LF_062316

22ndcenturymedia

The Lake Forest Leader 062316

®

JUN 26

RAVINIA.ORG

featuring

The Lake ForesT LeaderTM

Lake Forest and Lake Bluff’s hometown newspaper LakeForestLeader.com • June 23, 2016 • Vol. 2 No. 19 • $1

A

,LLC

Publication

Lake Bluff farmers market

opens for the summer, Page 3

Melissa Norton (left), of Mundelein’s Holcomb Hollow, chats with Highland Park resident

Alice Zuper and daughter Maxwell Gregory, of Lake Forest, during the Lake Bluff farmers

market on June 10 on the Village Green. Claire Esker/22nd Century Media

Getting

smart

Automated

water meter

reading

system coming

to Lake Bluff,

Page 6

Headed to high school Accomplished

Class of 2016 leaves LFCDS, Page 10

‘She lived

by the

Golden

Rule’

Longtime

Lake Forester

remembered,

Page 12


®

JUN 26

RAVINIA.ORG

featuring

The Lake ForesT LeaderTM

Lake Forest and Lake Bluff’s hometown newspaper LakeForestLeader.com • June 23, 2016 • Vol. 2 No. 19 • $1

A

,LLC

Publication

Lake Bluff farmers market

opens for the summer, Page 3

Melissa Norton (left), of Mundelein’s Holcomb Hollow, chats with Highland Park resident

Alice Zuper and daughter Maxwell Gregory, of Lake Forest, during the Lake Bluff farmers

market on June 10 on the Village Green. Claire Esker/22nd Century Media

Getting

smart

Automated

water meter

reading

system coming

to Lake Bluff,

Page 6

Headed to high school Accomplished

Class of 2016 leaves LFCDS, Page 10

‘She lived

by the

Golden

Rule’

Longtime

Lake Forester

remembered,

Page 12


LakeForestLeader.com news

the lake forest leader | June 23, 2016 | 3

Annual farmers market

brings out diverse vendors

Danielle Gensburg

Freelance Reporter

Lake Bluff’s annual

farmers market kicked off

its first day of the summer

season on June 10

from 7 a.m.-noon with a

diversity of vendors selling

everything from fresh

honey, produce, fruits

and herbs to potted flowers

and flower bouquets,

Belgian waffles and kettle

corn made on site, cheeses,

handcrafted crepes and

coffees, flavorful jams,

and much more.

This year, the farmers

market, which has been

taking place since 1993

and brings the tradition

of local farmers and small

business owners to residents

of Lake Bluff, also

includes live music and

cooking demonstrations,

a talented balloon artist

for children, and a few

local nonprofits and programs

advocating for their

causes.

The University of Illinois

Extension Master

Gardener program, which

is a program made up of

trained gardeners who

volunteer to educate individuals

and groups in

local communities and

enhance community programs

centered around

horticulture and home

gardening, and Venus De

Miles, a non-competitive

women’s athletic event

and festival in Illinois

that benefits Greenhouse

Scholars, a nonprofit that

provides personal and financial

support to highperforming

college students

from low-income

communities, were in attendance.

Nora Carmichael, a representative from The Flower

Garden, displays peonies for sale at the Lake Bluff

farmers market on June 10. The farmers market takes

place every Friday from 7 a.m.-noon on the Village

Green. Claire Esker/22nd Century Media

“I love the [farmers]

market. I have come for

many years, and it’s a fun

thing to do every week. I

look forward to it,” said

Barbara Peterson, a Lake

Forest resident.

There are several returning

vendors to Lake

Bluff this year, as well

as a few first-timers, including

Deeter Cookies,

a company based in Lake

Forest that sells all-natural,

fresh-baked cookies;

Six Generations’ Farmin’

Local, which sells a variety

of fresh fruits and vegetables,

Oak Circle Farm,

a small organic farm that

sells fresh herbs, flowers,

and vegetables; and

The Giveback Kitchen,

which sells a variety of

chocolate fudge sauces

and gives back to Make-

A-Wish Illinois.

“[The Lake Bluff farmers

market] been wonderful.

The people are so

friendly, and it’s been very

busy. It’s a great market,

wonderful area,” said Sue

White, a sales representative

for Six Generations’

Farmin’ Local.

Some returning vendors

this year are The Flower

Garden, which sells sustainably

farmed, fresh-cut

flowers and flower bouquets;

Taste of Paris, a

restaurant and bakery in

Mundelein; River Valley

Kitchens, which is based

in Burlington, Wis. and

sells homemade, chemical-

and pesticide-free

mushrooms, jars of salsa,

hot onion relish and spinach

artichoke dips; Maggie’s

Munchies, a unique

shop for dogs that sells

all-natural dog treats; and

Elsie Mae’s Canning and

Pies, a business based in

Kenosha, Wis., that sells

unusual flavors of jam

such as dandelion, mango

and jalapeno, and green

chili basil, as well as mini

pies.

Please see market, 6

Lake Forest Caucus Seeks

D115 and D67 School Board Candidates

Lake Forest Caucus seeks individuals interested in interviewing

for an open position on the school boards. Candidate must be

a Lake Forest registered voter. Please submit your interest by

August 1, 2016 to:

richardchun@lfcaucusweb.com

Volunteers Seeking Volunteers

Fill Out a VPS on Website

Thank You

www.lakeforestcaucus.com

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project starts by partnering

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4 | June 23, 2016 | The lake forest leader lake forest

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the lake forest leader | June 23, 2016 | 5

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6 | June 23, 2016 | The lake forest leader news

LakeForestLeader.com

Lake Bluff Village Board

Village to install automated water meter reading system

NEIL MILBERT, Freelance Reporter

An automated water meter

reading system is being implemented

in Lake Bluff following

unanimous approval by the

Lake Bluff Village Board of a

$68,000 project management

service agreement with Strand

Associates, Inc. of Madison,

Wis., during its Monday, June

13 meeting.

The system consists of the

integration of radio frequency

technology, meter reading software,

replacement meters and

meter transmission units.

It is being implemented to

improve the accuracy and timeliness

of water meter readings.

Project Manager Brian Hackman

told the trustees that work

is scheduled to begin the week

of June 19 and conclude in

March.

“About 800 manual units will

be replaced and 2,100 units

will be connected to an outside

reading device by installation

of a three-wire system,” Hackman

said. “Installation will take

from a half hour to as long as

an hour.”

Strand Associates was recommended

by the Village staff

because of its success in managing

similar projects in other

municipalities. Among them

are Lake Forest, Highland Park,

Deerfield, Glencoe, Winnetka

and Wilmette.

Outdoor dining approved

Also approved by the Board

of Trustees by unanimous vote

were requests for outdoor dining

facilities made by Hansa

Coffee Roasters at 600 Walnut

Ave. and Wisma Concept LLC

at 24 E. Scranton Ave.

Each request called for six

square iron-top tables and 24

steel bistro style chairs.

Outdoor dining will be permitted

from April 1 to Nov.

30. The establishments will be

responsible for cleaning and

maintenance and adequate pedestrian

access must be maintained.

Tichner honored

Village President Kathleen

O’Hara presented Tom Tichner

with the Phyllis Albrecht Award

in recognition of his “distinguished

service to the Village of

Lake Bluff.”

“The board and residents of

Lake Bluff want to thank you and

the Tichner family for your most

outstanding and exemplary contributions,”

O’Hara told Tichner.

A resident of Lake Bluff since

1973, Tichner served as Village

clerk from 1987 to 1990 and as

a Village trustee from 1990 to

1999. While on the Board of

Trustees he served as chairman

of the Public Safety Committee

and the Lake Forest Cable Commission

and was a member of

the Economic Development and

Public Works Committees.

In accepting the award,

Tichner thanked the people he

worked with.

“All of you have done a great

deal of work at my behest and

now I am beholden to you for

this honor,” he said. “It was a

pleasure working with you and

for you. If asked to do it again

I’d say ‘yes’ if you were all

here.”

Lake Bluff D65 Board of Education

Vote Lake Bluff caucus to seek 2017 candidates, more voters

NEIL MILBERT, Freelance Reporter

Neil Dahlmann and Jill Rosa of

the Administrative Committee of

the Vote Lake Bluff caucus gave

a presentation to members of the

Lake Bluff District 35 Board of

Education during its Tuesday,

June 14 meeting.

Vote Lake Bluff is a non-partisan

volunteer committee endeavoring

to identify and endorse candidates

for the April 14 municipal

election.

Its mission is finding candidates

for five policy-making bodies: the

Village Board of Trustees, Village

president and Village clerk;

the Library Board of Trustees;

the Lake Bluff District 65 Board

of Education; the Lake Forest

High School District 115 Board of

Education; and the Park District

Board of Commissioners.

Dalhmann said Vote Lake Bluff

is seeking to stimulate wide voter

participation and is opposed to catering

to special interests.

Candidates will be selected as

individual nominees for each office

at the town meetings on Dec.

6 and Dec. 7.

Each candidate will have an opportunity

to speak for 10 minutes.

To be endorsed a candidate

must receive 51 percent of the

votes cast.

Tentative budget

Director of Finance and Operations

Jay Kahn presented the tentative

2016-17 budget.

Kahn listed projected expenditures

of $25,371,820 versus revenues

of $17,965,250 for a deficit

of $7,406,570, but pointed out

that “the operating budget is balanced.”

He explained that the bottom

line disparity is because the remaining

two-thirds of the $10.5

million allocated to the middle

school renovation project will be

paid during the fiscal year after an

expenditure of one-third of that

amount was paid during the 2015-

16 school year.

The ending fund balance on the

tentative budget is $4,765,218,

which is 31 percent of expenditures.

However, Kahn said he anticipates

that the fund balance could

rise to “36 percent or 38 percent”

of expenditures because of 2015-

16 surpluses.

Salaries total $316,138 of the

expenditures; benefits $68,456;

and purchased services $282,836.

Property taxes account for 92

percent of the revenue; other local

taxes 4 percent; state taxes 3 percent;

and federal taxes 1 percent.

The board will vote on the final

budget at its September meeting.

The budget will be posted on the

District 65 website 30 days prior

to the meeting.

Contracts approved

The board approved administrator

contracts for Kahn; Dr.

Kevin Rubenstein, director of

student services, technology and

assessment; Kelli Bue, curriculum

coordinator/teacher leader;

Nathan Blackmer, middle school

principal; Margaret St. Claire,

elementary school principal; and

Tracy Roehrick, assistant elementary

school principal.

Their salaries will increase by

an average of approximately 2 1/2

percent.

market

From Page 3

Kirk Cashmore, who started

Cashmore’s Produce and Ponics

in 2011 in Harvard, Ill., is

a unique vendor returning this

year to Lake Bluff’s farmers

market. Cashmore sells hydroponically

grown lettuce,

or lettuce that is grown using

mineral nutrient solutions in

water without soil.

“I think Lake Bluff is a

great farmers market. They really

enjoy having the organic,

local products here,” Cashmore

said.

“I do a winter time produce

basket, bi-weekly, that I drop

to clients here in town, and it’s

been a success. So I really enjoy

this market. The whole atmosphere,

the setting and the

crowd of people, it turns out

to be really good.”

Bonique, a manufacturer

of sweet Belgian waffles and

stoop waffle cookies, has a

booth at the farmers market

where it bakes all its waffles

on site. Dave’s Coffee Cake,

based out of Rock Falls, Ill.,

sells over 73 flavors of coffee

cake online and offers 15-20

different flavors at this year’s

farmers market.

There’s also Urban Kettle,

which sells small batches of

kettle corn made on site; Holcomb

Hollow, another business

based in Mundelein that

sells gluten-free, dairy-free

and vegan jams and baked

goods; Handcrafted Crepes,

a crepe stand based in Libertyville;

The Cheese People,

which is based in Chicago but

sells fresh cheeses made in

Wisconsin; and Leider’s Local

Honey, a family-owned

and operated business that

sells raw natural honey and

pollen locally made in Lake

County.

Lake Bluff resident Julie

Haas has been coming to the

farmers market in town for

five years with her children

and said she absolutely loves

it. Her and her son’s favorite

vendor? Bonique’s delicious

Belgian waffles.

“It’s super kid-friendly and

family-friendly. It’s a great

opportunity to meet with

friends in town. Everything is

great,” Haas said.

Lake Bluff’s farmers market

is open on Friday mornings

until Oct. 14 at the Village

Green in downtown Lake

Bluff.


LakeForestLeader.com news

the lake forest leader | June 23, 2016 | 7

Police Reports

Solicitor taken into custody

for failure to appear warrant

A Lake Bluff Police officer

responded to a solicitor

complaint at 12:38 p.m. on

June 7 in the 300 block of

Winchester Court.

The caller stated that a van

was parked on the street and

that a suspect was soliciting

on foot. The officer made

contact with an employee

who was doing contract

work on Winchester Court

before the suspect was taken

into custody for a failure to

appear warrant out of Kendall

County.

In other police news:

Lake Forest

• The Lake Forest Police

Department did not provide

reports of arrests this week.

From the Village

Attend the Foodstock Concert

Attend the Foodstock Concert

from 4-7 p.m. on Sunday,

June 26, on the Village Green

to benefit the Lake County

C.O.O.L Food Pantry. Participants

can enjoy a variety

of musical acts and food, and

are encouraged to donate nonperishable

food items benefiting

Lake County residents in

need.

Fifth annual Northwestern

Medicine Lake Bluff Criterium

From the City

Water main replacement on

Old Elm Road began June 13

The water main under Old

Elm Road is being replaced.

The project began June 13.

This project will require

Old Elm Road to be closed

to through traffic between

Lake Bluff

June 11

• An officer conducted a

traffic stop at 10:52 p.m. on

Waukegan Road north of

Route 176. The driver was

cited for driving a vehicle

under the influence of alcohol.

• An officer conducted a traffic

stop at 9:29 p.m. near the

intersection of Route 41 and

Route 176. The driver was

issued a warning for driving

without working brake

lights.

June 6

• An officer responded to an

identity theft report at 8:30

p.m. in the public safety

building.

Ridge Road to the east and

Everett Road to the west.

To avoid delays, use Everett

Road and Ridge Road to

detour around the construction

zone. The project completion

date is estimated to be

Aug. 28.

June 5

• An officer conducted a traffic

stop at 3 p.m. on northbound

Route 41 near the Village

limits. The driver was

cited for speeding and driving

with a suspended license.

• An officer responded to an

identity theft report at 2:18

p.m. at the public safety

building.

EDITOR’S NOTE: The Lake

Forest Leader’s Police Reports

are compiled from official

reports found on file at the Lake

Forest and Lake Bluff Police

Departments. Individuals named

in these reports are considered

innocent of all charges until

proven guilty in a court of law.

and Block Party returns July

23

The fifth annual Northwestern

Medicine Lake Bluff

Criterium and Block Party

returns to Lake Bluff on July

23. Fast-paced bicycle racing

begins at 9 a.m. and the worldclass

pro racers begin at 4 p.m.

New categories this year include

a hand cycling race for

people with physical disabilities

and novel fixed gear races

on bicycles with no brakes.

The block party on the Village

Green is scheduled from

4-11 p.m. with music beginning

at 8 p.m. Spectators can

view the racing action either

live, or from the Jumbotron

screen, and enjoy food from

several local restaurants, libations

and live music. For

more information, visit www.

intelligentsiacup.com.

From the Village is compiled

from the Village of Lake Bluff’s

weekly Lake Bluff Letter email

newsletter

For more information, contact

Bernard Pondexter, engineering

assistant, at (847)

810-3556.

From the City is compiled from

the City of Lake Forest’s email

newsletter

THE GLENCOE ANCHOR

New wine bar scheduled to open in

August

A new establishment serving wine

and small plates is slated to come to

downtown Glencoe by the end of the

summer.

Glencoe Wine Bar, which will be

located at 338 Tudor Court across

from Writers Theatre, is scheduled

for a target opening date of August

after interior improvements are complete,

according to co-owner Jason

Walsh. Walsh explained his decision

to focus on selling wine at the establishment

and added that Glencoe

Wine Bar will also offer food such as

small plates.

“We did do a demographic study.

The demographics skew towards

wine drinkers, if you will,” Walsh

said. “Not so much the beer and spirits,

so that was beneficial to us.”

Glencoe Wine Bar will be open

from mid-afternoon to 11:30 p.m.,

according to Walsh, and offer seating

both indoors and outdoors. Walsh

noted that he has the option of operating

as late as 1 a.m. when there’s

a special event at his establishment,

but he doesn’t anticipate staying

open until that hour. He added that

the plan is to have Glencoe Wine Bar

closed when there isn’t an event going

on at Writers Theatre.

“I don’t ever foresee us going that

late,” Walsh said of operating until 1

a.m. “Just in case someone wanted to

host a party or another event to keep

us competitive.”

The wine bar would probably not

be open Mondays, Walsh said, and

they would adjust accordingly with

the Writers Theatre schedule.

“Tuesdays seem to be leaning as to

[not being open], but now with the

additional productions going on at

the theater it may be deemed profitable

to be open,” Walsh said.

Reporting by Todd Marver, Freelance

Reporter. Full story at GlencoeAnchor.

com.

THE NORTHBROOK TOWER

Trustees support proposal for new

assisted living facility

The Northbrook Board of Trustees

hosted a preliminary review of an assisted

living facility application at its

regular June 14 meeting.

The plan’s developer, Heritage

Woods Northwest LLC, hopes to

build a 35-foot structure on 3.07

acres of land at 2060 and 2074

Shermer Road and 2005 and 2041

Techny Road.

The proposal outlined plans for

three floors, equipped with 105 units

ranging from 330- to 850-square

feet. Additionally, the developer said

the facility would include a library,

computer lounge, theater, salon, fitness

room, physical therapy space

and two dining options.

The facility would offer meals,

housekeeping, laundry services,

transportation and living assistants

for a flat monthly fee of $5,500 to

$6,500 per month, with affordable

housing options through the Illinois

Department of Healthcare and Family

Services Supported Living Program

for those who qualify.

As a whole the board supported

the prospective project, offering a

combination of suggestions and well

wishes.

Reporting by Lauren Kiggins, Freelance

Reporter. Full story at Northbrook-

Tower.com

THE WILMETTE BEACON

Comprehensive Annual Financial

Report presented at Village meeting

The Village’s finance director Melinda

Molloy and Jamie Wilkey, partner

at Lauterbach and Amen LLP,

presented the Village’s 2015 Comprehensive

Annual Financial Report

at the Village Board meeting on June

14.

Each year the Village undergoes

an audit of its financial statements

and records by an independent audit

firm as required by state statute. The

Village utilizes the services of Lauterbach

and Amen LLP to perform the

audit.

The purpose of the audit is to obtain

an opinion that the Village’s financial

statements are prepared in

accordance with Generally Accepted

Accounting Principles.

The Village received the highest

possible opinion that an auditor can

give.

Reporting by Todd Marver, Freelance

Reporter. Full story at WilmetteBeacon.

com.


8 | June 23, 2016 | The lake forest leader lake forest

LakeForestLeader.com

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the lake forest leader | June 23, 2016 | 9

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the lake forest leader | June 23, 2016 | 11

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12 | June 23, 2016 | The lake forest leader news

LakeForestLeader.com

In Memoriam

Remembering a part of Lake Forest history

Descendent

of Lake Forest

Scottish pioneers

was ‘serene,

gentle’

Alan P. Henry

Freelance Reporter

Virginia Dean Steele

Taylor, formerly a longtime

resident of Lake Forest

and Winnetka, and the

great-granddaughter of the

1830s Lake Forest Scottish

pioneers Matthew Steele

and Ellen Atteridge Steele,

died April 6 in Killingly,

Conn. at the age of 92.

“Virgie,” as she was

known throughout her life,

cherished her family’s history

as one of the first settlers

in Lake Forest and

was respectful of it. The

Steele family farm, where

she spent weekends growing

up, extended along

360 acres between Routes

60 and 176. Elawa Farm

and Mellody Farm Nature

Preserve today sit on that

property, which the family

sold in 1949.

“You represent your

family through the decades

and the centuries,” said her

daughter, Laurie Taylor-

Curby, of Virgie’s sense of

honor and duty to the family

name. “She was always

serene, gentle and beautiful

within and without. She

lived by the Golden Rule

and was admired for her

gracious and loving composure

throughout life.”

In her youth, Virgie lived

in Winnetka on school

days and spent weekends

in Lake Forest, faithfully

attending Lake Forest

Presbyterian Church with

her family.

“She grew up in a home

full of love, grace, creativity,

athletics and Midwestern

values. All of

those influences remained

throughout her life,” said

Taylor-Curby.

On weekends, she’d often

be riding their horse

Frenchy through the 330

acres of pasture, playing

in the hayloft landing

at the barn, harvesting

hickory nuts, enjoying

family picnics or watching

polo matches at Fort

Sheridan or the Onwentsia

Club. After a morning

of cold weather bird

hunting or horseback riding,

Grandma Anna Steele

would welcome them back

to the house with a glass

of homemade blackberry

brandy.

At New Trier, she excelled

as an athlete and

student. She was captain

of the girls lacrosse and

field hockey teams as

well as Head Student of

Women’s Sports in high

school. She met her future

husband, Lewis Treat

Taylor (deceased 1988), in

middle school, and dated

him while attending New

Trier. They both graduated

in 1941.

She worked at a Winnetka

record shop in 1941 to

save money to attend Lake

Forest College, where she

majored in accounting and

political science during

World War II. When Taylor

returned from the war,

they married and she gave

up her last year at Lake

Forest to support the newlyweds

while he attended

college. They soon bought

their own home in Lake

Forest.

While raising her four

children in Lake Forest,

Virgie also opened her

home and her heart to foster

children and exchange

students from the college.

She was active in the Glencoe

Women’s Club, Lake

Forest’s Church of the

Holy Spirit, and the Winter

Club, while also volunteering

as a Cub Scout den

mother and as the local

Girl Scout Leader. She de-

Please see Memoriam, 18

Virginia Dean Steele

Taylor, the greatgranddaughter

of the

1830s Lake Forest

Scottish pioneers

Matthew Steele and

Ellen Atteridge Steele, is

pictured at the family’s

home in Lake Forest in

1944. photo Submitted

“These kids are driving

me insane!”

Enjoy the royal treatment

with your kids this weekend

at the Princess Ball.

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LakeForestLeader.com sound off

the lake forest leader | June 23, 2016 | 13

Social snapshot

Top Stories

From LakeForestLeader.com as of June

20

1. 10 Questions with Jonathan Salm

2. Crilly’s first solo exhibit at Re-invent

Gallery opens

3. Lake Bluff D65 Board of Education:

Vote Lake Bluff caucus to seek 2017

candidates, more voters

4. From the Editor: Returning to my roots

5. Lake Bluff Village Board: Village to

install automated water meter reading

system

Become a member: LakeForestLeader.com/plus

Elawa Farm is celebrating the beginning

of summer, posting this photo with the

caption “All the pretties in the garden.

#ladysmantle.”

Like The Lake Forest Leader: facebook.com/

TheLakeForestLeader

Congratulations to our @LFCountryDay

Effort and Honor Roll recipients!

@LFCountryDay, Lake Forest Country

Day School commemorated its talented students

on June 17

Follow The Lake Forest Leader: @TheLFLeader

go figure

1993

An intriguing number from this week’s edition

The year that the Lake Bluff

farmers market launched in the

village, which takes place every

year from June to October on the

Village Green. Story on Page 3.

From the Assistant Editor

Change we can relieve in

Derek Wolff

d.wolff@22ndcenturymedia.com

During the writing

of this issue and

after the madness

and the deadline scrambles

of churning out the

last one, I turned 25 years

old, officially closer to 30

than my teenage years.

So much can change in a

week, on so many fronts.

As many of you are

aware by now, The Leader’s

editor Nicki Koetting

is heading back to Texas.

Her last day will be the

day this edition of The

Leader comes out and the

paper will transition into

the more-than-capable

hands of Kirsten Keller,

who was previously the

assistant editor for The

Wilmette Beacon, The

Winnetka Current and

The Glencoe Anchor.

graduation

From Page 10

“The two of them really

typified the idea that our

students are well-rounded,”

Whelan said. “They’re

problem-solvers, artists,

musicians and wonderful

mathematicians. More importantly,

they were chosen

by their peers because

Throughout my nine

months or so working for

22nd Century Media in

our Northbrook office,

Nicki has been a close

friend and a great mentor.

I’ve learned a lot from

her in my tenure working

within Lake Forest and

am grateful for the lessons

that she has taught

me. I will, of course, look

to form the same bond

with Kirsten and help her

immediately get acclimated

to her new community,

one that I’ve grown to

love during my tenure in

the area.

In this business, we’re

constantly looking to

break the news for our

readers on the latest

happenings around town.

Usually these stories deal

with unsavory things like

a fire that has broken out

at a home or an ongoing

police investigation.

Occasionally, we break

“good news,” like when

a police chief retires to

pursue his heart’s desire

and his deputy chief is

promoted.

In that vein, I’m excited

to break more good

news to you. Starting

they are wonderful human

beings.”

Going to high school

will be a little nervewracking,

especially since

many of these students

had attended Lake Forest

Country Day School for

nearly their entire lives.

But the excitement to begin

a new chapter of their

lives was evident among

this week, my role in our

22CM family has shifted

to that of the sports editor

for our Lake Forest and

Highland Park publications.

In this role, I’ll

be able to increase our

coverage of our local

athletes on the diamond,

the gridiron, at the rink or

on the hard court, in the

pool or on the greens and

everywhere in between.

I’ll be working with our

other North Shore papers

to bring you up to speed

on the latest and greatest

in athletics north of Addison

and Clark.

I’ve been fortunate to

already cover so many

unique sporting stories

around the North Shore:

the Highland Park native

who’s racing down his

dreams in NASCAR,

the Lake Forest native

playing in Major League

Soccer, watching Lake

Forest High School’s

Cal Coughlin come an

out away from a perfect

game. As a baseball

player for 20 years and a

coach for two, the son of

a coach and brother of a

Division I All-American

athlete, as well as the

the class.

“I’m sad to be leaving a

place I’ve become so accustomed

to and a little

nervous to be attending

school in a very unfamiliar

territory,” said Alexos.

“But I’m also excited to

move on and use the values

that I have been taught

here.”

grandson of a Cubs draft

pick, I’ve only ever

wanted to be around the

ballfield my entire life.

In this new position,

I’ll get to do plenty of

that this summer while

gearing up to cover an extensive

and exciting high

school slate in the fall. At

the same time, I’ll have

my ear to the grindstone

and am always looking

out for new feature story

ideas — so if you have

a story you feel should

be told around the sports

world, don’t hesitate to

give me a ring.

The Lake Forest

Leader

Sound Off Policy

Editorials and columns are the

opinions of the author. Pieces

from 22nd Century Media are

the thoughts of the company as

a whole. The Lake Forest Leader

encourages readers to write

letters to Sound Off. All letters

must be signed, and names and

hometowns will be published.

We also ask that writers include

their address and phone number

for verification, not publication.

Letters should be limited to 400

words. The Lake Forest Leader

reserves the right to edit letters.

Letters become property of The

Lake Forest Leader. Letters that

are published do not reflect

the thoughts and views of The

Lake Forest Leader. Letters can

be mailed to: The Lake Forest

Leader, 60 Revere Drive ST

888, Northbrook, IL, 60062.

Fax letters to (847) 272-4648 or

email to nicki@lakeforestleader.

com.

www.lakeforestleader.com

visit us online at www.LAKEFORESTLEADER.com


LakeForestLeader.com sound off

the lake forest leader | June 23, 2016 | 13

Social snapshot

Top Stories

From LakeForestLeader.com as of June

20

1. 10 Questions with Jonathan Salm

2. Crilly’s first solo exhibit at Re-invent

Gallery opens

3. Lake Bluff D65 Board of Education:

Vote Lake Bluff caucus to seek 2017

candidates, more voters

4. From the Editor: Returning to my roots

5. Lake Bluff Village Board: Village to

install automated water meter reading

system

Become a member: LakeForestLeader.com/plus

Elawa Farm is celebrating the beginning

of summer, posting this photo with the

caption “All the pretties in the garden.

#ladysmantle.”

Like The Lake Forest Leader: facebook.com/

TheLakeForestLeader

Congratulations to our @LFCountryDay

Effort and Honor Roll recipients!

@LFCountryDay, Lake Forest Country

Day School commemorated its talented students

on June 17

Follow The Lake Forest Leader: @TheLFLeader

go figure

1993

An intriguing number from this week’s edition

The year that the Lake Bluff

farmers market launched in the

village, which takes place every

year from June to October on the

Village Green. Story on Page 3.

From the Assistant Editor

Change we can relieve in

Derek Wolff

d.wolff@22ndcenturymedia.com

During the writing

of this issue and

after the madness

and the deadline scrambles

of churning out the

last one, I turned 25 years

old, officially closer to 30

than my teenage years.

So much can change in a

week, on so many fronts.

As many of you are

aware by now, The Leader’s

editor Nicki Koetting

is heading back to Texas.

Her last day will be the

day this edition of The

Leader comes out and the

paper will transition into

the more-than-capable

hands of Kirsten Keller,

who was previously the

assistant editor for The

Wilmette Beacon, The

Winnetka Current and

The Glencoe Anchor.

graduation

From Page 10

“The two of them really

typified the idea that our

students are well-rounded,”

Whelan said. “They’re

problem-solvers, artists,

musicians and wonderful

mathematicians. More importantly,

they were chosen

by their peers because

Throughout my nine

months or so working for

22nd Century Media in

our Northbrook office,

Nicki has been a close

friend and a great mentor.

I’ve learned a lot from

her in my tenure working

within Lake Forest and

am grateful for the lessons

that she has taught

me. I will, of course, look

to form the same bond

with Kirsten and help her

immediately get acclimated

to her new community,

one that I’ve grown to

love during my tenure in

the area.

In this business, we’re

constantly looking to

break the news for our

readers on the latest

happenings around town.

Usually these stories deal

with unsavory things like

a fire that has broken out

at a home or an ongoing

police investigation.

Occasionally, we break

“good news,” like when

a police chief retires to

pursue his heart’s desire

and his deputy chief is

promoted.

In that vein, I’m excited

to break more good

news to you. Starting

they are wonderful human

beings.”

Going to high school

will be a little nervewracking,

especially since

many of these students

had attended Lake Forest

Country Day School for

nearly their entire lives.

But the excitement to begin

a new chapter of their

lives was evident among

this week, my role in our

22CM family has shifted

to that of the sports editor

for our Lake Forest and

Highland Park publications.

In this role, I’ll

be able to increase our

coverage of our local

athletes on the diamond,

the gridiron, at the rink or

on the hard court, in the

pool or on the greens and

everywhere in between.

I’ll be working with our

other North Shore papers

to bring you up to speed

on the latest and greatest

in athletics north of Addison

and Clark.

I’ve been fortunate to

already cover so many

unique sporting stories

around the North Shore:

the Highland Park native

who’s racing down his

dreams in NASCAR,

the Lake Forest native

playing in Major League

Soccer, watching Lake

Forest High School’s

Cal Coughlin come an

out away from a perfect

game. As a baseball

player for 20 years and a

coach for two, the son of

a coach and brother of a

Division I All-American

athlete, as well as the

the class.

“I’m sad to be leaving a

place I’ve become so accustomed

to and a little

nervous to be attending

school in a very unfamiliar

territory,” said Alexos.

“But I’m also excited to

move on and use the values

that I have been taught

here.”

grandson of a Cubs draft

pick, I’ve only ever

wanted to be around the

ballfield my entire life.

In this new position,

I’ll get to do plenty of

that this summer while

gearing up to cover an extensive

and exciting high

school slate in the fall. At

the same time, I’ll have

my ear to the grindstone

and am always looking

out for new feature story

ideas — so if you have

a story you feel should

be told around the sports

world, don’t hesitate to

give me a ring.

The Lake Forest

Leader

Sound Off Policy

Editorials and columns are the

opinions of the author. Pieces

from 22nd Century Media are

the thoughts of the company as

a whole. The Lake Forest Leader

encourages readers to write

letters to Sound Off. All letters

must be signed, and names and

hometowns will be published.

We also ask that writers include

their address and phone number

for verification, not publication.

Letters should be limited to 400

words. The Lake Forest Leader

reserves the right to edit letters.

Letters become property of The

Lake Forest Leader. Letters that

are published do not reflect

the thoughts and views of The

Lake Forest Leader. Letters can

be mailed to: The Lake Forest

Leader, 60 Revere Drive ST

888, Northbrook, IL, 60062.

Fax letters to (847) 272-4648 or

email to nicki@lakeforestleader.

com.

www.lakeforestleader.com

visit us online at www.LAKEFORESTLEADER.com


All the world’s a stage

New Lake Forest Theatre to be a

purveyor of musical theater, Page 19

The lake forest leader | June 23, 2016 | LakeForestLeader.com

Out of the frying pan

Highland Park’s Honey’s Hot Chicken serves

spicy Southern fare, Page 20

Artists, residents connect at Artists on the Bluff festival, Page 17

Brian Willard, of Chicago, participates in a gesture drawing exercise during the Artists on the Bluff arts festival on Saturday, June 18, on the

Lake Bluff Village Green. Claire Esker/22nd Century Media


16 | June 23, 2016 | The lake forest leader puzzles

LakeForestLeader.com

north shore puzzler CROSSWORD & Sudoku

THE NORTH SHORE: Glencoe, Glenview, Highland Park, Northbrook, Wilmette, Kenilworth, Winnetka, Northfield, Lake Forest and Lake Bluff

Across

Down

Crossword by Myles Mellor and Cindy LaFleur

1. Church area

5. Meadow sounds

9. Tax preparer, for

short

12. Plant life

14. GBN alum who

plays professional

ice hockey for the

New York Rangers,

Jayson ____

15. Time periods, for

short

16. Casanova and

Don Juan

17. Elliptical

18. Former EU zone

body created by a

treaty

19. Mice predator

20. Gardener’s need

22. As well

23. “Finally!”

27. One who could be

a Sunday driver

32. Yuletide tune

33. One may be taken

to the cleaners

34. Perfect

38. Afloat

39. “Fantasy Island”

prop

40. Fine-grained

quartz

42. GBN alum who

is a former president

of NBC, Don

44. Dovetail

45. Doctor’s order

46. Bar drinks

47. Picard’s craft

52. Storyteller

53. Get ready for

takeoff

55. Montgomery state

(abbr.)

58. Sitting pols

59. Quick piercing

62. Song element

64. I topper

65. Inspired sage

66. Type of ship

67. Ethyl or benz follower

68. Entertainer award

69. Small child

1. 60s do

2. Furrow former

3. Music genre

4. Before, to Burns

5. Cut at an angle

6. Earlier

7. Bird with bladelike

bill

8. In a funk

9. Talon

10. You might get

tried in it

11. Andy Warhol accessory

13. Blonde shade

14. Majority

21. Wooden propeller

22. So-called

24. Broadcasting

25. Right this minute

26. Cold dessert

27. Scouts grp.

28. The Iron Chancellor’s

first name

29. Punishment for a

sailor, maybe

30. Gloved one

31. Wow

34. It’s posted around

the neighborhood

35. Stan who created

Spider-Man

36. Capsized

37. Portico (Gr.)

41. Coast Guard rank:

Abbr.

43. Sixth sense, for

short

46. Torment

47. Omit

48. A sheer fabric

49. Kind of test

50. Antsy

51. Short story master

54. Word that means

“kind”

55. Affectedly creative

56. Beat soundly

57. Pine (for)

59. Historic leader?

60. Backboard attachment

61. Social or Hindu

ending

63. “Is it soup ___?”

LAKE FOREST

The Lantern

(768 Western Ave.

(847) 234-9844)

■8-10 ■ p.m. Saturdays:

Trivia

■6-8 ■ p.m. Sundays:

Holly the Balloon

Lady

LAKE BLUFF

Maevery Public House

(20 East Scranton Ave.

(847) 604-3952)

■7:30 ■ p.m. every third

Thursday of the

month: Warren Beck

GLENCOE

District

(667 Vernon Ave. (847)

786-4556)

■8-11 ■ p.m. every Tuesday:

Karaoke

Writers Theatre

(664 Vernon Ave. (847)

242-6000)

■Through ■ July 31:

“Death of a Streetcar

Named Virginia Woolf:

a Parody”

■Through ■ July 31:

“Company”

HIGHLAND PARK

Norton’s Restaurant

(1905 Sheridan Road,

(847) 432-3287)

■Saturday, ■ June 25:

Unfinished Business!

HIGHWOOD

210

(210 Green Bay Road,

(847) 433-0304)

■8 ■ p.m. Thursday,

June 23: Los Perros

Cubanos

■9 ■ p.m. Friday, June

24: Rollover

■7:30 ■ p.m. Sunday,

June 26: The Working

Man’s BBQ and Blues

Showcase

WINNETKA

Taste on Chestnut

(507 Chestnut St. (847)

441-0134)

■6 ■ p.m. Thursday, June

23: Girl’s Night Out

■All ■ day, Friday, June

24: Flight Night

To place an event in The

Scene, email chris@GlenviewLantern.com

answers

How to play Sudoku

Each Sudoku puzzle consists of a 9x9 grid that

has been subdivided into nine smaller grids of

3x3 squares. To solve the puzzle each row, column

and box must contain each of the numbers

1 to 9.

LEVEL: Medium

Crossword by Myles Mellor and Susan Flanagan


LakeForestLeader.com life & Arts

the lake forest leader | June 23, 2016 | 17

Lake Bluff art festival marks 16th year

Igor Studenkov

Freelance Reporter

For the past 16 years,

artists and musicians from

Lake Bluff, Lake Forest

and other surrounding suburbs

have gathered on the

Lake Bluff Village Green

to show off their work.

The annual art festival

is organized by the Artists

on the Bluff, a Lake Bluff

based nonprofit that works

to promote art and support

local artists. This year the

event took place from Saturday-Sunday,

June 18-19.

While some of the longtime

exhibitors said the festival

got smaller and quieter

over the years, everybody

agreed that it’s a great way

to share and sell art. The

fact that the weather turned

out to be nicer than it had

been the few previous years

didn’t hurt, either.

As artist and current Artists

on the Bluff president

Kristin Ashley told The

Leader, the festival is an

outgrowth of her organization’s

mission.

“We like to look back at

all the artists who found

[Lake Bluff] to be a mecca

of creativity since the late

1800s,” she said. “There

have been a lot of artists,

musicians and actors who

came from Lake Bluff

or chose to live in Lake

Bluff.”

Ashley said that the region’s

natural beauty drew

a lot of artists in and inspired

them. The festival

is a way for the village to

celebrate that legacy, draw

attention to local artists and

do something fun for the

Joan Paparigian, of Quatraluna in Winthrop Harbor,

helps a patron pick from her handmade jewelry during

the Artists on the Bluff arts festival Saturday, June 18,

on the Village Green. Claire Esker/22nd Century Media

community.

Most of the artists that

exhibit at the festival are

Artists on the Bluff members

who have been part

of the festival for several

years. Ashley said that new

participants are always

welcome. Any artist interested

in exhibiting should

submit at least three JPEG

files of their work and their

artist’s statement.

“[We get artists] from [a]

100-mile radius, but most

of the people are local,”

said Ashley.

Musical performances

have always been part of

the festival. Jim Kendros,

who served as the event

emcee, said that they try to

spotlight local talent, and

this year was no exception.

Terry Moran, owner of

Lake Bluff’s Moran’s Appliance

Services, was just

one of the several performers

that fit the bill.

“We do our best to have

as varied acts as possible,”

said Kendros.

And, indeed, the performances

aren’t always just

music. This year, Lake Forest’s

CenterStage theater

gave a preview of their upcoming

production, singing

a few songs from “Fiddler

on the Roof.”

The artwork on display

was just as diverse. Ashley

displayed her signature

feather paintings – spirit

animals painted on actual

turkey feathers. She explained

that, when she was

in art school, she got an

assignment to paint something

on several objects.

That’s when inspiration

struck.

“I though the feathers

were like pieces of strained

glass,” Ashley said.

She liked it so much

that she kept working with

them. Painting on something

small requires quite

a bit of skill, but the results

are well worth the effort,

she said. Plus, the feathers

have one natural advantage.

Summer

Tile Sale

Sale

“The birds already have

oil in their feathers, so

the oil point works pretty

well,” Ashley said.

She shared her tent with

artist Robert Nonnemacler,

of Gurnee. He painted portraits

of Native Americans,

and the two artists thought

their respective works fit

well together.

“I grew up in a town that

had a very rich history of

Please see festival, 19

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18 | June 23, 2016 | The lake forest leader faith

LakeForestLeader.com

Memoriam

From Page 12

lighted in hosting bridge parties

and dinners in her home. She

also worked as the bookkeeper

for her husband’s Lake Forest

insurance agency.

“Aunt Virgie’s home was

a copy of her own childhood

home - noise and wall-to-wall

activity circling around her maternal

center of quiet grace,”

said goddaughter Rose Tarr Kilroy.

“There was never a need in

any Aunt Virgie household for a

television; there was too much

life to enjoy.”

Later in life, Virgie was employed

as a pension analyst with

the Methodist Church Board of

Pensions in Evanston. She also

decided to go back to Lake Forest

College, take a final year of

courses, and graduate, which

she did in 1989.

“She was the shortest and oldest

graduating student that day;

but she stood the tallest with her

jubilant smile,” said her daughter,

Louise. “Laurie, Leslie and

I were there to celebrate this triumph;

three daughters could not

have been any prouder.”

For the next 23 years, Virgie

lived with her daughters and

their families in Illinois, Massachusetts

and Connecticut and

was an active participant raising

her grandchildren.

“Mom always said she was

rich with family and three

homes,” said Louise.

A life-long dressmaker with

a flair for quiet fashion, Virgie

continued creating clothing for

herself and her girls, as well

as intricate knitwear and many

forms of needlepoint. She also

continued to enjoy painting,

home décor, gardening and

sports. She remained athletically

active until age 89.

Virgie was predeceased by

her son Stephen Lewis Taylor;

her brothers Merritt and Lowell

Steele; and her parents Robert

G. Steele of Lake Forest and Arvilla

(Honey) Dean of Winnetka.

She is survived by her daughters

Laurie Taylor-Curby (Wm

Curby), Leslie Taylor Jefferson

(Tere North) and Louise Steele

Taylor (Dawn Krasnecky); and

three grandchildren, Matthew

Taylor-Curby in Massachusetts

and Jack and Kelsey Rafferty

in Connecticut. Her remaining

Steele cousin, Joseph W. Steele,

is now the last of the Steele

great-grandchildren in Lake

Forest.

Nancy Sweet

Nancy Frederick Sweet, 88,

died June 16 in Lake Forest

where she lived with her husband

of 65 years, Philip Whitford

Kirkland Sweet Jr., retired

chairman and CEO of Northern

Trust Corporation. She was the

loving mother of three children,

Sandra Harkness Sweet, P. W.

Kirkland Sweet III, and David

A. F. Sweet, and two daughtersin-law,

Carol Monek Sweet and

Patricia Shields Sweet.

Sweet grew up in Paxton, Ill.,

the daughter of Mr. and Mrs.

David Arthur Frederick, and

was a graduate of Emma Willard

School and of Wellesley

College. She served as benefit

chairman for a number of charitable

organizations, including

Ravinia Festival, the Infant

Welfare Society of Chicago, the

Boys and Girls Clubs, the Chicago

Symphony and the Lyric

Opera Guild. She also served

as women’s board president of

the Illinois Children’s Home

and Aid Society and was on

the board of the Emma Willard

School. Sweet loved music and

dancing, played the piano and

was an avid bridge player at

the Everglades Club and at the

Bath & Tennis Club in Palm

Beach, as well as at the Lyford

Cay Club in the Bahamas. She

golfed at Onwentsia Club and

Shoreacres on the North Shore.

Her beloved grandchildren

are Stephanie Sweet Ingersoll,

Stacy Sweet Patlovich, Marilla

Sweet Gedge, Hannah Harding

Sweet, David A. F. Sweet Jr.

and Philip W. K. Sweet II, and

she is also survived by three

great-grandchildren: Henry

Wright Ingersoll, George Kirkland

Ingersoll and Whitford

Theodore Patlovich. In lieu of

flowers, donations may be sent

to the Emma Willard School,

285 Pawling Ave., Troy, N.Y. or

made at emmawillard.org.

John Trees

John (Jack) Simmons

Trees, 84,

of Phoenix, Ariz.

previously of Lake

Forest, Lake Bluff, Sedona, Ariz.

and Twin Lakes, Wisc. passed

away June 4. Trees battled Parkinson’s

disease for more than

25 years and was an inspiration

to all who knew him. He is survived

by his wife of more than

60 years, Dianne; children, Julie

(JD) Watumull, Michael, Nancy

Vogt; grandchildren, Jared

(Kristin) and Ashley Watumull,

Joshua and Savannah Trees, Alexander

and Eleanor Vogt; greatgrandchildren,

Jade and Jemma

Watumull; and numerous nieces

and nephews. He is also survived

by his sister, Joanne (Phillip)

Davis. Trees was preceded

in death by his parents, Harry A.

and Eleanor Smith Trees and his

brother, James Frederick Trees.

Trees was born in Evanston

and grew up in Glencoe, graduating

from New Trier High

School. After graduating from

DePauw University in 1954, he

served as a first lieutenant in the

United States Air Force until

1957. He was a navigator in the

Strategic Air Command. He then

began what would be a lifelong

career working for Allstate Insurance

Company, retiring as a

group vice president.

During his time at Allstate,

Trees was a dedicated advocate

for automobile safety. He served

as the director of the Highway

Loss Data Institute in Washington

from 1972-1990; Insurance

Institute for Highway Safety

from 1987-1990; Advocates for

Auto and Highway Safety from

1989-1990 and was appointed

by President James Carter to the

National Highway Safety Advisory

Commission in 1978. He

also served his local community

as a member of the Lake Bluff

Board of Appeals from 1971-

1978 and the Lake Bluff School

Board from 1964-1971. In lieu

of flowers, donations may be

made to the National Parkinson’s

Foundation and The Salvation

Army.

Helen Walther

Helen Lenore Walther, 76,

of Pleasant Prairie, Wisc., formerly

of Lake Forest, died June

13 at Grande Prairie Health and

Rehabilitation Center in Pleasant

Prairie. She was born Feb.

22, 1940 in Herrin, Ill. At an

early age Helen’s family moved

to Lake Forest where she grew

up and later met her husband

Leonard. They married in 1958

and together they raised their

family in Zion. They retired to

Nevada but moved back to the

Midwest to be closer to family

in 2007.

Walther worked for several

local businesses, but if she was

asked she would say her most

important job and the one she

was most proud of was raising

her eight children. Family was

everything to her. She had many

interests including painting,

drawing, games, spending time

with friends and family, and

helping others. She was a very

compassionate, generous person

whose kindnesses touched

many people throughout her

life.

She is survived by her loving

husband of 58 years, Leonard

Walther, her devoted children

Cheryl (Kevin) Bisig, Nora

(Don) Orrick, Leonard (Maria)

Walther, Mary (Steve) Robinson,

Joseph Walther, Linda Walther,

Judy (Michael) Bubser,

David (Colette) Walther; her

adoring 15 grandchildren and

nine great-grandchildren; her

sisters Margaret (the late John)

Simpson, Maureen (Don) Coleman,

her sister-in-law Ethel Elwell,

as well as many nieces and

nephews. Walther was preceded

in death by her parents Leonard

and Allene Elwell, her brother

James Elwell and her sister Allene

Elwell. In lieu of flowers,

please send donations to The

Michael J. Fox Foundation for

Parkinson’s Research, Donation

Processing, P.O. Box 5014,

Hagerstown, Md.

Have someone’s life you’d

like to honor? Email

d.wolff@22ndcenturymedia.com

with information about a loved one

who was part of the Lake Forest/

Lake Bluff community.

Faith Briefs

Church of St. Mary (175 E. Illinois Road, Lake

Forest)

Eucharistic Adoration

Each Wednesday, the Church

of St. Mary offers Eucharistic

Adoration following the 8 a.m.

Mass. A rosary will be prayed

each week at 6:40 p.m. with

Benediction following at 7 p.m.

Summer School of Faith

For its fourth consecutive

summer, the St. Mary’s Adult

Education Committee invites

you to the “Summer School of

Faith” for five Tuesday evenings

beginning June 14. Sessions start

at 7 p.m. in the Stuart Room at

the Gorton Community Center

and are free and open to the public.

This summer’s lectures focus

on overcoming secular obstacles

to faith in the 21st century. These

classes are especially helpful in

answering fundamental questions,

including “Why believe in

God at all?”

Union Church of Lake Bluff (525 E. Prospect

Ave., Lake Bluff)

Live Wires

Live Wires is the Union

Church youth group for fourththrough

sixth-graders. The group

meets on Wednesdays in Fellowship

Hall at the church from 4 to

5 p.m. for lively discussion and

fun activities.

The Church of the Holy Spirit (400 E.

Westminster Road, Lake Forest)

Coffee and Conversation

On Sundays, join the Rev.

Alan James in the Armour Room

at 10 a.m. for a lively and informative

discussion.

Christ Church of Lake Forest (100 N. Waukegan

Road)

The Bridge Young Adults Group

Every Wednesday from 7-9

p.m. If you think you’re a young

adult, you are welcome to join.

Contact TheBridgeCCLF@

gmail.com for more information.

Submit information for

The Leader’s Faith page to

d.wolff@22ndcenturymedia.com

The deadline is noon on Thursday.

Questions? Call (847) 272-4565

ext. 24.


LakeForestLeader.com life & Arts

the lake forest leader | June 23, 2016 | 19

New theater company launches in Lake Forest

Danielle Gensburg

Freelance Reporter

Although there’s no

shortage of appreciation

for the arts in Lake Forest

— from popular plays and

musicals being performed

throughout the year by

CenterStage in Lake Forest

and Citadel Theatre,

to concerts put on by the

professional Lake Forest

Symphony, art exhibits

and events hosted by Re-

Invent Gallery, and one of

the largest, interdisciplinary

artists retreats in the

country located at Ragdale

— the city has welcomed

a brand new addition to its

arts community, known as

Lake Forest Theatre.

Hoping to become the

leading professional musical

theater in Lake Forest

and the surrounding suburbs

in Lake County, Lake

Forest Theatre opened this

year and is kicking off

its inaugural season with

three musicals that have

won 10 Tony awards combined:

“The Secret Garden,”

which opened June

1, with performances going

until July 2; “Young

Frankenstein,” showing

from Oct. 7-30; and “A

Chorus Line,” which is

being held from March

24-April 16.

“I always dreamt of

owning my own theater

company,” said Steve

Malone, Lake Forest Theatre

founder and managing

artistic director. “I wanted

to do something on a different

level. I wanted the

artist and the performer to

feel extremely provided

for, supported and pampered.

And I really wanted

it to be a very collaborative

experience.”

Malone chose Lake

Forest as the destination

for his new theater,

which will perform all of

its shows for the inaugural

season at the John and

Nancy Hughes Theatre at

the Gorton Community

Center, because of a need

he recognized in the community

for a preeminent

professional arts company

that would be similar to

Writers Theatre in Glencoe.

“Lake Forest definitely

could support another theater

company. There’s a

need for all levels of theater.

The community itself

has been totally supportive.

Everyone seems to be

interested in what we’re

doing. I think we’re on

to something very good,”

Malone said.

Each of the company’s

performances will be accompanied

by a live orchestra,

and concessions,

such as wine and soft

drinks, will be available

for purchase in the lobby

before, during and after

every show.

Malone said his new

Steve Malone, Lake Forest

Theatre’s founder and

managing artistic director

(left), goes over scenes

with Elizabeth Mazur,

the actress portraying

Martha in the company’s

inaugural production,

“The Secret Garden.” 22nd

Century Media File Photo

theater company focuses

on musicals and will provide

four musicals each

year, eventually growing

to include one classic, nonmusical

performance every

year like “A Streetcar

Named Desire” or “Who’s

Afraid of Virginia Woolf.”

“I want it to be family

entertainment. I’m trying

to pick shows that have

appeal on many levels,”

Malone said. “These are

going to be more recognizable

titles, maybe done

on a different level and

hopefully done with more

creative twists. Shows that

have messages in them

and lessons to be learned.

Those are the kind of

shows I’m looking to do.

“I definitely want to

establish a high-quality,

professional, paid environment

for the actors,

the production staff that

works on it, and for the

musicians. And in return,

what we’ll deliver to the

community will be top

quality. And I want it to

be a theater that you want

to come back to, and you

want to tell your family

and friends about. I want

to get back to those times

when people used to celebrate

the arts and came to

theater more frequently.”

Malone said more than

300 people auditioned

for the company’s first

show, “The Secret Garden,”

and both equity and

non-equity actors are welcome

to audition for each

show. Rehearsals for each

show take place for five

to five-and-a-half weeks

in a 28-room house at

600 Broadsmoore Drive

in Lake Forest owned by

Malone that functions as

a creative and active environment.

The house will

also host a number of special

events for the 2016 inaugural

season, including

a Halloween Masquerade

Ball on Oct. 31 and “The

Twelve Days of Christmas”

party from Dec. 5-21

that will kick off the company’s

capital campaign

to raise funds to build its

own theater and campus

down the road.

Malone said that building

a brand new arts complex

for Lake Forest Theatre,

which, in addition to

the theater, could include

a restaurant, acting, dance

and singing classes for

adults and children, a gift

shop, and a set/prop area,

would cost between $25-

30 million.

Malone said he feels

that theater is an incredibly

worthwhile industry,

as well as creatively challenging.

“It forces you to be very

much in tune with your

body, your mind, your

spirit. It allows you to just

be creative. It allows both

sides of your brain to be

working at the same time.

For some people that’s a

challenge, but for most actors

it’s a joy,” Malone said.

“Theater can not only build

confidence, it can bring

you to a whole other level

personally. You can be that

introverted person in your

everyday life and then all

of a sudden you have to

learn how to work in a team

environment. Putting on a

show is the best example of

teamwork.”

While a veteran of the

theater industry for over

40 years, having performed

since he was 13

years old and been what

he described as a “character

actor” in storefront theaters

all across Chicago,

the North Shore, and the

south and west suburbs,

Malone has dabbled in

fields in his professional

life that are as varied from

theater as possible.

Receiving his bachelor’s

degree in marketing

and finance from Indiana

University and his MBA

from Northwestern University’s

Kellogg School

of Management, Malone

started out working in advertising

and marketing

and later opened up a bed

and breakfast type of business

for dogs in Chicago,

which included canine

daycare and overnight

boarding.

With his canine business

taking off and standing on

its own, Malone delved

into real estate next. He

worked in real estate for

the last 12-15 years before

deciding it was time for

another change.

“This is a dream of mine

to open this [theater company],

and it’s a dream I

hope I never wake from.

I’ve been able to feel that

this is the right place, at

the right time, in the right

city. I wish I had done this

earlier,” Malone said.

To learn more about

Lake Forest Theatre or to

purchase tickets to its upcoming

performance of

“The Secret Garden,” visit

www.lakeforesttheatre.

com.

festival

From Page 17

wars with Native Americans,

so I’ve always been

exposed to day, and I’ve

always been interested,” he

said. “I think it’s their story,

and what a sad story it is

[that inspired me]. I’d just

like people to remember

them.”

Other artists displayed

jewelry. Alison Tompkins,

of Lake Bluff, said she was

inspired by designs from

1920s, 1930s and 1940s,

singling out Coco Chanel as

one of her major influences.

“I allow the beads to

speak for themselves, and

I just add something to add

to their beauty,” she said.

All of the artists who

spoke to The Leader had

nothing but positive things

to say about the festival.

“It’s a nice show, a pretty

good show,” said photographer

Bob London, of Chicago.

“I’m very happy. I

made some sales.”

Painter Jacqui Blatchford,

of Lake Forest, has

been part of the festival

since the beginning. She

said that things may have

changed, but its fundamental

spirit survived.

“It got smaller [over the

years],” said Blatchford.

“We don’t have quite as

many exhibitors. But I love

it. It’s a lovely little show.

I’m very happy here.”

It says something about

the festival’s impact that at

least one of the kids who

showed up during the early

days of the festival became

an artist himself.

Brian Willard told The

Leader that he started

painting when he was 11

because the work he saw

at the event inspired him.

He credited Blatchford,

as well Lake Forest High

School art teacher Melissa

Doucette, as major influences

and mentors.

“[The festival] is wonderful,”

he said.

“This is how I met Jacqui

Blatchford. It’s how I got

into art – I found my teacher

and my mentor. It’s filled

with great people who are

supporting each other.”


20 | June 23, 2016 | The lake forest leader dining out

LakeForestLeader.com

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At Honey’s Hot, Southernstyle

spice worth the bite

Colin Hanner

Contributing Editor

At the end of February,

Jeff Shapiro and Dean Eliacostas,

the minds behind

local favorite Real Urban

Barbecue, packed a car and

went on a culinary journey

some 500 miles south to

Nashville. Beside the legendary

honky-tonk style

music that lines Broadway,

the Music City is known

for something else that the

pair were looking to bring

north: hot chicken.

Sixteen restaurants were

on the agenda, including

Prince’s Hot Chicken

Shack, the supposed proprietor

of the original

spicy deep-fried poultry

delicacy. Shapiro and

Eliacostas ate their way

through the town, sometimes

up to six restaurants

in a day. By the end, they

had narrowed down what

they wanted to bring back

to Highland Park.

Enter Honey’s Hot

Chicken, the fast casual,

chef-inspired hot chicken

restaurant opening in

Highland Park on Friday,

June 24, on St. John’s Avenue

in the former Kip’s

Delicatessen location.

Shapiro, who grew up

in Highland Park, recalled

the Kentucky Fried Chicken

that used to be in Highland

Park. Where are people

supposed to get their

fried chicken now?

“There was need and a

void for fried chicken,”

Shapiro said. “When I

asked people where they

would go for fried chicken,

everyone just kind of

had that blank stare – nobody

knows where to go

for fried chicken.”

Shapiro and Eliacostas

The Nashville hot chicken is seasoned with variety of

spices like cayenne pepper, paprika and chili powder.

Derek Wolff/22nd Century Media

Honey’s Hot Chicken

1791 St. Johns Ave.,

Highland Park

(847) 432-6300

www.

honeyshotchicken.com

11 a.m.-9 p.m.

Tuesday-Sunday

Closed Mondays

welcomed Assistant Editor

Derek Wolff and me into

the space last week to taste

a bit of Southern fare in a

far-from-home setting.

Eliacostas prepared us

a high-table full of food,

a catered event which

looked like it was meant

for 10, but only eaten

by two. But hey, it’s the

South, and family-style is

encouraged.

The fried chicken is prepared

in a variety of different

ways: original, honey

butter, Nashville hot, buffalo,

or dusted with zesty

ranch or a Mediterraneanbased

za’atar seasoning.

“It’s going to be fried

chicken the way you want

it,” Shapiro said. “It’s really

going to separate us

from everybody else.”

We tried the honey butter

hot chicken first, made

with straight-from-thecomb

honey and whipped

butter. It’s not too sweet

(perfect for dinner), and

the leftover honey butter is

great for dipping with the

flaky homemade biscuits.

Onto the fried grits,

which are cooked as you

would typical grits, sat to

cool and congeal and then

shaped with a circular cutter.

White cheddar mac ‘n’

cheese, roasted potato salad,

Buffalo chicken spring

rolls, jalapeno corn fritters

and grilled watermelon

with feta cheese round out

the sides.

When Real Urban Barbecue

opened in Highland

Park, Shapiro recalled a

line out the door to fill a

void of Southern fare. He’s

hoping that Honey’s will

have similar success.

“I think we’ll have that

same type of success here

because of the fact that we

own other restaurants; we

know the municipality,” he

said.

“I grew up, my kids

grew up here, my wife

works here in downtown

Highland Park, we have

other businesses in Highland

Park — just because

of that, the buzz is all over

the place.”


LakeForestLeader.com life & Arts

the lake forest leader | June 23, 2016 | 21

Lake Forest Symphony

announces 2016-17 season

Book Lovers’

Lunch features

LF author

300 attend

Bernie’s Book

Bank event

Submitted by Bernie’s

Book Bank

Three-hundred guests

from the city and suburbs

gathered May 6 at Bernie’s

Book Bank in Lake

Bluff in celebration of its

fifth annual Book Lovers’

Lunch.

This year, the featured

speaker was New York

Times best-selling author

and Lake Forest resident

Jen Lancaster. Lancaster

shared stories about everything

from the importance

of volunteering to her career

misadventures and

signed copies of her latest

release “The Best of Enemies.”

Guests enjoyed a lunch

prepared by Chef John des

Rosiers, who caters all the

special events at the nonprofit’s

expanded book

processing center and

event facility.

Bernie’s Book Bank is

the leading provider of

new and gently used books

to at-risk children in the

Chicagoland area. The

lunch helped raise money

to meet the nonprofit’s

goal of distributing four

million books to at-risk

Chicago-area children by

the end of 2016.

Co-chair Jill Rosini of Deerfield, Bernie’s Book Bank Founder and

Executive Director Brian Floriani, author and special guest Jen

Lancaster of Lake Forest, and event co-chairs Julie Gish of Lake

Forest and Jacqueline Babb of Glencoe. Photos by Eric Decker/

Bernie’s Book Bank

Rosemary Ryan, of Lake Forest.

Tracy Barrett, Betsy Skarecky and Kelly Huegunard, all of Lake

Forest.

“The Best of Enemies” author Jen Lancaster, of Lake Forest,

presents at the Book Lovers’ Lunch on May 6.

Submitted by the Lake Forest

Symphony

The Lake Forest Symphony announced

the debut of two new concert

series in Lake Forest in its 2016-

17 concert season in addition to five

pairs of subscription concerts.

The new offerings include two

concerts for families and young children

and the debut of a salon concert

series combining music and commentary

in an intimate and informal

setting. Both will be held in Lake

Forest’s Gorton Community Center.

The season will be the regional orchestra’s

59th year of operating and

it remains the only professional orchestra

in Lake County. Under the

baton of its internationally recognized

music director Vladimir Kulenovic,

the orchestra has expanded its

mission to include educational and

community engagement initiatives.

Lake Forest Symphony 2016-17

season overview

All five subscription concerts will

be conducted by the orchestra’s music

director Vladimir Kulenovic, who

will be in his third season with the

orchestra and whose contract was recently

extended for another four seasons.

Kulenovic was the 2015 Solti

Foundation U.S. Conducting Fellow

and in the same year was named

“Chicagoan of the Year in Classical

Music” by the Chicago Tribune.

Highlights of the subscription

season include the ongoing retrospective

of all 104 symphonies by

Franz Joseph Haydn, masterworks

by Beethoven, Dvořák, Brahms and

Tchaikovsky, as well as gorgeous

and powerful modern works by Arvo

Pärt and LFS Composer-in-Residence

James Stephenson.

Soloists will feature local and international

favorites including Stefan

Milenkovich (violin), Allison

Eldredge (cello), John Bruce Yeh

(clarinet) and Ilya Yakushev (piano).

Members of the orchestra will also

be featured as soloists in music of

Shostakovich and Hindemith.

“Next season will feature works

that are both familiar and new to

our audiences, and I look forward

to working with our slate of talented

soloists who will bring insightful

musical interpretations to their performances,”

Kulenovic said. “I especially

look forward to working with

members of our orchestra who will

be featured as soloists on two concerts

and my appearance on the new

salon concert series, where I will

both perform on piano and discuss

my musical path that has brought me

to this wonderful orchestra and the

community of Lake Forest.”

“The season promises to have

something for everyone and will

combine familiar audience favorites

with works that are unusual and

seldom heard,” said Susan Lape,

executive director of the Lake Forest

Symphony. “We are particularly

excited about our new offering of

the salon series and our continuing

commitment of offering educational

and family concerts throughout Lake

County.”

Gorton Community Center family

concert series

The Lake Forest Symphony is

delighted to introduce a new programming

series based at the Gorton

Community Center in downtown

Lake Forest for the 2016-17 season.

At this vital hub of community activity,

the Symphony will host two concerts

for children and their families

– an introduction to the instruments

of a symphony in “Compose Yourself!”

and a second afternoon of musical

storytelling with “Crumpet the

Trumpet.”

Salon concert series in Lake Forest

Another new musical offering will

be a series of three “salon” events,

during which patrons will be treated

to an intimate evening of performance

and conversation with Lake

Forest Symphony musicians – the

three events will feature music director

Vladimir Kulenovic, concertmaster

Netanel Draiblate and principal

flutist Lyon Leifer in intriguing

glimpses into the craft, history and

cultural nuances of music.


22 | June 23, 2016 | The lake forest leader real estate

LakeForestLeader.com

The Lake Forest Leader’s

of the

WEEK

What: Four-bedroom, 2.1-bathroom home

Where: 1061 S. Ridge Road, Lake Forest

Amenities: This home opens to a foyer and

a living room with a vaulted ceiling and

picture windows, and a butler’s pantry

with a wine rack and hardwood floors.

The formal dining room looks out to the

backyard’s waterfall and koi pond. The

remodeled kitchen has a pantry, marble

countertops and wooden floors. Step

down into the sunken family room, which

features a gas fireplace, recessed lighting,

surround sound and a ceiling fan. The

master suite has a walk-in closet and a

shower and Jacuzzi bathtub. The backyard

is fenced-in and has outdoor surround

sound, a storage shed, a patio and a fire

pit.

Asking price: $599,900

Listing agent: Brunhild

Baass, Baird & Warner,

(847) 804-0092,

brunhild.baass@

bairdwarner.com

May 13

• 12346 Quassey Ave.,

Lake Bluff, 60044-1461

- Alan F. Menegazzi to

Brian J. Leahy, Carolina

M. Garcia Leahy,

$642,500

• 12842 Jenkisson

Ave., Lake Bluff, 60044

- Gumbiner Jr. Trust

to Caitlyn Brunjes,

$252,500

May 16

• 716 Kendler Court,

Lake Forest, 60045-

3136 - Aandhi Group

LLC to Patrick Burke,

Jennifer Burke,

$900,000

May 17

• 274 Ahwahnee Lane,

Lake Forest, 60045-

2003 - Steven Delfavero

to Jill Hochlowski,

$430,000

• 12554 Meadow

Circle, Lake Bluff,

60044-1172 - Ridge

Enterprises LLC to

Steven M. True, Lauren

M. True, $420,000

May 18

• 309 Whytegate Court,

Lake Forest, 60045-

4705 - Chao Qi to

Gang Xia, Chun Zeng,

$650,000

May 19

• 227 E. Woodland

Road, Lake Bluff,

60044-2166 - Sarah

E. Scott to Craig J.

Shields, Amy M. Shield,

$925,000

• 313 E. Center Ave.,

Lake Bluff, 60044-2505

- Todd R. Helfrich to Reid

Wilson, $800,000

• 339 E. North Ave.,

Lake Bluff, 60044 -

Grabowski Trust to Adam

Warren, Karen Warren,

$425,000

• 681 Edgecote Lane,

Lake Forest, 60045-

2022 - Timothy J. Derr to

Richard J. Wille, Tara V.

Wille, $677,920

• 90 Franklin Place

East 309, Lake Forest,

60045-1239 - Jean

S. Witter to L. Thomas

Gregory, $332,500

May 20

• 150 S. Bradford Court,

Lake Forest, 60045-

2337 - Charmaine T.

Palombella to Michael

J. King, Merry Jo King,

$680,000

• 883 Cherokee Road,

Lake Forest, 60045-

3962 - Michael F. Welsh

to Kim Ann Wagner,

$680,000

May 23

• 107 Lauralton St.

107, Lake Bluff, 60044-

1159 - Charlie Huang

to Katarzyna Kopacz,

$205,000

May 24

• 77 Warrington Drive,

Lake Bluff, 60044-

1323 - Dehaven Trust

to Michael Galeski, Lisa

Galeski, $471,000

• 1179 Grandview Lane,

Lake Forest, 60045-

4013 - Reinhardt Trust

to Andrew Mannarino,

Stephanie Mannarino,

$812,000

• 177 Washington Road,

Lake Forest, 60045-2451

- Ronald M. Hashimoto to

Henry M. Greene, Julie M.

Greene, $735,000

• 489 E. Illinois

Road, Lake Forest,

60045-2364 - James

W. Duncan to James

Moorhead, Mary Gould

Moorhead, $1,050,000

• 611 E. Illinois Road,

Lake Forest, 60045-

2473 - James Lundberg

to Zachary Jacobs,

Stephanie Caparelli,

$455,000

• 882 Cherokee Road,

Lake Forest, 60045-

3959 - David E. Zelken

to Michael S. Weiss,

$780,000

The Going Rate is provided

by Record Information

Services, Inc. For more

information, visit www.

public-record.com or call

(630) 557-1000.


LakeForestLeader.com classifieds

the lake forest leader | June 23, 2016 | 23

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24 | June 23, 2016 | The lake forest leader classifieds

LakeForestLeader.com

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LakeForestLeader.com classifieds

the lake forest leader | June 23, 2016 | 25

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Sell It 708.326.9170

Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It

DEADLINE -

Friday at 3pm

Automotive

$52

4 lines/

7 papers

Help Wanted

per line $13

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7 papers

Real Estate

$50

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7 papers

Merchandise

$30

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7 papers

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• 4 lines of information (28 characters per line)

• Additional lines only a $1.95

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Suite #3 Unit SW

Orland Park, IL 60467

Name

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Phn: 708.326.9170 • Fax: 708.326.9179

www.22ndcenturymedia.com

Exp.


26 | June 23, 2016 | The lake forest leader sports

LakeForestLeader.com

Athlete of the Week

10 Questions

with Jon’nah Williams

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Williams is a rising junior who plays

center field for the Lake Forest High

School softball team. She’s interested in

pursuing softball at the collegiate level.

Her favorite school subject is math.

How long have you been playing

softball and how did you get

started with it?

I’ve been playing softball since the third

grade and my friend introduced me to the

sport when I first moved to Lake Bluff.

What is your favorite sport to

watch on television?

I like to watch football and basketball

because they’re very intense.

What is on your pregame playlist?

My friend Katie [Wickman] and I had

this thing where we did “Jon’nah jams”

where we’d make our own remixes to

current songs and come up with our own

versions. We’d make up songs based on

current songs so we were like our own

mixtape.

Do you have a favorite place to

eat in Lake Forest, Lake Bluff or

anywhere on the North Shore?

I really like to eat at Panera Bread. I

get the broccoli cheddar soup.

If you were stranded on a deserted

island, what three things would

you need to have with you?

Water, tape and a lighter.

If you could travel in time in one

direction only, would you rather go

into the past or into the future?

I’d go to the future and I’d want to see

when I had kids, what they would look

like. I’d want to see their life as they

grow up.

If someone paid for you to travel

Varsity Views

to outer space for a week, would

you go?

Yes I would. I’d like to see what space

looks like. I’m not big on astronomy, I

don’t study it, but I like the way that the

sky looks and think that astronauts and

going to space is really cool as a general

topic.

What’s the most challenging aspect

of playing center field?

Being able to cover so much ground

and trusting other people to catch the

ball.

What is the best coaching advice

you’ve ever received?

I went to a DePaul softball camp and

they were really hands on. They had

people from their softball team that were

very helpful because they broke down

instructions and that was the best coaching

I’ve received.

What’s the best part of being an

athlete at LFHS?

The competition. I love competing and

I like being able to better myself and like

seeing other people better themselves as

well. I think that’s a great part of being

an athlete and being able to compete

against other players.

Interview by Assistant Editor Derek Wolff


LakeForestLeader.com sports

the lake forest leader | June 23, 2016 | 27

Boys Volleyball

Welcome to 22nd Century Media’s All-Area team: Team 22. Thanks to help from area coaches and the

eyes of 22nd Century Media staff, the best players were selected from the nine high schools — New Trier

(NT), Loyola Academy (LA), Glenbrook North (GBN), Glenbrook South (GBS), Highland Park (HP), Lake

Forest (LF), Lake Forest Academy (LFA), North Shore Country Day School (NSCDS) and Christian Heritage

Academy — in our coverage area.

First Team

Second Team

OUTSIDE HITTERS

Ryan Gardner, LA senior

• 277 kills, 24 aces, 43 blocks;

Gardner was named Chicago

Catholic League All-Conference

and selected to the Vernon Hills/

Barrington All-Tournament team

earlier in the season.

OUTSIDE HITTER

Mason Moore, LF senior

• 349 kills, 31 aces, 58

blocks; As one of the most

talented and physical outside

hitters in the North Suburban

Conference, Moore dominated

the competition with his

powerful swing.

OUTSIDE HITTER

Henry Lindstrom, NT senior

• 280 kills, 47 aces, 34 blocks;

The three-time CSL South All-

Conference captain took the

Trevians to the quarterfinals for

the third straight year.

MIDDLE HITTER/BLOCKER

Shane King, LF senior

• 166 kills, 69 blocks; King

scored 248 points this season

and served as the leaders

of the best middle attacking

team in the North Suburban

Conference.

MIDDLE HITTER/BLOCKER

Jon Simon, GBN senior

• 167 kills, 55 blocks; Simon

finished second on the team

in kills and led the Spartans in

hitting percentage in 2016.

Jeremy Doman, GBN senior

• 241 kills, 18 aces; The CSL North

Player of the Year’s offense played

a major role in his team’s run to

conference and regional titles.

MIDDLE HITTERS/BLOCKERS

Frank Schorsch, HP senior

• 145 kills, 61 blocks; Schorsch

was the Giants’ leading blocker

and one of their biggest offensive

weapons.

Brian Stickler, LF junior

• 39 kills, 79.5 blocks; Stickler’s

defense led the Scouts to first place

in the North Suburban Conference.

SETTER

Niko Gjaja, NT junior

• 678 assists, 52 kills; The CSL

South All-Conference selection

helped anchor a strong Trevians

attack.

SETTER

Alex Freidinger, GBS senior

• 804 assists, 23 kills; The

Titans’ 2016 MVP finished

his career as third all-time in

assists at GBS.

RIGHT SIDE

Kevin Lamp, LF freshman

• 230 kills, 58 aces, 63.5

blocks, 484 assists, 94 digs;

The freshman scored or

assisted on 43 percent of the

Scouts’ points in 2016 and

finished in the top-2 in nearly

every statistical category.

LIBERO

Noah Regnier, LA senior

• 630 digs, 19 aces, .902

serving percentage, 2.53 passer

rating (3.0 scale); The twotime

Chicago Catholic League

All-Conference selection set the

school record for digs in his final

season as a Rambler.

Honorable Mentions:

Varun Rao, LF senior S; Ryan

Chiou, HP senior S; Danny

Voronov, GBN junior S; Joe

Ferber, GBN senior S; Dylan

Brown, HP senior OH; Peter

Hindsley, NT senior OH; Wil

Audley, LF senior OH; Bennett

Preskill, HP senior L; Matthew

Byrne, LA junior RH; Jack

Howard, LA freshman OH

RIGHT SIDE

Billy Fauntleroy, NT junior

• 221 kills, 27 blocks; Fauntleroy, a

CSL South All-Conference selection,

dominated the right side for the

Trevians.

LIBERO

Danny Martens, GBN senior

• 326 digs, 13 aces, .915 serving

percentage; The CSL North All-

Conference selection led the

Spartans in both digs and sets

played.


28 | June 23, 2016 | The lake highland forest park leader landmark sports

LakeForestLeader.com

hplandmark.com

GirlS Soccer

Welcome to 22nd Century Media’s All-Area team: Team 22. Thanks to help from area coaches and the

eyes of 22nd Century Media staff, the best players were selected from the nine high schools — New Trier

(NT), Loyola Academy (LA), Glenbrook North (GBN), Glenbrook South (GBS), Highland Park (HP), Lake

Forest (LF), Lake Forest Academy (LFA), Regina Dominican (RD) and North Shore Country Day School

(NSCDS) — in our coverage area.

FirST Team

Forward

Kelly Maday, NT senior

• 16 goals, 19 assists. The U of

I-bound forward garnered Illinois

Gatorade Player of the Year

honors — despite missing eight

games to injury, she impacted

the run of play every game.

MidFielder

Celia Frei, NT senior

• 11 goals, 5 assists. Yet

another talented option for

a Trevians team replete with

offensive weapons.

deFense

Sydney Parker, NT sophomore

• 9 goals, 5 assists. The

sophomore played like a far

more experienced player. She

scored the game-winner in New

Trier’s 1-0 supersectional win

against St. Charles North.

Forward

Olivia Peters, GBS senior

• 37 goals, 11 assists. An

All-State selection, she simply

knew how to find the back

of the net — she finished her

Titans career with a whopping

111 goals and 40 assists.

MidFielder

Paige Bourne, LF senior

• 9 goals, 19 assists. Lake

Forest’s all-time leader in

assists, the Purdue-bound

senior defined the idea of a

player making her teammates

better.

deFense

Samantha Urban, NT junior

• 1 goal, 1 assist. After

learning from ’15 grads Jackie

Welch and Caroline Smith,

Urban stepped in to help

anchor the next iteration of

New Trier’s stingy defense.

Forward

Devin Burns, LA senior

• 24 goals, 13 assists. After

missing 2015 with an injury,

she garnered GCAC Player of

the Year and NSCAA All-America

honors. She is Loyola’s career

goals leader (80).

deFense

Riley Burns, LA sophomore

• 1 goal, 5 assists. Younger

sister of Iowa-bound Devin,

Riley helped lead a stout

defense that recorded 17

shutouts and conceded just 12

goals all season.

Goalkeeper

Dani Kaufman, NT senior

• 16 shutouts, .30 GAA. The

four-year starter and three-time

state champion backstopped

a New Trier defense that

recorded shutouts with

amazing regularity.

MidFielder

Bina Saipi, NT senior

• 15 goals, 12 assists. Voted

team MVP by her teammates,

the DePaul-bound midfielder

came up big in the clutch,

including an overtime goal in

the sectional semifinals.

deFense

Alex Yasko, LA senior

• 3 goals, 7 assists. The twotime

All-State selection paired

well with Burns, forming the

core of a defense on which it

was often impossible to score.

Honorable mentions:

Maude Tarbox, GBS junior GK; Gabby

Baldo, GBS senior MF; Hary Ramirez,

Highland Park senior D; Lauren

Chrisman, LA senior D; Carly Levin,

LFA senior MF; Grace Miller, NSCDS

junior F; Haley Yamada, NT senior F;

Avery Schuldt, NT junior MF; Katie

Sadera, NT senior D; Natalie Laser,

NT junior F; Sarah Allworth, RD senior

F; Colleen Palmer, RD junior D

Second Team

Forwards

Stephanie Ramsey, LA sophomore

• 18 goals, 12 assists. Another talented

Rambler, Ramsey was a dynamic

playmaker complementing seniors KK

Phelan and Devin Burns.

KK Phelan, LA senior

• 23 goals, 13 assists. Very easily a firstteam

pick; the senior paired with Devin

Burns for a fearsome Ramblers attack up

top.

Lily Sands, GBS junior

• 18 goals, 11 assists. When fellow

forward Peters wasn’t the one scoring,

Sands, an All-Sectional pick, usually was.

MidFielders

Nadia Basave, LFA senior

• 10 goals, 4 assists. Voted the team’s

MVP, Basave was the heart of this Caxys

team.

Sheridan Bufe, LF senior

• 5 goals, 2 assists. Pairing with Bourne

in the midfield, Bufe, an All-Sectional

selection, helped control the play in the

middle third.

Lauren Kaplinsky, NSCDS junior

• 11 goals, 7 assists. A First Team

All-ISL pick for the second year in a row,

Kaplinsky was a productive player for the

Raiders attack.

deFense

Kiley Sullivan, GBN senior

• 3 goals, 6 assists. The senior outside back

and captain garnered All-Sectional and All-

Conference honors as both the leader of the

defense and the team as a whole.

Adrian Walker, LF senior

• 5 goals, 1 assist. A four-year starter and

captain for the Scouts, Walker’s speed

and skill anchored the defense.

Emily Porta, GBN sophomore

• 5 goals. The sophomore defender and

All-Conference selection gave the Spartans

some offensive pop from the backline,

including tallying the lone goal in GBN’s 1-0

win against Niles North on April 28.

Anne Brennan, GBS senior

• All-Conference selection. The only multiyear

starter on GBS’s backline, the senior

centerback helped keep shots away from

goalie Maude Tarbox.

Goalkeeper

Maggie Avery, LA sophomore

• 15 shutouts, .421 GAA. The talented

underclassman garnered All-Sectional

honors as the last line of defense for the

Ramblers.


LakeForestLeader.com sports

the lake forest leader | June 23, 2016 | 29

On your mark, get set, go

GLASA hosts National Open/Great Lakes Regional Games

Great Lakes Adaptive Sports Association athlete Christian

Clemmons races during the adult National Open/Great

Lakes Regional Games, which were held June 10-12 at

Loyola Academy and Lake Forest High School. Photos

Submitted

Sam Grewe competes in the high jump. Grewe was one

of 47 GLASA athletes to compete in the National Open/

Great Lakes Regional Games.

Stella McMillan prepares for the power lifting competition.

VERDI

From Page 30

Siskel of Siskel and Ebert

fame and Clarence Page,

now a Washington columnist

for the Tribune.

What other career options

did he consider? Verdi

chuckled and answered

“There was no Plan B.”

Following a short stint

in Neighborhood News he

went to the sports department

where he was a copyreader

and headline writer.

One of his colleagues on

the copy desk was Pierson,

who went on to earn

the coveted Dick McCann

Award for making a “long

and distinguished contribution

to pro football

through coverage.”

Verdi broke into hockey

writing as the backup to

the assistant sports editor,

Ted Damata, who was

nearing the end of his career

and covered only the

Blackhawks’ home games.

“I broke in with Tony

Esposito and Keith Magnuson

and Cliff Koroll in

1970 when they went from

last (in their division in the

1969-70 season) to first

place,” Verdi said.

In the opinion of Esposito,

another lifelong

friend, “Verdi is the kind

of guy who never goes

into anything halfheartedly.

He researched and he

learned. He worked hard

at it. And he’s still writing

effectively (as the Hawks’

historian). He makes what

could be a real boring article

on some Blackhawk

guy into something that’s

really nice and interesting

to read.”

Also numbered among

Verdi’s close friends are

some of the game’s alltime

greats, Bobby Orr

and Wayne Gretzky.

This story has been edited

to fit for print. To view the

full version, visit LakeForestLeader.com.

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30 | June 23, 2016 | The lake forest leader sports

LakeForestLeader.com

‘Best columnist, beat writer, reporter’ Verdi honored

NEIL MILBERT

Freelance Reporter

Bob Verdi is to Chicago

sports writing what Bobby

Hull was to the Blackhawks,

Ernie Banks to the

Cubs, Walter Payton to the

Bears and Michael Jordan

to the Bulls.

“He’s one of a kind,”

said the Blackhawks Hall

of Fame goalie Tony Esposito.

“You see his articles

now and they’re still

tremendous.”

Now the long-time

Northbrook resident and

1967 graduate of Lake

Forest College is going to

join Esposito in the Hockey

Hall of Fame.

His induction as a “Media

Honouree” on Nov.

14 in Toronto is in recognition

of his selection to

be the recipient of 2016

Elmer Ferguson Memorial

Award for excellence

in hockey journalism that

was announced earlier

this month by the National

Hockey League.

Monumental is the word

that best describes Verdi’s

body of work as a sportswriter

and sports columnist

for the Chicago Tribune

from 1967-2007.

During that time frame

he was selected as Illinois

Sportswriter of the Year

19 times by the National

Sportscasters and Sportswriters

Association.

His first sports page bylines

were as the Blackhawks’

beat reporter. He

soon also was the beat

reporter for the Cubs and

White Sox, switching

teams in mid-season and

all the while managing to

stay on top of what was

happening in hockey.

Then, in 1969, Verdi

became the conductor of

the Tribune’s Wake of the

News column, expanding

his insightful and artful

prose to take in football,

basketball, golf, horse racing

and the Olympics. He

also squeezed in books on

Hull, Stan Mikita, Jim Mc-

Mahon, Harry Carey and

Don Drysdale.

“He was the one guy

who had a pipeline to Mc-

Mahon that no one else

had,” remembered Lake

Forest’s Don Pierson, the

Tribune’s distinguished

pro football writer who

came to the newspaper in

1967 and remained until

his retirement in 2007.

“In all the time I was

there he was the best columnist,

beat writer, reporter

we had. His wit is the

first thing that comes to

mind. The other thing was

how he was somehow able

to develop rapport with

the players that other guys

weren’t willing or able to

do.”

George Langford was

the baseball beat reporter

and filled in as a hockey

writer before becoming

the Tribune’s sports editor

in 1977.

Langford’s thoughts

on Verdi: “He is a public

professional of immense

talent and a private man.

Honesty, self-deprecating,

an ability to find humor

and empathy and express

it with understatement that

instantly connected to the

reader. Lifelong love affair

with golf, hockey, good cigars

and perfection in his

profession.

“He has an ability to set

his subjects at ease [and]

gain their trust. He was

never comfortable with the

negative but understood it

was sometimes necessary

and wrote with balance

and without sensationalism.

He is a Hall of Famer

in every sense.”

When Verdi left the Tribune

he became senior

writer for Golf Digest and

Golf World through 2009.

During this time he continued

to be a contributing

columnist for the Tribune,

working as a freelance

writer.

In 2010 Verdi became

the Blackhawks’ “Team

Historian.” The New York

Rangers’ fan of winters

long past writes for Blackhawks

Magazine and as an

online contributor to chicagoblackhawks.com

and

Bob Verdi, the Chicago Blackhawks’ “Team Historian”

since 2010, is pictured with Blackhawks President and

CEO John McDonough, Blackhawks Executive Vice

President Jay Blunk and Blackhawks Chairman Rocky

Wirtz during the Chicago Blackhawks Stanley Cup

championship ring ceremony in October 2015. Chicago

Blackhawks

was the feature writer in

the team’s 2010, 2013 and

2015 Stanley Cup championship

books “One Goal,”

“One Goal II” and “One

Goal III.”

“John McDonough (the

team’s president and chief

executive officer) brought

me out of moth balls — I

mean golf balls — to cover

a sport that was my first

beat,” Verdi said.

Verdi is a native of

Brooklyn and the New

York Rangers were the

love of his hockey life

when he went away to college

at Lake Forest.

Why Lake Forest?

“I was a Milwaukee

Braves fan and when I

found out it was 60 miles

from Milwaukee that sort

of clinched it,” he said.

“And then, of course, they

moved (to Atlanta in 1966)

and there I was trying to

get through college.

“The Rangers were awful

but I liked them. One

year they made the playoffs

amazingly. I happened

to be in my dorm room

one night — which was

a rarity. I wanted to listen

to the Rangers play the

Canadiens and the only

broadcast I could get was

the French broadcast (by

a Montreal station). I kept

hearing ‘rondelle, rondelle,

rondelle.’ I thought

I knew everybody in the

league but I didn’t know

who this guy ‘rondelle’

was.

“That night I said to

myself: ‘I’ve got to get a

job where I can go to the

games and get paid for it.’

And late I found out that

‘rondelle’ was the puck.”

Verdi’s came into the

newspaper world back

home in New York as a

summer vacation employee

of the Long Island Press

where he spent two summers

writing and editing.

After graduating from

Lake Forest with a degree

in English he joined the

Tribune in the fall of 1967,

starting out in what then

was the paper’s Neighborhood

News Department.

Among his colleagues

there were two others destined

to become national

brand-name journalists,

the late movie critic Gene

Please see VERDI, 29


LakeForestLeader.com sports

the lake forest leader | June 23, 2016 | 31

Drury pushes new bill to outlaw daily fantasy sports

1st-and-3

varsity views

Soccer stars of

the SPRING

1. Paige Bourne

(Above). Bourne

earned a firstteam

slot on Team

22 after a stellar

senior campaign

that saw her score

nine goals and add

19 assists for the

Scouts girls soccer

team en route to

a regional championship

winning

season.

2. Sheridan Bufe. The

midfielder scored

five times and

added two assists

for the Scouts this

year while playing

alongside Bourne.

3. Adrian Walker.

Walker was a four

year starter and

standout for Lake

Forest, scoring five

goals and adding

one assist while

playing stout defense

in her senior

campaign.

Derek Wolff

Assistant Editor

Daily fantasy sports, the

slow-burn version of the

tilt of the roulette wheel,

the pull of the penny slot

and the rush of the blackjack

table, operate under

the same set of principles

that gambling dens from

Joliet to Las Vegas do as

players wager money on

outcomes in which they

have limited control.

In Illinois, with allegations

of bribery swirling

around the daily fantasy

sports industry and its two

largest representatives,

FanDuel and DraftKings,

Illinois State Rep. Scott

Drury (D-Highwood)

would prefer to call the

proverbial spade a spade,

filing a new bill on June 8

that makes it clearer that

daily fantasy sports contests

are illegal gambling

acts within the state.

The proposed bill

would amend the criminal

code of 2012 and provides

that a person commits

gambling when he or she

knowingly establishes,

maintains, operates or

offers an Internet site,

smartphone application or

other similar electronic or

digital media or communication

technology that

enables a person to play

a game of skill or chance

for money.

Anyone caught operating

a paid daily fantasy

sports game would be

subject to a Class A misdemeanor

for a first offense

and a Class 4 felony

for a second or subsequent

offense.

“The bill merely seeks

to clarify existing Illinois

law which makes

daily fantasy sports and

games of skill or games of

chance illegal gambling

in Illinois,” Drury said.

“It specifically states that

daily fantasy sports, the

operators of daily fantasy

sports are engaged in the

act of gambling, which is

currently an illegal act under

the law.”

Daily fantasy sports

contest on DraftKings and

FanDuel enable users to

draft a team of players in

a variety of sports in oneday

contests with buy-ins

ranging from $1 to several

thousand. After buying

into the contest, the user

is given a set salary and

picks a certain amount of

players per position for

whichever contest they’ve

entered, earning points

based on statistics the athletes

earn during competition

that day or night.

As a “game of skill,”

users have full control

over exactly which players

they choose for the

lineups, though they are

limited by the amount of

the salary cap and only

having a certain amount

of players at one position.

For example, a daily

fantasy baseball contest

could see users selecting

Jake Arietta of the Chicago

Cubs or Chris Sale

of the Chicago White Sox

as their starting pitcher,

moves that would theoretically

earn more points for

their teams at the pitching

position since both are

marquee pitchers in baseball.

However, this move

would likely cost the user

a significant amount of

salary for the contest.

Last December, Drury

requested an opinion from

Attorney General Lisa

Madigan on whether or

not she believed daily

fantasy sports were illegal

gambling. Madigan determined

that Drury was

correct, though it hasn’t

stopped DraftKings and

FanDuel from continuing

to profit, with Illinois

fielding around 2 million

players for the sites.

“It’s been very frustrating,”

Drury said. “I think

the time has come to just

put a stop to all of this and

say this industry is not

worthy of the special legislation

that they seek and

clarify that the law, it’s

always been illegal, it still

is illegal and that’s where

it’s going to be.”

Drury filed the bill on

June 8 and immediately

got bipartisan support

from Illinois State Rep.

Ron Sandack (R-Downers

Grove). Drury hoped the

support from across the

aisle would be a good sign

of things to come moving

forward, though with legislative

session concluding

at the end of May, it

may take a while before it

could be put to a vote.

Drury expects there will

be pushback on the issue

since proponents of legalizing

daily fantasy sports

are actively working to

push alternative legislation.

“Every lobbyist in

Springfield literally was

hired to work on this issue,”

he said. “I anticipate

that the same interests

will be in reverse on this

bill, trying to get it passed

or not. What I like about

this bill, it’s already a bipartisan

bill. We already

know that there’s bipartisan

support for this idea,

and I hope that we can use

that bipartisan support to

clear an easier path for

this legislation than with

the countervailing proposal.”

Daily fantasy sports

could be headed down

the same road that online

poker in the United States

has taken after “Black Friday”

occurred on April

13, 2011, when the United

States Department of Justice

shut down popular

poker websites PokerStars

and Full Tilt Poker, freezing

hundreds of thousands

of player accounts in a

case that came forth in the

United States v. Scheinberg.

In 2016, online poker

is being regulated on a

state-by-state basis.

Daily fantasy sports

might be headed in the

same direction, but Drury

was more focused the

routes that gambling sites

have taken already.

“I can’t predict,” he

said. “What I can say is

that the path that these

sites took in Illinois was

the wrong one. To come in

here and try to saturate the

market with ads and target

minors to play the game

so that they’ll be hooked

on it as adults was not the

way to bring your product

in and build a sense of

community. What the federal

government will do,

I’ll leave that to my counterparts

in Congress.”

More than anything

else, Drury was concerned

with the long-term negatives

of gambling and addiction

that could affect

players, especially underage

ones who could take

advantage of the sites’ security

measures.

“There’s some very serious

public policy questions

that need to be addressed

with daily fantasy

sports and the biggest one

is exposing minors to online

sports gambling and

the societal cost that will

have as they grow up betting

on sports,” he said.

“That has been one of

my primary critiques of

the industry and the proposed

legislation to legalize

it. What they’re doing

is de facto making online

gambling and sports betting

for minors legal, and

I don’t think that’s the direction

Illinois wants to

go in.”

Listen Up

“His wit is the first thing that comes to

mind.”

Don Pierson — Pierson writes about Chicago Blackhawks

team historian Bob Verdi

tune in

What to watch this week

BASEBALL: Lake Forest hosts Lake County foe

Grayslake in summer legion baseball.

• Lake Forest hosts Grayslake, Monday, June 27, 6

p.m.

Index

29 - Great Lakes Regional Games

26 - Athlete of the Week

Fastbreak is compiled by Assistant Editor Derek Wolff. Send

any questions or comments to d.wolff@22ndcenturymedia.

com.


Lake Forest Leader | June 23, 2016 | LakeForestLeader.com

Bob Verdi, a Lake Forest College Class of 1967 graduate and former

Chicago Tribune sportswriter and sports columnist, was inducted as

a “Media Honouree” on Nov. 14 to the Hockey Hall of Fame. He was

recognized to be the recipient of 2016 Elmer Ferguson Memorial Award

for excellence in hockey journalism, announced earlier this month by

the National Hockey League. Chicago Blackhawks

Lake Forest College alumnus Bob Verdi inducted into Hockey Hall of Fame, Page 30

Place your bets 58th District

Representative takes stand on fantasy

sports, Page 31

All-Area excellence

22nd Century Media’s boys volleyball, girls soccer

teams chosen, Pages 27-28

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