AFRICA

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AA_Brochure_201602150451

AFRICA

INDIAN OCEAN ISLANDS

UNITED ARAB EMIRATES

TRAVEL BROCHURE


ABOUT AFRICA ANSWERS

Down Under Answers, a multi-award-winning wholesaler since 1992 is excited to

introduce our new brand, Africa Answers. We want to offer you the same highly

personalized service, attention to detail and the passion of our experienced and

knowledgeable Destination Specialists as with our South Pacific destinations.

Africa Answers has its roots firmly planted in Africa, and we are committed to

delivering a highly personalized vacation that suit your style, taste and budget and

is tailor-made just for you, unlike any other vacation out there. From budget to

luxury, from intense to breathtaking, from independent to escorted, and everything

in between.

We are the travel experts when it comes to tailor-made vacations to South Africa,

Botswana, Namibia, Zimbabwe, Mozambique, Kenya, Tanzania, Rwanda, Uganda,

Mauritius, Seychelles, and Egypt and Dubai. We offer unprecedented savings and

highly personalized service backed by our experienced and knowledgeable

destination specialists.

This website is a small selection of the hotels, resorts, lodges, tours and vacations

we offer. We are the experts when it comes to your precious vacation

arrangements: From independent arrangements with air and land, self-drive,

cruises, escorted tours, air only, destination weddings and honeymoons, and

everything from golfing, private game safari lodges, food and wine, private guided

experiences, beach hotels, health and wellness and so much more..

Come see more, come discover, come experience.. with Africa Answers.

CONTACT YOUR LOCAL TRAVEL PROFESSIONAL, CALL TOLL-

FREE 866 427 2540, EMAIL INFO@AFRICAANSWERS.COM OR

VISIT AFRICAANSWERS.COM TODAY

400 108th Ave NE, Suite 200 | Bellevue | WA 98004

PH: 866 – 427 – 2540 | PH: 1 425 460 0899 | FAX: 1 425 460 0890


KENYA HORIZONS

ESCORTED TOUR

from $2345 pp, land only

GREAT ZIMBABWE

ESCORTED TOUR

from $2675 pp, land only

Fully escorted tour with experienced guide. Tour departs Nairobi on

Tuesday, minimum 2 passengers.









Meet and greet on arrival

Half bottle mineral water per person, per day

Highlights include: Samburu National Park; Aberdare Mountain range;

Lake Nakuru; the famed Masai Mara National Park

English speaking driver/guide throughout

Game drives in modern safari cruises with 7 window seats

All park fees and Govt taxes

7 nights in first class accommodation

7 Breakfasts, 6 Lunches, 6 Dinners

ESSENTIAL SOUTH

AFRICA

from $1900 pp, land only

A Suggested Independent itinerary that can be tailor-made to suit your

exact style, taste, budget and preferred travel dates.








Silver Meet & Greet on arrival at Cape Town International Airport

4 nights at Protea Hotel Sea Point – standard room, bed and breakfast

Scheduled full day Peninsula Tour

Scheduled full day Winelands Tour

3 nights at Hippo Hollow – Standard Room, including breakfast and

game drives

2 nights at Elephant Hills Resort – Standard Room, including breakfast,

Sunset cruise, and tour of the Falls

Round-trip scheduled transfers in Cape Town, Kruger National Park,

and Victoria Falls

www.africaanswers.com

Fully escorted tour with experienced guide. Please call for departure dates.

Fully guided tour in Great Zimbabwe

Highlights include: a visit to the Bulawayo museum; full day Matopo

Hills tour; including entrance to View of the World; a visit to the

Painted Dog Conservation Center; a visit to a Traditional healers

village; a tour of Victoria Falls

Open vehicle game drive in Hwange National Park

10 nights standard accommodation

Donation to Painted Dog Conservation Center

Commentary by experienced and professional guide

Touring in air-conditioned Midi Vehicle

10 Breakfasts, 3 Lunches, 10 Dinners

TO BOOK CALL TOLL FREE

8 6 6 - 4 2 7 - 2 5 4 0

or email info@africaanswers.com

Reserve your copy of our brochure and be added to our mailing list today:

Email Natasha Smith, Manager of Africa Answers natasha@africaanswers.com

TERMS AND CONDITIONS: Prices are per person, twin share, land only in US$ and are

valid as at Oct 15, 2010. Contact Africa Answers to obtain the best available airfare deal from

your home city for your preferred travel dates. Prices are subject to change due to currency

fluctuations and seasonal surcharges. Blackout dates may apply. Advertised prices reflect low

season pricing. A US$350 deposit per person is required to secure your land reservation,

further deposits will be required for additional land and air arrangements. *WA ID: 601 684

531 CA CST: 2076233-40. To qualify: Book a minimum of US$1500 pp in land arrangements

per booking. Applies to new bookings only. Incentive is available for all qualified bookings

deposited by Nov 30, 10.


Vacation: Best of Three Rivers, Best of Three Countries

Overview

Caprivi, Namibia. Victoria Falls, Zimbabwe . Chobe, Botswana

8 Days, 7 Nights

Often described as Namibia’s answer to the Okavango Delta, the Caprivi Strip has an

interesting history. Germany traded Zanzibar for the Caprivi Strip, intending it as a short cut

linking Namibia to the Indian Ocean via the Zambezi River. What wasn’t taken into account

was that Victoria Falls, which drop 355’, made navigating the Zambezi River impossible.

Today, it’s the Zambezi and three other rivers that surround the Caprivi Strip that make it so

special and game rich. The waterfront areas of Chobe, Kwando, Linyanti and the

aforementioned Zambezi combine riverine forests with vast wetlands, attracting over 600

species of bird, 4 of the big 5 (less rhino) as well as four National Parks. Nearly 200 kinds of

flora, shrubs, trees and fruits, complement the wildlife and amazing geography.

Highlights

Game tracking in 2 of the most game rich

areas of Southern Africa

Excellent birding options

2 nights in maginificent Victoria Falls

4 star accommodation option from $3899

per person based on double occupancy

This package includes 3 nights in the Caprivi on the border of Namibia and Botswana, as

well as 3 nights in Chobe, Botswana and 2 nights in Victoria Falls. Truly the best of all 3 countries.

A 4 star accommodation version of this itinerary is also available, featuring Lianshulu Lodge, Muchenje Lodge and Victoria Falls Safar I Lodge.

Please call for details.

Additional Details

3 nights Caprivi accommodation – Susuwe Island Lodge (5*) or Lianshulu (4*)

2 nights Chobe accommodation - Ngoma Safari Lodge (5*) or Muchenje Safari Lodge (4*)

2 nights Victoria Falls accommodation – Safari Club (5*) or Safari Lodge(4*)

Meet & Greet and transfers

Guided Tour of the Falls

Sunset Cruise on the Zambezi Explorer

All meals

Game Drives & Boat cruises while at Caprivi and Chobe

Local Drinks and beverage (Safari Lodge excepted)

Group Size

Minimum 2 - surcharge applies to single travelers

Dates

Daily 1 June - 21 December, 2015

Price

$4699 /per person based on double occupancy*

Trip Terms

Prices are quoted in USD and are ‘from’, per person, based on double occupancy. Single supplements apply. Black-out dates may apply. Pricing is

subject to availability and all prices, itineraries and routings are subject to change without notice. Prices are current at time of posting (5/20/15) and

may differ when you book your travel. Please call for our current pricing and itinerary details.

Terms and Conditions

Read our full Terms and Conditions here


Itinerary

Map

3 nights.

Day 1: Arrive Kasane, transfer to Caprivi,

Namibia

On arrival into Kasane Airport, you will be met by your guide

who will drive you through the Chobe National Park to

Namibia and proceeding to your accommodation, Susuwe

Island Lodge on and island in the Kwando River. Arrive in

time for the afternoon game drive. You will be at Susuwe for

Days 2 and 3: At Susuwe, Namibia

Susuwe Island Lodge is an oasis in a game rich area on an

island in the Kwando River. Six luxury suites, each with a

wooden viewing platform and private plunge pool, are a

haven of calm and respite, an airy dreaming space to

recharge the senses. Twice daily, professionally guided game

drives are rewarded with special sightings of roaming

elephant and buffalo, lechwe, lion, and leopard. Susuwe is particularly suited to

honeymooners and those who seek a retreat, and a high level of non-invasive

personal service. Discerning travelers, and those who have visited Africa previously,

will appreciate the authenticity of experience.

Day 4 Caprivi to Chobe, Botswana

Transfer to Botswana where you will stay for three nights.

You will be at Ngoma Safari Lodge, arriving in time for the

afternoon game activity.

Day 5: At Ngoma Safari Lodge

Perched up on the edge of the valley, the view of the Chobe

River and the open floodplains from the vantage of your

private room and plunge pool is unrivalled in the area. When

not out on a game drive, the view over the Chobe River from

your room often shows herds of elephant, buffalo, giraffe,

and other plains game. Expect brilliant personal guided

safaris through the park in the morning and late afternoon, lazy middays by the pool,

and stunning dinners under African stars. River cruises, game drives, game walks and

picnics in the bush are yours to choose from.

Day 6: Chobe to Victoria Falls, Zimbabwe

Transfer to Victoria Falls, Zimbabwe where you will stay at

Victoria Falls Safari Club for two nights.

Day 7: At Victoria Falls

Enjoy a walking tour of the Falls and a Sunset Cruise on the

mighty Zambezi River. Depart tomorrow morning.


Destination: Botswana

With an area of almost 373 000 square miles, Botswana is virtually the same size as Texas. Travelers come to experience the stunning beauty of the world’s largest intact inland Delta – the Okavango; the

unimaginable vastness of the world’s second largest game reserve – the Central Kalahari Game Reserve; the isolation and other-worldliness of the Makgadikgadi Pans – uninhabited pans the size of

Portugal; and the astoundingly prolific wildlife of the Chobe National Park.

Situated in the center of southern Africa, Botswana is a landlocked country, with Namibia, South Africa, Zambia and Zimbabwe as its immediate neighbors. Botswana lies an average of 3,000 feet above sea

level and is more than 372 miles from the nearest coast.

Botswana has abandoned mass tourism and focuses on high quality, low volume tourism as the best way to preserve the environment. Your first – and most lasting impressions – will be of vast expanses of

uninhabited wilderness stretching from horizon to horizon, the sensation of limitless space, astoundingly rich wildlife and bird viewing, night skies littered with stars and heavenly bodies of an unimaginable

brilliance, and stunning sunsets of unearthly beauty.

With more and more cultural tourism options on offer, you will be charmed by the people of Botswana, visiting their villages and experiencing first-hand their rich cultural heritage. But perhaps most of all,

Botswana’s greatest gift is its ability to put us in touch with our natural selves. It offers that vital link so keenly felt by inhabitants of the developed world, a pervasive void we feel but often cannot name – our

connectedness with Nature and the astonishing diversity of plants and animals to be explored.

Overview

People

The term “Batswana” refers to the ethnic group of people who speak the Setswana language and share the Sotho-Tswana culture, while in its common contemporary usage, it refers to all citizens of the

Republic of Botswana, regardless of their ethnic background. The singular is “Motswana”: a citizen of the country. “Tswana” is used as an adjective - for example “Tswana state” or “Tswana culture”.

Language

The national language is Setswana however the official language is English.

History

Batswana, a term also used to denote all citizens of Botswana, refers to the country’s major ethnic group (the “Tswana” in South Africa), which came into the area from South Africa during the Zulu wars of

the early 1800s. Prior to European contact, the Batswana lived as herders and farmers under tribal rule.

In the 19th century, hostilities broke out between the Batswana and Boer settlers from the Transvaal. After appeals by the Batswana for assistance, the British Government in 1885 put “Bechuanaland” under

its protection. The northern territory remained under direct administration and is today’s Botswana, while the southern territory became part of the Cape Colony and is now part of the northwest province of

South Africa; the majority of Setswana-speaking people today live in South Africa.

In June 1964, Britain accepted proposals for democratic self-government in Botswana. The seat of government was moved from Mafikeng, in South Africa, to newly-established Gaborone in 1965. The 1965

constitution led to the first general elections and to independence in September 1966. General elections serve to elect members of parliament, and the presidential candidate from the party that wins the most

seats in the general election becomes the president. Seretse Khama, a leader in the independence movement and the legitimate claimant to traditional rule of the Bamangwato, became the country’s first

president, was re-elected twice, and died in office in 1980. The presidency passed to the sitting vice president, Ketumile Masire, who was elected in his own right in 1984 and re-elected in 1989 and 1994.

Masire retired from office in 1998. The presidency passed to the sitting vice president, Festus Mogae, who was elected in his own right in 1999. Mogae won a second term in elections held October 30, 2004

and stepped down in accordance with national term limits on March 31, 2008. On April 1, 2008 former Vice President Ian Khama assumed the presidency. Khama was elected as President in his own right

during the general election held on October 16, 2009.


Travel Guide

Currency

The currency in Botswana is the Pula (P) which is made up of 100 Thebe. Pula means ‘rain’ in Setswana while thebe means ‘shield’ in Setswana.

Time Difference

9 hours ahead of Los Angeles

6 hours ahead of New York

Best Time to Travel

Game viewing is at its peak during the dry winter months of May to October when animals reliably concentrate at year round water sources. In particular, many experts regard the cooler months of June to

August as the best time of year for a Botswana safari - the game viewing is consistently excellent, there’s virtually no rain and the weather is comfortable. Prices are at their highest during these prime

months.

Wildlife disperses and becomes harder to locate when the rains begin in January through April. However, several destinations such as Chobe’s Savute region and the Kalahari offer excellent game viewing

at this time. One reason is that they lie on the path of migrating animals – such as zebra.

A year-round birding destination, bird watchers will find the migrant-filled summer months of the rainy season the best time to visit Botswana for both numbers and diversity of species.

December is a particularly good month as many antelope give birth then which means more predators come around to hunt.

Weather

Summer is from November to the end of March and usually brings very high temperatures. It is also the rainy season and cloud coverage and rain can cool things down, although only usually for a short

period of time.

The winter season begins in May and ends in August. This is also the dry season when virtually no rainfall occurs. Winter days are invariably sunny and cool to warm; however, evening and night

temperatures can drop below freezing point in some areas.

The in-between periods - April/early May and September/October - still tend to be dry, but the days are cooler than in summer and the nights are warmer than in winter.

Summers (particularly from December through to February) can become exceptionally hot, and rain may make some roads muddy and impassable.

What to Wear

Layers are best - you will be in open, moving vehicles before sunrise and after sunset, so even in summer it will be cool. Jackets, caps and gloves also recommended year round.

Health Requirements

No vaccinations or medications are currently required for entry to Botswana from the United States.

Africa Answers is unable to give personalized medical advice and requests that travelers contact their travel clinic regarding recommended medications.

Visa Requirements

A passport with at least six months of validity remaining is required. U.S. citizens are permitted stays up to 90 days total within a 12 month period without a visa. Passports must have 2 blank visa pages

available.

Tipping & Porterage

Tipping guidelines will be issued with final documents.

Credit Cards

International Visa and MasterCard are usually accepted throughout Botswana but American Express and Diners Club are often not accepted.

Electrical Appliances

220-240 volts AC, 50Hz.

Water

The country’s tap water is safe to drink. Most supermarkets, shops, camps and lodges also have bottled water available. When road traveling it is recommended to carry sufficient water at all times.


Destination: Chobe National Park

The Chobe National Park, which is the second largest national park in Botswana and covers 6,565 square miles, has one of the greatest concentrations of game found on the African continent. Its

uniqueness in the abundance of wildlife and the true African nature of the region, offers a safari experience of a lifetime.

A major feature of Chobe National Park is its elephant population. First of all, the Chobe elephant comprise part of what is probably the largest surviving continuous elephant population. This population

covers most of northern Botswana plus northwestern Zimbabwe. The Botswana’s elephant population is currently estimated at around 120,000.

Kasane is the main city in this region.

Overview

People

The term “Batswana” refers to the ethnic group of people who speak the Setswana language and share the Sotho-Tswana culture, while in its common contemporary usage, it refers to all citizens of the

Republic of Botswana, regardless of their ethnic background. The singular is “Motswana”: a citizen of the country. “Tswana” is used as an adjective - for example “Tswana state” or “Tswana culture”.

Language

The national language is Setswana however the official language is English.

History

Batswana, a term also used to denote all citizens of Botswana, refers to the country’s major ethnic group (the “Tswana” in South Africa), which came into the area from South Africa during the Zulu wars of

the early 1800s. Prior to European contact, the Batswana lived as herders and farmers under tribal rule.

In the 19th century, hostilities broke out between the Batswana and Boer settlers from the Transvaal. After appeals by the Batswana for assistance, the British Government in 1885 put “Bechuanaland” under

its protection. The northern territory remained under direct administration and is today’s Botswana, while the southern territory became part of the Cape Colony and is now part of the northwest province of

South Africa; the majority of Setswana-speaking people today live in South Africa.

In June 1964, Britain accepted proposals for democratic self-government in Botswana. The seat of government was moved from Mafikeng, in South Africa, to newly-established Gaborone in 1965. The 1965

constitution led to the first general elections and to independence in September 1966. General elections serve to elect members of parliament, and the presidential candidate from the party that wins the most

seats in the general election becomes the president. Seretse Khama, a leader in the independence movement and the legitimate claimant to traditional rule of the Bamangwato, became the country’s first

president, was re-elected twice, and died in office in 1980. The presidency passed to the sitting vice president, Ketumile Masire, who was elected in his own right in 1984 and re-elected in 1989 and 1994.

Masire retired from office in 1998. The presidency passed to the sitting vice president, Festus Mogae, who was elected in his own right in 1999. Mogae won a second term in elections held October 30, 2004

and stepped down in accordance with national term limits on March 31, 2008. On April 1, 2008 former Vice President Ian Khama assumed the presidency. Khama was elected as President in his own right

during the general election held on October 16, 2009.


Travel Guide

Currency

The currency in Botswana is the Pula (P) which is made up of 100 Thebe. Pula means ‘rain’ in Setswana while thebe means ‘shield’ in Setswana.

Time Difference

9 hours ahead of Los Angeles

6 hours ahead of New York

Best Time to Travel

Game viewing is at its peak during the dry winter months of May to October when animals reliably concentrate at year round water sources. In particular, many experts regard the cooler months of June to

August as the best time of year for a Botswana safari - the game viewing is consistently excellent, there’s virtually no rain and the weather is comfortable. Prices are at their highest during these prime

months.

Wildlife disperses and becomes harder to locate when the rains begin in January through April. However, several destinations such as Chobe’s Savute region and the Kalahari offer excellent game viewing

at this time. One reason is that they lie on the path of migrating animals – such as zebra.

A year-round birding destination, bird watchers will find the migrant-filled summer months of the rainy season the best time to visit Botswana for both numbers and diversity of species.

December is a particularly good month as many antelope give birth then which means more predators come around to hunt.

Weather

Summer is from November to the end of March and usually brings very high temperatures. It is also the rainy season and cloud coverage and rain can cool things down, although only usually for a short

period of time.

The winter season begins in May and ends in August. This is also the dry season when virtually no rainfall occurs. Winter days are invariably sunny and cool to warm; however, evening and night

temperatures can drop below freezing point in some areas.

The in-between periods - April/early May and September/October - still tend to be dry, but the days are cooler than in summer and the nights are warmer than in winter.

Summers (particularly from December through to February) can become exceptionally hot, and rain may make some roads muddy and impassable.

What to Wear

Layers are best - you will be in open, moving vehicles before sunrise and after sunset, so even in summer it will be cool. Jackets, caps and gloves also recommended year round.

Health Requirements

No vaccinations or medications are currently required for entry to Botswana from the United States.

Africa Answers is unable to give personalized medical advice and requests that travelers contact their travel clinic regarding recommended medications.

Visa Requirements

A passport with at least six months of validity remaining is required. U.S. citizens are permitted stays up to 90 days total within a 12 month period without a visa. Passports must have 2 blank visa pages

available.

Tipping & Porterage

Tipping guidelines will be issued with final documents.

Credit Cards

International Visa and MasterCard are usually accepted throughout Botswana but American Express and Diners Club are often not accepted.

Electrical Appliances

220-240 volts AC, 50Hz.

Water

The country’s tap water is safe to drink. Most supermarkets, shops, camps and lodges also have bottled water available. When road traveling it is recommended to carry sufficient water at all times.


Destination: Linyanti/Savuti Region

The 308 000-acre private Linyanti Concession bordering Chobe National Park’s western boundary is an enormous, wildlife-rich area, shared between just three small camps (DumaTau, Kings Pool and

Savuti Camp), which creates an unrivaled atmosphere of remoteness and space.

There are three main features of the Linyanti Concession: the Linyanti River, the woodlands of the interior and the well-known Savute Channel, famous as a sporadic and unusual watercourse. The Channel

stopped flowing between 1980 and 2008; during this time it was an open grassland, home to a wide variety of animals. In 2008, the Savute Channel once more flowed, creating a water source that rapidly

filled with aquatic life, wide varieties of waterbirds, and hippo, amongst other changes. With two thirds of the Channel located in the concession, Wilderness guests have private and exclusive access to its

abundant game.

These three features together with the floodplains, woodlands, grasslands, palm islands and scrub vegetation of the area harbor one of the densest dry season concentrations of elephant in Botswana - at

times the Linyanti must have several thousand elephants roaming around. This phenomenon is one of the main attractions for travelers to northern Botswana, but the area is also important in holding good

numbers of predators, providing an integral stronghold for species like the critically endangered wild dog, as well as lion, cheetah and spotted hyaena. The roan antelope found in the area can provide an

equal thrill however, as can the high concentration of birds of prey, seasonal zebra congregations and the cathedral-like woodland of mature mopane trees.

Aside from roan, other plains game includes red lechwe, Burchell’s zebra, blue wildebeest, impala, common waterbuck, sable, eland, southern giraffe, chacma baboon, vervet monkey, warthog, hippo and

Cape buffalo. Nocturnal species often seen are lesser bushbaby, spring hare, aardwolf, serval, large spotted genet and if you are extremely lucky the elusive pangolin!

Birding is outstanding here ranging from the Okavango specials, such as Slaty Egret, Hartlaub’s Babbler, African Skimmer, Allen’s Gallinule and Wattled Crane, to the drier mopane woodland species like

Racket-tailed Roller, Bradfield’s Hornbill, White-breasted Cuckoo-shrike, Bennett’s Woodpecker, Swallow-tailed Bee-eater and Arnott’s Chat. This area is also excellent for Kori Bustard, Ostrich,

Secretarybird, and Ground Hornbill with Southern Carmine Bee-eaters in summer. The Savute Channel is famous as an area with a high concentration of eagles and raptors and this area is internationally

recognised as an IBA (Important Bird Area), particularly for birds of prey like Dickinson’s Kestrel and waterbirds. There are also various owl species to be seen here such as Verreaux’s (Giant) Eagle-Owl

and African Scops-Owl.

The many varied habitats within these areas - marshes, waterways, riverine forests, dry woodlands and grasslands - and the prolific and diverse wildlife and spectacular scenery together form a wonderful

contrast to the Okavango. Adding this area to a Botswana itinerary makes for a varied and balanced experience of the country and in many ways it is an essential complement to a visit to the Okavango.

Overview

People

The term “Batswana” refers to the ethnic group of people who speak the Setswana language and share the Sotho-Tswana culture, while in its common contemporary usage, it refers to all citizens of the

Republic of Botswana, regardless of their ethnic background. The singular is “Motswana”: a citizen of the country. “Tswana” is used as an adjective - for example “Tswana state” or “Tswana culture”.

Language

The national language is Setswana however the official language is English.

History

Batswana, a term also used to denote all citizens of Botswana, refers to the country’s major ethnic group (the “Tswana” in South Africa), which came into the area from South Africa during the Zulu wars of

the early 1800s. Prior to European contact, the Batswana lived as herders and farmers under tribal rule.

In the 19th century, hostilities broke out between the Batswana and Boer settlers from the Transvaal. After appeals by the Batswana for assistance, the British Government in 1885 put “Bechuanaland” under

its protection. The northern territory remained under direct administration and is today’s Botswana, while the southern territory became part of the Cape Colony and is now part of the northwest province of

South Africa; the majority of Setswana-speaking people today live in South Africa.

In June 1964, Britain accepted proposals for democratic self-government in Botswana. The seat of government was moved from Mafikeng, in South Africa, to newly-established Gaborone in 1965. The 1965

constitution led to the first general elections and to independence in September 1966. General elections serve to elect members of parliament, and the presidential candidate from the party that wins the most

seats in the general election becomes the president. Seretse Khama, a leader in the independence movement and the legitimate claimant to traditional rule of the Bamangwato, became the country’s first

president, was re-elected twice, and died in office in 1980. The presidency passed to the sitting vice president, Ketumile Masire, who was elected in his own right in 1984 and re-elected in 1989 and 1994.

Masire retired from office in 1998. The presidency passed to the sitting vice president, Festus Mogae, who was elected in his own right in 1999. Mogae won a second term in elections held October 30, 2004

and stepped down in accordance with national term limits on March 31, 2008. On April 1, 2008 former Vice President Ian Khama assumed the presidency. Khama was elected as President in his own right

during the general election held on October 16, 2009.


Travel Guide

Currency

The currency in Botswana is the Pula (P) which is made up of 100 Thebe. Pula means ‘rain’ in Setswana while thebe means ‘shield’ in Setswana.

Time Difference

9 hours ahead of Los Angeles

6 hours ahead of New York

Best Time to Travel

Game viewing is at its peak during the dry winter months of May to October when animals reliably concentrate at year round water sources. In particular, many experts regard the cooler months of June to

August as the best time of year for a Botswana safari - the game viewing is consistently excellent, there’s virtually no rain and the weather is comfortable. Prices are at their highest during these prime

months.

Wildlife disperses and becomes harder to locate when the rains begin in January through April. However, several destinations such as Chobe’s Savute region and the Kalahari offer excellent game viewing

at this time. One reason is that they lie on the path of migrating animals – such as zebra.

A year-round birding destination, bird watchers will find the migrant-filled summer months of the rainy season the best time to visit Botswana for both numbers and diversity of species.

December is a particularly good month as many antelope give birth then which means more predators come around to hunt.

Weather

Summer is from November to the end of March and usually brings very high temperatures. It is also the rainy season and cloud coverage and rain can cool things down, although only usually for a short

period of time.

The winter season begins in May and ends in August. This is also the dry season when virtually no rainfall occurs. Winter days are invariably sunny and cool to warm; however, evening and night

temperatures can drop below freezing point in some areas.

The in-between periods - April/early May and September/October - still tend to be dry, but the days are cooler than in summer and the nights are warmer than in winter.

Summers (particularly from December through to February) can become exceptionally hot, and rain may make some roads muddy and impassable.

What to Wear

Layers are best - you will be in open, moving vehicles before sunrise and after sunset, so even in summer it will be cool. Jackets, caps and gloves also recommended year round.

Health Requirements

No vaccinations or medications are currently required for entry to Botswana from the United States.

Africa Answers is unable to give personalized medical advice and requests that travelers contact their travel clinic regarding recommended medications.

Visa Requirements

A passport with at least six months of validity remaining is required. U.S. citizens are permitted stays up to 90 days total within a 12 month period without a visa. Passports must have 2 blank visa pages

available.

Tipping & Porterage

Tipping guidelines will be issued with final documents.

Credit Cards

International Visa and MasterCard are usually accepted throughout Botswana but American Express and Diners Club are often not accepted.

Electrical Appliances

220-240 volts AC, 50Hz.

Water

The country’s tap water is safe to drink. Most supermarkets, shops, camps and lodges also have bottled water available. When road traveling it is recommended to carry sufficient water at all times.


Destination: Namibia

Namibia is a country of startling contrasts that straddles two great deserts: the Namib (after which it is named) is the oldest desert on the planet, and its sea of red sand lies along the Atlantic coastline, while

in the eastern interior lies the Kalahari, a vast and sparsely vegetated savannah that sprawls across the border into neighboring countries.

Over the years, there have been a number of cultural influences that have all added to the unique atmosphere of Namibia. At various times Germany, Great Britain and South Africa have all governed the

territory, but it was with the eventual independence of Namibia in 1990 that the country was able to develop its multi-cultural character and reinvent itself. There is a rich and colorful uniquely African vigor

that now freely blends in with the European influences on architecture, food, customs and art, all merging to create a distinctive Namibian character.

All this is in interesting juxtaposition with the expansive landscapes that surround the cities. The many national parks and game reserves boast a huge variety of wildlife in a kaleidoscope of differing

environments: giraffes amble across the blinding white saltpans of Etosha National Park, gemsbok plunge headlong up impossibly steep red dunes at Sossusvlei, and seals in their many thousands

colonize lonely beachheads along the Skeleton Coast. Astonishing contrasts are everywhere for the visitor to savor, enjoy and photograph.

Namibia has rapidly become a well-known safari destination with a difference, famed for its remote and intimate lodges, interaction with the indigenous people as well as the wildlife, and offering unique

opportunities to become involved with the cultural heritage of all its peoples.

Overview

People

Namibians are of diverse ethnic origins. The principal groups are the Ovambo, Kavango, Herero/Himba, Damara, Colored (including Rehoboth Baster), White (Afrikaner, German, English, and

Portuguese), Nama, Caprivian, San, and Tswana.

The Ovambo make up about half of Namibia’s people. The Ovambo, Kavango, and East Caprivian peoples, who occupy the relatively well-watered and wooded northern part of the country, are settled

farmers and herders. Historically, these groups had little contact with the Nama, Damara, and Herero, who roamed the central part of the country vying for control of sparse pastureland. German colonial

rule destroyed the war-making ability of the tribes but did not erase their identities or traditional organization. People from the more populous north have settled throughout the country in recent decades as a

result of urbanization, industrialization, and the demand for labor.

Language

The official language is English. German and Afrikaans are also widely used and there are numerous African languages and dialects which fall into two main groups, namely Bantu and Khoisan

History

Namibia was, due to its barren coastline, colonized by the Europeans as one of the last African countries. It was the German merchant and adventurer Adolf Luederitz from Bremen, who bought in 1883 the

bay of Angra Pequeña from Nama Chief Joseph Fredericks from Bethanien. He also bought the area in a 20 mile radius around the bay. The purchase price was then 10 000 Reichsmark and 260 guns. The

bay is today known as Luederitz Bay.

In 1884, the German Empire took over the “protection” of Luederitz’ possessions. A tiny corps of the “Kaiserliche Marine” landed in the bay and raised the German flag. From 1884 to 1914, Namibia was a

“German Protectorate” called “Deutsch Südwestafrika”. The German Empire sent the “Deutsche Schutztruppe” (Protection Corps). It had the task to transform the area between Oranje and Kunene into a

German colony. German settlers were supposed to buy land and freely and safely establish farms. For this purpose the indigenous population, mainly Nama and Herero, was to be subjugated.

Initially the colonization proceeded more or less peacefully. Treaties were negotiated with Nama and Herero representatives. In these “Protection Agreements” both groups were assured of military support.

In return, the Nama and Herero agreed to let German settlers take possession of their land and use it agriculturally.

Eventually the Herero and the Nama realized that the German colonization threatened their subsistence and their traditional way of life as free cattle and goat herders so both population groups rose in armed

rebellion. These military conflicts lasted until 1908 and resulted in the total defeat of the black population.

At the beginning of the First World War, South Africa occupied the area and in 1920, she was given the country by the League of Nations as a mandate. When this was abolished in 1966 by the UN, South

Africa rebelled and the result was many years of military struggle between South Africa and the Namibian liberation movement SWAPO, which was supported by the United Nations. On March 21, 1990 the

political independence of Namibia was finally granted and a democratic constitution drawn up. SWAPO won the first free elections and became the strongest party. Its leader Dr. Sam Nujoma became the

first Namibian President.


Travel Guide

Currency

The currency in Namibia is the Namibian Dollar (NAM$), which is fixed to and therefore equivalent to the South African Rand (ZAR). The Namibian Dollar and South African Rand are the only legal tender

in Namibia and can be used freely to purchase goods and services. The Namibian Dollar, however, is not legal tender in South Africa.

Travelers’ checks and foreign currency can be exchanged at any of the commercial banks, which are well represented throughout the country. Visitors may bring any amount of foreign currency into the

country. Further information and assistance can be obtained from any commercial bank in Namibia.

Weather

The climate is typically semi-desert with hot days and cool nights. Midsummer temperatures may rise to over 40 degrees Celsius. Winter days are warm, but dawn temperatures may drop to freezing.

Along the coast it is cool with low rainfall and fog prevails from late afternoon until mid-morning.

The rainy season lasts from October to April. The rest of the year is dry and cloudless. Namibia averages 300 days of sunshine a year.

Health Requirements

Malaria is prevalent only in the north of the country. Malaria prophylaxis is not required in Windhoek, but is suggested for travel to the north. Information on vaccinations and other health precautions, such

as insect bite protection, may be obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) hotline for international travelers at wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/

Visa Requirements

A passport and visa are normally required. Bearers of U.S. passports who plan to visit Namibia for tourism for less than 90 days can obtain visas at the port of entry and do not need visas prior to entering

the country. Travelers coming for work or study, whether paid or voluntary, must obtain a work or study permit prior to entering Namibia. Passports must have at least six months of validity remaining

beyond the traveler’s planned date of arrival in Namibia.

All travelers traveling to or from Namibia via South Africa are strongly encouraged to have five or more unstamped visa pages in their passport. Travelers merely transiting South Africa (those not stopping

over or exiting the international terminal in South Africa) should not require visa stamps and may require fewer blank pages for travel. South Africa and Namibia both require at least two unstamped visa

pages – one for the entry stamp and one for exit. Visitors who do not have enough blank visa pages in their passport risk being denied entry and returned to the U.S. at their own expense.

Credit Cards

Most hotels/lodges, restaurants, travel agencies and the bigger shops will take major credit cards – Visa, MasterCard, and American Express.

Electrical Appliances

220 volts AC, 50hz. Outlets are of the round three-pin type

Water

All water from taps is purified and visitors need have no hesitation in drinking it. Bottled water is readily available.


Destination: Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe is a land-locked country blessed with fertile soils, mineral wealth and wonderful scenery. Destinations like Victoria Falls, Hwange National Park and Mana Pools are world-renowned and the

country is blessed with diverse habitats, from the granite hills of the Matopos to the majestic mountains, lush forests and beautiful rivers of the Eastern Highlands. As such, there is much to attract the

traveler, from wildlife viewing and adrenalin adventures to delving into the history of the Zimbabwean people going back thousands of years.

It is in the more unspoilt and peaceful northern parks that we concentrate our safari operations. The Zambezi has an exceptional variety of spectacular scenery as well as one of the world’s natural wonders:

the Victoria Falls. The National Parks along the Zambezi are legendary; our concession lies in Mana Pools, located on the floodplains of Africa’s Great Rift Valley and offering superb wildlife viewing.

Along the Botswana border the easternmost tongues of the Kalahari sands creep into the country and mix with the teak forests of the interior, so that desert-adapted animals share the same habitat with

woodland species. Hwange National Park is home to some of southern Africa’s last great elephant, buffalo and sable herds; Wilderness’ Makalolo concession within Hwange is a truly wild area where

animals have no restrictions and can migrate back and forth. This area also offers Zimbabwe’s best summer game viewing.

Overview

People

Primarily of the Bantu group of south and central Africa, the black Zimbabweans are divided into two major language groups, which are subdivided into several ethnic groups. The Mashona (Shona

speakers), who constitute about 75% of the population, have lived in the area the longest and are the majority language group. The Matabele (Sindebele speakers), representing about 20% of the population

and centered in the southwest around Bulawayo, arrived within the last 150 years. An offshoot of the South African Zulu group, they maintained control over the Mashona until the white occupation of

Rhodesia in 1890.

More than half of white Zimbabweans, primarily of English origin, arrived in Zimbabwe after World War II. Afrikaners from South Africa and other European minorities, including Portuguese from

Mozambique, also are present. Until the mid-1970s, there were about 1,000 white immigrants per year, but from 1976 to 1985 a steady emigration resulted in a loss of more than 150,000, leaving about

100,000 in 1992. Renewed white emigration in the late 1990s and early 2000s reduced the white population to less than 50,000. English, the official language, is spoken by the white population and understood,

if not always used, by more than half of the black population.

Language

English is the official language. Other widely spoken languages are Shona and Sindebele, which also have various dialects and other minority languages.

History

There have been many civilizations in Zimbabwe as is shown by the ancient stone structures at Khami, Great Zimbabwe and Dhlo-Dhlo. The Mwene Mutapa (or Monomatapas) were the first major

civilization to become established. By the mid 1440’s, King Mutota’s empire included almost all of the Rhodesian plateau and extensive parts of what is now Mozambique. The regular inhabitants of the

empire’s trading towns were the Arab and Swahili merchants with whom trade was conducted. In the early 16th century the Portuguese arrived and destroyed this trade and began a series of wars which left

the empire so weakened that it entered the 17th century in serious decline. Several Shona states came together to form the Rozwi empire which covered more than half of present day Zimbabwe. By 1690

the Portuguese had been forced off the plateau and much of the land formerly under Mwene Mutapa was controlled by the Rozwi.

As a result of the mid-19th century turmoil in Transvaal and Natal, the Rozwi Empire came to an end. A treaty was signed with the British South Africa Company in 1888 allowing them to mine gold in the

kingdom, now under Ndebele rule. The increasing influx of settlers as a result of this treaty led to war with the Ndebele in 1893. The Ndebele were defeated and European immigration began in earnest.

There was a clear portrayal of the conflict between black and white after the referendum of 1922 in which the Whites chose to become a self-governing colony rather than become part of the Union of South

Africa. This effectively excluded most blacks from the vote, despite the colony’s theoretically non-racial constitution. In 1930 a land act was passed which excluded Africans from ownership of the best

farming land further enhancing white supremacy. The labor law, carried in 1934, prohibited the Africans from entering skilled trades and professions. As a consequence of these actions, Africans were

forced to work for subsistence wages on white farms, mines and factories.

By 1953, the mining and industrial concerns were in favor of a more racially mixed middle class as a balance to the radical elements in the labor force. The formation of a number of political parties along

with sporadic acts of sabotage came as a result of African impatience with the prospects of constitutional change. At the forefront of this move was the Zimbabwe African People’s Union (ZAPU), mostly

Ndebele, led by Joshua Nkomo. It was shortly joined by the Zimbabwe African National Union (ZANU), mostly Shona, a break-away group under Ndabaningi Sithole. After the collapse of the federation in

1963, both ZAPU and ZANU were banned and the majority of their leaders imprisoned. At the same time, as a response to Britain’s refusal to grant independence to Southern Rhodesia, Ian Smith the prime

minister, called for a unilateral declaration of independence (UDI). In the May 1965 elections, Smith’s party picked up every one of the 50 government seats, in December, UDI was declared.

Britain declared Smith’s action illegal and imposed economic sanctions. In 1968 the UN voted to make the sanctions mandatory but they were largely ineffective. The measures taken by the British

government to force Smith to revoke UDI and accept Black majority rule were useless, as the economic sanctions imposed actually saw Rhodesia’s economy grow. Both ZAPU and ZANU began

campaigns of guerrilla warfare around 1966, and guerrilla raids led to an escalation in white emigration from Rhodesia.

In 1980 Mugabe’s ZANU party won the election although the whites retained most of the guarantees that Smith wanted. There followed a continuing bitter rivalry between ZAPU and ZANU. Guerilla activity

started again. Nkomo (ZAPU) left for England and did not return until Mugabe guaranteed his safety. Soon talks led to the uniting of the two rival parties. In 1988 the law guaranteeing whites 20 seats in

parliament was rescinded. In 1990/1991 it was declared that half of the land belonging to white farmers would be allocated to blacks.


Travel Guide

Currency

The currency in Zimbabwe is the Zimbabwean Dollar (Z$). For shopping or paying for activities, “cash is still definitely king” (US Dollars especially) and so you are encouraged to bring as much US$ cash

as possible for your stay in order to get the best prices (small denominations only as $100 bills are not accepted). Please note that anything bought from registered dealers in local Zimbabwean cash is

subject to 15% VAT (which is not refundable on departure).

Weather

Generally, the days are bright and sunny and the nights clear and cool. November to April are the summer months (which is also the rainy season) while winter is from May to August (which usually bring

dry weather). September and October are very hot and very dry.

Health Requirements

Travelers to Zimbabwe who are coming from infected countries require a yellow fever vaccination certificate. Malaria precautions are recommended

Visa Requirements

A passport, visa, return ticket, and adequate funds are required to enter Zimbabwe. U.S. citizens traveling to Zimbabwe for tourism, business, or transit can obtain a visa at the airports and border ports-ofentry,

or in advance. Americans entering Zimbabwe for tourism can expect to pay $30 for a single-entry, 30-day duration of stay visa upon entering the country.

Credit Cards

Most hotels/lodges, restaurants, travel agencies and the bigger shops will take credit cards

Money

.

Electrical Appliances

Electrical current in Zimbabwe is 220 volts, 50Hz. Three round pin and three rectangular blade plugs are common

Water

Bottled water is recommended.


Destination: Victoria Falls

Zimbabwe’s most renowned tourist attraction and one of the most astonishing natural world wonders, Victoria Falls is an unsurpassed African destination for adventure, leisure and business. The hub of a

great regional wildlife region, Victoria Falls is located centrally at the point where Zimbabwe, Zambia, Botswana and Namibia meet and makes regional get-togethers a breeze.

A 1 mile stretch of thunderous water tumbling over a sheer basalt cliff-face, Victoria Falls is one of the seven wonders of the natural world, and rates high on the list of ‘must experience’ destinations among

travelers the world over. A friendly, bustling resort town just a few minutes from the Falls and the legendary Zambezi river, Victoria Falls is also an acclaimed World Heritage Site. Besides it natural

beauty and the sheer marvel of its cascading thunderous sheets of water, it’s the unchallenged adventure capital of Africa with more than 50 activities available – and the list is growing.

There is something for everyone. Adrenalin junkies favor the famous 111m bungy-jump, wild white-water rafting and high wire swings across the vast gorge, while those preferring quieter pursuits can

enjoy river cruises, scenic flights over the Falls, elephant-back trails, golf and a plethora of other air, land and water activities.

Victoria Falls is also famed for its range of safari activities – walks with lions, elephant interactions, day and nocturnal game drives, bush walks, canoeing and even aerial safaris!

Overview

People

Primarily of the Bantu group of south and central Africa, the black Zimbabweans are divided into two major language groups, which are subdivided into several ethnic groups. The Mashona (Shona

speakers), who constitute about 75% of the population, have lived in the area the longest and are the majority language group. The Matabele (Sindebele speakers), representing about 20% of the population

and centered in the southwest around Bulawayo, arrived within the last 150 years. An offshoot of the South African Zulu group, they maintained control over the Mashona until the white occupation of

Rhodesia in 1890.

More than half of white Zimbabweans, primarily of English origin, arrived in Zimbabwe after World War II. Afrikaners from South Africa and other European minorities, including Portuguese from

Mozambique, also are present. Until the mid-1970s, there were about 1,000 white immigrants per year, but from 1976 to 1985 a steady emigration resulted in a loss of more than 150,000, leaving about

100,000 in 1992. Renewed white emigration in the late 1990s and early 2000s reduced the white population to less than 50,000. English, the official language, is spoken by the white population and understood,

if not always used, by more than half of the black population.

Language

English is the official language. Other widely spoken languages are Shona and Sindebele, which also have various dialects and other minority languages.

History

There have been many civilizations in Zimbabwe as is shown by the ancient stone structures at Khami, Great Zimbabwe and Dhlo-Dhlo. The Mwene Mutapa (or Monomatapas) were the first major

civilization to become established. By the mid 1440’s, King Mutota’s empire included almost all of the Rhodesian plateau and extensive parts of what is now Mozambique. The regular inhabitants of the

empire’s trading towns were the Arab and Swahili merchants with whom trade was conducted. In the early 16th century the Portuguese arrived and destroyed this trade and began a series of wars which left

the empire so weakened that it entered the 17th century in serious decline. Several Shona states came together to form the Rozwi empire which covered more than half of present day Zimbabwe. By 1690

the Portuguese had been forced off the plateau and much of the land formerly under Mwene Mutapa was controlled by the Rozwi.

As a result of the mid-19th century turmoil in Transvaal and Natal, the Rozwi Empire came to an end. A treaty was signed with the British South Africa Company in 1888 allowing them to mine gold in the

kingdom, now under Ndebele rule. The increasing influx of settlers as a result of this treaty led to war with the Ndebele in 1893. The Ndebele were defeated and European immigration began in earnest.

There was a clear portrayal of the conflict between black and white after the referendum of 1922 in which the Whites chose to become a self-governing colony rather than become part of the Union of South

Africa. This effectively excluded most blacks from the vote, despite the colony’s theoretically non-racial constitution. In 1930 a land act was passed which excluded Africans from ownership of the best

farming land further enhancing white supremacy. The labor law, carried in 1934, prohibited the Africans from entering skilled trades and professions. As a consequence of these actions, Africans were

forced to work for subsistence wages on white farms, mines and factories.

By 1953, the mining and industrial concerns were in favor of a more racially mixed middle class as a balance to the radical elements in the labor force. The formation of a number of political parties along

with sporadic acts of sabotage came as a result of African impatience with the prospects of constitutional change. At the forefront of this move was the Zimbabwe African People’s Union (ZAPU), mostly

Ndebele, led by Joshua Nkomo. It was shortly joined by the Zimbabwe African National Union (ZANU), mostly Shona, a break-away group under Ndabaningi Sithole. After the collapse of the federation in

1963, both ZAPU and ZANU were banned and the majority of their leaders imprisoned. At the same time, as a response to Britain’s refusal to grant independence to Southern Rhodesia, Ian Smith the prime

minister, called for a unilateral declaration of independence (UDI). In the May 1965 elections, Smith’s party picked up every one of the 50 government seats, in December, UDI was declared.

Britain declared Smith’s action illegal and imposed economic sanctions. In 1968 the UN voted to make the sanctions mandatory but they were largely ineffective. The measures taken by the British

government to force Smith to revoke UDI and accept Black majority rule were useless, as the economic sanctions imposed actually saw Rhodesia’s economy grow. Both ZAPU and ZANU began

campaigns of guerrilla warfare around 1966, and guerrilla raids led to an escalation in white emigration from Rhodesia.

In 1980 Mugabe’s ZANU party won the election although the whites retained most of the guarantees that Smith wanted. There followed a continuing bitter rivalry between ZAPU and ZANU. Guerilla activity

started again. Nkomo (ZAPU) left for England and did not return until Mugabe guaranteed his safety. Soon talks led to the uniting of the two rival parties. In 1988 the law guaranteeing whites 20 seats in

parliament was rescinded. In 1990/1991 it was declared that half of the land belonging to white farmers would be allocated to blacks.


Travel Guide

Currency

The currency in Zimbabwe is the Zimbabwean Dollar (Z$). For shopping or paying for activities, “cash is still definitely king” (US Dollars especially) and so you are encouraged to bring as much US$ cash

as possible for your stay in order to get the best prices (small denominations only as $100 bills are not accepted). Please note that anything bought from registered dealers in local Zimbabwean cash is

subject to 15% VAT (which is not refundable on departure).

Weather

Generally, the days are bright and sunny and the nights clear and cool. November to April are the summer months (which is also the rainy season) while winter is from May to August (which usually bring

dry weather). September and October are very hot and very dry.

Health Requirements

Travelers to Zimbabwe who are coming from infected countries require a yellow fever vaccination certificate. Malaria precautions are recommended

Visa Requirements

A passport, visa, return ticket, and adequate funds are required to enter Zimbabwe. U.S. citizens traveling to Zimbabwe for tourism, business, or transit can obtain a visa at the airports and border ports-ofentry,

or in advance. Americans entering Zimbabwe for tourism can expect to pay $30 for a single-entry, 30-day duration of stay visa upon entering the country.

Credit Cards

Most hotels/lodges, restaurants, travel agencies and the bigger shops will take credit cards

Money

.

Electrical Appliances

Electrical current in Zimbabwe is 220 volts, 50Hz. Three round pin and three rectangular blade plugs are common

Water

Bottled water is recommended.


Interest: Romance

“Exceptional. Exquisite. Timeless.” Africa will take you back to the glamorous bygone

days of travel, with colonial heritage accommodations, claw foot tubs and candle lit

dinners in the wide-open spaces. Pampering is a given, with most hotels, resorts and

safari camps offering spa’s, romantic and private locations for dinner, sundowners,

plenty of breathtaking vista’s and fine food and wine.

Romance exudes from the private game reserves with luxurious surroundings, starry

nights, and the hypnotic allure of the animals themselves.

The Indian Ocean offers balmy days, azure waters and the hint of the exotic. In the

Seychelles, they claim to own the original Garden of Eden, and the islands have long

been called ‘the Islands of Love’. The Maldives offers idyllic conditions, and lazy days to

melt your cares away.

Dubai is an intoxicating region, glamorous, ritzy and above all where you are in a scene

to be seen. Treat your sweetie to dinner at the Burj Al Arab, or a private dune dinner

complete with belly dancers, champagne at sunset and an Arabian feast under the light

of a million stars.

“I wouldn’t have dreamed we could have a honeymoon as romantic as we did in South Africa” Jason Mesnick – Star of the ABC series The Bachelor

& now Africa Answers Sales Manager.


Interest: Honeymoon

“I wouldn’t have dreamed we could have a honeymoon as romantic as we did in South

Africa” Jason Mesnick – Star of the ABC series The Bachelor & Africa Answers Sales

Manager

You’ve dreamed about your honeymoon your whole life, and now you have the biggest

decision of all, where to go. Let Africa Answers choreograph the ultimate romantic

honeymoon for you, tailored to suit your style, taste and budget.

Whether it is a candlelit room, romantic music and a bottle of bubbles in your exquisite

private game reserve lodge, or an intimate island getaway with the soothing lullaby of the

waves whispering sweet nothings, we know how to treat you right. We’ll roll out the red

carpet for your Africa honeymoon and provide you with a lavish list of honeymoon

amenities to welcome you to your new life! VIP treatments on offer includes room

upgrades, wine on arrival, his and hers gifts and much more… let us pamper you in style,

whatever that may be to you. We’ve organized honeymoons at chic city retreats, at

remote and exotic tented safari destinations, and on the sugary white sands of the

Seychelle’s own Garden of Eden.

We love romance, and we love newlyweds, so check out these cultured, exquisite and classic honeymoon options that can be completely

customized – just for you and your loved one. You might even like to ask us about a Destination Wedding?


Interest: Ultimate Luxury

There’s not even star ratings for the red carpet that we will roll out for you, the

Destination Specialists at Africa Answers know and understand the discerning traveler

and that ultimate luxury isn’t just a hotel room, it’s the full package. From first class flights

with lie-flat beds and fluffy comforters, meet and greet assistance and a private car

awaiting to whisk you to your elegant accommodations to rest and rejuvenate before

your Africa safari adventure.

We know luxury isn’t just a hotel room with fine furnishings and a chandelier, it’s the

unparalleled service of the staff, the attentive yet unobtrusive way your every need is

catered to, it’s having something before you even know you need it, it’s Africa Answers

offering our highly personalized and expert knowledge of the regions you are visiting and

taking care of every detail.

And while we are on the subject of how much we will pamper you, it is worth mentioning

that Africa offers sumptuousness beyond belief.. Stay in Elton John’s room at La

Residence in the winelands region just outside of Cape Town. Ensconce yourself at the

Cape Grace Hotel, providing a tantalizing experience that melds modern luxury with

traditional Cape culture. Perhaps try the 7-star luxury of Singita Private Game Reserve in

the Greater Kruger National Park Sabi Sands region, with its backdrop of African wilderness, and the Relais & Chateaux stamp of approval. If it’s

intoxicating you are after, you can’t go past Dubai’s enchanting location, offering an unprecedented level of luxury and service.

The Indian Ocean offers barefoot luxury and the luxury of time standing still and bathed in glorious sunlight.

Africa Answers are the travel experts when it comes to your ultimate luxury vacation. From private jets to exclusive use island retreats, private game

reserve lodges, to exquisite luxury tented camps – let us show you Africa in style…


Interest: Independent Vacations

See nature as it was intended, closer than anywhere else on earth.

Travel on your own schedule with a mix’n’match style approach. Be inspired by the

myriad of hotels, resorts, lodges and tours available, and let the travel experts know your

style, taste and budget, and we will create a vacation that is completely tailor-made to

you. This is our specialty, we’ve arranged everything from stopovers in Dubai to complex,

creative vacations that cater specifically to your requirements.

You can experience it all – from the Big Five (lion, leopard, elephant, buffalo and rhino)

to serious bird watching, to romance and relaxation, to sunrise and sundowners…

Kruger National Park is one of the world’s best-known wildlife parks, a quintessentially

South African wilderness experience that simply cannot be missed. And if you are after a

quality food and wine experience, these are inseparable from the South African gourmet

landscape.

The people of Africa will steal your heart, their warmth, their genuineness and their big

smiles, will bring your spirit to life again.

There’s so much to do and experience, and each of our destinations offers cheap and

cheerful to the ultimate luxurious escape.


Interest: Safari Getaway

Safaris are not only about the famed Big Five, but about the thousands of other

creatures big and small – from the worlds tallest animal - the giraffe – surely the most

elegant of all the bush animals to some of the smallest and most fascinating – like the

dung beetle. You’ll encounter elephants galore – watch out for that tiny baby crossing

the road – and herds of buffalo. There are so many different kinds of antelope your head

will spin, fat crocodiles sunning themselves on sandbanks, hyenas on the prowl, and, if

you’re very lucky, a pack of wild dogs.

We celebrate the difference and uniqueness of each area and its wildlife, with a huge

selection of public and private concessions, each with its own identity, feel and character.

This variety of accommodation, activities and lodges means that there’s something for

everyone wanting to experience Africa. Public safari concession camps in National Parks

offer comfortable accommodation, a restaurant, swimming pool, and open vehicle game

drives safaris.

Or choose from standard to the most luxurious private concessions (area’s that are

privately owned) where you are guaranteed a highly personalized game viewing

experience, as well as the services of knowledgeable guides that have a passion for the

bush. All life’s little luxuries are available to you with exquisite accommodations, all inclusive of meals (and most including alcohol too), and intimate

game viewing. Private access means you can go off-road and really track the animals without 40 other pairs of eyes being there with you or a time

limit on which you have to view the animals. These private reserves define service and luxury, and we highly recommend a stay in a private game

reserve be part of your Africa vacation.

In the heart of southern Africa, Botswana offers possibly the finest, authentic wildlife experience in the world. It is comprised largely of the Kalahari

Desert, within which lies the Okavango Delta, a wonderful blue-green wetland considered by many to be Africa’s most incredible wildlife and

wilderness sanctuary. This dynamic waterworld contrasts with an ecosystem driven by different stimuli in the Linyanti and Selinda region in the north

of the country.

Namibia has rapidly become a well-known safari destination with a difference, famed for its remote and intimate lodges, interaction with the

indigenous people as well as the wildlife, and offering unique opportunities to become involved with the cultural heritage of all its peoples.

The East African countries of Kenya and Tanzania are famous for one of nature’s most spectacular phenomena - the annual migration of more than

a million wildebeest (gnu). Countless wildlife documentaries have captured the spectacle of thundering hooves as they move from the Serengeti in

the south to the Masai Mara, in search of fresh grasslands. The migratory pink flamingos in Kenya, which lend Lake Nakuru its blush, number close

to a million and are an unforgettable sight in the shallows and this is just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to Kenya safaris.


Lodging: Abu Camp

Abu Camp offers the unique opportunity to bond with elephants firsthand. Situated in a vast private reserve, guests interact with the resident

elephant herd, whether riding or walking with them through the bush. The ultimate elephant education safari!

Overview

Named after a very special bull elephant, Abu Camp was the original base camp when Africa’s

first elephant back safaris were pioneered in the Delta 17 years ago. Today it is located in a

grove of magnificent hardwood trees on the edge of a large lagoon at the edge of the

Okavango Delta with a resident school of hippo.

Well-lit pathways link the Abu Camp tents with the main lounge and dining area. High vaulted

tenting opens out onto a tiered teak deck surrounding a giant termite mound, one of the

characteristic sights of the Okavango Delta. The lounge is replete with comfortable antique

furnishings and boasts an absorbing library of field guides and illustrated volumes on the wildlife

surrounding the camp, as well as throughout the Okavango Delta. A well-stocked bar provides

drinks and cocktails for post-safari sundowners around a camp fire while most of the meals are

taken al fresco on the deck. Nearby a secluded plunge pool enables guests to cool off and

relax.

With its shady trees and views overlooking the tranquil lagoon, Abu Camp is a haven of peace

and seclusion.

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Rating :

Rates : $1750 - $1750

Style : Lodge

Location/Contact : On the western side of

the Okavango Delta

Abu Camp is a Featured Hotel

Abu Camp is unique in the Okavango Delta in that it allows guests to interact with the resident

elephant herd, meeting each individual and initiating a journey into the complex behavior of the Special: Abu Camp

largest land mammal on Earth. Guests at Abu Camp are invited to become part of the elephant

herd during their stay: watching the evening feeding, sharing the simple joy of a frolicking youngster, and accompanying them on foot as they move

through the bush. These elephant encounters provide unforgettable magical moments. And viewing wildlife from atop an elephant allows a closer

approach to other animals than can be achieved when simply walking as an obvious human figure.

Abu Camp also offers morning and afternoon game drives, night drives and nature walks to view the abundance of fauna and flora in the area.

During the seasonal floods of the Okavango Delta, guests are invited to take to the waters in the mokoros, the traditional poled craft used in the

Okavango Delta.

Minimum 3 night stay.

Hotel Features

All Inclusive - meals and most alcoholic beverages Bar Eco-friendly Lodge

Fitness Facilities Full Breakfast Daily Gay Friendly

Guest Activities Guest library/lounge Guided Safaris Included

Housekeeping Service Laundry Service Major Credit Card Accepted

Multi-lingual reception staff Restaurant Room Service

Safe Deposit Box (front desk)

Wedding Services


Rooms and Suites

Luxury Safari Tent

An imaginative use of canvas and pole has created a unique style of tent which has been called Afro-Bedouin: high,

wide and airy, blending in flawlessly with the natural surroundings. Each of the five en-suite accommodation units has

its own distinctive furnishings and fittings, many of them antique, imparting an air of opulence amid the bush setting.

Each tent has its own private elevated teak deck sculpted around one of the lofty sycomore figs or jackalberry trees

with vistas the likes of which only the Okavango Delta can boast.

Location Map

In-Room Amenities

Mosquito nets

Ensuite Bathroom with Separate Shower

Coffee & Tea Making Facilities

Ensuite Bathroom

Safety Deposit Box (In Room)

Patio/Balcony


Lodging: Olakira

As the great Migration makes its way across the expansive Serengeti plains, so the luxury seasonal Olakira Camp follows. In the early part of the

year, Olakira is perfectly situated to witness the calving of wildebeest.

Overview

Olakira Camp is a classic, mobile safari camp that moves between the southern and central

Serengeti, attempting to stay close to the Migration from December to June, through preplanned

moves (the northern Serengeti, where the Migration typically wanders around from mid

July to November, is covered by its sister camp Sayari Camp). ‘Olakira’ means ‘star’ in the Maasai

language.

Typically, the camp will be in the Ndutu area from mid-December to March in order to witness the

magical calving season of the wildebeest in the southern Serengeti. From June onward, the

camp moves north to follow the Migration, staying in the central Serengeti for the rest of the

season. These move patterns are subject to change, as the philosophy behind the camp is to

be as close to the action as possible.

A stay in Olakira Camp is not about 5 star luxury though; it’s about something more than that.

Being in the middle of this wonderful spectacle, with wild animals roaming around camp at night,

is a dream come true to even the most experienced of travelers.

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Rating :

Rates : $900 - $1216

Style : Lodge

Location/Contact : moves between Ndutu

Dec-March and

Bologonja/Mara June-

Nov

Special: Olakira

Olakira is a Featured Hotel

Hotel Features

All Inclusive - meals and most alcoholic beverages Eco-friendly Lodge Laundry Service

Restaurant

Rooms/Facilities for Disabled Guests


Rooms and Suites

Tent

Olakira is an intimate mobile safari camp made up of 8 spacious and ensuite tents (no bath). Each tent features a

king size bed, en suite bathroom and private veranda with a stunning view over the Serengeti. The camp moves

twice a year between carefully chosen campsites, allowing for superb game viewing at all times. Meaning “star” in

Swahili, Olakira Camp aims to deliver an intimate and authentic safari experience.

Location Map

In-Room Amenities

Ensuite Bathroom with Separate Shower


Lodging: Selous Safari Camp

Selous Safari Camp is a classic luxury tented camp located on the banks of Lake Nzerakera in the most prolific and thrilling game viewing area of the

Selous.

Overview

North camp caters for 6 tents and the South camp caters for 7 tents, each with its own pool,

dining and main area providing a very personal and intimate safari experience. The North camp

can be partly or completely booked (4-6 tents) to ensure the ultimate “private” exclusivity.

Set amongst trees on the banks of Lake Nzerakera, one of the oxbow lakes that bejewel Selous

Game Reserve, southern Tanzania. The dining area and bar raised on viewing platform, with

large comfortable sofas, and wildlife reference library. Table d’hote dining makes the most of

African influences and local fresh fruit, vegetables & spices.

The river & lake systems around the camp attract a huge diversity of animals including lion,

leopard, elephant, buffalo, hippo and crocodile. The area is also home to one of the few

remaining wild dog populations in the world.

Activities include Game drives in open-sided 4-wheel drive vehicles; River safaris in boats with

outboard motors; Game walks; Fishing (subject to conditions and fee to be paid in camp).

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Rating :

Rates : $1040 - $1480

Style : Lodge

Location/Contact : Selous Game Reserve

Selous Safari Camp is a Featured Hotel

Special: Selous Safari Camp

Hotel Features

All Inclusive - meals and most alcoholic beverages All Inclusive - meals only Bar

Eco-friendly Lodge Full Breakfast Daily Gay Friendly

Gift Shop/Newsstand Guest Activities Guest library/lounge

Guided Safaris Included Housekeeping Service Internet Access

Laundry Service Major Credit Card Accepted Multi-lingual reception staff

Restaurant Swimming Pool Valet & Pressing service


Rooms and Suites

Tented Accommodation

Much as guests are encouraged to become at one with the bush surroundings, full consideration has been given to

comfort within the camp itself. The spacious tents are luxuriously appointed, with en suite bathrooms and open air

hot water showers. Ceiling fans are present in all the rooms situated above the king sizes beds where guests can

rest away the exertions of the morning activity and cool down during the heat of the day before heading out again

later.

Location Map

In-Room Amenities

Overhead Fans

Ensuite Bathroom

Outdoor Showers

Safety Deposit Box (In Room)

Patio/Balcony


Lodging: Singita Faru Faru Lodge

Situated on a slope, basking in the abundance of animal species and birdlife around it, Singita Faru Faru Lodge lends a contemporary signature

style to safari.

Overview

Inspired by a botanical theme, this riverside lodge offers barefoot elegance in a laid-back rustic

setting.

The organic lines of two rim-flow swimming pools echo those of a watering hole that lies just

below. The elevated viewing decks over the watering hole allow guests to view game without

even leaving their lodge, and a Swahili-inspired ‘beach’ offers the opportunity for some serious

rest and relaxation. The contrast of stone and canvas against cutting-edge design and

comfortable furnishings is integrated in eight open-style suites and one Villa Suite.

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Rating :

Rates : $1990 - $2090

Style : Lodge

Location/Contact : Grumeti Reserve

Singita Faru Faru Lodge is a Featured Hotel

Special: Singita Faru Faru Lodge

Hotel Features

All Inclusive - meals and most alcoholic beverages All Inclusive - meals only Babysitting

Bar Business Center Designated smoking areas

DVD selection available on request Eco-friendly Lodge Family Rooms

Fitness Facilities Full concierge service Gay Friendly

Gift Shop/Newsstand Guest Activities Guest library/lounge

Guided Safaris Included Housekeeping Service Internet Access

Laundry Service Major Credit Card Accepted Multi-lingual reception staff

Non-smoking rooms Restaurant Room Service

Safe Deposit Box (front desk) Spa Suitable for Children

Swimming Pool Valet & Pressing service Wedding Services

Wireless Internet (WiFi)


Rooms and Suites

Villa Suite

Eight air-conditioned en suite suites, with a bath and outdoor shower, and the Villa Suite. There is a dedicated family

suite suitable for a family of four and the Villa Suite is ideal for couples traveling together as it can accommodate 4

adults. Each suite has a reading area, a huge picture window, personal bar and fridge, and a deck with Swarovski

spotting scope.

Location Map

In-Room Amenities

Hair Dryer

Air Conditioning

Minibar

Overhead Fans

Mosquito nets

Ensuite Bathroom with Separate Shower

Coffee & Tea Making Facilities

Ensuite Bathroom

Outdoor Showers

Safety Deposit Box (In Room)

Telephone

Television

Patio/Balcony


Lodging: Tarangire Treetops

Perched high up in the age old Baobab and Marula trees. Astride the path of the Elephant Migration

Overview

Astride the path of the elephant migration, Tarangire Treetops sits alone in a private

conservation area bordering Tarangire National Park which covers an area of 260 sq kms and

the Masai Steppe amid rolling baobab studded hills with views to Lake Manyara and the Rift

Valley wall. Treetops has a magical Never-Never Land feel appealing to anyone with a sense of

fun and adventure.

The greeting that awaits you is a gigantic baobab tree around 700 years old that grows right in

the centre of the reception area. The reception is designed around the tree, making it the center

attraction.

Huge comfortable seats are scattered in this area, and right in the centre, a pit is constructed, in

a terraced pattern with cushions to make sitting comfortable. A fire pit is in the middle of this and

this very cosy especially during chilly evenings.

Distinctively furnished blending natural materials and modern décor, the tree houses provide

guests with a unique safari experience. Wildlife in the area includes buffalo, lion, cheetah,

leopard and huge herds of elephant, frequenting the camps water hole. The camp also offers

the unique facility of night game drives and game walks, including a Masai experience in an

authentic boma. A swimming pool is available for those wanting to refresh themselves after a

long day’s game drive. The dining area overlooks the swimming pool and a water hole which is

often frequented by game. It is open, spacious and allows an uninterrupted view of the land.

The bar is in the same area as the dining room and carry’s on the theme of the dining area.

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Rating :

Rates : $1460 - $1690

Style : Lodge

Location/Contact : Tarangire National Park

Tarangire Treetops is a Featured Hotel

Tarangire Treetops is a Recommended Hotel

Special: Tarangire Treetops

Tarangire National park is literally teeming with wildlife throughout the year. It is home to some of the largest herds of elephant in Africa, and other

wild life in this area includes buffalo, lion, cheetah, and leopard. It is also an ornithologist’s paradise, rich in birds pf prey.

Hotel Features

All Inclusive - meals and most alcoholic beverages All Inclusive - meals only Babysitting

Bar Designated smoking areas Eco-friendly Lodge

Foreign Exchange Full Breakfast Daily Gay Friendly

Gift Shop/Newsstand Guest Activities Guest library/lounge

Guided Safaris Included Housekeeping Service Internet Access

Laundry Service Major Credit Card Accepted Non-smoking rooms

Parking Restaurant Room Service

Safe Deposit Box (front desk) Shoe Shine service Suitable for Children

Swimming Pool Wedding Services Wireless Internet (WiFi)


Rooms and Suites

Tree House

Tarangire Treetops offers 20 luxury tents, built atop tree-attached platforms, overlooking the Tarangire Sand River.

Each en-suite unit has a private veranda and lounge area, with sweeping views over the private Conservation area.

Location Map

In-Room Amenities

Hair Dryer

Minibar

Overhead Fans

Mosquito nets

Ensuite Bathroom

Safety Deposit Box (In Room)

Patio/Balcony

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