AFRICA

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AA_Brochure_201602155902

AFRICA

INDIAN OCEAN ISLANDS

UNITED ARAB EMIRATES

TRAVEL BROCHURE


ABOUT AFRICA ANSWERS

Down Under Answers, a multi-award-winning wholesaler since 1992 is excited to

introduce our new brand, Africa Answers. We want to offer you the same highly

personalized service, attention to detail and the passion of our experienced and

knowledgeable Destination Specialists as with our South Pacific destinations.

Africa Answers has its roots firmly planted in Africa, and we are committed to

delivering a highly personalized vacation that suit your style, taste and budget and

is tailor-made just for you, unlike any other vacation out there. From budget to

luxury, from intense to breathtaking, from independent to escorted, and everything

in between.

We are the travel experts when it comes to tailor-made vacations to South Africa,

Botswana, Namibia, Zimbabwe, Mozambique, Kenya, Tanzania, Rwanda, Uganda,

Mauritius, Seychelles, and Egypt and Dubai. We offer unprecedented savings and

highly personalized service backed by our experienced and knowledgeable

destination specialists.

This website is a small selection of the hotels, resorts, lodges, tours and vacations

we offer. We are the experts when it comes to your precious vacation

arrangements: From independent arrangements with air and land, self-drive,

cruises, escorted tours, air only, destination weddings and honeymoons, and

everything from golfing, private game safari lodges, food and wine, private guided

experiences, beach hotels, health and wellness and so much more..

Come see more, come discover, come experience.. with Africa Answers.

CONTACT YOUR LOCAL TRAVEL PROFESSIONAL, CALL TOLL-

FREE 866 427 2540, EMAIL INFO@AFRICAANSWERS.COM OR

VISIT AFRICAANSWERS.COM TODAY

400 108th Ave NE, Suite 200 | Bellevue | WA 98004

PH: 866 – 427 – 2540 | PH: 1 425 460 0899 | FAX: 1 425 460 0890


KENYA HORIZONS

ESCORTED TOUR

from $2345 pp, land only

GREAT ZIMBABWE

ESCORTED TOUR

from $2675 pp, land only

Fully escorted tour with experienced guide. Tour departs Nairobi on

Tuesday, minimum 2 passengers.









Meet and greet on arrival

Half bottle mineral water per person, per day

Highlights include: Samburu National Park; Aberdare Mountain range;

Lake Nakuru; the famed Masai Mara National Park

English speaking driver/guide throughout

Game drives in modern safari cruises with 7 window seats

All park fees and Govt taxes

7 nights in first class accommodation

7 Breakfasts, 6 Lunches, 6 Dinners

ESSENTIAL SOUTH

AFRICA

from $1900 pp, land only

A Suggested Independent itinerary that can be tailor-made to suit your

exact style, taste, budget and preferred travel dates.








Silver Meet & Greet on arrival at Cape Town International Airport

4 nights at Protea Hotel Sea Point – standard room, bed and breakfast

Scheduled full day Peninsula Tour

Scheduled full day Winelands Tour

3 nights at Hippo Hollow – Standard Room, including breakfast and

game drives

2 nights at Elephant Hills Resort – Standard Room, including breakfast,

Sunset cruise, and tour of the Falls

Round-trip scheduled transfers in Cape Town, Kruger National Park,

and Victoria Falls

www.africaanswers.com

Fully escorted tour with experienced guide. Please call for departure dates.

Fully guided tour in Great Zimbabwe

Highlights include: a visit to the Bulawayo museum; full day Matopo

Hills tour; including entrance to View of the World; a visit to the

Painted Dog Conservation Center; a visit to a Traditional healers

village; a tour of Victoria Falls

Open vehicle game drive in Hwange National Park

10 nights standard accommodation

Donation to Painted Dog Conservation Center

Commentary by experienced and professional guide

Touring in air-conditioned Midi Vehicle

10 Breakfasts, 3 Lunches, 10 Dinners

TO BOOK CALL TOLL FREE

8 6 6 - 4 2 7 - 2 5 4 0

or email info@africaanswers.com

Reserve your copy of our brochure and be added to our mailing list today:

Email Natasha Smith, Manager of Africa Answers natasha@africaanswers.com

TERMS AND CONDITIONS: Prices are per person, twin share, land only in US$ and are

valid as at Oct 15, 2010. Contact Africa Answers to obtain the best available airfare deal from

your home city for your preferred travel dates. Prices are subject to change due to currency

fluctuations and seasonal surcharges. Blackout dates may apply. Advertised prices reflect low

season pricing. A US$350 deposit per person is required to secure your land reservation,

further deposits will be required for additional land and air arrangements. *WA ID: 601 684

531 CA CST: 2076233-40. To qualify: Book a minimum of US$1500 pp in land arrangements

per booking. Applies to new bookings only. Incentive is available for all qualified bookings

deposited by Nov 30, 10.


Vacation: Best of Botswana Safari - Disabled

Overview

Maun - Makgadikgadi Pans - Khwai - Okavango Delta - Savute - Kasane

10 Days, 9 Nights

This safari has been designed for those with mobility issues - ranging from those who are

permanently electric wheelchair bound to those just recuperating from knee or hip surgery.

Accessible vehicles, aircraft, tents and lodge rooms are used so that even severely disabled

folk are able to experience a safari without compromise. The safari operator has wide

experience hosting people with all manner of challenges and will customize a program to suit

the traveler if necessary. This safari is suggested as being in reach of all travelers and

features the highlights of Botswana, the jewel of Southern Africa. Experience the stunning

beauty of the world’s largest intact inland Delta – the Okavango Delta, the isolation and

other-worldliness of the Makgadikgadi – uninhabited pans the size of Maine; and the

astoundingly prolific wildlife of the Chobe National Park. A pre- or post trip to Victoria Falls is

recommended.

Highlights

4 diverse game rich areas of Botswana -

Makgadikgai Pans, Khwai, Okavango Delta

and Savute Marsh

Light charter aircraft 'flightseeing' transfers

Daily game activities

Private mobile camp stay

Additional Details

9 nights accommodation

All meals, all soft drinks, mineral water, local beer & wine

All transfers by vehicle and light charter aircraft

Game activities daily

Experienced guide

Park entrance fees

Group Size

Minimum 2 - reductions apply for larger parties

Dates

Any day, year round.

Price

$8020 /person based on double occupancy*

Trip Terms

Prices are quoted in USD and are ‘from’, per person, based on twin share occupancy. Seasonal Surcharges apply. Single supplements apply.

Black-out dates may apply. All pricing is strictly subject to availability. All prices, itineraries and routing are subject to change without notice. Please

call for our current prices. Prices are current at time of posting (6/18/14) and may differ when you book your travel and are not guaranteed until full

payment is received and processed.

Terms and Conditions

Terms and Conditions supplied at time of quotation.


Itinerary

Map

Days 1 & 2: Makgadikgadi Pans

Fly Maun to Makgadikgadi Pans which is populated by up to

30,000 zebra and wildebeest closely accompanied by

predators, offers guests the chance to experience the

exhilaration of seeing large concentrations of game and the

resultant predator interaction. The natural setting of the lodge

above the river, acts as an amazing viewing platform from

where guests can enjoy the spectacular wildlife sightings. Overnight: Leroo La Tau

Days 3,4 & 5: Khwai River - Okavango

Move from your lodge to a private Mobile Camp in a private

area along the Khwai River, the Okavango Delta’s eastern

outflow. Moremi Game Reserve is surrounded by wildlife

management areas and private concessions of the

Okavango, with no boundaries. A key advantage of being in

this private concession is the freedom to do walking safaris

and night drives. Overnight: Private Mobile Camp

Days 6 and 7: Savute

Commence a full day game-drive through the southern part of

Chobe National Park to Savute Marsh. This drive can take

between 4 and 6 hours depending on animal sightings and

photographic opportunities on the way. Overnight: Savute

Safari Lodge

Days 8 and 9: Chobe National Park

Chobe National Park is renowned for its reliable and diverse

game viewing. Safaris are conducted both by boat and on

land. This section of the park is best known for its elephant

and hippo populations but the waters attract all manner of

game including large herds of buffalo. Overnight: Chobe

Game Lodge

Day 10: Depart Kasane

You will be transferred to the airport for departure, or, we

recommend a few days in Victoria Falls as an optional extra.


Destination: Central Kalahari Region

The Central Kalahari Game Reserve (CKGR) is one of the largest protected areas in Africa. The concession is located in its northern plains where the landscape and topography comprises flat grasslands

and undulating vegetated dunes teeming at times with a multitude of antelope species and large predators. This area is characterized by vast open grassy plains, seasonal pans, wooded acacia islands,

prehistoric scrub-covered dunes and fossil riverbeds.

As a result of this diversity of habitats, healthy game populations move seasonally between dune and valley, depending on the season. It is also known to hold significant populations of large predators such

as lion, cheetah and brown hyaena.

Aside from the enormous plain in front of camp, other prime wildlife viewing areas include places with evocative names such as Deception Valley and Sunday Pan. The former is all that remains of an

ancient riverbed which today is an 80km-long gentle valley floor covered with short palatable grasses interspersed with picturesque tree islands. The name ‘Deception’ is derived from the mirage effect

caused by the dry surface of the pan halfway along its length which often appears misleadingly full of water.

During the summer months, after much-needed rains, the area where Kalahari Plains is situated is characterized by lush green landscapes, floral displays and pans that fill with water. At this time of year

these verdant flatlands are alive with aggregations of gemsbok, springbok and blue wildebeest. As a result of these numbers, predator concentrations are also high and sightings of the almost mythical blackmaned

Kalahari lion are complemented by some of the best cheetah viewing in Africa. Black-backed jackal and bat-eared fox also occur, with wild dog and leopard seen on occasion. Other mammal

possibilities include steenbok, red hartebeest, giraffe and the charismatic ground squirrels and meerkats (suricates).

In the winter months, the Kalahari is more typically a desert-type system: warm and dry. Game viewing remains productive and moves into the vegetated dunal belt and pan systems surrounding the

valleys; a series of ecologically placed waterholes further enhance wildlife viewing.

Overview

People

The term “Batswana” refers to the ethnic group of people who speak the Setswana language and share the Sotho-Tswana culture, while in its common contemporary usage, it refers to all citizens of the

Republic of Botswana, regardless of their ethnic background. The singular is “Motswana”: a citizen of the country. “Tswana” is used as an adjective - for example “Tswana state” or “Tswana culture”.

Language

The national language is Setswana however the official language is English.

History

Batswana, a term also used to denote all citizens of Botswana, refers to the country’s major ethnic group (the “Tswana” in South Africa), which came into the area from South Africa during the Zulu wars of

the early 1800s. Prior to European contact, the Batswana lived as herders and farmers under tribal rule.

In the 19th century, hostilities broke out between the Batswana and Boer settlers from the Transvaal. After appeals by the Batswana for assistance, the British Government in 1885 put “Bechuanaland” under

its protection. The northern territory remained under direct administration and is today’s Botswana, while the southern territory became part of the Cape Colony and is now part of the northwest province of

South Africa; the majority of Setswana-speaking people today live in South Africa.

In June 1964, Britain accepted proposals for democratic self-government in Botswana. The seat of government was moved from Mafikeng, in South Africa, to newly-established Gaborone in 1965. The 1965

constitution led to the first general elections and to independence in September 1966. General elections serve to elect members of parliament, and the presidential candidate from the party that wins the most

seats in the general election becomes the president. Seretse Khama, a leader in the independence movement and the legitimate claimant to traditional rule of the Bamangwato, became the country’s first

president, was re-elected twice, and died in office in 1980. The presidency passed to the sitting vice president, Ketumile Masire, who was elected in his own right in 1984 and re-elected in 1989 and 1994.

Masire retired from office in 1998. The presidency passed to the sitting vice president, Festus Mogae, who was elected in his own right in 1999. Mogae won a second term in elections held October 30, 2004

and stepped down in accordance with national term limits on March 31, 2008. On April 1, 2008 former Vice President Ian Khama assumed the presidency. Khama was elected as President in his own right

during the general election held on October 16, 2009.


Travel Guide

Currency

The currency in Botswana is the Pula (P) which is made up of 100 Thebe. Pula means ‘rain’ in Setswana while thebe means ‘shield’ in Setswana.

Time Difference

9 hours ahead of Los Angeles

6 hours ahead of New York

Best Time to Travel

Game viewing is at its peak during the dry winter months of May to October when animals reliably concentrate at year round water sources. In particular, many experts regard the cooler months of June to

August as the best time of year for a Botswana safari - the game viewing is consistently excellent, there’s virtually no rain and the weather is comfortable. Prices are at their highest during these prime

months.

Wildlife disperses and becomes harder to locate when the rains begin in January through April. However, several destinations such as Chobe’s Savute region and the Kalahari offer excellent game viewing

at this time. One reason is that they lie on the path of migrating animals – such as zebra.

A year-round birding destination, bird watchers will find the migrant-filled summer months of the rainy season the best time to visit Botswana for both numbers and diversity of species.

December is a particularly good month as many antelope give birth then which means more predators come around to hunt.

Weather

Summer is from November to the end of March and usually brings very high temperatures. It is also the rainy season and cloud coverage and rain can cool things down, although only usually for a short

period of time.

The winter season begins in May and ends in August. This is also the dry season when virtually no rainfall occurs. Winter days are invariably sunny and cool to warm; however, evening and night

temperatures can drop below freezing point in some areas.

The in-between periods - April/early May and September/October - still tend to be dry, but the days are cooler than in summer and the nights are warmer than in winter.

Summers (particularly from December through to February) can become exceptionally hot, and rain may make some roads muddy and impassable.

What to Wear

Layers are best - you will be in open, moving vehicles before sunrise and after sunset, so even in summer it will be cool. Jackets, caps and gloves also recommended year round.

Health Requirements

No vaccinations or medications are currently required for entry to Botswana from the United States.

Africa Answers is unable to give personalized medical advice and requests that travelers contact their travel clinic regarding recommended medications.

Visa Requirements

A passport with at least six months of validity remaining is required. U.S. citizens are permitted stays up to 90 days total within a 12 month period without a visa. Passports must have 2 blank visa pages

available.

Tipping & Porterage

Tipping guidelines will be issued with final documents.

Credit Cards

International Visa and MasterCard are usually accepted throughout Botswana but American Express and Diners Club are often not accepted.

Electrical Appliances

220-240 volts AC, 50Hz.

Water

The country’s tap water is safe to drink. Most supermarkets, shops, camps and lodges also have bottled water available. When road traveling it is recommended to carry sufficient water at all times.


Destination: Chobe National Park

The Chobe National Park, which is the second largest national park in Botswana and covers 6,565 square miles, has one of the greatest concentrations of game found on the African continent. Its

uniqueness in the abundance of wildlife and the true African nature of the region, offers a safari experience of a lifetime.

A major feature of Chobe National Park is its elephant population. First of all, the Chobe elephant comprise part of what is probably the largest surviving continuous elephant population. This population

covers most of northern Botswana plus northwestern Zimbabwe. The Botswana’s elephant population is currently estimated at around 120,000.

Kasane is the main city in this region.

Overview

People

The term “Batswana” refers to the ethnic group of people who speak the Setswana language and share the Sotho-Tswana culture, while in its common contemporary usage, it refers to all citizens of the

Republic of Botswana, regardless of their ethnic background. The singular is “Motswana”: a citizen of the country. “Tswana” is used as an adjective - for example “Tswana state” or “Tswana culture”.

Language

The national language is Setswana however the official language is English.

History

Batswana, a term also used to denote all citizens of Botswana, refers to the country’s major ethnic group (the “Tswana” in South Africa), which came into the area from South Africa during the Zulu wars of

the early 1800s. Prior to European contact, the Batswana lived as herders and farmers under tribal rule.

In the 19th century, hostilities broke out between the Batswana and Boer settlers from the Transvaal. After appeals by the Batswana for assistance, the British Government in 1885 put “Bechuanaland” under

its protection. The northern territory remained under direct administration and is today’s Botswana, while the southern territory became part of the Cape Colony and is now part of the northwest province of

South Africa; the majority of Setswana-speaking people today live in South Africa.

In June 1964, Britain accepted proposals for democratic self-government in Botswana. The seat of government was moved from Mafikeng, in South Africa, to newly-established Gaborone in 1965. The 1965

constitution led to the first general elections and to independence in September 1966. General elections serve to elect members of parliament, and the presidential candidate from the party that wins the most

seats in the general election becomes the president. Seretse Khama, a leader in the independence movement and the legitimate claimant to traditional rule of the Bamangwato, became the country’s first

president, was re-elected twice, and died in office in 1980. The presidency passed to the sitting vice president, Ketumile Masire, who was elected in his own right in 1984 and re-elected in 1989 and 1994.

Masire retired from office in 1998. The presidency passed to the sitting vice president, Festus Mogae, who was elected in his own right in 1999. Mogae won a second term in elections held October 30, 2004

and stepped down in accordance with national term limits on March 31, 2008. On April 1, 2008 former Vice President Ian Khama assumed the presidency. Khama was elected as President in his own right

during the general election held on October 16, 2009.


Travel Guide

Currency

The currency in Botswana is the Pula (P) which is made up of 100 Thebe. Pula means ‘rain’ in Setswana while thebe means ‘shield’ in Setswana.

Time Difference

9 hours ahead of Los Angeles

6 hours ahead of New York

Best Time to Travel

Game viewing is at its peak during the dry winter months of May to October when animals reliably concentrate at year round water sources. In particular, many experts regard the cooler months of June to

August as the best time of year for a Botswana safari - the game viewing is consistently excellent, there’s virtually no rain and the weather is comfortable. Prices are at their highest during these prime

months.

Wildlife disperses and becomes harder to locate when the rains begin in January through April. However, several destinations such as Chobe’s Savute region and the Kalahari offer excellent game viewing

at this time. One reason is that they lie on the path of migrating animals – such as zebra.

A year-round birding destination, bird watchers will find the migrant-filled summer months of the rainy season the best time to visit Botswana for both numbers and diversity of species.

December is a particularly good month as many antelope give birth then which means more predators come around to hunt.

Weather

Summer is from November to the end of March and usually brings very high temperatures. It is also the rainy season and cloud coverage and rain can cool things down, although only usually for a short

period of time.

The winter season begins in May and ends in August. This is also the dry season when virtually no rainfall occurs. Winter days are invariably sunny and cool to warm; however, evening and night

temperatures can drop below freezing point in some areas.

The in-between periods - April/early May and September/October - still tend to be dry, but the days are cooler than in summer and the nights are warmer than in winter.

Summers (particularly from December through to February) can become exceptionally hot, and rain may make some roads muddy and impassable.

What to Wear

Layers are best - you will be in open, moving vehicles before sunrise and after sunset, so even in summer it will be cool. Jackets, caps and gloves also recommended year round.

Health Requirements

No vaccinations or medications are currently required for entry to Botswana from the United States.

Africa Answers is unable to give personalized medical advice and requests that travelers contact their travel clinic regarding recommended medications.

Visa Requirements

A passport with at least six months of validity remaining is required. U.S. citizens are permitted stays up to 90 days total within a 12 month period without a visa. Passports must have 2 blank visa pages

available.

Tipping & Porterage

Tipping guidelines will be issued with final documents.

Credit Cards

International Visa and MasterCard are usually accepted throughout Botswana but American Express and Diners Club are often not accepted.

Electrical Appliances

220-240 volts AC, 50Hz.

Water

The country’s tap water is safe to drink. Most supermarkets, shops, camps and lodges also have bottled water available. When road traveling it is recommended to carry sufficient water at all times.


Destination: Linyanti/Savuti Region

The 308 000-acre private Linyanti Concession bordering Chobe National Park’s western boundary is an enormous, wildlife-rich area, shared between just three small camps (DumaTau, Kings Pool and

Savuti Camp), which creates an unrivaled atmosphere of remoteness and space.

There are three main features of the Linyanti Concession: the Linyanti River, the woodlands of the interior and the well-known Savute Channel, famous as a sporadic and unusual watercourse. The Channel

stopped flowing between 1980 and 2008; during this time it was an open grassland, home to a wide variety of animals. In 2008, the Savute Channel once more flowed, creating a water source that rapidly

filled with aquatic life, wide varieties of waterbirds, and hippo, amongst other changes. With two thirds of the Channel located in the concession, Wilderness guests have private and exclusive access to its

abundant game.

These three features together with the floodplains, woodlands, grasslands, palm islands and scrub vegetation of the area harbor one of the densest dry season concentrations of elephant in Botswana - at

times the Linyanti must have several thousand elephants roaming around. This phenomenon is one of the main attractions for travelers to northern Botswana, but the area is also important in holding good

numbers of predators, providing an integral stronghold for species like the critically endangered wild dog, as well as lion, cheetah and spotted hyaena. The roan antelope found in the area can provide an

equal thrill however, as can the high concentration of birds of prey, seasonal zebra congregations and the cathedral-like woodland of mature mopane trees.

Aside from roan, other plains game includes red lechwe, Burchell’s zebra, blue wildebeest, impala, common waterbuck, sable, eland, southern giraffe, chacma baboon, vervet monkey, warthog, hippo and

Cape buffalo. Nocturnal species often seen are lesser bushbaby, spring hare, aardwolf, serval, large spotted genet and if you are extremely lucky the elusive pangolin!

Birding is outstanding here ranging from the Okavango specials, such as Slaty Egret, Hartlaub’s Babbler, African Skimmer, Allen’s Gallinule and Wattled Crane, to the drier mopane woodland species like

Racket-tailed Roller, Bradfield’s Hornbill, White-breasted Cuckoo-shrike, Bennett’s Woodpecker, Swallow-tailed Bee-eater and Arnott’s Chat. This area is also excellent for Kori Bustard, Ostrich,

Secretarybird, and Ground Hornbill with Southern Carmine Bee-eaters in summer. The Savute Channel is famous as an area with a high concentration of eagles and raptors and this area is internationally

recognised as an IBA (Important Bird Area), particularly for birds of prey like Dickinson’s Kestrel and waterbirds. There are also various owl species to be seen here such as Verreaux’s (Giant) Eagle-Owl

and African Scops-Owl.

The many varied habitats within these areas - marshes, waterways, riverine forests, dry woodlands and grasslands - and the prolific and diverse wildlife and spectacular scenery together form a wonderful

contrast to the Okavango. Adding this area to a Botswana itinerary makes for a varied and balanced experience of the country and in many ways it is an essential complement to a visit to the Okavango.

Overview

People

The term “Batswana” refers to the ethnic group of people who speak the Setswana language and share the Sotho-Tswana culture, while in its common contemporary usage, it refers to all citizens of the

Republic of Botswana, regardless of their ethnic background. The singular is “Motswana”: a citizen of the country. “Tswana” is used as an adjective - for example “Tswana state” or “Tswana culture”.

Language

The national language is Setswana however the official language is English.

History

Batswana, a term also used to denote all citizens of Botswana, refers to the country’s major ethnic group (the “Tswana” in South Africa), which came into the area from South Africa during the Zulu wars of

the early 1800s. Prior to European contact, the Batswana lived as herders and farmers under tribal rule.

In the 19th century, hostilities broke out between the Batswana and Boer settlers from the Transvaal. After appeals by the Batswana for assistance, the British Government in 1885 put “Bechuanaland” under

its protection. The northern territory remained under direct administration and is today’s Botswana, while the southern territory became part of the Cape Colony and is now part of the northwest province of

South Africa; the majority of Setswana-speaking people today live in South Africa.

In June 1964, Britain accepted proposals for democratic self-government in Botswana. The seat of government was moved from Mafikeng, in South Africa, to newly-established Gaborone in 1965. The 1965

constitution led to the first general elections and to independence in September 1966. General elections serve to elect members of parliament, and the presidential candidate from the party that wins the most

seats in the general election becomes the president. Seretse Khama, a leader in the independence movement and the legitimate claimant to traditional rule of the Bamangwato, became the country’s first

president, was re-elected twice, and died in office in 1980. The presidency passed to the sitting vice president, Ketumile Masire, who was elected in his own right in 1984 and re-elected in 1989 and 1994.

Masire retired from office in 1998. The presidency passed to the sitting vice president, Festus Mogae, who was elected in his own right in 1999. Mogae won a second term in elections held October 30, 2004

and stepped down in accordance with national term limits on March 31, 2008. On April 1, 2008 former Vice President Ian Khama assumed the presidency. Khama was elected as President in his own right

during the general election held on October 16, 2009.


Travel Guide

Currency

The currency in Botswana is the Pula (P) which is made up of 100 Thebe. Pula means ‘rain’ in Setswana while thebe means ‘shield’ in Setswana.

Time Difference

9 hours ahead of Los Angeles

6 hours ahead of New York

Best Time to Travel

Game viewing is at its peak during the dry winter months of May to October when animals reliably concentrate at year round water sources. In particular, many experts regard the cooler months of June to

August as the best time of year for a Botswana safari - the game viewing is consistently excellent, there’s virtually no rain and the weather is comfortable. Prices are at their highest during these prime

months.

Wildlife disperses and becomes harder to locate when the rains begin in January through April. However, several destinations such as Chobe’s Savute region and the Kalahari offer excellent game viewing

at this time. One reason is that they lie on the path of migrating animals – such as zebra.

A year-round birding destination, bird watchers will find the migrant-filled summer months of the rainy season the best time to visit Botswana for both numbers and diversity of species.

December is a particularly good month as many antelope give birth then which means more predators come around to hunt.

Weather

Summer is from November to the end of March and usually brings very high temperatures. It is also the rainy season and cloud coverage and rain can cool things down, although only usually for a short

period of time.

The winter season begins in May and ends in August. This is also the dry season when virtually no rainfall occurs. Winter days are invariably sunny and cool to warm; however, evening and night

temperatures can drop below freezing point in some areas.

The in-between periods - April/early May and September/October - still tend to be dry, but the days are cooler than in summer and the nights are warmer than in winter.

Summers (particularly from December through to February) can become exceptionally hot, and rain may make some roads muddy and impassable.

What to Wear

Layers are best - you will be in open, moving vehicles before sunrise and after sunset, so even in summer it will be cool. Jackets, caps and gloves also recommended year round.

Health Requirements

No vaccinations or medications are currently required for entry to Botswana from the United States.

Africa Answers is unable to give personalized medical advice and requests that travelers contact their travel clinic regarding recommended medications.

Visa Requirements

A passport with at least six months of validity remaining is required. U.S. citizens are permitted stays up to 90 days total within a 12 month period without a visa. Passports must have 2 blank visa pages

available.

Tipping & Porterage

Tipping guidelines will be issued with final documents.

Credit Cards

International Visa and MasterCard are usually accepted throughout Botswana but American Express and Diners Club are often not accepted.

Electrical Appliances

220-240 volts AC, 50Hz.

Water

The country’s tap water is safe to drink. Most supermarkets, shops, camps and lodges also have bottled water available. When road traveling it is recommended to carry sufficient water at all times.


Destination: Okavango and Moremi GR

The Okavango is a labyrinth of lagoons, lakes and hidden channels covering an area of over 10,563 square miles and the largest inland delta in the world. Trapped in the parched Kalahari sands it is a

magnet for the wildlife who depend on the permanent waters of this unique feature.

Sometimes called a ‘swamp’, the Okavango is anything but. Moving, mysterious, placid, gentle and beautiful, from a wide and winding channel it spreads through tiny, almost unnoticeable channels that

creep away behind a wall of papyrus reed, into an ever expanding network of increasingly smaller passages.

These link a succession of lagoons, islands and islets of various sizes, open grasslands and flooded plains in a mosaic of land and water. Palms and towering trees abound, throwing their shade over crystal

pools, forest glades and grassy knolls. The Okavango’s water is remarkably clean and pure and this is almost certainly due to the fact that it passes through very sparsely populated areas on its journey

from Angola.

In the lush indigenous forests of the delta and its islands, and along the floodplains spawned by this great marriage of water and sand, more than 400 species of birds flourish. On the mainland and among the

islands in the delta, lions, elephants, hyenas, wild dog, buffalo, hippo and crocodiles congregate with a teeming variety of antelope and other smaller animals - warthog, mongoose, spotted genets, monkeys,

bush babies and tree squirrels.

Moremi covers some 3,026 square miles, as the eastern section of the Okavango Delta. Moremi is mostly described as one of the most beautiful wildlife reserves in Africa as it combines mopane

woodland and acacia forests, floodplains and lagoons. It is the great diversity of plant and animal life that makes Moremi so well known. The reserve contains within its boundaries approximately twenty

percent of the Okavango Delta.

Birdlife is prolific and varied, ranging from water birds to shy forest dwellers. There are many species of ducks end geese, as well as an amazing variety of heron.

Elephants are numerous, particularly during the dry season, as well as a range of other wildlife species from buffalo, giraffe, lion, leopard, cheetah, wild dog, hyaena, jackal and the full range of antelope,

large and small, including the red lechwe. Wild dog, whose numbers are so rapidly dwindling elsewhere, are regularly sighted in the Moremi and have been subject to a project being run in the area since

1989.

Overview

People

The term “Batswana” refers to the ethnic group of people who speak the Setswana language and share the Sotho-Tswana culture, while in its common contemporary usage, it refers to all citizens of the

Republic of Botswana, regardless of their ethnic background. The singular is “Motswana”: a citizen of the country. “Tswana” is used as an adjective - for example “Tswana state” or “Tswana culture”.

Language

The national language is Setswana however the official language is English.

History

Batswana, a term also used to denote all citizens of Botswana, refers to the country’s major ethnic group (the “Tswana” in South Africa), which came into the area from South Africa during the Zulu wars of

the early 1800s. Prior to European contact, the Batswana lived as herders and farmers under tribal rule.

In the 19th century, hostilities broke out between the Batswana and Boer settlers from the Transvaal. After appeals by the Batswana for assistance, the British Government in 1885 put “Bechuanaland” under

its protection. The northern territory remained under direct administration and is today’s Botswana, while the southern territory became part of the Cape Colony and is now part of the northwest province of

South Africa; the majority of Setswana-speaking people today live in South Africa.

In June 1964, Britain accepted proposals for democratic self-government in Botswana. The seat of government was moved from Mafikeng, in South Africa, to newly-established Gaborone in 1965. The 1965

constitution led to the first general elections and to independence in September 1966. General elections serve to elect members of parliament, and the presidential candidate from the party that wins the most

seats in the general election becomes the president. Seretse Khama, a leader in the independence movement and the legitimate claimant to traditional rule of the Bamangwato, became the country’s first

president, was re-elected twice, and died in office in 1980. The presidency passed to the sitting vice president, Ketumile Masire, who was elected in his own right in 1984 and re-elected in 1989 and 1994.

Masire retired from office in 1998. The presidency passed to the sitting vice president, Festus Mogae, who was elected in his own right in 1999. Mogae won a second term in elections held October 30, 2004

and stepped down in accordance with national term limits on March 31, 2008. On April 1, 2008 former Vice President Ian Khama assumed the presidency. Khama was elected as President in his own right

during the general election held on October 16, 2009.


Travel Guide

Currency

The currency in Botswana is the Pula (P) which is made up of 100 Thebe. Pula means ‘rain’ in Setswana while thebe means ‘shield’ in Setswana.

Time Difference

9 hours ahead of Los Angeles

6 hours ahead of New York

Best Time to Travel

Game viewing is at its peak during the dry winter months of May to October when animals reliably concentrate at year round water sources. In particular, many experts regard the cooler months of June to

August as the best time of year for a Botswana safari - the game viewing is consistently excellent, there’s virtually no rain and the weather is comfortable. Prices are at their highest during these prime

months.

Wildlife disperses and becomes harder to locate when the rains begin in January through April. However, several destinations such as Chobe’s Savute region and the Kalahari offer excellent game viewing

at this time. One reason is that they lie on the path of migrating animals – such as zebra.

A year-round birding destination, bird watchers will find the migrant-filled summer months of the rainy season the best time to visit Botswana for both numbers and diversity of species.

December is a particularly good month as many antelope give birth then which means more predators come around to hunt.

Weather

Summer is from November to the end of March and usually brings very high temperatures. It is also the rainy season and cloud coverage and rain can cool things down, although only usually for a short

period of time.

The winter season begins in May and ends in August. This is also the dry season when virtually no rainfall occurs. Winter days are invariably sunny and cool to warm; however, evening and night

temperatures can drop below freezing point in some areas.

The in-between periods - April/early May and September/October - still tend to be dry, but the days are cooler than in summer and the nights are warmer than in winter.

Summers (particularly from December through to February) can become exceptionally hot, and rain may make some roads muddy and impassable.

What to Wear

Layers are best - you will be in open, moving vehicles before sunrise and after sunset, so even in summer it will be cool. Jackets, caps and gloves also recommended year round.

Health Requirements

No vaccinations or medications are currently required for entry to Botswana from the United States.

Africa Answers is unable to give personalized medical advice and requests that travelers contact their travel clinic regarding recommended medications.

Visa Requirements

A passport with at least six months of validity remaining is required. U.S. citizens are permitted stays up to 90 days total within a 12 month period without a visa. Passports must have 2 blank visa pages

available.

Tipping & Porterage

Tipping guidelines will be issued with final documents.

Credit Cards

International Visa and MasterCard are usually accepted throughout Botswana but American Express and Diners Club are often not accepted.

Electrical Appliances

220-240 volts AC, 50Hz.

Water

The country’s tap water is safe to drink. Most supermarkets, shops, camps and lodges also have bottled water available. When road traveling it is recommended to carry sufficient water at all times.


Interest: Safari Getaway

Safaris are not only about the famed Big Five, but about the thousands of other

creatures big and small – from the worlds tallest animal - the giraffe – surely the most

elegant of all the bush animals to some of the smallest and most fascinating – like the

dung beetle. You’ll encounter elephants galore – watch out for that tiny baby crossing

the road – and herds of buffalo. There are so many different kinds of antelope your head

will spin, fat crocodiles sunning themselves on sandbanks, hyenas on the prowl, and, if

you’re very lucky, a pack of wild dogs.

We celebrate the difference and uniqueness of each area and its wildlife, with a huge

selection of public and private concessions, each with its own identity, feel and character.

This variety of accommodation, activities and lodges means that there’s something for

everyone wanting to experience Africa. Public safari concession camps in National Parks

offer comfortable accommodation, a restaurant, swimming pool, and open vehicle game

drives safaris.

Or choose from standard to the most luxurious private concessions (area’s that are

privately owned) where you are guaranteed a highly personalized game viewing

experience, as well as the services of knowledgeable guides that have a passion for the

bush. All life’s little luxuries are available to you with exquisite accommodations, all inclusive of meals (and most including alcohol too), and intimate

game viewing. Private access means you can go off-road and really track the animals without 40 other pairs of eyes being there with you or a time

limit on which you have to view the animals. These private reserves define service and luxury, and we highly recommend a stay in a private game

reserve be part of your Africa vacation.

In the heart of southern Africa, Botswana offers possibly the finest, authentic wildlife experience in the world. It is comprised largely of the Kalahari

Desert, within which lies the Okavango Delta, a wonderful blue-green wetland considered by many to be Africa’s most incredible wildlife and

wilderness sanctuary. This dynamic waterworld contrasts with an ecosystem driven by different stimuli in the Linyanti and Selinda region in the north

of the country.

Namibia has rapidly become a well-known safari destination with a difference, famed for its remote and intimate lodges, interaction with the

indigenous people as well as the wildlife, and offering unique opportunities to become involved with the cultural heritage of all its peoples.

The East African countries of Kenya and Tanzania are famous for one of nature’s most spectacular phenomena - the annual migration of more than

a million wildebeest (gnu). Countless wildlife documentaries have captured the spectacle of thundering hooves as they move from the Serengeti in

the south to the Masai Mara, in search of fresh grasslands. The migratory pink flamingos in Kenya, which lend Lake Nakuru its blush, number close

to a million and are an unforgettable sight in the shallows and this is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to Kenya safaris.

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