junenews

eight2o

CONTENTS


4

IN THE COURTS

Who is in the courts for an

environmental offence?

6

THE DESIGN TEAM

We look at how the design team

directly impact the work that we do

7

WHAT WE COULD BETTER

Looking at inspections and paperwork,

which all site teams should

be completing

8

HOT WEATHER WORKING

How to look after yourself this

summer

10

SITE OF THE MONTH

Deptford- Millennium Main

Emergency Repair

12

COMMUNITY WOOD

RECYCLING SCHEME

A cheaper more efficient way to

recycle wood

14

TOPIC OF THE MONTH

This months topic revolves around

archaeology and watching briefs

16 18

SMB REPORTING FIGURES

Take a look at April’s SMB’s SHE

figures

SAFETY ALERTS

List of alert to be briefed this month


Prison sentence & fines for poor pollution prevention measures

Case 1:

A man in Kidderminster has been given a

suspended prison sentence, for illegally storing

3,000 litres of waste oil and falsifying hazardous

waste documentation. Pollution prevention

measures (drip trays, bunding, spill kits etc.)

and oil storage regulations (labelling) were not

followed.

Case 2:

A rendering plant has been fined £15,300 after

its effluent lagoon discharged into a watercourse,

causing ammonia pollution and potential harm to

fish. The company’s site drainage and sampling

was inadequate, and so they were fined for failing

to take reasonable care to prevent pollution.

Please ensure that you are implementing pollution prevention and meeting storage regulations

on all of our sites and depots, or we risk the chance of prosecution.


EARLY ENVIRONMENTAL

PLANNING WORK

The team are undertaking early

scoping work on some of our largest

projects,including HS2, Guidlford STW

and Faringdon pipeline, to scope

environmental and regulatory constraints,

inform design options and programme

and minimise the risk of delays.

GUILDFORD

Early programmed ecological surveys

on the proposed new STW location, will

inform design and any actions required,

such as the need for an Environmental

Impact Assessment or Planning

application.

PROGRAMME-WIDE

GREAT CRESTED NEWT

ASSESSMENT

Chris Rochfort and SMB Ecologist

Gareth Lavery are leading on a

programme-wide effort to ensure all SMB

projects are covered during the current

April-June great crested newt survey

window.

This has involved short listing sites which

require site surveys and those that can

benefit from cost savings through the

innovative new eDNA technique .

FARINGDON

Archived environmental data from the

previous main installed in 2001 has been

utilised and reviewed, saving both time

and money.

ENGAGEMENT WITH

STAKEHOLDER AND

CUSTOMER TEAM`

Matthew Coe (Design Environmental

Advisor), presented to Pete Saunders’

team about environmental pressure

groups in the Thames Water patch.

He shared experience on a number

of pressure groups, including Action

for River Kennet and the River

Chess Association and examples of

successfully managing their expectations

in the past, to avoid unwanted customer

complaints.

The session was very successful and

Pete Saunders’ has shared his thanks on

behalf of his team.

THE

DESIGN

TEAM

ENGAGEMENT WITH THE

ENVIRONMENT AGENCY

AND NATURAL ENGLAND

Members of the team are in discussion

with the regulators to understand how

recent changes and proposed changes

to regulations will affect SMB.

An example is attendance at a recent

Environment Agency workshop to

discuss the new exemptions to flood

defence consents.


Site Agents / Managers Monthly

Environmental Inspections.

As Site Agents / Managers, you are required to complete a Monthly

Environmental Inspection for your project each month, and then send this to

your Environmental Advisor. Alternatively, for SMB schemes, you can also

complete the form on Safeguard.

If you work on the DMA works, you DO NOT have to complete one for each

street within the DMA, but can instead rotate around your works and/or pick

the works that are of a higher risk.

Project Start Set up Checklist

We have recently combined the H&S and Environmental Start Set-Up

checklist, which details requirements for site. This should be completed

by the Site Agent / Manager prior to the commencement of any works.

If you have any comments, queries, or suggestions, then do let us

know.

Permit to Pump

If you plan to/are discharging any water, then you need to fill in

the permit to pump form and send this to your Environmental

Advisor prior to any discharge. This will ensure that we comply

with the Environment Agency’s guidelines.

WHAT WE

COULD DO

BETTER

As part of the construction

team, you have a

responsibility to ensure that

the above documents are

completed


HOT

WEATHER

WORKING


The sun and warm weather brings special hazards,

especially for those who work outdoors and who

drive frequently.

Sun exposure can be damaging and increases the

chance of an incident occurring. To reduce this risk,

we should all understand the potential for an injury

or illness and what we can do to prevent this.

The possibility of contracting skin cancer is well

known, but the immediate effects of heat exhaustion

and heatstroke are not so widely understood. They

can develop quickly over a few minutes, or gradually

over a few hours;

• Heat exhaustion is where you become very hot

and start to lose water or salt from your body;

• Heatstroke is where the body is no longer able

to cool itself and a person’s body temperature

becomes dangerously high. This is less common

but can be life threatening.

General signs and symptoms include:

• Tiredness and weakness

• Feeling faint or dizzy

• A decrease in blood pressure

• A headache

• Muscle cramps

• Feeling and being sick

• Heavy sweating

• Intense thirst

• A fast pulse

• Urinating less often and having much darker

urine than usual.

Severe heat exhaustion or heatstroke requires

hospital treatment.

You should call 999 for an ambulance if:

• The person doesn’t respond to the above

treatment within 30 minutes

• The person has severe symptoms, such as a

loss of consciousness, confusion or seizures

If the person is feeling better after using the

above measures, but you have any concerns

about them, contact your GP or NHS 111 for

advice.

Heat exhaustion and heatstroke can be prevented

by;

• Keeping aware- check for heat wave warnings

• Wearing appropriate head wear to reduce sun

stroke/burns

• Using protective sun creams

• Using dark lensed protective glasses where

appropriate

• Increasing the amount of water drunk

• Taking regular rests out of direct sun light

• Reducing the time between breaks when driving

• Planning high physical activities either early or

late in the day and avoid strenuous activities

during 11:00-15:00

• Stopping what you are doing if you feel ill, resting

in a cool place and drinking plenty of fluids

• Informing your Supervisor if illness persists

If prolonged, severe symptoms include:

• Confusion

• Disorientation

• Seizures (fits) and a loss of consciousness.

If you notice that someone has signs of heat

exhaustion, you should:

• Get them to lie down in a cool place - e.g. a room

with air conditioning or in the shade

• Remove any unnecessary clothing, to expose as

much of their skin as possible

• Cool their skin - use a cool/ wet sponge or flannel,

cold packs around the neck and armpits, or wrap

them in a cool/wet sheet.

• Fan their skin while it’s moist - this will help the

water to evaporate to cool the skin

• Get them to drink fluids - ideally water, fruit juice

or a rehydration drink, such as a sports drink.


SITE OF THE MONTH

DEPTFORD

MILLENNIUM MAIN

EMERGENCY REPAIR

This scheme in South London

started as an emergency job, but

has since developed due to its

burst history.

The works involve entering a

1000mm dia GRP main via a 10m

deep shaft and repairing it from

the inside (removing the need to

excavate up to 10m deep).

The team have had a number of

Health, Safety and Environmental

issues, which they have managed

successfully;


• Shaft Location in a dog walking

park - team identified that there

was a risk of smaller dogs

entering the site compound and

potentially near the open shafts,

via gaps under the site fencing.

They decided to contact the local

authority and obtain permission to

allow the grass to grow to cover

the gaps below the fencing base

and also built plastic extensions

next to all pathways.

• Recycled Water - the team

pumped groundwater from the

shaft and used this for the toilet

system.

• Pollution Prevention - There is a

designated area for generator and

fuel storage. These are all placed

on hardstanding, bowsers and fuel

containers are double bunded and

spill kits are readily available.

• Electrical Safety/Housekeeping

- To supply the different office and

storage rooms, generator leads

were pinned across the length

of the site metallic fencing. This

not only increased the risk of

slips and trips, but also raised the

potential for damage to the cable;

which could result in the fencing

becoming live. Using a simple

method of housekeeping and

insulation materials (wood), the

team have made the works tidy

and safe (see top picture).

• Common Sense approach -The

works have numerous external

visitors and so the team decided

to segregate different parts of

the compound. Enclosed in the

centre of the compound, they

have created a fenced off area

which houses the entry hole to the

confined space shaft, leaving

the remainder of the site PPE

free. This allows visitors to enter

the office and site welfare areas

without risk of being exposed to

any activities.

• Community Impact - to minimise

damaging the aesthetic value of

the park to the local community,

the team have placed green

debris netting around the

compound, so that the site

blended in with the grass in the

park.

• Noise Mitigation - the site is

surrounded by a residential area

and so acoustic barriers are being

used around the generator to

minimise noise levels.

• Wellbeing - see-through netting

was used, so that after working in

the shafts, the teams could take a

break in the site compound, whilst

being able to see the views of the

park.


The Community wood recycling scheme should be considered on all of our

projects, since it not only saves resources through recycling, but it also saves on

disposal costs, since this scheme will collect wood at a lower cost than normal

collection.

Additionally, the scheme provides opportunities for the wider community, since

they hire disadvantaged people, including those with mild mental health, learning

difficulties and ex-offenders.

Get your site registered today and support a Community Wood Recycling

enterprise near you.

Wood you chose Community Wood Recycling?

1. Want to cut your waste wood disposal costs?

2. Want to bring positive change to disadvantaged people’s lives?

3. Want to help fulfil your company’s environmental and sustainability policy

commitments?

If the answer is yes to all of the above then go community Wood recycling.


FACTS

1. Nearly all waste timber or wooden items, regardless of

size or condition are collected.

2. 100% of the timber collect is reused or recycled = no

waste production.

3. Other reusable material they accept includes ducting,

insulation and spare fixings.

4. This service costs £16 per cubic yard

5. Register your site with a local enterprise, notify them

and receive collection in 48 hours.

6. Less fuel is used and less pollution generated, since

about 12 cubic yards can be collected in one go,

resulting in fewer vehicle movements.

01273 203 040

Info@communitywoodrecycling.org.uk

www.communitywoodrecycling.org.uk


TOPIC

OF THE

MONTH


Archaeology is the study of human history through

excavations and the analysis of artefacts, including

jewellery, pottery, coins, bones and skeletons. It

is against the law to cause reckless or deliberate

damage to archaeological remains and to remove

them if found.

Typical signs of archaeology include burnt or

blackened material, brick or tile fragments, pottery

or bone fragments, skeletons, timber joists, post

holes, brick or stone foundations and in-filled

ditches.

What to do if you think you have found

archaeological remains;

Thanks to the great care taken by eight2O

during construction work, we’ve managed

to recover fragments of stoneware pottery

and clay pipes dating to the 17th century

from riverine silts beneath the embankment.


• STOP work immediately and remove any machinery

from the excavation

• CONTACT your eight2O Site Agent who will inform

the Environmental Advisor (Via CSIM for SMB)

• DO NOT start work again until an archaeologist

has been to site and handed the site back over

Archaeological Watching Briefs (AWB)

If the Preliminary and Third Party Assessment

(PE3PA) and/or your Implementation Environmental

Management Plan (IEMP) states the need for an

AWB, you must ensure that an order has been raised

and that an archaeologist is on site when you start

breaking out.

If I am working in disturbed ground do I need

an AWB?

Yes – archaeological artefacts are discovered all the

time in pre-disturbed ground.

Case Study 1: Discovery under an AWB at

St Pauls

Works on a Victorian water main (1.8m deep) right in

the heart of London revealed remains of a 17th century

building and cathedral, including brick walls, floors and

cellars.

Case Study 2: eight2O Archaeological

Discovery in Henley

Under an AWB for a FLIP pump station installation in

Henley, archaeological remains were uncovered. The

most interesting find, was a large wooden stake, found

over 2m below the ground surface. Archaeologists hope

to establish the age of this, by radiocarbon dating or

dendro-chronology (tree-ring dating).


APRIL’S SMB

REPORTING

FIGURES

87%

98%

98%

Diversion of Mixed Construction

from landfill vs target

100%

Diversion of Excavated

Material from landfill

vs Target

It is the responsibility of the

construction team to ensure that

our subcontractors are using

facilities which maximise recycling.


4

1

1

PPE

1

Trip or slip hazard

Unsafe Condition Water Quality

Driving hazard

1

Unsafe Condition- plant, machinery & equipment

Every month reporting data is extracted from Safeguard and the BB

Hotline.

Whether a service strike, incident, near miss or hazard, it is all

incredibly important to us.

71

Please ensure that you are

completing your inspections on

safeguard. These are crucial in

identifying hazards and reducing

the risk of an incident on site.

We are getting better ... but we are

not reaching our target yet!

170

COMPLETED H&S

INSPECTIONS


FASTING

PIPE CLAMP

INJURY

HV CABLE

STRIKE


SAFETY ALERTS

Select each safety alert to download to your device. If you

are briefing out to your colleagues download DW01F04, fill

out and return to the H&S safety team.

DW01F04

LV

ELECTRICAL

STRIKE

Click here, to download

safety alert.

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