Military

mfukuda14

OUR

HEROES

COURAGEOUS LIVES ★

the

1940s


INSPIRING STORIES

FROM THE EDITORS OF

REMINISCE


CONTENTS

the

1940s


3

THE HOMEFRONT

their supplies; Lt. John

Hyndman is the solider with

24

BAND OF SISTERS

their supplies; Lt. John

Hyndman is the solider with

48

ROLL CALL

their supplies; Lt. John

Hyndman is the solider with

26

HAPPY DAYS!

their supplies; Lt.

John Hyndman is

the solider with the

rifle on his back

(center), says his

12

BASIC TRAINING

their supplies; Lt. John

Hyndman is the solider with

30

HOMETOWN HEROES

their supplies; Lt. John

Hyndman is the solider with

56

COMING HOME

their supplies; Lt. John

Hyndman is the solider with

18

BAND OF BROTHERS

their supplies; Lt. John

Hyndman is the solider with

40

ENTERTAINING THE

TROOPS

their supplies; Lt. John

66

TRIBUTE

their supplies; Lt. John

Hyndman is the solider with

2 our heroes • the 1940s

the 1940s • our heroes

3


BASIC TRAINING

ON THE

MOVE

leaving home!

I adore this photo of my grandparents

winifred and harry ansonia (in front of

microphones) dancing in the ’30s at a

YMCA in Utica, New York. Check out

jazz legends louis armstrong and

ella fitzgerald in the band! Grandpa

danced every weekend until he was 92. n

ROBIN WOLZMUTH • CAMDEN, NY

8 our heroes • the 1940s

the 1940s • our heroes

9


BASIC TRAINING

FORT DIX SUMMER 1942:

During the height of the

Art Deco design period,

which occurred during

the 1920s and ’30s, the

movement was known as

Style Moderne. The

newer appellation is a

clipped version of the

CAMP

LIFE

❝My husband, howard

‘hap’ arnold (on his

head in foreground), and his

buddies goof around at U.S.

Marine Corps boot camp in

Parris Island, South Carolina, in

1953. He was in the Marines for

about 20 years.


CORALEE ARNOLD • COOL, CA

★SUMMER

1943: During

the height of the Art

Deco design period,

which occurred during

the 1920s and ’30s, the

movement was known as

Style Moderne. The

newer appellation is a

clipped version of the n

10 our heroes • the 1940s

the 1940s • our heroes

11


BAND OF BROTHERS

U.S. MARINES

UNLOAD their

supplies; Lt. John

Hyndman is the

solider with the rifle

on his back (center),

says his wife, Lois.

MARINES PRAY enroute to Iwo Jima.

I WAS

THERE

iwo jima A serviceman’s

first-hand account of this

fierce battle.

BY JOHN HYNDMAN • NAVY HOSPITAL, HI

LOIS J. HYNDMAN sent us a copy of a letter her husband, Lt. John S.

Hyndman, wrote home on March 31, 1945, 22 days after being wounded. In

this excerpt, he gives his firsthand account of the ferocious battle to take the

island and the devastation endured by the U.S. Marines.

Dear folks, I suppose you’ve heard by now that

I was wounded in Iwo Jima. Got shrapnel

across my head —quite a crease—fractured

my skull. But I am feeling fine now. I

received my Purple Heart in bed from

Admiral King. He pinned it on my pajamas. What a

beauty it is! The nurses have all been wonderful, except

when they shoot me with penicillin or morphine. I

haven’t an unstuck place on my body.

Everything is sore clear down to my toes.

Even my toes hurt. I have an open wound on my head,

which they are waiting on to close. That’s all that’s

holding me up.

So I’m a wounded veteran now. How do you folks feel

about it? Not too badly, I hope. A lot of people got hurt

in this operation. You can’t see for heck where they are

shooting from. Their pillboxes are wonders to behold.

You can sit right on top of one and never see it. They

really had the beach covered. Boy, it was murder. For 15

days, I watched guys around me get hit —killed or

wounded. Lost legs, arms, fingers, heads, and every other

thing attached to their bodies. The Japs used a bullet like

a .22 hollow point that made a small hole going in and a

huge one going out. It was mighty hot for a few days—

my, how we worked! Twenty-four hours a day, no sleep.

I was called up to join Rifle Company. I picked up a

15-man platoon—all that was left of a 50-man outfit.

When we got through the first day, I had only 12 left. I

had three machine gun squads attached—lost four of

those boys too. All to one well-hidden sniper. Snipers

were mean—and accurate. They wore Marine uniforms,

and if you saw them out front, you thought they were

your own men and held fire.

The island was finally secured—it was slow going—

about 50 feet per day. The little rock was really an

arsenal. You couldn’t lead a platoon across that country

for love or money. Three divisions on line on a space

two miles wide. No room to maneuver—it was all just

straight-ahead movement into heavy fire of Nambus

and snipers. They were good marksmen, right in the

head, neck, chest, or stomach every time. I got awfully

tired of seeing it happen. You’ll never know how I feel

about it, that’s for sure. Always wondering when I’d get

hit, walking around careless as “hell.” Finally a mortar

fragment creased my cranium. Didn’t know a thing

until I woke up several hundred miles away in a

hospital. Now I wonder who took over my platoon.

Well, I’ve rambled on too long now, so must close up

shop.

All my love, John

P.S. Please don’t worry about me. I am in great shape

(better than ever).

12 our heroes • the 1940s

the 1940s • our heroes

13


BAND OF SISTERS

GIRL

POWERED

U.S. MARINES UNLOAD their supplies; Lt. John Hyndman is

the solider with the rifle on his back (center), says hit. John

Hyndman is the solider with the rifle on his back (center), says

U.S. MARINES

UNLOAD their

supplies; Lt. John

Hyndman is the

solider with the rifle

on his back (center),

says his wife, Lois.

equal

opportunities

Women who

served made for

a more nimble

military.

BY JOAN MERCER • DOTHAN, AL

American women played important

roles during World War II, both at

home and in uniform. Not only did

they give their sons, husbands,

fathers, and brothers to the war

effort, they gave their time, energy, and some

even gave their lives.

Reluctant to enter the war when it erupted in

1939, the United States quickly committed itself

to total war after the Japanese attack on Pearl

Harbor. That commitment included utilizing all

of America’s assets—women included. The Axis

powers, on the other hand, were slow to employ

women in their war industries. Hitler derided

Americans as degenerate for putting their

women to work. The role of German women, he

said, was to be good wives and mothers and to

have more babies for the Third Reich.

When the war began, quickie marriages

became the norm, as teenagers married their

sweethearts before their men went overseas. As

the men fought abroad, women on the Home

Front worked in defense plants and volunteered

for war-related organizations, in addition to

managing their households. In New Orleans, as

the demand for public transportation grew,

women even became streetcar “conductorettes”

for the first time. When men left, women

“became proficient cooks and housekeepers,

managed the finances, learned to fix the car,

worked in a defense plant, and wrote letters to

their soldier husbands that were consistently

upbeat.” (Stephen Ambrose, D-Day, 488) Rosie

the Riveter helped assure that the Allies would

have the war materials they needed to defeat the

Axis.

Nearly 350,000 American women served in

uniform, both at home and abroad, volunteering

for the newly formed Women’s Army Auxiliary

Corps (WAACs, later renamed the Women’s

Army Corps), the Navy Women’s Reserve

(WAVES), the Marine Corps Women’s Reserve,

the Coast Guard Women’s Reserve (SPARS), the

Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASPS), the

Army Nurses Corps, and the Navy Nurse Corps.

General Eisenhower felt that he could not win

the war without the aid of the women in

uniform. “The contribution of the women of

America, whether on the farm or in the factory

or in uniform, to D-Day was a sine qua non of

the invasion effort.” (Ambrose, D-Day, 489)

Women in uniform took office and clerical

14 our heroes • the 1940s

the 1940s • our heroes

15


HOMETOWN HEROES

RESCUE: During

the height of the

Art Deco design

period, which

★NAME: John Smith

FROM: RAHWAY, NEW JERSEY

SERVED: 1940-1945

MEDALS: PURPLE HEART

IN

SERVICE

the rescuer After serving

his country, his community

came next. BY DIANE KAZALA • GILBERT, AZ

RESCUE: During the height of the Art Deco design period, which occurred

One of my Heros is my

late father in law

Kenny Montgomery.

After serving his

country he returned

home to Moses Lake, Washington

and became a fire fighter. Back

then, (just as I am sure it is now)

firemen had a responsibility to the

community as a whole. Not only

were they involved in fighting fires,

but also in search and rescue on

Moses Lake and even being a part

of the town’s parade. My husband

loved to tell the story of him and his

friends playing with matches and

setting a vacant lot on fire only to

have his father come to put it out!

Kenny later became the Fire Chief

of Lynwood, Washington. He told

me that the hardest part of his job

was the day he had to carry a child

that hadn’t made it out of a burning

home. He said the nightmares of

that day lasted a lifetime.

Unfortunately he (as so many

others before him) died of lung

cancer. But not before leaving a

lasting impression of what it means

to be a hero for me and my children.

Gone but not forgotten. n

It was 1942, and I was

manning the midnight

security shift at the

main gate of the U.S.

Coast Guard base in

Curtis Bay, Maryland.

Since there was no traffic,

I decided to hose off my

’41 Plymouth, which was

covered with coal dust—a

common occurrence back

then in the sooty

Baltimore area.So I rolled

up my pants, took off my

jumper and hat and went

at it. When I finished, I

SENIOR LTS.

BIRNEY DIBBLE and

Frank Folk in Korea,

and , and Birney on

R&R in Japan, and

Birney on R&R in

Japan, and Birney on

R&R in Japan, and

Birney on R&R in

Japan

16 our heroes • the 1940s

the 1940s • our heroes

17


ENTERTAINING THE TROOPS

PAY IT

FORWARD

BOB HOPE DUETS WITH DINAH SHORE their

supplies; Lt. John Hyndman is the solider with the

rifle on his back (center), says his wife, Lois.

tonic for the troops

Big Hollywood stars

venture across the seas;

local dances, and future

tops of the pops!

MISS MARTHA RAYE

their supplies; Lt.

John Hyndman is the

solider with the rifle

on his back (center),

says his wife, Lois.

OLIVIA DE HAVILLAND signs autographs for

the boys stationed in France.

MY UNCLE, BYRON LOVED AIRPLANES and flew with

the Cole Brothers Air Show as a wing walker. When

the war broke out he was sent to Germany and

Luxembourg as a lineman in the Signal Corps. Their

responsibilities were to repair telephone lines and

other related things. One of his fellow soldiers was a

man by the name of Tony Bennet. They became good

friends and spent many cold nights trying to keep

warm using everything they could find to keep warm.

Tony loved to sing and did a lot of it. He said when he

got home he wanted to go to New York and be a

professional singer. A wish that really came true. I

have seen him several times on TV and as far as I know

he still singing. —BRUCE BRYNER

18 our heroes • the 1940s

the 1940s • our heroes

19


ROLL CALL

MY UNCLE, ALBERT

D. CORRELL, served

in the Army Air Corp

during World War II,

He is pictured on the

far right, kneeling.

If anyone recognizes

this picture or these

airmen, I would very

much like to know

the names of the

men and the place

they called their

hometown.

DOLORES CORRELL

CAMPBELL

160 Linder Road,

Greenbrier, AR

72058deecam@

alliancecable.net

LOST &

FOUND

look familiar? We want to

know where they are now!

HELEN ANDERSON GLASS cherishes this photo she received from

ALEX MENA after he read “Roll Call” in Reminisce Extra/July 2015.

Alex is the son of radio operator, NEMESIA MENA, of the

O’Sullivan Crew 713, Eighth Air Force 2nd Division, 14th Bomb

Wing 492nd Bomb Group 857th Bomb Squadron.

NEMESIO

MENA

JOHN

McCARTHY

UNCLE

ALBERT

THE O’SULLIVAN CREW 713 was the

first to complete a 30-mission combat

tour during WWII. Lined up in front of

their B24 Liberator bomber,

“Irishman’s Shanty,” on July 31, 1944,

are: front row from left, Thomas

Chaffee, navigator, Charles Crowley,

bombardier, David O’Sullivan, pilot,

Peter Leri, co-pilot; back row from

left, Gildo Gregory, engineer/

top turret, Nemesio Mena, radio

operator, Barney Edwards,

tail gunner, John D. McCarthy,

waist gunner, Edward E. Picard,

waist gunner, and Emmitt Coomer,

nose gunner.

20 our heroes • the 1940s

the 1940s • our heroes

21


ROLL CALL

MY UNCLE BOB if there are any

veteran readers from WWII who might

remember my dad. I am trying to get

info about his time in Germany then . I

have lots of pictures but he died before

he could write anything in the photo

album. He was in the European/Africa/

Middle Eastern campaign, 9Th Army

WERE YOU

STATIONED AT

FORT EUSTIS?

My aunt CELIA RODGERS

after he read “Roll Call” in

Reminisce Extra/July 2015. Alex is

the son of radio operator, JANE

LERNER of the O’Sullivan Crew

713, Eighth Air Force 2nd

Division, 14th Bomb Wing

492nd Bomb Group 857th Bomb

Squadron.

DID YOU KNOW MY DAD? if

there are any veteran readers from

WWII who might remember my dad. I

am trying to get info about his time in

Germany then . I have lots of pictures

but he died before he could write

anything in the photo album. He was in

the European/Africa/Middle Eastern


LOOKING TO

RECCONECT:

Send your pics

and requests to

OurHeroesmag.com/

RollCall

WERE YOU STATIONED AT FORT BRAGG?

Cherishes this photo she received from GEORGE TALBOT after he

read “Roll Call” in Reminisce Extra/July 2015. Alex is the son of radio

operator, RICHARD WILKES of the O’Sullivan Crew 713, Eighth

Air Force 2nd Division, 14th Bomb Wing 492nd Bomb Group

857th Bomb Squadron. n

22 our heroes • the 1940s

the 1940s • our heroes

23


TRIBUTE

rescued: a forgotten treasure A daughter’s

love is the best tribute. BY TERESA SMITH • MADISON, WI

My hard-working Dad

(Frank J. George, Sr.)

was the youngest child

of dirt-poor

immigrants (Greek

father and Russian mother). Dad

was raised during the Depression

and started working at 5 years old

selling newspapers in downtown St.

Louis. After the tragic death of his

beloved father, he continued to

work throughout his childhood and,

later, was the sole support for his

mother until her death in 1958.

Dad didn’t like to talk about his

sad childhood and he had no

mementos from those destitute

early years but he did have four

photos of himself (in his youth),

which we kids treasured.

Dad was drafted into the army in

1946 and was stationed in Osaka,

Japan for over seven months. After

he was honorably discharged, he

returned to St. Louis, met my Mom,

and the rest is history.

Decades later, after Dad married

and became the father of 6 children,

Mom and I were talking in the

basement while she

was doing laundry. I

was young but an old

grip suitcase caught

my eye hidden in the

shadows on the

shelves behind the

scary furnace and I

asked Mom about it.

She smiled and said,

“Oh, that’s the only

suitcase your Dad ever

owned! He took that

little suitcase with

him when he was

drafted and sent to

Japan!” She laughed and said, “Can

you believe he kept everything in

that one small suitcase?” My heart

skipped a beat —what a treasure!

This tattered, little, old suitcase was

the oldest relic from Dad’s premarriage

days! I barely touched it, it

was too precious to me (and I was

scared to be so close to the furnace)!

Years later, after my parents

passed away, I was the last of their

kids to go through their house and

look for keepsakes. There wasn’t

much left in the house where I grew

up. My last stop was in the storage

shed (that Dad built) in the

backyard but I didn’t expect to find

any sentimental treasures in there. I

walked into the shed, casually

looked behind a roll of vinyl fencing

and, WOWEE, there was Dad’s

little, old army suitcase! My heart

almost stopped! I had found the

greatest treasure! Under close

inspection above the handle, I could

see tiny remnants where Dad

printed his name in pencil so many

decades ago! I proudly and excitedly

took the suitcase home!

I decided to turn the old suitcase

into “Dad’s Mini-Mobile Army

Museum” and filled it with items

from 1940s military life: Army

shirt; Dad’s mother’s photo; Air

Mail stationery; Japanese coins and

paper money; Osaka, Japan

postcards; cards; dice; etc.

I also put the coolest item Dad

bought in Japan in the suitcase - an

ID bracelet with his name engraved

on one side and “Osaka, Japan”

engraved on the back!

I display Dad’s suitcase open on a

small vintage luggage rack so

everyone can enjoy the little

“museum”. I used scrapbooking

pages and stickers to make various

photo displays of Dad’s army years

(and personal life) and keep these in

the top of the suitcase lid. I look at

the priceless suitcase treasure every

day with heartwarming thoughts.

I’m so glad that I found and rescued

that long-forgotten treasure!

P.S. Although Dad grew up

poor, he was always willing to help

anyone even though money was

always tight. He called himself

“The Last of the Big

Spenders” and had a

big, proud grin on

his face when we

called him that, too!

When Dad passed

away, I had “Last of

the Big Spenders”

engraved on his

memorial marker at

Jefferson Barracks

National Cemetery.

Dad had a great

sense of humor and I

know he is having

the last laugh!

24 our heroes • the 1940s

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