

Drag Olympics. She thought I would be

a great bunny so she gave me to her

daughters.“


Gimme ‘Nanny’ Moore

Nanny of the twin Gina & Tina Hopelezz

“They can’t do without me. I do everything;

taking care of the twins, the

administration, massages, I paint the

walls, ironing,.. You see, I’m not to be

missed. But life goes on!“


Countess Cornelia ‘Cyanide’ Mesmer

Jennifer’s niece – Personal Costume Designer

“The House of Hopelezz is a creative

platform where everybody is allowed

to be who he wants to be and Jennifer

keeps the whole bunch together.“


Horse Hopelezz

Jennifer’s horse


Miss Nix

Just hangin’ around


Citronella

Jennifer’s favourite electropopstar


Elard

Richard’s husband – Writer

“It’s so great to see him play with gender

and sexuality that I’m very moved when

I see how people react to him. Standing

next to him gives me the possibility to

be the croniqueur of the time and age of

this unique scene.“


EVELYN EVELYN

EVELYN and EVELYN NEVILLE are a song writing duo performing

original compositions on piano, ukulele, guitar and accordion.

The sisters are parapagus tripus dibrachius twins, sharing

three legs, two arms, three lungs, two hearts and a single liver.

Born September 11, 1985 on a small farm on the Kansas-Colorado

border, the Evelyns have travelled the greater part of

North America performing with “Dillard & Fullerton’s Illusive

Travelling Show”.

Their unique musical style is inspired by their many eclectic

influences - from 80’s music to show tunes, Joy Division to the

Andrews Sisters.

The sisters currently reside in Walla Walla, Washington. They

are fluent in chicken and their favourite colours are purple and

yellow.

The “Evelyn Evelyn” debut features twelve tracks co-produced

by Amanda Palmer (The Dresden Dolls) and Seattle musician

Jason Webley.

Drawing on their background in circus performance and an

eclectic range of unlikely influences, the Evelyn sisters have

crafted a collection of timeless new genre-bending songs full

of humour, sadness and double entendre.

Over three years in the making, “Evelyn Evelyn” incorporates

the talents of over forty musicians and special guests to create

a playfully dark musical landscape filled with diverse orchestration.

The result is a blend of story and song quite unlike

anything you’ve heard before.

www.evelynevelyn.com


Photo Scott Irvine

ET ALORS? 239


When it comes to

beauty in it’s

most rhapsodic

form, there is

nothing more

accurate than to

show you some

of the most

dazzling,

beautiful and

intriguing beings

in the world of

fetish modelling.


ET ALORS? 241


az

Which actress/actor (dead or alive) has to play you, in the biopic of

your life? Why?

I’d love for Brigitte Bardot (circa 65) to do the job, because she’s a wonderful

moody French pouter. Unfortunately I don’t look anything like her, so

that’s wishful thinking!

If you could paint the world, what colour would it be?

Aubergine! It looks great and it tastes great! Plus it’s a mixture of calm

(blue) and anger (red), so it’s quite balanced, really.

They name a cocktail after you, what has to be in it?

Lots of vodka and not much else! My favourite drink is actually red wine,

but apart from kalimucho, you can’t really turn that into a cocktail.

What tickles your brain?

Sneezing.

Photo Rowan Murray

Latex Anatomic Bomb!

Hair & make-up Sammm Agnew

VISIT MAZ AT

Facebook.com/mamzellemaz

Tell us all about your favourite candy.

The sweets from my childhood are those widely available in France:

Carambars (sticky toffee stuff), Malabars (bubble gum), Tagadas and

Dragibus by Haribo (chewy fruity stuff), Michokos by La Pie Qui Chante

(chocolate and toffee) - and of course, I’ve always got one or two Chupa

Chupps in my handbag.

ET ALORS? 243


gent

leave

Which actress/actor (dead or alive) has to play you, in the biopic of

your life? Why?

I can’t decide between Anjelica Huston, Joe Dallesandro or Catherine

Deneuve, but screw the biopic of my life, I’m not done yet. Besides, I get

to play all three of them every day, which is a much greater privilege.

If you could paint the world, what colour would it be?

I’d paint it black, as the song goes... Everything ink black in gorgeous textures

of kidskin, sable, silk and lace. That way, we’d need wear nothing

but silver jewelry to look gorgeous every day. Oh, and maybe a little red

lipstick.

They name a cocktail after you, what has to be in it?

I think it’d be a fairly simple mix of lime, salt and Tequila. classic, fresh and

dangerous served exclusively to patrons submerged in hot water and only

if you’re topless. It’d be called a Fingerlicker...

What tickles your brain?

Sedition, salacity and sacrilege. Cultural chaos pioneers make me hot.

PHOTO Shami Kiely

www.caveboy.com.au

VISIT AGENT CLEAVE AT

www.agentcleave.blogspot.com

Tell us all about your favourite candy.

I can’t go past licorice. It’s an acquired taste, you love it or you hate it and

I like that people are so militant about their stance either way. But not the

salted Dutch kind, oh no my licorice has to be heavy on the molasses, I like

it soft, sticky and sweet.

ET ALORS? 245


avier

Which actress/actor (dead or alive) has to play you, in the biopic of

your life? Why?

That can only be Meryl Streep of course...Meryl Streep, the more drama

the better!!!

If you could paint the world, what colour would it be?

Red, don’t know why, I just love red. Colour of love, colour of blood,

colour of my monthly period..

They name a cocktail after you, what has to be in it?

It’s not going to be a fruity non alcohol drink thats for sure!! So we’ll

start off with some sodium oxybate, gamma-butyrolactone , potassium

hydroxide, then add some mint to spice it up a bit. Oh and fully shaken

not stirred...

PHOTO ANGELA TELLIER

www.ANGELATELLIER.com

What tickles your brain?

Read the above.. ;-)

VISIT XAVIER AT

facebook.com/xavier.appelman

Tell us all about your favourite candy.

Well, I love Chupa Chupps, I really like what it means too!!

ET ALORS? 247


fhegemeia

Which actress/actor (dead or alive) has to play you, in the biopic of

your life? Why?

Kate Winslet. Great actress, woman with curves and from what I have

seen in interviews a cool and relaxed person. No arrogance. And I just love

how she portrays Rose in Titanic.

If you could paint the world, what colour would it be?

Transparent colors to see all of it’s beauty and ugliness that is hidden

behind walls, things or personalities.

They name a cocktail after you, what has to be in it?

Actually, Piña Colada is my perfect cocktail!

Love coconut.

What tickles your brain?

Love, life, lust. Good food/drinks/people, art & history.

PHOTO PAUL REINQUIN

www.PAULREINQUIN.com

VISIT IFHEGEMEIA AT

Facebook.com/Ifhegemeia.bernheart

Tell us all about your favourite candy.

One golden rule for my kind of candy: low on nutritions, full of carbs! I

absolutely adore candy. And cake, chocolate and cookies and everything

models shouldn’t have. Luckily, there’s a fitness studio just around the

corner.

ET ALORS? 249


arnie

carlet

Which actress/actor (dead or alive) has to play you, in the biopic of

your life? Why?

Helena Bonham Cartwheel, I like her, she is quircky and she has biiig hair.

If you could paint the world, what colour would it be?

Scarlet of course.

They name a cocktail after you, what has to be in it?

Explosives!

PHOTO JAMES AND JAMES

clothes libidex

What tickles your brain?

Feathers and Fetish.

VISIT MARNIE AT

www.scarlett-diva.com

Tell us all about your favourite candy.

Chocolate!

ET ALORS? 251


achael

Which actress/actor (dead or alive) has to play you, in the biopic of

your life? Why?

If I can take my pick, it would definitely be Marlene Dietrich. She was

both an actress and a singer, and she’s a huge inspiration to me. She was

a beautiful, strong woman with enticing charisma yet she always maintained

something mysterious.

If you could paint the world, what colour would it be?

I would honestly not know which colour to choose.. Painting the world in

one colour would make it so blank and the world is everything but. Variety

is one of the things that keeps it interesting. Plus, my favourite colour is

black, which would make the world a little depressing I think.

They name a cocktail after you, what has to be in it?

17 year-old single malt and a Cuban cigar. In my book that counts as a

cocktail ;)

What tickles your brain?

Psychology. The human mind and what it can cause, do and create is endlessly

interesting. I love reading psychological thrillers, but also fantasy

and sci-fi novels, and I’m always in awe about how the authors can come

up with such horrific characters or completely new worlds. The other main

interest that always tickles my brain are languages. I have a love for etymology

and (comparative) linguistics.

PHOTO Thomas burggraf

www.picturerail.de

Dress Bizarre design

VISIT RACHAEL V AT

www.rachael-v.com

Tell us all about your favourite candy.

Chocolate! There’s nothing that chocolate can’t solve and I like it in every

way, shape and form. It all depends on my mood: when I’m feeling decadent

or have something to celebrate I’ll go for chocolate truffels, when I’m

moody I’ll go for BonBonBloc or praline filled chocolate bars or bonbons,

when I’m sad it’s Ben&Jerry’s Super Fudge Chunk (with a spoon straight

from the carton). You can also wake me up for chocolate coated strawberries,

or chocolate cake with a chocolate mousse filling. I’ve got the

munchies now...

ET ALORS? 253


ugo

ourke

Which actress/actor (dead or alive) has to play you, in the biopic of

your life? Why?

Probably Hayden Christensen as an adult Hugo, because he is an idealised

version of what I would like to look like, much like my self portraits. For

Hugo as a child they would have to use CGI because I fucking hate it when

the kid looks nothing like the adult character!

If you could paint the world, what colour would it be?

Is chrome a colour? People could be more reflective on their actions.

They name a cocktail after you, what has to be in it?

Vodka + a drop of blood from 500 baby seals.

PHOTO HUGO ROURKE

VISIT HUGO AT

www.hugoharlotphoto.blogspot.com

What tickles your brain?

Texture, perfect symmetry and great (may I emphasize the word great)

homo-erotic imagery.

Tell us all about your favourite candy.

I like the new Starburst range actually, soft candy is always a winner

because I have sensitive teeth!

ET ALORS? 255


ena

assque

Which actress/actor (dead or alive) has to play you, in the biopic of

your life? Why?

Bettie Page, I know she was mostly a model but that also includes acting..

I love her free spirit, her sweet smile and naughty eyecontact.

If you could paint the world, what colour would it be?

My favourite is turquoise but it would be boring if the whole world would

be just one colour..

So I imagine that the world is made of a giant jawbreaker-candy with

every existing colour.

They name a cocktail after you, what has to be in it?

Champagne, vodka, peach & smal gold leaves.

PHOTO KATJA EHRHARDT

WWW.HIGHGLOSSDOLLS.COM

VISIT DENA AT

WWW.DENAMASSQUE.COM

What tickles your brain?

Everything that internally moves and inspires me; colours, structures,

shapes, emotions, literature, touch, shadows, art, eyes, flirting.. life itself;

creation, but even decay & death in some sort of strange way.

Tell us all about your favourite candy.

It’s gentle and can last very long, it’s hard & rough but also sweet, it’s

bringing ecstasy everytime I threat it well and play with it for quite a

while... letting it melt on my tongue... Chokotoff, Côte d’Or.

ET ALORS? 257


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www.lamaitressedupirate.com

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