2015+Planning+and+Development+Services+Annual+Report

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2015+Planning+and+Development+Services+Annual+Report

2015 ANNUAL REPORT

Planning &

Development

Services

VIBRANT

ECONOMY

complete

community

FISCAL

DISCIPLINE

organizational

alignment

HUB of the Fraser Valley


Table of Contents

Planning & Development Services

Planning & Development Services.........................................................3

Introduction..............................................................................................4

Application Process................................................................................4

2015 State of the City..............................................................................5

Inquiry, Submission & Review................................................................6

Development Inquiry Meetings..............................................................6

Land Development Applications Received............................................6

Approval & Issuance...............................................................................7

Residential Lots & Units........................................................................7

Commercial & Industrial Floor Space....................................................7

Construction............................................................................................8

Number of Building Permits..................................................................8

Value of Building Permits......................................................................9

New Commercial Floor Space..............................................................10

New Industrial & Institutional Floor Space.............................................10

Residential Units...................................................................................11

Building Inspections..............................................................................11

Departmental Initiatives..........................................................................12

Community Planning manages the City’s Official Community Plan (OCP),

bringing together land use, urban design and social planning policies, along

with overall infrastructure needs into long range land use plans. The division is

responsible for the development and implementation of strategies, policies and

plans that guide the City’s future growth and development.

Development Planning is responsible for reviewing and processing

development applications such as rezoning, subdivision and development

permits. These applications are reviewed for compliance with the OCP, Zoning

Bylaw and other municipal bylaws and policies.

Development Engineering is responsible for reviewing and processing

engineering drawings for development applications, and for environmental

services. The drawings are reviewed for compliance with the Development

Bylaw and other municipal bylaws and policies.

Building Permits and Licences is responsible for ensuring all building

construction in the City meets Building Code requirements for health, life safety

and fire protection. Functions include plan checking, building permit issuance,

on-site inspections and business licencing.

For more information: www.abbotsford.ca/planning

The Planning &

Development

Services Department

consists of four main

divisions: Community

Planning, Development

Planning, Development

Engineering and

Building Permits &

Licences.

Source of all data: City of Abbotsford, Planning and Development Services unless otherwise stated.

2 Planning & Development Services

ANNUAL REPORT 2015 3


Introduction

The 2015 Planning and Development Services (PDS) Annual Report uses the

quarterly reports as a basis, and is a snapshot of how we’ve progressed over the

past year. The report outlines accomplishments regarding development activity

and trends, and departmental initiatives.

The past year saw continued growth and departmental activity. Staff coordinated

226 DIMs, received 188 land development applications, created 184 lots,

approved over 29,000 m 2 of industrial floor space, issued 1,575 building permits,

and completed 11,355 building inspections.

Departmental initiatives included in this report highlight some of the projects

undertaken by PDS in 2015. Major initiatives include Abbotsforward - Official

Community Plan Update, the UDistrict Neighbourhood Plan, Zoning Bylaw

Update (Phase 2 and Housekeeping), and an Amanda Update.

We will continue to build on these achievements and look forward to another

successful year in 2016!

For more information: www.abbotsford.ca/stats

Application Process

?

1. INQUIRY

There is a lot of information to consider before making an application,

including understanding the relevant City plans, procedures, and bylaws.

Development Inquiry Meetings (DIMs) are an opportunity to meet with

City staff, discuss ideas, and determine how the City’s plans and policies

affect a potential application.

2. SUBMISSION & REVIEW

Once an application is submitted, staff review and refer the proposal to

other agencies, if required. Development applications are first reviewed

by the Development Application Review Team (DART) for general

compliance and to identify requirements from each department. Once

the application is reviewed and revisions are completed, the application

can proceed to the next step.

3. APPROVAL & ISSUANCE

Depending on the type of application, it will either be reviewed by

Council or City staff. If an application is supported, and is approved

in principle, requirements for final approval must be met. A building

permit application will be accepted once the development is approved

in principle. The building permit will be issued once the requirements for

final development approval and building permit issuance are met.

2015 State of the City

145,000

140,000

135,000

130,000

125,000

120,000

31,150 single detached units

(includes 4,740 accessory suites)

Source: City of Abbotsford

6,100 single attached units

Source: City of Abbotsford

13,350 multi-family units

Source: City of Abbotsford

850,000 m 2 (9,130,000 ft 2 )

total commercial floor space

Source: BC Assessment

2015 pOPULATION

141, 500

2005 2010 2015

The 2015 State of the

City shows where we are

today with a snapshot of

population and a total citywide

inventory of residential,

commercial and industrial

units and floor space.

Since the population has

been steadily increasing

over the past 10 years, we

need to know what kind of

housing, and the amount of

commercial and industrial

floor space is available to

service the population and

ensure there’s room for

places of employment.

This 2015 information will

be used as a baseline to

which future annual growth

and development can be

compared.

4. CONSTRUCTION

Once the building permit has been issued, construction can begin.

Construction activity must meet the requirements of City bylaws and

other government agencies. Applicable inspections are undertaken

during the appropriate stages of construction and prior to occupancy of

the building.

695,000 m 2 (7,481,000 ft 2 )

total industrial floor space

Source: Colliers International

4 Planning & Development Services

ANNUAL REPORT 2015 5


?

Inquiry, Submission & Review

Development Inquiry Meetings

Approval & Issuance

Residential Lots & Units

During 2015 staff coordinated 226 Development Inquiry Meetings (DIM) an

increase of 104% from 2014 (111). DIM’s are intended to provide preliminary

comments to land owners and developers considering development in respect to

INQUIRY

meetings

the Official Community Plan, Development Permit Areas/Guidelines, zoning, and

226

anticipated off-site upgrades.

100

Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4

50 50 65

61

DEVELOPMENT

Land Development Applications Received

Applications

received per year

400

400

6,500

300

300

6,000 200

200

100

5,500

100

0

0

5,000

406

406

323

6,509

6,491

6,420

6,462

308

6,372

323

282

308

268

282

268

184

184

143

135

134

143

135

134

91

87

91

64

15 19

25

87

15 19

25

64

2011 Single 2012 detached 2013 (lots) 2014 2015 2011 2012 Townhouse 2013 (units) 2014 2015 2011 2012 Apartment 2013 (units) 2014 2015

2011 Single detached 2012 (lots) 2013 2014 Townhouse (units) 2015

Apartment (units)

2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 5 yr avg 10 yr avg

5 yr avg 10 yr avg

2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 5 yr avg 10 yr avg

80

70

188

154

224

149

In 2015 there was an increase in subdivision applications received from 2014 but a

decrease in the number of lots created. This suggests there are smaller infill subdivisions

being created, which will likely continue in 2016. In 2015 there were 87 townhouse units

approved and 308 apartment units approved, with apartment approvals exceeding both

the 5 year (219 units) and 10 year (271 units) averages.

60

55

151

Commercial & Industrial Floor Space

40

43

30,000

30,000

6,500

6,372

6,509

6,420

6,491

6,462

29,262 m²

314,859 29,262 m² ft²

314,859 ft²

20

0

7

OCP Rezoning Subdivision Development Permit Agricultural Land

Reserve

2011 2012 2013 2014 2015

The total number of land development applications received in 2015 (188) increased 22%

from 2014 (154). Official Community Plan amendment applications received in 2015 (7)

decreased by 46% from 2014 (13). Rezoning applications received (43) increased by

30% from 2014 (33). In 2015, there were 55 subdivision applications received, which is

an increase of 120% from 2014 (25). Development permit applications received (70) have

increased by 27% from 2014 (55). The number of Agricultural Land Reserve applications

(13) decreased by 54% from 2014 (28).

13

20,000

20,000

6,000

10,000

10,000

5,500

0

5,000 0

20,881 m²

224,680 20,881 m² ft²

17,139 m²

224,680 ft²

184,416 17,139 m² ft² 15,067 m²

184,416 ft² 162,120 15,067 m² ft²

162,120 ft²

14,653 m²

157,671 14,653 m² ft²

13,139 m²

157,671 ft²

141,374 13,139 m² ft²

141,374 ft²

2,788 m² 2,807 m²

5,437 m²

29,999 2,788 m² ft² 30,203 2,807 m² ft²

232 m² 58,500 5,437 m² ft²

29,999 ft² 30,203 ft²

2,499 232 m² ft² 58,500 ft²

2,499 ft²

2011 2012 Commercial 2013 2014 2015

2011 2012 Industrial 2013 2014 2015

2011 Commercial

2012 2013 2014 2015 Industrial

2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 5 yr avg 10 yr avg

20115 yr avg201210 yr avg 2013 2014 2015 5 yr avg 10 yr avg

In 2015 approved commercial floor space totaled 17,139 m 2 , which exceeds the 5

year (11,669 m 2 ) average. Approved industrial floor space totaled 29,262 m 2 which

substantially exceeds the 5 year (12,613 m 2 ) and the 10 year (10,534 m 2 ) averages.

This is the highest amount of industrial floor space approved in the previous 10 years.

6 Planning & Development Services

ANNUAL REPORT 2015 7


Construction

Number of Building Permits

Construction

Value of Building Permits

800

798

Number of issued building

permits per year

$300,000,000

6,500

6,372

6,509

6,420

6,491

6,462

The total number

of issued building

permits increased

by 15% from 2014

to 2015 and was

the highest number

issued of the

previous 5 years.

600

400

200

122

372

124

93

1,575

1,374

1,564

58

1,450

1,454

$200,000,000

6,000

$100,000,000

5,500

5,000 $0

$260,802,573

$169,648,771

$208,446,275

2011 2011 2012 2012 2013 2013 2014 2014 2015

2015

5 yr avg 10 yr avg

$185,562,623

Note: Construction values are subject to change.

$296,704,479

Total construction value

of issued building permits

in 2015 ($297 million)

exceeded both the 5 year

($225 million) and 10 year

($247 million) averages,

and was the highest

construction value of the

previous 5 years.

0

Agricultural Commercial Residential Multi-family Industrial Institutional Other

8

The greatest increases

in the total number of

issued building permits

from 2014 to 2015 were

in institutional (71%),

multi-family (63%), and

single detached residential

(31%). Residential (single

detached and multi-family)

permits made up almost

60% of the total number of

issued building permits in

2015.

2011 2012 2013 2014 2015

2015

1,575

total issued building permits

122

agricultural

372

commercial

798

residential (single detached)

124

multi-family

93

industrial

58

institutional

2014

1,374

140

401

609

76

103

34

The total construction value in 2015 was $297 million compared to $186 million in

2014, which is a 60% increase from 2014 to 2015. The greatest increases in value

from 2014 to 2015 were in institutional (125%), single detached residential (113%),

and multi-family (87%).

2015

CONSTRUCTION

value

$296,704,479

2014

CONSTRUCTION

value

$185,562,623

agricultural commercial residential (single detached) multi-family industrial institutional

9% 16%

26%

($25,696,925)($46,616,729)

($76,025,206)

31%

($93,580,155)

other

6% 12%

($17,596,126)($36,949,338)


Construction

Construction

6,500

New Commercial Floor Space

Residential Units

Construction of new

commercial floor space

has been relatively stable

over the past 5 years, with

the exception of 2011

when Highstreet was

constructed.

50,000

6,000

25,000 5,500

5,000 0

67,271 m²

6,372

(723,833 ft²)

5,406 m²

(58,169 ft²)

6,509

29,372 m²

(316,044 ft²)

11,690 m²

(125,782 ft²)

6,420

13,867 m²

(149,205 ft²)

6,491

6,462

100

5,500

2011 2011 2012 2012 2013 2014 2013 2015 2014 100 2015

2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 5 yr avg 10 yr avg

5 yr avg 10 yr avg

500

500

400

400

6,500

300

300

6,000 200

200

217

217

6,372

187

187

134

134

6,509

240

126

499

499

6,420

97

97

6,491

6,462

164

164

95 100

87 80

87

95 100

87 80

87

257

257

131

131

334

334

New Industrial & Institutional Floor Space

0

0

5,000

2011 2012Single 2013 detached 2014 2015 2011 2012 Townhouse 2013 2014 2015 2011 2012 Apartment 2013 2014 2015

2011

2011

2012Single 2013 detached

2012

2014 2015

2013

5 yr avg

2014

10 Townhouse yr avg

Apartment

2015

2011 5 yr avg 2012 10 yr avg 2013Note: Single 2014 detached 2015includes 5 secondary yr avg suites 10 yr and avgcoach houses.

30,000

6,500

30,000

25,000

25,000

20,000

6,000

20,000

6,372

6,509

28,360 m²

29,835 m²

(305,154 ft²)

(321,025 ft²)

6,420

6,491

6,462

Residential activity in 2015 for single detached, townhouse and apartment units was

greater than in all of the previous 5 years. Both the 5 and 10 year averages were exceeded

for single detached (5 year: 255, 10 year: 282), townhouse (5 year: 105, 10 year: 105) and

apartment (5 year: 182, 10 year: 235) units.

15,000

15,000

10,000

10,000 5,500

5,000

5,000

0

5,000 0

8,386 m²

(90,232 8,665 m² ft²)

(93,235 ft²) 5,302 m²

(57,052 ft²)

5,302 m²

(57,050 ft²)

6,395 m²

(68,807 7,398 m² ft²)

(79.602 ft²)

16,170 m²

(173,988 17,170m² ft²)

(184,749 ft²)

5,275 m²

(56,756 ft²)

5,575 m²

(56,759 ft²)

9,462 m²

(101,812 ft²)

9,462 m²

(101,811 ft²)

4,337 m²

(46,671 ft²)

4,337 m²

(46,666 ft²)

4,487 m²

(48,279 ft²)

4,487 m²

(48,280 ft²)

8,500 m²

(91,456 ft²)

9,226m²

(99,272 ft²)

2011 2012 Industrial 2013 2014 2015 2011 2012

Institutional

2013 2014 2015

2011 20112012 2013 Industrial 20122014 2015 20135 yr avg 10 yr 2014 avg Institutional 2015

20115 yr avg201210 yr avg 2013 2014 2015 5 yr avg 10 yr avg

Building Inspections

10,547

10,303

11,355

The number of building

inspections increased by

10% between 2014 and

2015.

New industrial floor space in 2015 exceeded both the 5 year (12,923 m 2 ) and the 10

year (15,994 m 2 ) averages, but decreased from 2014 by 43%. While construction activity

decreased, 2016 is expected to be a strong year for industrial construction activity as

29,262 m 2 was approved in 2015. New institutional floor space in 2015 exceeded the 5

year average (6,412 m 2 ) and almost reached the 10 year average (8,794 m 2 ), increasing

89% from 2014.

2013

2014

2015

10 Planning & Development Services

ANNUAL REPORT 2015 11


Departmental Initiatives

Departmental Initiatives

Council’s 2015-

2018 Strategic

Plan includes 4

cornerstones to

support the overall

vision for the City:

Abbotsford is the

Hub of the Fraser

Valley.

VIBRANT

ECONOMY

organizational

alignment

Background

research

Abbotsforward - Official Community Plan (OCP)

Update

Following a successful launch in 2014, Abbotsforward continued

to progress with broad community engagement activities including

an online survey, road show booths, neighbourhood walks, stakeholder and

committee workshops, a speaker event, and Citizen Advisory Commission

meetings. Through all of these activities, almost 7,000 interactions have been

had with residents and stakeholders about the future of Abbotsford and resulted

in 7 Big Ideas for the future and 3 ways to grow as a city.

By the end of 2015, staff had begun the final work in Stage 3 (out of four stages)

preparing a new draft Official Community Plan based on the work completed

to date. In 2016, the draft OCP will be presented to Council and presented to

stakeholders and residents, before being prepared as a bylaw for Council’s

consideration and adoption.

E N G A G E M E N T

1 2 3 4

Explore new

concepts

Create the

Plan

Complete the

Plan

VIBRANT

ECONOMY

UDistrict Neighbourhood Plan

The City has partnered with the University of the Fraser Valley

(UFV) to develop two separate but fully integrated plans to

guide the future growth and development of the UDistrict.

The Neighbourhood Plan will provide land use, servicing and transportation

direction and policies required to implement the vision for the neighbourhood.

The Campus Master Plan will direct future university growth and expansion.

The project is currently in Stage 2 – Choices and Direction of a four-stage joint

planning process between the City and UFV.

Stage 2 kicked off in third quarter of 2015 with the development of several

growth concepts for the neighbourhood and campus. These ideas for the

future development of the UDistrict were presented to the public and various

stakeholders for feedback in October 2015 through an open house, on-line

questionnaire, and meetings. The ideas were organized around major themes

such as land uses, mobility, and open space, which allowed the community

to express their opinions about key elements that will inform the design of the

community as it grows. The following key themes emerged directly from the

engagement sessions and survey:

• Integrate the community and the campus

• Provide more housing and shopping options

• Improve opportunities for safe and easy walking and cycling

• Create neighbourhood gathering places

Abbotsforward is the

most significant city

shaping process ever

undertaken by the City

of Abbotsford.

UDistrict

Neighbourhood Plan

will provide a unique

opportunity for the City

and the University of

the Fraser Valley to

work together for a

future vision.

complete

community

May 2014 - Oct 2014 Oct 2014 - May 2015 May 2015 - Mar 2016 Mar 2016 - Jun 2016

The input received is currently being used to develop a preferred concept for

the UDistrict. The final concept will be used as a base for further analysis,

including the completion of a Servicing Strategy, a multi-modal Traffic Impact

Assessment, a Parking Study, and an economic feasibility analysis. A summary

of these studies and the preferred concept will be presented to Council in 2016.

FISCAL

DISCIPLINE

organizational

alignment

Big Ideas Fair, June 2015

UDistrict Neighbourhood

12 Planning & Development Services

ANNUAL REPORT 2015 13


Departmental Initiatives

Departmental Initiatives

Zoning Bylaw Phase 2 (Urban)

Amanda Update

Phase 2 of the

Zoning Bylaw

Update will further

improve and enhance

the document.

organizational

alignment

Phase 1 of the Zoning Bylaw update was completed in 2014,

which resulted in the replacement of the 1996 Zoning Bylaw with

a greatly simplified and streamlined document. In Q3 2015, staff

began the next major update to improve and enhance the Zoning Bylaw, called

Phase 2. The primary topics that will be included in Phase 2 are as follows:

• Home Occupation regulations

• Boarding House/Rooming House regulations

• Truck Parking (paving vs. gravel regulations)

• Commercial Vehicle mobile repair regulations

• Accessory Office/Retail Use provisions in Industrial Zones

• Adult Entertainment use regulations

• Previous text amendments

Staff are completing background research and will be introducing the preliminary

findings to Council in 2016 for their input, and to authorize staff to proceed with

stakeholder and public consultation.

VIBRANT

ECONOMY

organizational

alignment

In 2015 the Planning and Development Services Department

(PDS) with their partners from Business and Technology Solutions

began an initiative to re-fresh and modernize the software

(AMANDA) that supports the everyday work being completed by

Development Planning staff.

Called the “AMANDA Makeover”, the update not only reflects the

process improvement initiatives that have been completed over

the last couple of years by PDS, but will introduce a user friendly dashboard and

allow additional online features that will provide greater access to information

for applicants, customers, and residents. In the long term, staff expects this

project will also provide a more reliable data set for capturing and reporting on

development trends in the City and improve overall operational efficiency. The

“AMANDA Makeover” project will continue throughout 2016.

The Amanda Update

is an initiative to

refresh and modernize

the software that

supports City staff.

Zoning Bylaw Housekeeping Update

Improvements to

the Zoning Bylaw

provide a legally

resilient document

that is understandable

to all residents.

organizational

alignment

In July 2015, City staff presented 76 Housekeeping Amendments

to the Zoning Bylaw for Council consideration. The purpose of

this housekeeping update was to clarify and improve the Zoning

Bylaw, and to provide a legally resilient document that is understandable to all

residents. The Housekeeping Amendment was summarized into the following

three categories:

• Definition changes/additions (19 in total) - included within this category

were changes to the text of definitions, or addition of new definitions.

Largely, the changes provide greater clarity for uses already identified

within the Zoning Bylaw.

• Map changes (19 in total) - generally map changes were where the

existing zoning does not match the existing use. In many situations the

adoption of the new Zoning Bylaw created non-conforming situations.

The proposed map changes resolve many land use issues brought to the

attention of staff since the adoption of the new Zoning Bylaw (No. 2400-

2014) in September 2014.

• Minor revisions (38 in total) - the minor revisions include clerical errors,

typos and inconsistencies that were noted between different sections of

the bylaw or with other established City regulations. The intent of these

minor revisions was to bring consistency to the bylaw.

14 Planning & Development Services

ANNUAL REPORT 2015 15


City of Abbotsford

32315 South Fraser Way

Abbotsford, BC V2T 1W7

604-853-2281

www.abbotsford.ca

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