Beach Magazine June 2016

cbudman

June 9, 2016

Volume 46, Issue 45

Hurricane Street veteran

Ron Kovic

Photo by David Fairchild

Angelo’s Big Wave

Pak’s paintings

Baran bairns

Beach Happy Hour Guide


Considering a Major Remodeling Project?

RSVP Today

for our Complimentary

Wine Tasting Wednesday,

June 15th at 6 pm

Architectural Design &

Remodeling Seminar

This seminar will include:

• Functioning Design

• Choosing a contractor

• Exploration of materials

Join us on

Saturday

June 11 th

at 10:00 am

Join us on

Thursday

June 16 th

at 6:00 pm

Living Through

Your Remodel

This seminar will include:

• ‘Livable Remodeling’ tips

• The latest trends in the South Bay

• The advantage of true design / build


June 9, 2016

Volume 46, Issue 45

ON THE COVER

Born on the Fourth of July author

Ron Kovic at his Hollywood

Riviera home.

Photo by Brad Jacobson

Michael Burstein is a probate and estate planning

attorney. A graduate of the University of California,

Hastings College of the Law in 1987, he is admitted

to the California, Kansas and Oklahoma Bars and

is a member of the Order of Distinguished Attorneys

of the Beverly Hills Bar Association.

As an estate and probate lawyer, Michael has prepared

approximately 3,000 living trusts and more

than 4,000 wills.

An Estate Planning,

Estate Administration,

and Probate Attorney

l Living Trusts

l Wills

l Powers of Attorney

l Asset Protection

l Veterans Benefits

l Advance Health

Care Directives

l Insurance Trusts

l Probate

l Conservatorships

BEACH PEOPLE

16 Eye of the hurricane by Paul Teetor

Author Ron Kovic follows up on his best selling war memoir Born on the

Fourth of July with an equaling searing post war memoir Hurricane Street,

chronicling the government’s treatment of wounded warriors.

20 Team Kat by Randy Angel

Four-year, Sea Hawk varsity patcher Kat Ung has led her team to four consecutive

Bay League Championships.

24 Angelo’s big day by Ed Solt

Angelo Luhrsen stopped off at the Redondo Breakwall on his way to look

for bigger, cleaner waves up north. Instead, he paddled out and caught a

30-foot bomb that earned him the South Bay Boardriders Club’s Big Wave

Challenge Award.

42 Ocean abstracts by Bondo Wyszpolski

Physician turned artist Samuel Pak discusses the ocean-influenced

abstract paintings he will exhibit at the Hermosa Beach Fine Arts Festival

this weekend.

46 Highway Barans by Richard Foss

Baran family siblings Jason, Jenna and Jonathan and chef Tyler Gugliotta

team up to bring fine dining to the Hermosa highway.

12 Beach calendar

14 Tour de Pier

22 Beach Bar Guide 2016

32 El Segunda Ed Foundation Gala

36 South Bay Medal of Valor lunch

BEACH LIFE

38 SB Boardriders Big Wave Awards

40 Young at Art

44 Richstone Pier to Pier

48 Yacht clubs Opening Day

51 Service Directory

l Pet Trusts

l And Much More!

Call us to schedule an appointment or for our

FREE Guide:

Selecting the Best Estate Planning Strategies

111 North Sepulveda Boulevard, Suite 250

Manhattan Beach, California 90266

310-545-7878

STAFF

PUBLISHER Kevin Cody, ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER Richard Budman, EDITORS Mark McDermott, Randy Angel, David Mendez, Caroline

Anderson and Ryan McDonald, ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Bondo Wyszpolski, DINING EDITOR Richard Foss, STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS

Ray Vidal and Brad Jacobson, CALENDAR Judy Rae, DISPLAY SALES Adrienne Slaughter, Tamar Gillotti, Amy Berg and Shelley Crawford

CLASSIFIEDS Teri Marin, DIRECTOR OF DIGITAL MEDIA Jared Thompson, GRAPHIC DESIGNER Tim Teebken, DESIGN CONSULTANT Bob

Staake, BobStaake.com, FRONT DESK Judy Rae, INTERNS Sean Carroll

EASY READER (ISSN 0194-6412) is published weekly by EASY READER, 2200 Pacific Cst. Hwy., #101, P.O. Box 427, Hermosa Beach, CA 90254-0427. Yearly domestic

mail subscription $100.00; foreign, $200.00 payable in advance. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to EASY READER, P.O. Box 427, Hermosa Beach, CA 90254. The

entire contents of the EASY READER newspaper is Copyright 2016 by EASY READER, Inc. www.easyreadernews.com. The Easy Reader/Redondo Beach Hometown News

is a legally adjudicated newspaper and the official newspaper for the cities of Hermosa Beach and Redondo Beach. Easy Reader / Redondo Beach Hometown News is also

distributed to homes and on newsstands in Manhattan Beach, El Segundo, Torrance, and Palos Verdes.

CONTACT

n Mailing Address P.O. Box 427, Hermosa Beach, CA 90254 Phone (310) 372-4611 Fax (424) 212-6780

n Website www.easyreadernews.com Email news@easyreadernews.com

n Classified Advertising see the Classified Ad Section. Phone 310.372.4611 x102. Email displayads@easyreadernews.com

n Fictitious Name Statements (DBA's) can be filed at the office during regular business hours. Phone 310.372.4611 x101.

6 Easy Reader / Beach magazine • June 9, 2016

June 9, 2016 • Easy Reader / Beach magazine 7


10 Easy Reader / Beach magazine • June 9, 2016

June 9, 2016 • Easy Reader / Beach magazine 11


S O U T H B AY

CAL ENDAR

June 9, Thursday

Mix it up

South Bay Professional Association

Business & Fun After 5

networking group connects

employers with professionals

and executives for employment

opps. 5 - 7:30 p.m. Lido

di Manhattan, 1550 Rosecrans

Ave, Manhattan Beach. No

charge to attend and Happy

Hour will be in full swing.

sbpa-la.org.

June 10, Friday

Cancer Nutrition

Cancer Support Community

Redondo Beach (CSCRB) hosts

Lilly Padilla, certified integrative

nutrition coach, chef and

cancer survivor. The relationship

between healthy microbes

and the immune

system during and after cancer

treatments will be examined. 1

- 2:30 p.m. 109 West Torrance

Blvd., RB. Lunch provided, advance

registration required.

(310) 376-3550 or cancersupportredondobeach.org.

June 11, Saturday

The highest bidder

Manhattan Wine Auction,

the largest charity wine auction

in SoCal, raises funds for

the Manhattan Beach Ed Foundation.

Doors open at 4:30

p.m. Manhattan Country Club,

1330 Parkview Ave, Manhattan

Beach. For tickets visit

manhattanwineauction.com or

call 310-303-3342.

Unique flowers

36th annual Fuchsia Festival.

Beautiful Fuchsias for sale

including hanging baskets,

standard trees, and patio

shrubs. Free potting when you

buy a plant, container and soil.

Ask the experts. Bring your

questions on pruning, potting,

and propagation. Door Prizes.

Saturday & Sunday 10 a.m. - 4

p.m. South Coast Botanic Garden,

26300 Crenshaw Blvd.,

Palos Verdes Peninsula. Southcoastbotanicgarden.org

Get yer summer on

Summer Open House at

Dockweiler Youth Center,

12505 Vista Del Mar, Playa del

Rey. 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. Enjoy inflatables,

carnival games, and

entertainment. Learn all about

the exciting recreational programming

offered at the center

coming this summer. For information

and hours call (310)

726-4131 or visit beaches.lacounty.gov.

June 12, Sunday

Redondo Tri’s harder

Haven’t signed up? Come

down and cheer on racers in

the sprint or mini-sprint

events. 7:30 a.m. Veterans

Park, Redondo Beach. rbtriathlon.com

for more info.

Ferrari Car Show

With their beginnings in racing,

the legendary Ferrari has

been in production since 1943,

racking up over 5,000 successes

on race tracks and roads

all over the world. See these

legendary cars on the Upper

Meadow as displayed by the

Ferrari Club of America –

Southwest Region. No registration

required. 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Included with paid Garden admission.

South Coast Botanic

Garden, 26300 Crenshaw

Blvd., Palos Verdes Peninsula.

southcoastbotanicgarden.org.

Democrats meet

Robert Greenwald, noted

filmmaker, will talk about his

latest documentary. “Making a

Killing: Guns, Greed and the

NRA,” will be shown. 2:30 -

4:30 p.m. Palos Verdes Peninsula

Center Library Community

Room, 701 Silver Spur

Rd., Rolling Hills Estates. Free

and open to all. For information

contact David Hall at

(310) 377-7334.

June 14, Tuesday

Storytime

Children ages 1 - 5 years old

and their caregivers join in a

fun storytime full of songs,

rhymes, stories and movement.

Limited to 50 individuals.

Starts at 10:15 a.m., get

your numbered pass at the

Children’s desk starting at 10

a.m. Redondo Beach Library,

330 Pacific Coast Highway, Redondo

Beach. redondo.org.

The 12th annual Redondo Beach Triathlon is Sundya, June 12. The race starts at

7:30 a.m. at Veterans Park in Redondo Beach and follows a scenic course

through the PiKing Harbor and on to the Redondo Pier. For more information visit

RBTriathlon.com

June 18, Saturday

Pool Party

Begg Pool Kick-Off Party.

Event is free for the entire

family. Water games, balloon

toss, swimming, and music.

No food will be provided, but

you are more than welcome to

bring a picnic to eat on the

grass area. 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.

1402 N. Peck Avenue, Manhattan

Beach. citymb.info/pr.

(310) 802-5428.

Friends for sale

Hermosa Beach Friends of

the Library Book Sale. All proceeds

go toward Hermosa Library

acquisitions and

programs. 9 a.m. - noon. 1309

Bard Street, behind Stars Antiques,

Hermosa Beach. (310)

379-8475 or for future sales

visit hbfol.org.

Kick off summer

Terranea Resort’s 3rd annual

Music on the Meadows. Enjoy

an afternoon filled with musical

headliners including Colin

Hay (of Men at Work), Kate

Voegele, The Walcotts, Barley,

and more.Noon - 7 p.m. General

admission tickets $39. For

tickets and reservations terraneasocial@destinationhotels.com.

For more info call

Guest Relations at (877) 701-

2758. Terranea.com.

Recycle

Waste Collection Event. Get

rid of your used motor oil, antifreeze,

cleaners with acid or

lye, pesticides or herbicides,

batteries, pool chemicals and

lots more. 9 a.m. American

Honda, 1919 Torrance Blvd.,

Torrance. For future collection

events and for a list of acceptable

waste visit lacsd.org.

June 19, Sunday

Beat it with Sabina

Free To Be Me Community

Drum Circle family drumming

event, every third Sunday

noon - 3 p.m. Meet at the

water's edge north of the Hermosa

Beach Pier. Bring

friends, family, drums and percussion

instruments (otherwise

provided). Volunteers

welcome. For information

contact Sabina Sandoval (310)

944-5475, or visit freetobemedrumcircle.com.B

South Bay’s Largest Retailer

of Stationery Products

Wedding Invitations ● Personal Notes ● Business Letterhead

Envelopes ● Boxed Notes ● Holiday Cards

● Graphic Services

“GREAT GIFTS FOR GREAT PEOPLE”

● Root and Trapp Candles

● Huge Selection of Olukai Footwear

● Graduation Gifts

Simply Tiles Design Center

Nantucket Crossing

867 Silver Spur Road (next to Bristol Farms), Rolling Hills Estates

310.377.7201

www.nantucketcrossing.com

Fine Ceramics, Natural Stone, Hardwoods, Cabinetry, Faucetry.

Kitchen & Bathrooms Specialist.

3968 Pacific Coast Hwy., Torrance • (310) 373-7781 • www.simplytiles.com

License #904876

12 Easy Reader / Beach magazine • June 9, 2016


each charity

TOUR DE PIER

Riders cruise past $1 million mark

O

ver 1,000 stationary cyclists helped raise over $1

million to fight pancreatic cancer during the

fourth annual Tour de Pier at the Manhattan

Beach pier on Sunday, May 15. Among the teams was the

Pancreatic Cancer Victory Tour All Stars. Each of the five

members had either fought pancreatic cancer personally,

or had a loved one who did.

“The Tour was epic and emotional from start to finish,”

said Laurence Cohen, who organized the team and

celebrated his 65th birthday at the event. The team’s

MVP, Lupe Romero-De La Cruz, ran the Los Angeles

Marathon in 2013, just two months after surgical treatment.

“Not one day goes by that I don’t get emotional and

thank God for my life,” said Romero-De La Cruz. Teammember

Julie Weiss lost her father to the disease six

years ago. In 2012, she ran one marathon a week to

honor his memory and raise money for research.

“When my father passed away of pancreatic cancer in

November 2010, I realized how poorly funded this disease

was,” Weiss said. The team’s other members included

Shawn Veronese, who ran a marathon a month

to honor her mother Virginia, and Eric McIntyre, who

rode over 6,000 miles through 18 states after his wife Liz

passed away from the disease.

In just four years, Tour de Pier has raised over $2 million

for the Hirshberg Foundation for Pancreatic Cancer

Research, the Cancer Support Community of Redondo

Beach and the Uncle Kory Foundation. Tour de Pier was

founded by Manhattan Beach residents Heath Gregory

and Jonathan Hirshberg, who lost his father to pancreatic

cancer in 1997. For more information, visit

TourDePier.com. — by Caroline Anderson

1

3 4

2

5

PHOTOS BY BRAD JACOBSON

(CIVICCOUCH.COM)

1. Manhattan Beach Parks and Rec Director Mark

Lehman outgunned.

2. The Los Angeles Rams sent their advance team to

Manhattan Beach.

3. Pedal to the mettle.

4. Stand and be counted.

5. A good year for the Bruins.

6. An Inglewood police officer takes in the view.

7. Leading by example.

8. Bruin recruiter, in disguise.

9. The Pancreatic Cancer Victory Tour All Star team

(left to right) Shawn Veronese, Eric McIntyre, Laurence

Cohen, Lupe Romero-De La Cruz and Julie Weiss.

Photo by Carol Finley.

6 7

8

9

14 Easy Reader / Beach magazine • June 9, 2016

June 9, 2016 • Easy Reader / Beach magazine 15


Eye of the HURRICANE

Ron Kovic left one war to fight another, this time for something he believed in.

The "Born on the Fourth of July" author’s new book, Hurricane Street,

tells the tale of the Vietnam veterans’ anti-war movement

16 Easy Reader / Beach magazine • June 9, 2016

by Paul Teetor

When he can’t sleep late at night or needs

a caregiver’s help to get out of bed in

the morning, Ron Kovic has a mantra

that keeps him going forward: dignity over despair.

It’s a reminder of how the Redondo Beach resident

wants to live his life.

It also helped inspire him to write his first

book, the timeless anti-war classic "Born on the

Fourth of July." That powerful 1976 memoir told

the story of his All-American childhood in Long

Island, New York, where he and his friends

played war games imitating the heroic battles

their fathers had fought in World War II. It told

how they thrilled to the John Wayne war films

they saw every Saturday at the local movie theatre.

And it told how the war games, where they

“killed” hundreds of Japanese and Germans, and

the war films starring a guy who never served in

the military all contributed to the patriotic fever

that led him to enlist in the Marines after graduating

from high school in 1964.

But the raw, beating heart of the book was his

description of the harrowing physical, psychological

and institutional trauma he suffered in Vietnam

– and later back in the U.S. — after a North

Vietnamese bullet severed his spinal cord on January

20, 1968. It left him, at age 21, a paraplegic

destined to live the rest of his life in a wheelchair.

His graphic narrative of the bullet entering his

body, of being carried off the battlefield by men

who were strangers to him, and of the appalling

conditions and under-trained, neglectful staff in

the string of hospitals he was sent to were equal

parts shocking, revolting and revelatory to an

American public that was increasingly turning

against the war.

Late in the book he finds a measure of redemption

as an activist member of the Vietnam Veterans

Against the War. It gave him a cause and a

reason to go on living that helped him overcome

the why-me? feelings that destroyed many other

severely wounded vets.

“I saw pictures in the Santa Monica newspaper

of veterans throwing their medals away,” he recalled.

“I was very moved by that. We had a small

group of veterans in the LA area that merged

with the larger group called Vietnam Veterans

PHOTOS BY DAVID FAIRCHILD

against the War.”

Secretary of State John Kerry, who famously

asked Congress “How do you ask a man to be the

last man to die in Vietnam? How do you ask a

man to be the last man to die for a mistake?” was

part of that group of veterans throwing their

medals away.

“John Kerry has shown a great deal of moral

courage,” Kovic said. “He learned from that war.

He’s not repeating the same mistake over and

over again.”

In addition to purging some of his own inner

demons and calling the public’s attention to a war

he considered a tragic mistake with tragic consequences,

Kovic had a more personal motivation

for writing his first book.

“I wanted my parents to know that I was more

than a victim in the war,” he said in a recent interview.

“I wanted to take what happened to me

and turn it into something positive. It’s very rewarding

to know that you can take something

like that and turn it into art, into a book and ultimately

into a film.”

Twelve years after "Born on the Fourth of July"

hit the best-seller lists, director Oliver

Stone and actor Tom Cruise turned it

into an award-winning film that

opened America’s eyes — in a way

that a mere book never could in

these times — to the brutal consequences

of war and the often inadequate

care that its wounded veterans

received. It was a case study of the

power of film to draw an audience in

by entertaining them and then use

the images flickering on the screen to

educate them about important social

issues – a subtle, subliminal process

that is becoming rarer and rarer as

Hollywood concentrates on popcorn

films built around comic book super

heroes.

Kovic, unlike many people whose

life story has been adapted to film,

has nothing but good things to say

about the film and nothing but great

memories of making it. He was a cowriter,

along with his fellow Vietnam

vet Stone, of the screenplay that won

a Golden Globe award. It was

awarded on January 20, 1990, exactly

22 years after he was shot and

wounded.

“Every January 20 I raise it over

my head to remind myself that something

good happened on that day as

well as something very bad,” he said.

The film was also nominated for

eight Academy awards and won two,

including Best Director for Stone.

“Oliver did a fantastic job of keeping

the integrity of the story intact,”

he said. “And Tom Cruise brought

real depth to the role, something I

wasn’t sure he could do before we

started filming.”

Little known fact: "Born on the

Fourth of July," with Martin Bregman

producing and Al Pacino in the Ron Kovic

role, was only a few days away from starting

principal photography in 1978 when the financing

fell through. But Stone, who was the original

screenwriter, promised Kovic that if he ever became

a real player in Hollywood, he would revive

the project. And after he directed the blockbusters

“Platoon” and “Wall Street” in the mid-

1980s, Stone had enough Hollywood juice to find

the financing to make "Born on the Fourth of

July."

“He kept his promise, without my ever reminding

him of the promise,” Kovic said. “And he

made a film that has stood the test of time as an

important document of the Vietnam War.”

Now, 40 years after his first book was published,

Kovic’s mantra of dignity over despair

helped him write his newest book, "Hurricane

Street," which will be released on his 70th birthday,

July 4. Kovic will read from "Hurricane

Street" Wednesday, July 6, at 7 p.m. at the Manhattan

Beach Library at 1320 Highland Avenue.

He will also discuss "Born on the Fourth of July"

and how the two books are connected, how they

are two parts of one man’s ongoing, never-ending

story of war, remembrance and redemption.

Ron Kovic helps Tom Cruise on the set of “Born on the Fourth of July.” Kovic was

impressed with the actor’s dedication to learning his role by spending hours in a

wheelchair. Photo courtesy Ron Kovic

After being so outspoken about the Vietnam

War for more than 40 years, Kovic knows that he

is a controversial guy, even among some of his

fellow Vietnam vets. He is a leader on one side

of a divisive debate that still rages more than four

decades after the last Americans were airlifted

out of Saigon.

Former Manhattan Beach Mayor Bob Holmes

is one of those Vietnam vets who does not agree

with Kovic’s strong stand against the war. He says

he made a conscious choice not to read "Born on

the Fourth of July" nor watch the film when it

came out.

“People like Ron who strongly opposed the war

draw a mixed reaction from those who served in

the war, and I don’t think it’s a surprise to Ron

that opinion of him in the veterans community is

very mixed,” Holmes said. “Some may feel there’s

an element of disloyalty in what he says. But I

know there are plenty of others who agree with

him that we wasted our time there.”

Regardless of where veterans stand on the debate

over the righteousness of the war, Holmes

says, there are two things they can all agree on.

“I think all of us agree that the U.S. government

has not properly taken care of those who served

their country,” he said. “And second,

that regardless of how I feel about

Ron and his activism, I respect his

service to our country, I respect that

he has suffered greatly, and God

bless him.”

For his part, Kovic said he feels the

same about veterans who feel differently

than he does about the war.

“We are all brothers, and all one

family,” he said. “I have great respect

for all those who traveled 13,000

miles to serve our country. How

much more can a citizen give than

that? I honor my fellow vets.”

"Hurricane Street" is taken from

the name of the Marina del Rey

street Kovic lived on in the mid-

1970s and tells the riveting, long-forgotten

tale of how he and several

other disabled veterans in wheelchairs

traveled from the Long Beach

Veterans Administration Hospital to

Los Angeles, where they occupied

Senator Alan Cranston’s office in

1974. They protested the poor treatment

in the VA Hospitals. They also

demanded better treatment and a

face-to-face meeting with the head of

the VA, Donald Johnson. To show

they were serious they staged a sit-in

that turned into a 17-day hunger

strike and attracted first local and

then national media attention.

Johnson came to LA to the building

that housed Cranston’s office on

the 13th floor, but he refused to meet

with the veterans unless they came

to the VA office on the seventh floor

of the same building. Kovic, aware

that many of the men had physical

problems that limited their movement,

problems that were getting

worse the longer they were away

from the VA Hospital, was just as adamant that

Johnson should take the 30-second elevator ride

to Cranston’s office to meet with them. Neither

side budged, so Johnson went back to Washington.

But the media uproar was so loud that President

Richard Nixon, already dealing with the

final, fatal months of the Watergate scandal, ordered

Johnson back to LA, where he finally met

with the vets on their captured turf.

Johnson resigned several months later and the

first of many VA reforms were begun. Even today,

however, there are still plenty of complaints

about VA care and Kovic insists the VA still has a

long way to go. He notes with a mixture of sadness

and anger that 22 military veterans commit

suicide every day.

“A whole new generation of veterans is coming

back from Iraq and Afghanistan with the same

problems we had,” he said. “It’s unconscionable,

a national outrage, that the VA is not prepared to

care for them properly. These are men and

women in severe emotional crisis.”

The poignant subtext of the "Hurricane Street"

Ron Kovic cont. on page 18

June 9, 2016 • Easy Reader / Beach magazine 17


Ron Kovic cont. from page 17

story is how this small band of brave, desperate

men, who had fought so hard for their country

only to feel betrayed once their bodies were broken

and they were no longer useful to the war

machine, were now so broken spiritually that

they were unable to remain united after their

protest was successful.

The vets’ physical and

mental problems were so

severe that the group fractured

into factions under

the growing internal and

external pressures bearing

down on them and ultimately

disbanded just a

few months after the

hunger strike.

And after it was all over

and Johnson was gone and

the VA had pledged to

make reforms, most of

them died within a few

years from causes directly

linked to their traumatic

injuries or indirectly

through drug and alcohol

abuse and suicide.

Kovic, unlike so many of

his wounded comrades

who couldn’t find a reason

to go on living or a lifestyle

that worked for them,

went on to a long career of

social activism embracing

multiple causes, from the

environment to human

rights to the anti-nuclear

movement.

But in "Hurricane Street" he returns to his original

anti-war cause.

“I wrote it so that people would never forget

what happened during those two and a half

weeks. I want people to see the consequences of

what war does to human beings,” he said during

a long, wide-ranging interview at the Yellow Vase

Café in the Hollywood Riviera section of Redondo

Beach. “How absurd it was that severely

wounded veterans who had given three quarters

of their bodies were forced to go on a hunger

strike in a senator’s office because they weren’t

18 Easy Reader / Beach magazine • June 9, 2016

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being properly cared for by the wealthiest country

in the world.”

As he approaches his 70th birthday, Kovic has

mellowed considerably from the angry, embittered

young man he wrote about in "Born on the

Fourth of July."

“I now realize that we all need to listen to each

other, whether we agree or not,” he said. “We

can’t just scream at each other and expect to

Tom Cruise, Ron Kovic, and director Oliver Stone celebrate a sweep of the top awards at the 1990

Golden Globes. Photo courtesy Ron Kovic

solve our problems.”

He knows he has been lucky to outlive most of

his wounded brothers who joined him in the sitin

and hunger strike. Now he has the perspective

to see the big picture of his life story as he enters

his eighth decade on this earth.

“I’m grateful just to be alive,” he said. “I’m

thankful for every day.”

Part of what makes him so grateful to be alive

is his girlfriend of nine years, TerriAnn Ferren, a

Torrance resident who handles marketing and

public relations for the Torrance Cultural Arts

Center.

Buying or Selling

Office: 310.546.3441

Cell: 310.643.6363

Email: Donruane@verizon.net

“I dedicated ‘Hurricane Street’ to her,” he said

quietly. “She is very special and has become the

anchor in my life.”

Their meeting and courtship is a classic case of

serendipity.

After moving to Redondo Beach about 12 years

ago, Kovic had become friendly with Bill Sharman,

the basketball Hall of Famer – as both a

Boston Celtics player and a Los Angeles Lakers

coach – and his wife

Joyce. They also lived in

Redondo Beach. She had

lost a brother in the Vietnam

War, a loss that affected

her deeply. After

watching "Born on the

Fourth of July" she

reached out to Kovic.

“She called me, and we

got together and talked

about a lot of things,” he

said. “I soon became close

friends with her and Bill.”

A few years later they

invited him to a dinner

party at their home where

he met Ferren.

“I had heard about Ron

from Joyce and Bill but I

had never met him,” Ferren

recalled. “When I saw

him over by the pool I introduced

myself. I had

never read his book or

seen the movie, but we

just started talking and

talked and talked and

talked. Right from the

start it was so easy to be

with him.”

Even at that first meeting she noticed what an

evolved man he was, so unlike the bitter young

man lashing out at the world as described in his

first book.

“He was sincere and very gracious and very interested

in others,” Ferren said. “Other people

would come up to him and he would go out of

his way to make them comfortable. He is a kind,

generous, big-hearted man. I feel blessed to know

him.”

Attracting a great girlfriend: another benefit of

choosing dignity over despair.

Contact: teetor.paul@gmail.com Follow: @paulteetor. B

“Since 1992”

Don Ruane

Serving the South Bay Beach Cities and beyond

DRE#01036347


Redondo senior Kat Ung was the ace of the Sea Hawk pitching staff for four seasons,

capturing Bay League titles each year. Photo by Ray Vidal

A Humble

Hurler

All-CIF Redondo softball pitcher Kat Ung has seen her

hard work pay off with a trip to the CIF-SS Division 3

championship game.

by Randy Angel

She has been the ace of the Redondo softball pitching staff for four seasons.

Yet despite her many accomplishments, Kat Ung is quick to deflect

attention away from herself and toward her teammates.

The left handed pitcher will most likely earn her third straight All-CIF selection

this season after leading the Sea Hawks to their fourth straight Bay

league championship and first trip to the CIF-Southern Section finals since

1994.

Going into last Saturday’s CIF-SS Division 3 championship game against

top-seeded Grand Terrace, Ung was the winning pitcher in all four playoff

games, tossing three shutouts along the way. She had a 14-6 record with a

1.32 ERA, striking out 153 batters while walking only 20 in 111.2 innings.

Ung was excited about the possibility of finishing her prep career with a

championship ring.

“Losing humbles me and makes me grateful for every win,” Ung said. “Losing

two games in Bay League this year proved we should not take any team

for granted. I’m so proud of our team particularly (sophomore) Laura Chafe,

who stepped up when I sprained my elbow early in the season.”

Although she will go down as one of the top pitchers in Redondo school

history, posting a career record of 53-18 entering her final game, Ung said

the highlight of her high school career has been the relationships she has

made with her teammates.

“We’ve fought some tough battles to win four Bay League titles,” Ung said.

“We’d lose seniors but have had freshmen come in and produce at a high

level. It’s been exciting to see the different makeup of the teams each season.

It makes me look back and see how different my mentality is compared to

my freshman year.”

Along with being a southpaw, Ung is recognized by the face mask she

wears while pitching in the circle.

“I was in middle school and remember Redondo’s pitcher Brett Aspel being

hit in the face by a comebacker,” Ung recalled. “My dad thought paying $40

for a mask was a cheap investment to help prevent a serious injury. I’m not

afraid of the ball by any means and, fortunately, I have not been hit in the

face.”

Ung feels her vast experience is the strength of her game. As a freshman,

she relied on the rise ball but when hitters began to catch up to it, she

switched to throwing the changeup during her sophomore year.

After going back to the rise ball as a junior, she spent hours working with

Redondo pitching coach Tom "Jud" Judson and her personal coach of three

years Savana Lloyd to perfect her curveball, while focusing on inside pitches.

“Kat’s strength as a pitcher definitely lies in her lefty talents,” Lloyd said.

“She has amazing natural movement on her pitches, she spins the ball very

well and has fantastic command of her pitches. She trusts herself as a pitcher

and knows that if she gives 100 percent that is enough. I love this mentality

about Kat because often pitchers and athletes in general want to be bigger

and better. Kat recognizes her strengths, owns who she is, and has pure confidence

in herself and her pitching abilities. Because of this she extremely

solid on the mental side of the game.”

Ung has developed a close relationship with Redondo head coach Jennifer

Dessert. She has mentored Ung longer than any other coach.

“Honestly, at this point in time it’s hard to accept that Kat is leaving,”

Dessert said. “I have had some special kids go through my program over the

years and to say she will be missed is an understatement. She is poised and

tough and communicates with coaches and teammates well.”

Dessert admits Ung has put extra pressure on herself this year after getting

so close to the CIF finals in 2015.

“Being forced to go to the sidelines and rest was really what she needed to

get things back in order,” Dessert said. “I feel like she was able to finally rest

and take the weight of the season off her shoulders. The girls who have gone

through the last four years with Kat know that her presence here has raised

our level of play and expectations for players coming in the future.”

Off the field, Ung has the reputation of being a jokester and story teller,

but on the field she is all business.

“It’s just not me on the field. A pitcher just helps the team stay in the

game,” Ung said. “You have to trust your defense and offense to win the

game. My team lifts the pressure off me and I’m so grateful for all of the

teammates I have had.”

She also values her relationship with Dessert, who has relied on Ung to

be a sparkplug for the Sea Hawk offense. She has batted .355 this season.

“Our relationship has grown and is based on honesty,” Ung explained. “I

respect her so much and she has done so much for softball in Redondo

Beach. I’ll always remember her saying ‘You are worth every ounce of positive

thinking you can give yourself every single day.’”

With the end of her high school playing days ending soon, Ung had time

to reflect on her four-year varsity career.

“I’ve played with and against so many different players and I have

learned a lot from them,” Ung said. “I remember facing Mira Costa’’s Taylor

Glover when I was a freshman. I remember every pitch I threw. She

was a big senior and I was so intimidated.

“Beating Costa that year for the Bay League title was special. It was an

amazing game. They beat us 12-0 the first time we played but I was sick

and didn’t get to play. I figured I had nothing to lose and just played my

hardest and we won 5-3. That win gave me the confidence that I can help

my team and trust my teammates. Our defense made every play and Korynn

Ben Amor made an outstanding catch in right field to help us win

the game. It was the first big win in my softball career and the feeling of

being a part of that team was so exciting.”

Ung remembers senior infielder Kristen Currie taking her under her

wing during her freshman season.

“Kristen was an impact player but missed most of her senior season because

of injury,” Ung said. “She was so encouraging and made me feel very

comfortable as the youngest member of the team along with Allison Betty.

My advice to young players coming up is to stay humble and never expect

the game to be easy. Give it all you can and don’t play to inflate your stats.

Put the team first.”

Growing up, Ung played tennis and soccer but stopped in eighth grade

to focus of softball. She was introduced to softball by a soccer teammate

who encouraged her to play fall ball when she was eight years old.

Her career as a pitcher, however, got off to a slow start.

“I mocked my teammate while I was at the batting cages so I basically

taught myself how to pitch,” Ung explained. “But I had the wrong mechanics

and dislocated my elbow.”

Along with playing for Redondo, Ung has competed on various travel

ball teams. She began to excel as a pitcher playing for the South Bay Dynasty.

She currently is a member of the South Bay Diamond Girls and

teaches pitching to younger kids with Lloyd and Hermosa Beach Little

League.

Ung’s favorite player is former University of Texas All-American and

Olympic softball gold-medalist Cat Osterman.

“Like me, she’s left handed and not the fastest pitcher, but the movement

of her pitches makes her a winner,” Ung said.

Ung has attracted the attention of college softball programs and will be

attending Azusa Pacific University in the fall, a choice that was not difficult

to make.

“Academics was my top priority and I love the atmosphere there,” Ung

said. “I met the Azusa coaches at a camp when I was a sophomore and the

staff gave me some great pointers on pitching. I was invited to a second

camp that happened to be on my sister Kristen’s birthday. I was so grateful

for the offer to play there and being a religious school made my decision

to go there extremely easy.”

Ung has a 3.9 GPA and, although her major is undeclared, she has an interest

in business, history and athletic training.

She credits her parents Wayne and Bridgett for teaching hard work ethics

and humility and is a big fan of younger sister Kristen, a 15-year-old sophomore

who is captain of Redondo’s Junior Varsity softball team.

“My parents taught me so many important things and stressed the importance

of an education,” Ung said. “I thank them for dragging me to

practices and driving to Lancaster on a Friday afternoon for tournaments.

They taught me to be selfless and to always give credit to teammates.”

A self-proclaimed nerd who enjoys reading, particularly history, Ung is

also involved with her church youth group and is a Redondo Beach Youth

Commissioner.

Kat's biggest improvement has been in her ability to make adjustments

from one pitch to the next, Lloyd said. “The small adjustments that are the

hardest to make she does it and she does it well. She is extremely patient,

yet competitive and that combination takes her a long ways.

“ Her attitude is the best. She is always smiling, and is just a great girl,

teammate and student. She brings up everyone around her. I also enjoy

how consistent she is in everything she does. From being punctual, to always

working her hardest, to having a great attitude. She's a leader. No

matter what day it is, she shows up with the same level of greatness.”B

20 Easy Reader / Beach magazine • June 9, 2016

June 9, 2016 • Easy Reader / Beach magazine 21


Bottle Inn Riviera

Beer and wine $4 - $7; pizza, crab

cakes and a variety of appetizers $6

and under. 4-6 p.m.

The Bull Pen

Well spirits $4.50, house wines

$4.50, domestic beers $3, imported

beers $4, $2 off appetizers (Lounge

and Bar only). 4-7 p.m.

China Grill Bistro

Food and drink specials 4-7 p.m.

Frida Mexican - Del Amo

Food and drink specials (Bar Area

only), 3-6 p.m. and 9 p.m.-

close.

Greenbelt

Food and drink specials 4-6 p.m.

Hennessey’s

$5 selected cocktails, wines, drafts,

well drinks and more. $5 seared ahi

street tacos and other food Items. 4-

7 p.m.

2016

Happy Hour

Guide

Bull Pen bartender Kevin Norris prepares a martini to accompany tri tip

sliders and sauteed mushrooms.

Guiding you to the Happiest Hours at the Beach

Monday

HT Grill

$4 select drafts, $5 select wines by

the glass and select cocktails, $7

treats - from the Bar Eats Menu

(Lounge, Bar and Fire Pit only). 4-

7 p.m.

Patrick Molloy’s

$3 domestic draft beers; $4 import,

craft and IPA beers; half-off drinks

and liquor; $5 - $6 food specials. 3-

8 p.m.

P.F. Chang’s

$4 craft beer, $6 small plates, $6

cocktails and wine (available

throughout the restaurant). 3-6

p.m.

R/10 Social House

$5 snacks and libations 3 p.m.-

close

Ragin Cajun Café

$1 off drinks and appetizers 3-6

p.m.

Ramen Spott & Sushi Duke

$1 sushi and rolls 5-6 p.m.

Free

Parking

Free

Wifi

Join Us for Happy Hour Tuesday - Saturday!

4-6pm (bar only)

Late Night Happy Hour

Thursday to Saturday 9pm to 11pm

20% off pizza

Serving over 25 Hand-Tossed

Pizzas & Homemade Pastas!

Specializing in Montreal-style

Smoked Brisket , Poutine,

Osso Buco, Lamb Shanks &

fresh-grilled Salmon!

1000 Torrance Blvd., Redondo Beach

(310) 792-9300 www.pizzeriaorlandos.com

JOIN US TO CELEBRATE

OUR 10TH ANNIVERSARY!

HAPPY HOUR SPECIALS

Mon-Thurs 5-6pm $

1

SUSHI & ROLLS

Jicama pork street tacos and

agave margaritas are two of the

choices at P.F. Chang's Happy Hour.

Open 7 Days A Week for Lunch & Dinner

www.RamenSpott.com Facebook.com/RamenSpott

25412 Crenshaw Blvd. Torrance (Rolling Hills Plaza)

310-530-3900

22 Easy Reader / Beach magazine • June 9, 2016

June 9, 2016 • Easy Reader / Beach magazine 23


Frida Mexican

Cuisine’s

Maria Padilla,

Lorena Negrete,

Diana Flores and

Emma Jaramillo

in Del Amo.

The Slip Bar & Eatery

$3 - $5 beers, $1 off all wine and

well drinks, 3-6 p.m. $7 Food

Specials, 3 -7 p.m.

Power Hour - Buy 1 beer, wine or

well drink, get 1 for $1 (of same

kind), 6-7 p.m.

The Standing Room

Food and drink specials 3-6 p.m.

Ws China Bistro

Food and drink specials 4-7 p.m.

Tuesday

Bottle Inn Riviera

Beer and wine $4 - $7; pizza, crab

cakes and a variety of appetizers $6

and under. 4-6 p.m.

The Bull Pen

Well spirits $4.50, house wines

$4.50, domestic beers $3, imported

beers $4, $2 off appetizers (Lounge

and Bar only). 4-7 p.m.

China Grill Bistro

Food and drink specials 4-7 p.m.

Frida Mexican - Del Amo

Food and drink specials (Bar Area

only) 3-6 p.m. and 9 p.m.-

close.

Greenbelt

Food and drink specials 4-6 p.m.

Hennessey’s

$5 selected cocktails, wines, drafts,

well drinks and more; $5 seared

ahi street tacos, and other food

items. 4-7 p.m.

HT Grill

$4 select drafts, $5 select wines by

the glass and select cocktails, $7

treats - from the Bar Eats menu,

(Lounge, Bar and Fire Pit only). 4-

7 p.m.

Orlando’s Pizzeria & Birreria

$5 selected appetizers, selected

craft beers; $6 selected house

wines. 4-6 p.m.

Patrick Molloy’s

$3 domestic draft beers; $4 import,

craft and IPA beers; half off drinks

and liquor; $5 - $6 food specials. 3-

8 p.m.

P.F. Chang’s

$4 craft beer, $6 small plates, $6

cocktails and wine (available

throughout the restaurant). 3-6

p.m.

R/10 Social House

Half price bottles of wine; $5

snacks and libations. 3-6 p.m.

Join Us for HAPPY HOUR Mon-Fri 4-6pm AND Sun 3:30-6pm!

bites $5

chicken wings, kale caesar (add chicken $2),

meatball marinara sliders,

mushroom flatbread, margherita flatbread,

truffle fries, hummus

drinks 1/2 off

draughts and bottled beer, select wines

by the glass, mango bellini & sangria

“Bold and contemporary, the ingredients top shelf”

16 Craft Beers Homemade Sangria Peach & Pomegranate Bellinis

Farmer’s Market Vegetables Catering Grass-fed Beef Outdoor Dining

Open 7 Days A Week Mon-Fri 11am-11pm, Sat-Sun 10am-11pm (Brunch)

36 Pier Avenue Hermosa Beach (310)798-6585 www.greenbelthb.com

Bottle Inn

Riviera offers

Happy Hour

specials and a

comfortable

outdoor

ocean-view

patio.

TORRANCE

www.fridarestaurant.com

SUNDAY MARIACHI BRUNCH

10 am - 3 pm • Adults $ 29.95 • Kids (5-12) $18.95

Mimosas, House Margaritas, Sangria and Draft Beer only $5

Del Amo Fashion Center • 21438 Hawthorne Blvd. • Torrance • (310) 371-0666

24 Easy Reader / Beach magazine • June 9, 2016

June 9, 2016 • Easy Reader / Beach magazine 25


Greenbelt’s Evan Stinson, Mandi Thomas and Tyler Lewis.

Patrick Molloy’s at Happy Hour.

Orlando’s Pizzeria & Birreria offers Happy Hour specials on craft beer,

wine and appetizers.

HT Grill’s Luke Caler prepares a specialty

cocktail for Mimi Dodson, Darlene Takahashi

and Billy “The Mayor” Fletemeyer.

Hennessey’s Kristina Reyes.

Ragin Cajun Café

$1 off drinks and appetizers 3-6

p.m.

Ramen Spott & Sushi Duke

$1 sushi and rolls 5-6 p.m.

The Slip Bar & Eatery

$3 - $5 beers, $1 off all wine and

well drinks, 3-6 p.m. $7 food

specials, 3-7 p.m.

Power Hour - Buy 1 beer, wine or

well drink, get 1 for $1 (of same

kind), 6-7 p.m.

The Standing Room

Food and drink specials 3-6 p.m.

Ws China Bistro

Food and drink specials 4-7 p.m.

Wednesday

Bottle Inn Riviera

Beer and wine $4 - $7; pizza, crab

cakes and a variety of appetizers $6

and under. 4-6 p.m.

The Bull Pen

Well spirits $4.50, house wines

$4.50, domestic beers $3, imported

beers $4, $2 off appetizers (Lounge

and Bar only). 4-7 p.m.

China Grill Bistro

Food and drink specials 4-7 p.m.

Frida Mexican - Del Amo

Food and drink specials (Bar Area

only) 3-6 p.m. and 9 p.m.-

close.

Greenbelt

Food and drink specials 4-6 p.m.

Hennessey’s

$5 selected cocktails, wines, drafts,

well drinks and more. $5 seared

ahi street tacos, and other food

items. 4-7 p.m.

HT Grill

$4 select drafts, $5 select wines by

the glass and select cocktails, $7

treats - from the Bar Eats menu,

(Lounge, Bar and Fire Pit only). 4-

7 p.m.

Orlando’s Pizzeria & Birreria

$5 selected appetizers and selected

craft beers, $6 selected house

wines. 4-6 p.m.

Patrick Molloy’s

$3 domestic draft beers; $4 import,

craft and IPA beers; half-off drinks

and liquor; $5 - $6 food specials. 3-

8 p.m.

P.F. Chang’s

$4 craft beer, $6 small plates, $6

cocktails and wine (available

throughout restaurant). 3-6 p.m.

Martinis and Margaritas Coming Soon!

CELEBRATING TWO YEARS IN

RIVIERA VILLAGE!

Join Us for HAPPY HOUR

Everyday 4-6pm

Offering the SAME

Traditional Italian Cuisine

Outdoor Patio Seating

Open 7 Nights A Week

1700 S. Catalina Ave. Redondo Beach (310) 543-6800

26 Easy Reader / Beach magazine • June 9, 2016

June 9, 2016 • Easy Reader / Beach magazine 27


The Bull Pen

R10 Social House’s Portia Tsotesi and Marina Mora.

Ramen Spott/Sushi Duke offers Tuna, Yellowtail, Salmon and Shrimp during

its $1 Happy Hour.

Ragin Cajun Cafe’s Corey Cohen fixes a Blue Voodoo for Shyrl Lorino and

Holly Riddel.

The Slip’s bartender Betty Smith (on right) takes a quick break with Happy

Hour regulars.

314 Avenue I Redondo Beach

www.TheBullPenRedondo.com

(310) 375-7797

R/10 Social House

$5 snacks and libations 3-6 p.m.

Ragin Cajun Café

$1 off drinks and appetizers 3-6

p.m.

Ramen Spott & Sushi Duke

$1 sushi and rolls 5-6 p.m.

The Slip Bar & Eatery

$3 - $5 beers, $1 off all wine and

well drinks, 3-6 p.m. $7 food

specials, 3-7 p.m.

Power Hour - Buy 1 beer, wine or

well drink, get 1 for $1 (of same

kind), 6-7 p.m.

The Standing Room

Food and drink specials 3-6 p.m.

$15 Bulleit flights all day.

Ws China Bistro

Food and drink specials 4-7 p.m.

Thursday

Bottle Inn Riviera

Beer and wine $4 - $7; pizza, crab

cakes and a variety of appetizers $6

and under. 4-6 p.m.

The Bull Pen

Well spirits $4.50, house wines

$4.50, domestic beers $3, imported

beers $4, $2 off appetizers (Lounge

and Bar only). 4-7 p.m.

China Grill Bistro

Food and drink specials 4-7 p.m.

Frida Mexican - Del Amo

Food and drink specials (Bar Area

Only) 3-6 p.m. and 9 p.m.-

close

Greenbelt

Food and drink specials 4-6 p.m.

Hennessey’s

$5 selected cocktails, wines, drafts,

well drinks and more. $5 seared

ahi street tacos, and other food

items. 4-7 p.m.

HT Grill

$4 select drafts, $5 select wines

and select cocktails, $7 treats -

from the Bar Eats menu, (Lounge,

Bar and Fire Pit only). 4-7 p.m.

Orlando’s Pizzeria & Birreria

$5 selected appetizers and selected

craft beers, $6 selected house

wines, 4-6 p.m. $5 selected craft

beers and $6 selected house wines,

pizza 20% off. 9-11 p.m.

28 Easy Reader / Beach magazine • June 9, 2016

June 9, 2016 • Easy Reader / Beach magazine 29


The Standing Room’s Lucine Dounamalian, Colleen Rambeau, Kyle Rambeau

and Dennis Kawecki.

Ws China Bistro Happy Hour regulars Warren Brouillette, Thomas Aydelotte

and Rick Lloyd.

Patrick Molloy’s

$3 domestic draft beers; $4 import,

craft and IPA beers; half-off drinks

and liquor; $5 - $6 food specials. 3-

8 p.m.

P.F. Chang’s

$4 craft beer, $6 small plates, $6

cocktails and wine (available

throughout the restaurant). 3-6

p.m.

R/10 Social House

$5 snacks and libations 3-6 p.m.

Ragin Cajun Café

$1 off drinks and appetizers 3-6

p.m.

Ramen Spott & Sushi Duke

$1 sushi and rolls 5-6 p.m.

The Slip Bar & Eatery

$3 - $5 beers, $1 off all wine and

well drinks, 3-6 p.m. $7 food

specials, 3-7 p.m.

Power Hour - Buy 1 beer, wine or

well drink, get 1 for $1 (of same

kind), 6-7 p.m.

The Standing Room

Food and drink specials 3-6 p.m.

Ws China Bistro

Food and drink specials 4-7 p.m.

Friday

Bottle Inn Riviera

Beer and wine $4 - $7; pizza, crab

cakes and a variety of appetizers $6

and under, 4-6 p.m.

The Bull Pen

Well spirits $4.50, house wines

$4.50, domestic beers $3, imported

beers $4, $2 off appetizers (Lounge

and Bar only). 4-7 p.m.

China Grill Bistro

Food and drink specials 4-7 p.m.

Frida Mexican - Del Amo

Food and drink specials (Bar Area

Only). 3-6 p.m. and 9 p.m.-

close.

Greenbelt

Food and drink specials 4-6 p.m.

Hennessey’s

$5 selected cocktails, wines, drafts,

well drinks and more. $5 seared

ahi street tacos, and other food

items. 4-7 p.m.

HT Grill

$4 select drafts, $5 select wines by

the glass and select cocktails, $7

treats - from the Bar Eats menu,

(Lounge, Bar and Fire Pit only). 4-

7 p.m.

30 Easy Reader / Beach magazine • June 9, 2016


Orlando’s Pizzeria & Birreria

$5 selected craft beers, $6 selected

house wines, 20% off pizza. 9-11

p.m.

Patrick Molloy’s

$3 domestic draft beers; $4 import,

craft and IPA beers; half-off drinks

and liquor; $5 - $6 food specials. 3-

8 p.m.

P.F. Chang’s

$4 craft beer, $6 small plates, $6

cocktails and wine (available

throughout the restaurant). 3-6

p.m.

R/10 Social House

$5 snacks and libations 3-6 p.m.

Ragin Cajun Café

$1 off drinks and appetizers 3-6

p.m.

The Slip Bar & Eatery

$3 - $5 beers, $1 off all wine and

well drinks, 3-6 p.m. $7 food

specials. 3-7 p.m.

The Standing Room

Food and drink specials, 3-6 p.m.

Bulleit cocktails $6, Ward 8 $7,

beer and a Bulleit $3, all day.

Ws China Bistro

Food and drink specials 4-7 p.m.

Saturday

Bottle Inn Riviera

Beer and wine $4 - $7; pizza, crab

cakes and a variety of appetizers $6

and under, 4-6 p.m.

Orlando’s Pizzeria & Birreria

$5 selected beers, $6 selected house

wines, 20% off pizza. 9-11 p.m.

R/10 Social House

$5 snacks and libations 3-6 p.m.

The Standing Room

Food and drink specials 3-6 p.m.

Tito’s cocktails $6, Tito’s Mules $7,

all day.

Sunday

Bottle Inn Riviera

Beer and wine $4 - $7; pizza, crab

cakes and a variety of appetizers $6

and under, 4-6 p.m.

Greenbelt

Food and drink specials 3:30-6

p.m.

R/10 Social House

$5 snacks and libations 3-6 p.m.

The Standing Room

Food and drink specials 3-6 p.m.

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June 9, 2016 • Easy Reader / Beach magazine 31


each charity

ED! GALA

A success in El Segundo

T

he annual El Segundo Education Foundation

Gala attracted more than 750 people and

raised a new Ed! Gala record of $210,000. The

event featured nine major sponsors, 20 table sponsors

and more than 230 auction items provided by

local businesses while 30 restuarants provided food

and drink.

1

2

PHOTOS BY MARK MCDERMOTT

1. More than 30 local

restaurants

contributed food to the

Ed! gala, including

Sausal’s Nancy

Vrankovic and Chef

Anne Conness.

2. Ed! Foundation

CEO Carol Pirsztuk,

ESUSD Superintendent

Melissa Moore, Ed!

chairman Alex Abad,

and ESUSD Board of

Education president Jim

Garza accept a check

from Chevron Government

and Public Affairs

manager and refinery

general manager

Henry Kusch. The

$250,000 check

granted at the Gala is

used in support of

STEM programing,

specifically the Engineering

Pathway for

students K-12.

3. El Segundo’s Douglas

and Lara Carrigan

with Balletto

Vineyard’s sales manager

Jon Niemann.

4. El Segundo Unified

School District’s finest

— its teachers —

turned out in large

numbers, including (left

to right) Carolyn Elder,

Grace Kim, Alice Lee,

Lindsey Sharp, Kim

Stern, Celia Plotkin,

Rachel Salsev, Kelly

Wu, and Lisa Hong.

5. Former councilman

and mayor Carl Jacobson

shares a moment

with newly elected

councilmen Don Brann

and Drew Boyles.

6. Carol Pirsztuk, Ed!

CEO, with Alex Abad,

Ed! Chairman of the

Board, Jim Garza,

president of the ESUSD

Board of Education,

Ken Riesz, general

manager of NRG El

Segundo, Ahmed

Haque, NRG director

of asset management,

and ESUSD Superintendent

Melissa

Moore. NRG was recognized

with this

year’s Eddy Award for

its support of local

schools.

7. A group of what

Palm Realty’s Amie

Schneider (Ed! Chairman

Alex Abad’s

daughter) called El Segundo’s

“power

women” — mothers,

teachers, and businesswomen

— enjoy the

gala.

8. Miriam Vared and

El Segundo Mayor

Suzanne Fuentes

9. LA County Supervisor

deputy Steve

Napolitano,

center, with a group of

friends and supporters.

10. El Segundo

Mayor Suzanne

Fuentes, Steve Napolitano,

and Councilman

Drew Boyles.

3 4

5

7

9

6

8

10

KITCHEN AND BATH REMODELING

Certified Kitchen &

Bath Designer on Staff

• Design

• New Cabinets

• Cabinet Refacing

• Granite & Quartz

Countertops

• Showers

• Electrical

• Tub Installation

• Plumbing

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32 Easy Reader / Beach magazine • June 9, 2016

June 9, 2016 • Easy Reader / Beach magazine 33


Angelo Luhrsen on his Big Wave Challenge Award winning wave at the Redondo Breakwall on January 7. Photo by Charles Scholz

Challenge answered

Derek Brewer, Big Wave Challenge runner-up, January 12 at the Redondo Breakwall.

Photo by Charles Scholz

Angelo Luhrsen and Connor Beatty hadn’t planned on surfing the Breakwall. It looked too big and unruly. Then a ride-able

wave came through.

by Ed Solt

Angelo Luhrsen and his number one surf bro and fellow big wave

charger Connor Beatty could not decide whether to paddle out or

not. The Redondo Breakwall was macking. The other Breakwall locals

were sitting on the wall, watching. Spectators were gathered on the

beach next to the Chart House, drawn by the Thursday, January 7 forecast

for the biggest Southern California swell in over a decade.

Their surf check was supposed to be a quick one. After riding mostly

closed-out Torrance Beach earlier that morning, Luhrsen and Beatty had

stopped at the Breakwall with their big guns, enroute north, to a better

known bombora that handles large swells.

“Breakwall was big and ugly but after seeing one rideable wave, we were

on it,” Luhrsen said.

The decision would earn Luhrsen the South Bay Boardriders 2015-16 Big

Wave Challenge award, which was accompanied by a Pat Reardon big wave

gun and $3,000.

In large Breakwall surf, the whitewater is too powerful to paddle out

through from the beach, so surfers walk out roughly 200 yards along a walkway

near the top of the wall. Then, when they sense a lull between swells,

they climb down the boulders and jump into the water.

Later that morning, veteran Breakwall surfer Doug “Doc” Scheller would

Chris Wells, Big Wave Challenge runner-up, January 6 at the Redondo Breakwall. Photo by Brad Jacobson

be knocked down on the rocks by a wave and suffer a broken shoulder, a

broken arm and internal bruising. He said he would have died had

Luhrsen’s dad Michael and fellow surfer Jeremy Griffin not pulled him

from the cave in the rocks that he had been knocked into.

Luhrsen and Beatty had better luck getting off the rocks. But then their

luck ran out. A giant set rolled through before they could paddle past the

impact zone.

“We got smoked.” Luhrsen said. “The set took us all the way back to the

beach. I came up gasping for air and saw the whitewash was dragging us

back to shore like we were being towed behind a car,” Luhrsen recalled.

“We had our little walk of shame on the beach,” he added.

After a pep talk and some suggestions on where to jump off the rocks

from Luhrsen’s dad, the two walked back out along the breakwall and during

a rare lull between sets, made it out to the lineup spot.

“It was the furthest out that I have ever sat at the Breakwall,” Luhrsen

said. “I was way past the end of the breakwall and could see all of Palos

Verdes.”

Luhrsen was just getting comfortable on his Pat Ryan shaped, 7-foot-2 ET

gun, when another macking set came through. Cameras on the beach began

clicking.

When big, north swells hit the north facing extension of the Breakwall,

Angelo Luhrsen feeling at home at the Redondo Breakwall.

Photo by Mike Balzer

they bounce back and up, forming a jacking peak, which is the signature

of a solid Breakwall swell. Surfers generally take off at or

north of where the wave jacks up.

Luhrsen took off behind peak. The decision may be what accounted

for his Big Wave Challenge award.

“It was a big wall,” Luhrsen said, “It began to shift after I dropped

and entered my bottom turn.”

Photos from that day show him at the bottom of the wave barely

outracing the lip. The peak is jacking up ahead of him, 30 feet in the

air.

“I kept thinking, ‘Wow, I can’t believe I caught a wave this big at

my home break,’” he said. “When I got back to the beach and saw

the pictures, it looked even bigger than I thought it was.”

Beatty caught the wave behind Luhrsen’s. Beatty’s wave was almost

as large as the one he caught last winter at Mavericks, near San

Francisco, which earned him a nomination in the World Surf League

Big Wave Award paddle division. But it wasn’t as big as Luhrsen’s.

The 23-year-old Luhrsen recently received his college degree in engineering

and plans to move from his family’s home in Palos Verdes

to San Francisco.

“I’ve surfed Mavericks two times as well as quite a few other secret

Central California spots,” he said. “I’m eager to go back. At one of

these secret spots, I got blown to the rocks holding my uncle’s 10-

foot gun. I was so worried I’d mess his board up.”

“I have learned a lot from my dad and my uncles, James, Jude, and

Chase and give them credit for inspiring me,” Luhrsen said.B

Matt Meistrell, Big Wave Challenge runner-up, January 7 at the Redondo Breakwall.

Photo by Photo by Charles Scholz

Trevor LaShure, Big Wave Challenge runner-up, at Burnout. Photo by Tim Tindall

June 9, 2016 • Easy Reader / Beach magazine 35


each honors

SOUTH BAY MEDAL OF VALOR

Responders from the Beach Cities and beyond

receive their due

R

edondo Beach Harbor Patrol Officer David Poirier was one of two men

receiving top honors at the 42nd Annual South Bay Medal of Valor

Luncheon, alongside Hawthorne Police Officer Alex Khan. Last May,

Poirier rescued a hostile swimmer, one who didn’t want to be saved, in a 40-

minute battle by the Redondo Pier.

The luncheon, held by the South Bay Police and Fire Memorial Foundation

at the Torrance Marriott Redondo Beach, brought officials from cities around

the South Bay together to honor the 14 officers from seven agencies whose actions

went above and beyond to save lives.

PHOTOS BY DAVID MENDEZ

1. Redondo Beach Police

Captain Tom Krafick, Lt.

Todd Heywood, Redondo

Beach City Manager Joe

Hoefgen and Capt. Jeff

Hink.

2. Manhattan Beach Police

Chief and Medal of

Valor board president Eve

Irvine.

3. Redondo Beach Police

Chief Keith Kauffman and

Hawthorne Police Captain

Michael Ishii.

4. Redondo Beach Fire

Chief Robert Metzger

congratulates Redondo

Harbor Patrol Officer

David Poirier.

5. Manhattan Beach Police

Officers Carlos Olivares,

Derek San Agustin,

Chad Swanson and Don

Brown with MBPD Chief

Eve Irvine, center.

6. David Poirier and

family.

7. Redondo Beach officials

turned out to support

their city’s honoree, including

Mayor Steve Aspel,

City Treasurer Steve Diels,

City Manager Joe Hoefgen,

Asst. City Manager

Mike Witznansky, Fire

Chief Bob Metzger, and

Division Chiefs Isaac Yang

and Mark Winter.

8. Redondo Beach Police

Department Command

Staff.

9. Master of Ceremonies

Glen Walker, Hawthorne

Police Officer Alex Khan

and Hawthorne Police

Chief Robert Fager.

1

2 3

4

5

6 7

8

9

36 Easy Reader / Beach magazine • June 9, 2016

June 9, 2016 • Easy Reader / Beach magazine 37


T

sports

SB BOARDRIDERS BIG WAVE

Challenge Awards night

he best South Bay winter surf since the turn of the

century was celebrated during the South Bay Boardriders

Big Wave Challenge Awards night on Friday,

May 27 at the Hermosa Beach Community Center.

Palos Verdes surfer Angelo Luhrsen received the top

award for catching the biggest, documented wave of the

2015-16 winter. Photographer Charlie Scholz snapped

Luhrsen on January 7, making a bottom turn on a barreling,

Redondo Beach Breakwall wave, with an estimated 30-

foot face. The surprise presentation of the evening was the

inaugural Howard Eddy Award, presented by brothers

Derek and Keith Brewer, Greg Browning and Matt Walls.

When the four were groms surfing 16th Street in Hermosa

Beach, Eddy, who lived on 16th Street and was a retired

Panasonic employee, videotaped them almost every morning.

The Brewers, Browning and Walls said the tapes were

of enormous help in their development as young surfers.

Mike Balzer was selected as the first recipient of the award

for his co-founding of the South Bay Boardriders Club,

whose annual contest series is credited with spurring a

local resurgence in surfing, especially among groms and

gromettes.

Among those groms are Nathaniel Harris and Billy

Atkinson. When the SBBC contest series began five years

ago, they competed in the assisted (push in) grom division.

At the awards ceremony, the two were presented with the

Big Wave Hard Charger Award for holding their own in

triple overhead surf at the Redondo Breakwall.

Also honored were Breakwall regulars Jeremy Griffin

and Michael Lurhsen for rescuing surfer Doug “Doc”

Scheller after a wave knocked him down on the breakwall

the day Luhrsen’s son Angelo caught his award winning

wave.

Runner-up Big Wave Challenge honorees were: Matt

Meistrell, photo by Charlie Scholz at the Redondo Breakwall;

Derek Brewer, photo by Charlie Scholz at the Redondo

Breakwall; Chris Wells, photo by Brad Jacobson at

the Redondo Breakwall; and Trevor LaShure, photo by Tim

Tindall at Burnout.

For more information about the South Bay Boardriders

Club visit SouthBayBoardriders.com. – Kevin Cody B

1

2 3

PHOTOS BY STEVE GAFFNEY

(STEVEGAFFNEY.COM)

1. Big Wave Challenge honorees Trevor LaShure, Matt

Meistrell, Chris Wells, Derek Brewer, Angelo Luhrsen,

Brad Jacobson, Charlie Schultz, Tim Tindall and Boardrider

president Mike Balzer.

2. Howard Eddie Award recipient Mike Balzer with

presentees Derek and Keith Brewer.

3. Big Wave Hard Charger Award recipients

Nathaniel Harris and Billy Atkinson

4. Doug “Doc” Scheller thanks Jeremy Griffin and

Michael Luhrsen for saving his life after he was knocked

down by a wave at the Redondo Breakwall.

4

38 Easy Reader / Beach magazine • June 9, 2016


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Middler and Janie Hindle passed the baton to new co-chairs

Marisa Checa and Regina Patton.

The co-chairs thanked each school’s chairmen, introduced

the new Executive Board and unveiled the six projects selected

by the Design Committee for the 2016-17 school year. The Design

Committee solicits over 100 artists to produce art projects

suitable for kids pre-K through grade 8 to explore a variety of

media, many in the style of famous artists, allowing the kids

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7. Hermosa docents.

8. Montessori Peck docents with school chair Theresa

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9. Design Committee Lisa Barrios, Erin Pieronok, Lisa

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Kirk, Co-Directors Amy Frank and Lee Tunil.

10. Catherine Wojick of Savory N Sweet, located in Redondo

Beach, catered the brunch.

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40 Easy Reader / Beach magazine • June 9, 2016

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June 9, 2016 • Easy Reader / Beach magazine 41


art

Physician turned artist

Samuel Pak to

exhibit at Hermosa Fine Arts Festival

Please Stay on the Grass

“Deep Breath II (Bridging Union),”

by Samuel Pak

“Long Ago,”

by Samuel Pak

“Orange Islands,” by Samuel Pak

“Drench Kiss Soulmates Travel,”

by Samuel Pak

by Bondo Wyszpolski

What started in 2002 as the Hermosa Beach Art Walk has developed

over the years into a large-scale event, now called the Hermosa

Fine Arts Festival. This year’s show takes place Saturday

and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the lawn of the Hermosa Beach

Community Center.

The featured artist is Dr. Samuel Pak, who was a physician in Houston

for seven years before moving to Southern California late 2014.

“Samuel Pak was selected for the uniqueness of his artwork's design,”

said Art Walk president Robyn Alatorre. “His paintings work with the

beach and ocean themes, which have traditionally been a part of our event,

and the expressive and powerful abstract qualities of Sam's paintings communicate

the fresh direction the board is taking with the festival.”

Much of Pak’s work is dreamily abstract, with soft cloud-like forms

swirling this way and that. Then again, recognizable forms do emerge to

pull us back into the canvas.

Pak didn’t become a professional artist until he moved to the West Coast.

As with many of us, making a decent living came first, and the scales were

tipped in favor of a career in medicine.

“When people ask me where I get my inspiration, I often say, ‘I don’t

know,’ and perhaps that is not entirely true. It may be that my mind cannot

possibly put into words all the beauty of the things that I see, hear, touch

and feel. It may be the memory of a spectacular evening sky at the beach

with hints of emerging stars above, or a dense morning fog that slowly unveils

a magnificent mountain in the distance.

“It could be a classical music piece,” he continues, “with its inspirational

rhythms and melodies harkening back to the ancient truth discernable only

through the eternity in our hearts. It may be a person or people, and their

emotional state that my eyes have witnessed and my mind has captured

long ago. It could be a flash of certain photos or a painting or even just a

simple combination of colors that has embedded into my subconscious,

constantly merging with the inexpressible emotions of personal triumph

and painful loss.”

Pak doesn’t seem to have any doubts about the road ahead of him.

“One thing I do know,” he says, “is that all of my life experiences and

everything that I have done, including my career as a physician, have led

me to this decision. I am committed to being the best artist that I can possibly

be. Creativity is not a thing to be extracted from your mind but a vision

to be built continuously and relentlessly.”

This year’s 13th annual Fine Arts Festival has over 100 booths, with half

of the artists showing for the first time. They come from all over, their artwork

varied and diverse, with paintings in many different styles, plus photography,

sculpture, prints, and wearable art. For those hoping to buy,

there’s something for every budget.

There will of course be food and entertainment, including a craft beer

and wine garden. Also of note is the interactive booth created by installation

artist JonMarc Edwards. Called Debriti, it features thousands of tiny

letters that are made of natural, bio-degradable tag board. Participants are

encouraged to "choose their words carefully" as they combine texts to create

words and phrases to create their own poetry.

Proceeds from the festival will provide four scholarships to local students

pursuing the arts in college. They also support local art projects.

Other highlights include free face-painting and a free kids arts and crafts

area. The student art section features local students’ artwork, from the elementary

grades through college. Raffle tickets for sale will give visitors a

chance to ride home on a beautiful new Strand Cruiser, donated by Hermosa

Cyclery. B

“Super Nova (Laurentian),” by Samuel Pak

The 13th annual Hermosa Fine Arts Festival takes place Saturday

and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on the lawn of the Hermosa Beach

Community Center, 710 Pier Ave., Hermosa Beach. Information, hermosafinearts.com.

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June 9, 2016 • Easy Reader / Beach magazine 43


each charity

RICHSTONE PIER-TO-PIER

Walkathon

T

he Richstone Family Center raised over $120,000

during its 29th Annual Pier to-Pier Walkathon on

April 30. State Assemblyman David Hadley and

KTLA Meteorologist Vera Jimenez kick off the event. Participants

solicited pledges from supporters and walked

from the Manhattan Beach Pier to the Hermosa Beach

Pier and back. Red and white balloons and free

Cream’wiches from Manhattan Beach Creamery were

presented to the walkers at the finish line.

The Richstone Family Center is “dedicated to preventing

and treating child abuse and trauma; strengthening

and educating families; and decreasing violence in families,

schools and communities.”

1

PHOTOS BY CAROLINE ANDERSON

1. Volunteers wait for the walkers to arrive at the Hermosa

Beach Pier.

2. Popular cover band Once More performs each

year for the walk.

3. A young walker is rewarded with a balloon.

4. Walkin’ and talkin’ at the finish.

5. The coolest hats at the beach

6. Father, son and prized pup at the end of the walk.

7. Manhattan Creamery welcomed walkers with

their famous Cream’wiches.

8. State Assemblyman David Hadley and KTLA Meteorologist

Vera Jimenez helped kick off the event.

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44 Easy Reader / Beach magazine • June 9, 2016

June 9, 2016 • Easy Reader / Beach magazine 45


described as being made with pancetta, tomato jus, and parmesan, and

that tells you everything that’s going on here but for the dots of basil oil

that decorate the plate and provide aroma. I recommend ordering this the

way Italians do, as a simple refreshing shared plate between more strongly

flavored starters and main courses.

Those bolder items include a remarkable multi-step fried chicken, which

is first smoked and then fried, then coated with a soy sauce and chile gastrique.

This has layers of flavor and you can perceive them all: lightly

smoky, rich chicken overlaid by a cornmeal crust with herbs, overlaid with

the sweet and spicy and salty sauce. There was plenty of meat on the half

bird we were served, but we were finding new flavors all the way to the

last bite.

Another item that was a special on one visit was pork jowl with gooseberries,

a dish some people might find challenging. Jowl meat is fatty and

so tender that it’s slightly gelatinous, but the tart berries made a fine contrast

to the rich flavors. Gooseberry season is short and supplies are limited,

but if you like variety meats and new experiences you should see if this is

available.

Baran’s 2239 doesn’t serve hard liquor but has a well-curated list of beer,

wine, and cider, almost all available in four or six ounce pours, as well as

by the bottle. We tried the Virginia Dare and Decelle Villa Pinot Noirs to

experience an old and new world expression of the same grape, and both

went quite nicely with the chicken. Our server suggested Curran Grenache

Blanc with the endive and strawberry dish, and we admired his wine savvy

because it was a splendid choice. Most of the people who work here seem

to be extended family. They know every item and explain it clearly. They

make up for the terse menu very well, though it must take a lot of extra

time and training.

I’ve tried two desserts, an orange-pistachio panna cotta and coffee-toffee

pudding cake. The latter was my wife’s idea and I regarded it with trepidation,

as toffee isn’t one of my favorite items. Surprise, this one wasn’t

over-sweet and the espresso glaze made it a delight. The creamy panna

cotta was topped with artistically arranged ground nuts and dollops of jellied

citrus. Now that I know this can be done I want to explore these flavors

more.

The Baran siblings Jason, Jenna and Jonathan.

Dinner at Baran’s 2239 is remarkably reasonable for cooking of this quality.

We paid an average of about $50 per person with moderate portions of

wine and cider. High style has come to the highway in Hermosa. It’s an

almost perfect experience, and you don’t have to fight for parking downtown

to enjoy it.

Baran’s 2239 is at 502 Pacific Coast Highway in Hermosa. Open Tues. -

Sun. at 5 p.m. Closes 10 p.m. Tues. - Thurs. and Sun.; 11 p.m. Fri.-Sat. Parking

lot, wheelchair access OK, wine and beer served. Menu (unpriced) at

Barans2239.com, phone 424-247-8468. B

Highway to perfection

The chicken is first smoked and then fried. Photos by Brad Jacobson (CivicCouch.com)

Baran’s 2239 has brought high style to PCH in Hermosa

by Richard Foss

All-You-Can-Eat Lunch Buffet

MONDAY - FRIDAY

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Includes: Pizza,

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DINE-IN ONLY

46 Easy Reader / Beach magazine • June 9, 2016

Carpet weavers in Persia leave one, tiny flaw in their patterns, reasoning

that only God can create perfection. This is handy for modern

connoisseurs as a way of detecting counterfeits. Flawlessly symmetrical

carpets are the product of machine looms that care nothing for theology.

This probably explains the menu at Baran’s 2239, a new restaurant that

is otherwise close to perfect. The flaw in this case is minimalism taken to

the extreme, so that no matter what an item is, it is described only by three

ingredients no matter how many there actually are, with no hint of how it

is prepared. This would be fine in a diner where “burger, fries, and salad”

really tells you all you need to know, but some items here have very unusual

preparations. As an example, the item called an Indian egg, described only

as “lamb sausage/curry jus/cucumber,” is actually an exotic twist on the

Scotch egg, which is usually a bland pub snack that needs to be washed

down by several beers. This version is beautifully presented and fragrant

with South Asian spices. When one was delivered at a neighboring table

the scent was beguiling.

This dish and almost everything else at Baran’s 2239 is a creation of chef

Tyler Gugliotta, an underappreciated master who ran the kitchen at The

Shore and several other local restaurants, including the highly touted, but

ill-fated Brix@1601. He teamed up with Jason Baran and other members

of the Baran family to open this restaurant in a strip mall on PCH in Hermosa

Beach. Something about this environment and management has set

Gugliotta free, and he’s doing the most accomplished cooking of his career.

That doesn’t mean that everything is complex. One of the things that

grabs your attention right at the beginning of the meal is the simplest. The

fresh-baked focaccia may be the best bread I’ve had in the South Bay,

crunchy-crisp outside with a perfect light interior, and it’s served with a

bright orange herb butter that has a cheesey richness. Yes, it’s $5 for four

pieces of focaccia, but trust me, it’s worth it.

That bread reflects Tyler’s Italian heritage, and so does the spigarello with

cauliflower, white beans, and breadcrumbs. Spigarello is an heirloom cousin

to broccoli that is slightly more fibrous but less bitter. It shines in this simple

rustic Mediterranean preparation. Mine had a bit of char that suggested it

had briefly hit the grill or been pan-seared before being combined with the

other ingredients along with some garlic and a little oil.

Another standout starter is the endive leaves topped with goat cheese,

peas and pea tendrils, strawberries, almonds, and mint – an odd but successful

combination of bitter greens, funky cheese, and sweet fruit and vegetables.

The strawberries are briefly roasted to make them aromatic and

concentrate the flavor, and lightly peppered to give just a hint of sharpness.

It’s a complex and flawless harmony, and yes, I’m about to use the word

perfect again.

The entrees also include some very simple dishes. The house spaghetti is

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June 9, 2016 • Easy Reader / Beach magazine 47


each boating

YACHT CLUBS CELEBRATE

Opening Day

Y

acht club opening days began on the East Coast

to celebrate the day the waterways began to melt.

A canon was traditionally fired to help break up

the ice. Despite year ‘round sailing weather on the west

coast, the opening day tradition at King Harbor’s three

yacht clubs is as strong as at any East Coast club.

This year’s Sunday, April 10 opening day was a typically

breezy blue sky day, despite a forecast for rain. The

Redondo Yacht Club began the ceremonies with three

trumpeters from Redondo High Jazz band, under the direction

of director Ray Vizcarra, performing “The National

Anthem.”

King Harbor’s Yacht Club ceremony followed with

performances of “God Bless the USA” by Dave Barrette

and “Amazing Grace” by Michael Forbes. The ceremony

was attended by U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Halibut Commander

James Hurtt. Following the ceremony, Commander

Hurtt and his crew led tours of their 87-foot

cutter, which was docked at the club. In the afternoon

Port Royal Yacht Club began its opening day ceremony

with the “Pledge of Allegiance” led by Boy Scout Troop

966, followed by “The National Anthem” sung by director

Russell Densmore.

1. Redondo Union High Jazz

band’s Sam White, Joaquin Escalante

and Anthony Gallardo

perform the “National Anthem” at

the Redondo Beach Yacht Club

opening day ceremonies.

2. Redondo Beach Yacht Club’s

John Ellinwood rings eight bells in

memory of club members who

passed away over the past year.

3. Outgoing Redondo Beach

Yacht Club Commodore Eric

Hardt presents his wife Deb with

the traditional bouquet of flowers.

4. Former Port Royal commodores

Lynda Madden (left)

and Brenda Bloom (right) are

welcomed into the Order of the

Blue Gavel by District 11 President

Susana Araico and Vice

President Sheila Anderson.

5. Attending the Redondo Beach

Yacht Club opening day are

councilman Jeff Ginsberg, Pam

Aspel and husband and mayor

Steve Aspel, Harbor Patrol Officer

and Firefighter Grant Currie

and Fire Chief and Harbor Master

Robert Metzger.

6. Michael Forbes performs

“Amazing Grace” at the King

Harbor Yacht Club.

7. Outgoing King Harbor Yacht

Club commodore Bob Duncan

presents his wife Nancy with the

traditional flower bouquet.

8. Members of the King Harbor

Youth Foundation sailing team.

9. Commodore Bob Duncan receives

a commendation for his

service from State Assemblyman

David Hadley.

10. U.S. Coast Guard Cutter

Halibut Commander James Hurtt

with crewmembers Matthew

Crawford and Bryan Welsh.

11. The Port Royal cannon is

ready to declare opening day.

PHOTOS BY KEVIN CODY

12. Port Royal Vice Commodore

Barbara Smith welcomes guests.

13. Port Royal director Russell

Densmore sings the “National

Anthem.”

14. Boy Scout Drake Mathers

and fellow members of Troop

966 lead Port Royal members in

the Pledge of Allegiance.

15. Newly installed Port Royal

Commodore Craig Funabashi

keeps a close eye on Redondo

Mayor Steve Aspel.

16. Redondo Mayor Steve

Aspel puts in a call to the powers

that be, assuring members a boat

launch will not dislodge the King

Harbor Yacht Club from Mole A.

Having three club members on

the Harbor Commission might

help, he noted.

17. Port Royal master lessee

Gerald Thomas.

6 7

8

9 10

12

1

2

11

13

3 4 5

14 15 16 17

48 Easy Reader / Beach magazine • June 9, 2016

June 9, 2016 • Easy Reader / Beach magazine 49


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June 9, 2016 • Easy Reader / Beach magazine 51


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