Wedgwood Circle 2016 Patron Report

WCIntern

Wedgwood Circle

2016 Patron Report


FROM JACOB MARSHALL

WEDGWOOD CULTURAL CURATOR

This fall Wedgwood Circle will celebrate its 10th year of community. As we

reflect back on the accomplishments of the last decade, we are so proud to

have worked with you to support over 100 artists through Patron grants.

This simply would not have happened without your help and dedication to

serving an up and coming generation of artists. Thank you.

We have two goals for the Patron Fund this year.

First, we would like to address a long-standing challenge in our process. Each

year we speak to artists who have been put forward by our vetters and we

learn about needs that a Wedgwood grant could meet. We deploy 100% of

Patron funds raised in each year directly to artists, however these funds

typically don’t accumulate until the end of the year. Since many of the artists

we work with have needs that are timely, our ability to meet those needs in a

helpful way is diminished.

In reviewing this process, we have decided to take a pause and not build out a

new slate of artists this calendar year. Instead, we will focus on raising capital

so that we have reserves on hand at the beginning of next year in order to be

able to address artist needs in real time. When we resume building the artist

slate in 2017, we will also continue to fundraise each year moving forward to

replenish the capital that will be outlaid.

Would you consider contributing to the Patron Fund this year to

help us build a strong foundation for giving?

Second, we have been using this year to reconnect with all the artists who have

been a part of our patron program for the past 10 years and to collect stories

and insights from their experiences. We have already spoken to a significant

number of them and their stories and reflections are profoundly encouraging.

In the following pages you will see snapshots of these stories and hear words

directly from a few of the artists who have been impacted by the generosity of

the Patron Fund over the years. We can’t wait to share even more with you at

the Annual Event in Nashville in November.

We look forward to continuing this work with you and to re-launching the

patron slate in early 2017.

Thank you again for your presence in our community and your extraordinary

generosity of time, resources, energy, wisdom, spirit, and love.

Jacob and the Wedgwood family


TABLE OF CONTENTS

2

CANNON BLUE

3

NEULORE

4

THE LIGHTHOUSE & THE WHALER

5

TRACE

6

PAPER ROUTE

7

NATIVE RUN


2016 PATRON REPORT

CANNON BLUE

DANIEL JAMES

GRANT

PURPOSE

$5000 IN 2012

ALBUM PRODUCTION

HOW DID YOUR WEDGWOOD

GRANT IMPACT YOU?

“I just finished my record a month

ago now and it’s been a long time

coming, obviously. It was one of

these things where the grant came at

what was a very pivotal time in the

genesis of what became the album. It

was able to provide me a window of

time to clear my schedule and my

head and dive into what would become the core songs of the album. It was a longer

process than I anticipated to get the album to where it needed to be.

I signed a publishing deal last year and am producing a lot more, including the last

Joy Williams record. As I was waiting to find the words for my album I found these

side projects to sustain me during that process. Now I feel like I have a lot of different

avenues to create in, beyond just the band. The band can stay more pure that way

because I can do what I want to do and not depend on it to be my livelihood. Which

I’m grateful for because I can more freely express myself without having to worry

about it as much.”

WHY HAVE YOU GIVEN YOUR LIFE TO ART, BEAUTY, AND CULTURE?

“The creative life and the art world are luxuries, but they provide a lens for beauty,

shape civilization, and create rituals that give meaning to our inner landscapes. We

can’t put these things into words; they can’t be explained by scientific data. Nothing

has been as impactful on my life, on how I view the world, and how I communicate as

art. I don't have any other way of looking at life except through the records I grew up

listening to or the movies I've seen. They give words and meaning to unspeakable

things and offer value and awareness to society at large. I really feel like ultimately

that is what art can do - raise awareness and consciousness. It’s a vital lifeblood for

any culture.”

2


2016 PATRON REPORT

NEULORE

ADAM AGIN

GRANT

PURPOSE

$5000 IN 2012

RECORD MASTERING

HOW DID YOUR WEDGWOOD GRANT IMPACT YOU?

“I remember when we found out about the Wedgwood grant. We had no idea how

we were going to finish this project. We were out of money and I remember it being

such a joy and really shocking that someone would want to help us put out music. It’s

a very rare thing to have allies in this industry and a lot of times you feel alone.

Having a community of people with like-minded beliefs keeps the wind in your sails

when it’s very easy to give up. It provides a hope.

Right after the grant, we were signed to a major label and that was awesome at the

time... We had a couple of very successful years with licensing and in the sync world.

You guys helped us master our record. A lot of that music was used on different

television shows and commercials. We wouldn’t have been able to live off of music if

it wasn’t for Wedgwood helping us out to be able to get those licenses. That’s kept

my lights on for four or five years now.”

WHY HAVE YOU GIVEN YOUR LIFE

TO ART, BEAUTY, AND CULTURE?

“There is this burning passion that just seeps

out of me. It’s really like I don’t have a

choice. Songs are constantly coming out of

me because it’s been a gift that I’ve given to

have songs just pour out of me. And they’re

not songs I write necessarily, they definitely

are songs I have just been given.

I feel like a lot of the Christian industry hurts what is beautiful about Jesus. I’ve seen a

lot of fronting that everything is perfect instead of showing your true self. I used to

think I had to act like a rock star and be an icon. Now I’m just trying to be more open

to who I am, and I feel like it’s starting to break down that fan-to-artist wall. We’ve

gotten to have some really good conversations with fans, which has been really nice.

We get to actually influence lives rather than be “better” than other people. Because

we’re not.”

3


2016 PATRON REPORT

THE LIGHTHOUSE &

THE WHALER

MATTHEW LOPRESTI

GRANT

PURPOSE

$2,000 IN 2011

ALBUM PRODUCTION

HOW DID YOUR WEDGWOOD GRANT IMPACT YOU?

“The grant helped us finish our second album, ‘This Is An Adventure’. We had no real

financial support whatsoever for the album; we had raised about $10K on Kickstarter

from friends and family to record, but the grant got us over the hump. We recoded

with Ryan Hadlock in Seattle, who worked with the Lumineers and Brandi Carlile. The

Wedgwood grant was monumental in helping us get over the hump of basically

being a Cleveland local band to jumping into the music industry in a more serious

way.

Financially the help from Wedgwood was huge, but even more so was connecting to

a group of people who were pursuing the same thing as us in terms of being people

of faith making art outside of the Christian music scene. Through Wedgwood, we

were brought into this conversation and realized there are a lot of people doing this;

that really emboldened us and encouraged us to continue.”

WHY HAVE YOU GIVEN YOUR LIFE TO ART, BEAUTY, AND CULTURE?

“As a band, we want to create

something so beautiful that people

outside of a faith conversation will

say, ‘I respect this and I think you

make good art, so I want to hear

what you have to say about the

world and about life,’ in order to

build bridges for people back to

God.

Music is also a gifting God has given

me. I want to cultivate it to bring

beauty into the world, to bring people back into a conversation about God and who

Jesus is, but also use it as a platform to do good in the world. I took stock of my life

and asked, ‘What do I have and what can I give to make the world a better place?’

Right now, that’s music.”

4


2016 PATRON REPORT

TRACE

TRACY LE

GRANT

PURPOSE

$5,000 IN 2015

LIVE PERFORMANCES

HOW DID YOUR WEDGWOOD

GRANT IMPACT YOU?

“I feel like the timing of everything has

been pretty dramatic, but I feel like it’s

been sovereign timing. I’ve been doing

music for 18 months. Money is a tool

and I think for me, I don’t have any, so

when I met Wedgwood and got the

grant it really gave me the confidence

and wisdom to invest it smartly.

Any type of money as a gift is a gift,

and I have seen it being used in really

big ways. The biggest has been being

able to pay for live performances. That alone I feel has grown me as an artist the

most because I can write songs alone in my room, but I can’t magically get a band

together, do rehearsals, get gigs, get someone to get me gigs and play without

monetary assistance. In terms of where my career is going, a big part of where it’s

going is because I’ve been able to do live music as I’ve been releasing new music.”

WHY HAVE YOU GIVEN YOUR LIFE TO ART, BEAUTY, AND CULTURE?

“My mom is a singer, she’s been singing for 55 years, and it’s just rooted in me. My

story is that I never ever wanted to sing or sing in front of anybody until two years

ago. Writing has always been a big part of me and so it make sense that it turned

into songwriting. It’s kind of foolish, I think, to be 28 and think I’m going to start

music now as my career, but for some reason music just makes sense to me. I think it

is a calling.

It’s crazy to know in my heart this is what I’m supposed to do. It’s laughable. I’m still

shocked by it, and I want to continue to be shocked by it because I know I want it

really badly. It’s so cheesy, but I literally feel like it gives me life and it makes me see

God, personally, clearer.”

5


2016 PATRON REPORT

PAPER ROUTE

CHAD HOWAT

GRANT

PURPOSE

$6,500 FROM 2008 - 2012

MUSIC VIDEO + TRAVEL

HOW DID YOUR WEDGWOOD GRANT IMPACT YOU?

“We received our (first) grant in 2008 and we used that money to rent a van, trailer,

hotel rooms and gas and we went and played at SXSW (music festival). The

president at Universal Motown flew out and offered us a record deal after seeing us

play.

We also used a (second) grant to make a video for the first single off our second

album, called “You and I.” We filmed that with some friends of ours who are directors

and it kind of jump started the album promo cycle for the second record, which was

awesome. It was right after we had left the label and so all of the sudden the funds

were gone. That was a huge help, we needed that. “

WHY HAVE YOU GIVEN YOUR LIFE

TO ART, BEAUTY, AND CULTURE?

“If I could do anything else with my life, I

probably would. Music, it doesn’t really make

a lot of sense and there are too many times

when it actually makes more sense to quit or

to give up, so there has to be something

inside of you that tells you you have to do it;

to not do it would be like cutting off your arm

or your heart.

I remember the role that music and art

played in my life growing up and I just want to be that for somebody else. I want to

be somebody else’s favorite band and that kid locks himself in his room and listens to

our album top to bottom and feels this connection to it. I want to be for others what I

have received, just as a human being on this planet, for the benefit of experiencing

art. Art is a conduit to experience truth. This is just what I feel called to do. It is

definitely a calling versus a feeling that I want to give this a shot for a little bit.”

6


2016 PATRON REPORT

NATIVE RUN

RACHEL BEAUREGARD

GRANT

PURPOSE

$2,500 IN 2011

RECORDING

HOW DID YOUR WEDGWOOD GRANT IMPACT YOU?

“Our grant was used for the recording, mixing and mastering of a live house show

called ‘Setting the House on Fire’. That was really important because financially it

freed us up to make these trips back and forth to Nashville that we’d been doing

almost every month for about a year, which is not cheap. That is the make or break

for most artists at that level: the finances to be able to have freedom to do things like

that, because if you cannot do that then you cannot get to the next level. You can’t

meet the people you need to, you can’t take meetings, you can’t have co-writes.

Writing and being able to go on some incredible tours was really the beginning of

our trajectory into the Nashville music scene. Being able to do that and having the

freedom to do that allowed us to sign a publishing deal, which is what allowed us to

officially quit our jobs and move to Nashville and be full time musicians and writers.”

WHY HAVE YOU GIVEN YOUR LIFE TO ART, BEAUTY, AND CULTURE?

“You just never know how your music is

going to affect people, but sometimes it’s

the only thing that can affect people. For us

as entertainers, we get to live this constant

energy transfer between us and an audience

and back, and that is life-giving. The music

itself is life-giving and the experience is lifegiving,

both for us and for the audience. I

think if I were to sum it up I would say that I

want to be in music and play music even if

it’s just for a private set or a major arena.

You never know how it’s going to change

someone’s life and help them. Music is the

universal language that does that, I think

more than anything else.”

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WEDGWOOD CIRCLE

716 MONROE ST. NE, STUDIO #2

WASHINGTON, DC 20017

WWW.WEDGWOODCIRCLE.COM

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