LOUISIANA PAIN

louisiana.pain

LPQ-Summer-2016

LOUISIANA PAIN

QUARTERLY Vol. 27

FAMILY

PRACTICE

Dr. Neil Jolly Returns To

His Native New Orleans

SUMMER

RECIPE

Chilled Watermelon

Cucumber Feta Salad

THE TOOLBOX

STRATEGY

Top 10 Tools For

Managing Chronic Pain

WORKING

FOR YOU

Navigating

Worker’s Comp


CONTENTS

VOL. 27

6

2

01

02

03

05

06

12

20

WELCOME

A note from our practitioners

RECIPE

Chilled Watermelon Cucumber Feta Salad

HAPPENINGS THIS QUARTER

Events happening in the New Orleans area for July, August, & September

WORKING FOR YOU

Our efficient navigation of worker’s compensation

FAMILY PRACTICE

Dr. Neil Jolly joins his brother Dr. Tarun Jolly at Louisiana Pain Specialists

THE TOOLBOX STRATEGY

Top 10 tools for managing chronic pain

PUZZLES AND GAMES

Try our Sudoku puzzle and word search

12

Editors: Eirik Johnson, Deseri Ireland

Design: Eirik Johnson

Published by: Vektor Media

If you are interested in a magazine for

your practice contact Eirik Johnson at

EJohnson@VekMedia.com

4 5


Vol. 27 LOUISIANA PAIN QUARTERLY 1

WELCOME

Dr. Tarun Jolly

e hope your summer has been filled with family and fun. We are very

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excited to welcome a new Physician to Louisiana Pain Specialists, Dr.

Neil Jolly. Dr. Jolly is a New Orleans native returning from completing

his Anesthesia Training from Yale and Pain Management specialty certification

from Wake Forest University. He brings a fresh perspective utilizing the latest pain

management techniques and knowledge.

New Orleans during this time of year is hot and muggy, so make sure you stay

hydrated! In this issue, we offer you a healthy recipe to keep you nourished and

balanced. Be sure to check out “Happenings This Quarter” for some citywide events.

Despite the heat, there’s still a lot going on around town, whether you’re an art

fanatic, a sports lover or an exercise enthusiast.

Dr. Satvik Munshi

In this issue, you can also find out how Louisiana Pain navigates our patients through

worker’s compensation. Chronic pain can also affect you psychologically, so Dr. Mark

Skellie, Psy.D., offers some insight on social behavior and support.

Have a happy, healthy summer!

From our families to yours

Dr. Tarun Jolly

Dr. Satvik Munshi

Dr. Neil Jolly

Louisiana Pain Specialists

Dr. Neil Jolly

KENNER

231 West Esplanade Avenue, Suite B

Kenner, LA 70065

LOUISIANA PAIN SPECIALISTS LOCATIONS:

NEW ORLEANS EAST

5621 Read Boulevard

New Orleans, LA 70127

NEW ORLEANS

3439 Prytania Street, Suite 501

New Orleans, LA 70115

MARRERO

4520 Wichers Drive, Suite 205

Marrero, LA 70072

METAIRIE

3434 Houma Blvd, Suite 301

Metairie, LA 70006

CONTACT US: 504-434-7750 or LouisianaPain.com


2 LOUISIANA PAIN QUARTERLY Vol. 27

CHILLED WATERMELON

CUCUMBER FETA SALAD

C

hilled watermelon and chunks of cucumber

are tossed with feta cheese, Kalamata olives,

fresh mint and a drizzle of balsamic glaze.

Fresh textures combine with a sweet and salty contrast

that can be served for lunch, a side at dinner, or a

perfect mid-afternoon snack. Beat the heat with this

cool summer salad that’s as delicious as it is fun. You can

double this to make a big bowl for a crowd, or cut it in

half if you want to serve two.

Directions

1. Divide the watermelon and cucumbers equally

between 4 plates or in one large serving bowl

2. Top with olives, feta and mint

3. Drizzle the balsamic glaze over everything when

ready to serve

Ingredients:

• 4 cups chilled seedless

watermelon, diced large

• 1 medium chilled English

cucumber, peeled and diced

• 1/4 cup kalamata olives,

pitted and sliced

• 1/4 cup (1 oz) crumbled feta

• 1 tablespoon fresh mint (or

basil) leaves, thinly sliced

• 3 tbsp balsamic glaze


Vol. 27 LOUISIANA PAIN QUARTERLY 3

HAPPENINGS

THIS QUARTER

JULY

1-3 ESSENCE Festival

essence.com/festival

AUGUST

1-31 COOLinary New Orleans

coolinaryneworleans.com

4 Go 4th on the River

Enjoy all-day family activities along

the New Orleans Riverfront ending

with the exciting Dueling Barges

Fireworks Extravaganza!

go4thontheriver.com

8-10 San Fermin en Nueva

Orleans

Lace up your shoes and experience

an iconic Spanish event with the

annual Running of the Bulls! The

Big Easy Rollergirls chase runners

throughout the Central Business

District in a fun, festive race.

Viva España!

nolabulls.com

7-14 French Film Festival

neworleansfilmsociety.org

14-17 Bastille Day Fete

bastilledaynola.com

19-24 Tales of the Cocktail

talesofthecocktail.com

28-30 Festigals

One of the newer festivals on the

city’s cultural calendar, Festigals is

a weekend organized by women,

for women. Highlighting women’s

accomplishments and offering

inspiring events and speakers,

Festigals is a celebration of all things

feminine. Grab a girlfriend and come

check it out!

festigals.org

6 Whitney White Linen Night

cacno.org/wwln2016

5-7 Satchmo SummerFest

The annual Satchmo SummerFest

fills the French Quarter with music,

food, discussions, and exhibitions

regarding jazz music and history.

Best of all, it’s free!

fqfi.org/satchmo

11 Saints at Patriots

The Saints season starts vs the

Patriots Thursday night in the preseason

opener at New England.

6:30 PM FOX


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LOUISIANA PAIN QUARTERLY

Vol. 27

SEPTEMBER

1 Ravens at Saints

7:00 PM FOX

13 Red Dress Run

This unique event is open to men

and women alike, and it doubles as a

fundraiser for local charities.

nolareddress.com

13 Dirty Linen Night

Enjoy a leisurely stroll through the

Vieux Carré in Royal Street’s answer

to White Linen Night on Julia Street,

Dirty Linen Night is a showcase of

some of the city’s finest art galleries.

experienceneworleans.com/dirtylinen-

night.html

16 New Orleans Sushi Fest

neworleanssushifest.com

20 Saints at Texans

7:00 PM FOX

26 Steelers at Saints

7:00 PM FOX

Aug 31- Sep 5 Southern

Decadence

southerndecadence.net

2-4 Louisiana Seafood Festival

Louisianans know the real seasons

of the year are crawfish,

shrimp, crab, and oyster. Come

celebrate our state’s rich seafood

heritage over Labor Day

Weekend—but come hungry!

louisianaseafoodfestival.com

11 Saints at Raiders

The Saints visit Oakland to take on

the Raiders in week 1 of the NFL

regular season. Who Dat!

12:00 PM FOX

12-18 We Live to Eat

Restaurant Week

coolinaryneworleans.com/we-liveto-eat

18 Saints at Giants

12:00 PM FOX

24 NOLA on Tap

Now in its seventh year, NOLA on

Tap celebrates the world of beer by

taking over the Festival Grounds

at City Park. With over 400 beers

on tap, the festival features food,

tastings, games, and family fun.

nolaontap.org

26 Saints at Falcons

7:30 PM ESPN


Vol. 27 LOUISIANA PAIN QUARTERLY 5

WORKING FOR YOU

How Louisiana Pain Efficiently Navigates Worker’s Compensation

orkers’ compensation is a form of insurance

W

that provides wage replacement and medical

benefits to employees injured on the job, in

exchange for the employee’s right to sue the employer.

For someone suffering from a work injury, this can be

confusing, frustrating and time-consuming, and when

it comes to proper care and treatment, time is of the

essence to prevent the injury from getting worse and

getting the patient healed. Fortunately, Louisiana Pain

has an efficient system that gets patients on track

right away– often within just a day. Our medical billing

and insurance specialist handles all referrals – from

physicians, lawyers, and insurance adjusters– and makes

the process as seamless as possible.

From the time that paients are sent to us, our billing

and insurance specialist is the patient’s one contact. This

is crucial, as lines can become crossed when dealing

with too many people. We’ve all had the experience of

“too many cooks in the kitchen” and the concept is extra

frazzling when dealing with health care or legal issues.

But by serving as an efficient, well-organized middleman,

we alleviate patients’ stress and ensures that those

suffering from work-related injuries only need to focus

on healing, instead of cutting through pesky, bureaucratic

red tape.

We contact the Workman’s Comp adjuster for that

patient and get authorization for treatment within 24 to

48 hours for a new patient appointment.

Another reason workers’ comp cases work so well is

because Louisiana Pain has a long-standing relationship

with many insurance adjusters. Many of them give the

clinic a quick response because they are familiar with the

practice and how well we handle patients while under

our care,. We take pride in our personalized care

Suffering through a work injury can be confusing, frustrating

and time-consuming. Louisiana Pain will help you through it.

and relationships with patients, and it’s obvious that

the bedside manner pays off. Patients are offered all

the same courtesies as regular patients. We do our

best to accommodate all that the insurance companies

requests. We ensure that all paperwork is in place and

well- documented.

Many of our patients call during their treatment,

expressing how grateful they are that their pain has been

managed. Those phone calls are always so enjoyable.

The patients become more comfortable when they see

that someone genuinely cares and is working to make

sure they are able to live a better healthy and happy life.


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LOUISIANA PAIN QUARTERLY Vol. 27


Vol. 27 LOUISIANA PAIN QUARTERLY 7

Family

PRACTICE

Homecoming: Dr. Neil Jolly returns to New Orleans

to join his brother at Louisiana Pain Specialists

By Ben Morris

hile ‘family practice’ is an established field in

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its own right, in many respects medicine is

always a family affair. No matter whether we’re

young or old, the treatment of medical conditions can

affect our whole families, frequently having implications

beyond just the patient themselves. At Louisiana Pain

Specialists, however, the term ‘family practice’ has

another meaning. Originally founded by Dr. Tarun Jolly in

order to serve Louisiana patients encountering issues in

pain management, Louisiana Pain Specialists is proud

to welcome a member of its own Jolly family as a new

full-time physician on staff. This summer, Dr. Neil Jolly,

brother to Tarun, will be joining the practice, and bringing

his expertise to help treat those suffering from chronic

and acute pain.

Dr. Neil Jolly arrives at Louisiana Pain Specialists

with a great deal of experience and cutting-edge training.

Born and raised in the greater New Orleans area, he

moved to Texas and graduated from the University

of Texas at Austin with honors, remaining in Texas to

complete his M.D. and internship at UT Medical Branch in

Galveston and UT Southwestern-Austin. He then trained

at the Yale School of Medicine to receive his residency

degree in anesthesiology, moving finally to North Carolina

where he completed his interventional pain fellowship at

the well-respected Carolinas Pain Institute/Wake Forest

Baptist Health system.

Recently, Louisiana Pain Quarterly spoke to Dr.

Jolly to get to know him better.

LPQ: What got you interested in pain

management?

NJ: My desire to become a pain physician was simple.

I asked myself this question: what medical specialty

encounters a wide variety of medical problems, attempts

to provide patients with a more active and enjoyable

lifestyle, and can put a smile on both the patient and

physician at the end of the day? What attracts many

of us to become physicians in general is the aspiration

to help others through a career that is both rewarding

and challenging. Pain affects people of all backgrounds,

all lifestyles, and all ages. I look around and see family

members, friends, and peers that are all affected by pain,

afflictions that at times limit their ability to enjoy life. After

training in pain management, I can make a difference in

my patients’ lives, and this is what is most fulfilling.


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LOUISIANA PAIN QUARTERLY

Vol. 27

“We have the ability to share our expertise together and design treatment plans that will benefit our patients the most.”

I was exposed to the specialty of pain management

at an early age through my brother Tarun Jolly, which

provided me a head start in this field when compared

to my colleagues. Now, the two of us have the ability

to share our expertise together at Louisiana Pain

Specialists and design treatment plans that will benefit

our patients the most.

You’ve just finished your residency and fellowship.

How has the field changed since you completed

your training?

The field has changed dramatically, and for the

better. A decade ago, patients and even physicians

were unaware that ‘pain management’ existed,

meaning that patients often dealt with suboptimal pain

control. Now, however, we are increasingly aware of

the severe consequences of untreated pain, resulting

in a massive amount of published research paving the

way for new therapies. A great example is spinal cord

stimulation (also called neuromodulation), a minimally

invasive therapy that provides excellent relief of various

pain conditions affecting the spine and extremities. When

it was first introduced, neuromodulation was used only

as a treatment for leg pain. Today, however, we have

discovered that it can be life-changing for patients that

have chronic pain in their neck, back, arms, legs, and

even various head pain syndromes! Other examples of

advancements in pain management include the use

of smaller needles, smaller incisions, and more precise

imaging – ultimately meaning safer, quicker, and more

effective procedures for our patients.

Without a doubt, new technologies are a major

part of the field. But are traditional approaches still

valuable in pain management? For patients new

to technology, how do older forms of diagnosis

and treatment still enter in?

Great question. As mentioned earlier, perhaps the

most active research in pain management focuses on

neuromodulation. In this procedure, we implant very


Vol. 27 LOUISIANA PAIN QUARTERLY 9

small wires that stimulate a patient’s spine through tiny

electrodes, which in turn prevents the perception of

certain pain signals and can ultimately relieve or even

eliminate chronic pain. These treatments by far have

been the most impressive development in the

field. Additionally, radiofrequency lesioning, an old

technique that has become more advanced,

can essentially dissect a painful nerve very quickly to

provide relief in many areas including the back, neck,

hip, knee, foot, and head. With new research identifying

exactly which nerves cause certain types of pain, this

lesioning has become far more effective, providing us the

ability to identify appropriate targets and perform precise

interventions.

Traditionally, we consider the ‘old-fashioned’

approaches to pain management to be medications,

exercise, physical therapy, and dieting, which are all

extremely important components in treating a patient’s

pain. We call this a multi-modal approach, which simply

means that we include interventions, as outlined above,

alongside medications and conservative treatments

such as physical therapy and dieting to treat our

patients. Research has backed this idea for years, that

patients get better using more than one treatment plan

rather than just one alone. While there is concern about

prescribing certain medications safely, my duty as an

ACGME-trained pain management physician is to find the

right medication(s) for my patients and prescribe them

at the right dose, keeping patient safety in mind. Certain

conditions – such as nerve-related pain or joint-related

pain – will require supplemental medications to provide

more complete relief. But we combine this technique with

other approaches such as exercise and dieting to give

our patients the widest path to pain relief.

What types of procedures do you perform?

I can perform safely and effectively everything from

simple joint injections in the office, to highly specialized

procedures including minimally invasive spinal cord

neuromodulation. Pain management is not a field where

one can provide expertise by implementing only one or

two approaches. Instead, we as pain physicians must

utilize every piece of technology and knowledge we have

in order to provide our patients the best opportunity for

success. This means that I apply ultrasound guided


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LOUISIANA PAIN QUARTERLY

Vol. 27

“I am committed to bettering the health and lives of my patients through compassion and diligence.”

imaging as well as fluoroscopy to

guide my treatments for precision

and safety, and I always stay current

through a variety of courses offered

nationally and internationally when

new devices or FDA treatments are

approved.

Fluoroscopy is a core part of

treatment options nowadays. For

those who aren’t familiar with it,

can you describe how it works?

Fluoroscopy is essentially an

x-ray that is conducted in realtime.

For instance, as I prepare an

injection for a patient, we have them

lie down on a flat table. Then we use

a machine called a ‘C-arm’ (called

that because of its shape) to show

live X-ray images of the patient’s

targeted area as I insert the

medication through a tiny needle

to the area causing pain. Using

fluoroscopy, we can even show

patients pictures immediately after

the procedure to confirm that we

achieved the desired

result. Finally, by targeting the

precise area of pain, we need only

use a small amount of medication as

we deliver it directly to the correct

location, as opposed to taking

medications orally or through an

IV. Not only is fluoroscopy one of

the fundamentals of performing

pain procedures, but it also provides

patients the satisfaction that their

physician can deliver medication

with minimal side effects. Technology

has brought us a long way!

How do you, as a practicing

physician, regard the evolving

state and federal regulations

regarding pain management?

With the recent media attention

on the potentially dangerous side

effects of certain pain medications,

regulations have arisen that limit

physicians on what they can

and cannot prescribe for their

patients. What this means is that

pain physicians – in particular those

that have completed an accredited

pain fellowship with the ability to

attain board certification – should

now be the primary consultants

when it comes to treating pain. I am

confident in utilizing all the methods

currently available to provide the

best treatment plan. By monitoring

the use of certain medications and

tailoring treatments to each patient’s

needs, our patients are satisfied

knowing that we keep their safety

as our top priority. I know that all of

us will remain at the forefront of this

field by offering new and advanced

treatment options to our patients as

soon as they are approved and safe

to use.

You emphasize physical

exercise as a key part of

preventive pain management.

Are you active yourself?

I played basketball in high school,

and in my earlier years I played just

about every sport you can imagine.

I still stay active with friends on the

weekends – if there’s a gym with a

court nearby, chances are you’ll find

me there. I also enjoy skiing when

and where possible. I take pride

that I never took formal lessons and

instead just learned to ski through

simple observation. It’s still one of my

more enjoyable pastimes.


Vol. 27 LOUISIANA PAIN QUARTERLY 11

Let’s get to know you a little

better. First, why practice in New

Orleans?

This one is easy. I was born and

raised here through high school.

Once I left for college in Texas, I never

left sight of New Orleans. My goal

has always been to return home and

be around the food, the sites, and

most importantly the people I love. I

do have an extensive “Jolly” family in

the greater New Orleans area, but I

also have friends with whom I have

stayed in touch and a community

that I would like to serve positively.

Much of who I am today comes not

from my training across the nation,

but rather how I was raised right

here in New Orleans. Plus, who

would ever want to live in a city

without Mardi Gras or the Saints?

Can you tell us about yourself?

Of course! I’m recently married to my

wonderful wife, Rena. She’s a nurse

from New York, so even as attractive

as New Orleans is, I’ve had to do my

fair share of convincing to help her

understand that the Deep South has

as much charm as does New York. I

think so far she loves it.

Growing up, math was my

favorite subject. Numbers always

came naturally to me, perhaps

from my father who is a lifelong

accountant. Professionally and

personally, I live with a philosophy

in mind that comes from the great

Dalai Lama: “Our prime purpose in

this life is to help others. And if you

can’t help them, at least don’t hurt

them.” Finally, after thirteen years

of training outside of New Orleans, I

take pride in returning back to serve

a community in a city that I call

home. I am committed to bettering

the health – and ultimately the lives

– of my patients through compassion

and diligence.


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LOUISIANA PAIN QUARTERLY

Vol. 27

chronic pain

anxiety

emotional distress

stress

Depression

pain management

hopelessness

THE TOOLBOX STRATEGY

Top 10 Tools for

Managing Chronic Pain

By Dr. Mark Skellie, Psy. D.

f you’ve seen my previous articles, I’m

I

committed to people living with chronic pain

to develop a toolbox strategy for coping. The

toolbox strategy is really simple: If you have a range of

different ways to cope with pain, stress, or other types of

emotional distress when one tool does not work, you can

go back to the toolbox and find another. Individuals who

develop a variety of intentional coping strategies, have a

way to face any problem through trial and error. Like they

say, if you only have a hammer you tend to see every

problem as a nail…


Vol. 27 LOUISIANA PAIN QUARTERLY 13

For this article, I’ve developed a Top 10

List of great psychological strategies that

work to improve the quality of life for those

individuals living with chronic pain. Obviously,

this list is not meant to be a summary of all of

the possible strategies for managing chronic

pain and I would love to hear from you about

things that I have not included but are part of

your toolbox. The list is also not in any specific

order, but as a psychologist I’m obviously

biased towards number 10.

1LEAN ON YOUR DOC. Your relationship

with your physician and the rest of your pain

management team can make a dramatic

difference in living well with chronic pain. If you

are unsure about something, ask for more information

or where to find good information online. Your pain

management team is your ally in living well, so make sure

to tell them about major changes in your life that affect

your pain management or your current treatments.

It is important for you to understand the medicines

you’re taking, what they can do for you, and their

potential side effects. Then educate yourself about

additive or alternative treatment options. Your goal

should be to have a normal mood and activity level - if

you don’t, then a different medicine might be better for

you. Be proactive, to ask questions, and look for answers.

A great strategy is to write down questions you want to

research and discuss with your pain management team.

Keeping a pain journal can be a great way to

help your pain management team understand and more

effectively treat your chronic pain. At the end of each day,

record an average daily pain rating between 1 and 10,

where 10 indicates the worst pain possible. Then note

what you did that day, and how these activities made you

feel. The next time you see the doctor, bring the journal

and discuss your findings.

Lean on your doc. Ask questions and look for answers.

2

HYDRATE. According to the Mayo

Clinic, dehydration may aggravate the

symptoms of some chronic conditions, like

headaches and back pain. Although it may be

tempting to load up on coffee, soda, or juice, their diuretic

effect makes them poor sources for hydration. Water

keeps you hydrated without the extra calories, sodium, or

caffeine. The recommendation that adults need to drink

an 8-ounce glass of water 8 times per day may not be

accurate for all people and simply drinking when thirsty

may be a better goal. It should be noted that summer

increases our need for water due to the extreme heat, so

8 glasses a day is still a smart goal when it is hot. Also,

you should try to maintain the 8 glass habit when you

are having increased perspiration, high body temperature

(or fever), nausea or vomiting, or diarrhea, which magnify

your fluid needs.

3EAT CLEAN. If you’re living with chronic

pain, you want to do everything you can to help

your body, not hinder it. One way to keep your

body strong is to eat a well-balanced diet and

reduce your consumption of highly processed food (e.g.

fast food, frozen dinners, hot dogs, snack foods, etc).

Eating right improves blood sugar, helps maintain weight,

reduces heart disease risk, and aids digestion. Aim for


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LOUISIANA PAIN QUARTERLY

Vol. 27

a diet rich in whole grains, fresh produce, and low-fat

proteins. A diet free from processed foods can alleviate

inflammation. Foods that may alleviate inflammation that

leads to pain include

, foods high in

, , and .

Get Spicy. Turmeric is known for its anti-inflammatory

properties. This spice is a beneficial treatment for

chronic pain. It contains curcumin, which provides a

natural way to reduce inflammation in the body, without

harming the liver or kidneys. The National Center for

Complementary and Alternative Medicine explains that

turmeric increases ligament flexibility and boosts the

immune system. Add it to meals, or sprinkle it in your tea.

Another spice, Paprika, has capsaicin, a natural pain and

inflammation fighter. You can also get capsaicin from chili

peppers, red peppers, and cayenne pepper. Ginger and

garlic may also lower inflammation.

4

PUT OUT THE FIRE. Inflammation is a

process by which the body’s white blood

cells and substances they produce protect us

from infection with foreign organisms, such

as bacteria and viruses. However, in some diseases,

like arthritis, the body’s defense system -- the immune

system -- triggers an inflammatory response when there

are no foreign invaders to fight off. In these diseases,

called autoimmune diseases, the body’s normally

protective immune system causes damage to its own

tissues. The body responds as if normal tissues are

infected or somehow abnormal. Inflammation is a

common cause of pain, and certain chemicals in foods

may exacerbate it.

A smart goal is to keep food , that is close to

a natural state with little modern processing. It is a good

idea to generally reduce these possible inflammation

instigators:

• Refined Sugar

• Nightshade Vegetables

• Dairy

• Eggs

• Citrus Fruits

• High-Fat Red Meat

• Refined starches

• Processed Foods

• Red Wine, Coffee, Tea, and Soda

Low-sugar fruits such as pineapple are great

anti-inflammatory foods that may alleviate pain.


Vol. 27 LOUISIANA PAIN QUARTERLY 15

Stress management techniques

such as deep breathing calms

our minds, relaxes our bodies,

and helps ease pain.

5

BREATHE. It sounds so obvious, but few of

us actually take the time to stop what we’re

doing and calm our minds. Deep breathing,

biofeedback, and meditation are all stress

management techniques that relax our bodies, which

helps ease pain. Slow down, close your eyes…breathe in…

breathe out. It’s important to have patience. Adding new

tools to your pain management toolbox can take some

time before you can really make them work for you.

Yoga promotes both strength and

flexibility while calming the mind and decreasing stress.

This centuries-old practice offers a method of stress

reduction that can help those suffering from chronic pain,

reports the Mayo Clinic. The physical postures of yoga,

breathwork, and meditation are all tools in the painreduction

kit. Stress makes muscles spasm, according to

the National Institutes of Health. Because muscle spasms

are a part of acute and chronic pain, practicing Yoga and

other relaxation techniques helps train your body to relax.

By taking care of your emotional and physical health,

you can better manage your pain. That may mean saying

no to events or parties if you need the rest. Schedule

regular massages or set an unbreakable dinner date with

good friends to boost your spirits. How you care for you

is unique to you -- and it’s also up to you.

6

DISTRACT YOURSELF. You already know

that focusing on pain can just make it worse.

That’s why one potent prescription for relief is

to keep busy with activities that take your mind

off the pain. Take that cooking class you’ve had your eye

on, join a garden club, go on morning walks with a friend,

try a Yoga class. Even if you can’t control the pain, you

can control the rest of your life. Get started!


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LOUISIANA PAIN QUARTERLY

7

PERFECT YOUR

POSTURE. Never found

the time to make it to a

Yoga class or just don’t

find the motivation to get on the

mat? There are simple ways to

bring the posture of yoga into your

life. Whether in front of the TV or

using your computer at home or at

work, maintaining correct posture is

essential in fighting pain.

Keep your head directly above a

tall, straight spine to prevent strain

on your back and neck muscles.

Remember, however, that longstanding

postural problems will

typically take longer to address than

short-lived ones, as often the joints

have adapted to your long-standing

poor posture. Those living with

chronic pain can adopt bad posture

as a way to try to avoid aches and

pains. Awareness of your posture

and knowing what is correct will help

you correct yourself. With practice,

the correct posture for standing,

sitting, and lying down will gradually

replace your old posture. This, in turn,

will help you move toward a better

and healthier body position.

• Be more conscious and

aware of your posture

• Shoulders back and your

stomach pulled in

• Earlobes should be in line

with your shoulders

• Try not to sit in the same

position for too long.

Vol. 27

8

EXERCISE? It’s a

Catch-22: You’re hurting,

so you don’t exercise; but

without exercise, you may

lose muscle tone and strength, which

can make pain worse. Fortunately,

even mild exercises such as walking

and yoga release endorphins, the

feel-good brain chemicals that lift

mood and block pain. Light housecleaning

and playing with your

kids are every day activities that

can reduce symptoms. Ask your

doctor if you are healthy enough for

aerobic, strengthening, or stretching

exercises. They can give your body

the boost -- and relief -- it needs.

9

QUIT. Some people find

temporary relief from

stress and pain with a

quick smoke or drinking

alcohol. The irony is that smoking

may actually contribute to pain in the

long run. It slows healing, worsens

circulation, and increases the risk

of degenerative disc problems, a

cause of low back pain. The same is

true when we rely on alcohol to help

manage our pain, because increased

alcohol use impacts good sleep

and increases inflammation, not

to mention can be very dangerous

when combined with common pain

medications.

If you need an incentive to

quit, pain relief just may be it. Ask

your doctor about programs and

medicines to kick the habit.

10 important habit you

DONT GO IT

ALONE. Reaching

out is the most

can develop to help you deal with

chronic pain. Tell friends and family

what you’re feeling, because they

won’t know otherwise. Ask for help.

Learn more about your condition.

Then share what you know with

others.

Talking about

your pain with a behavioral health

professional who understands

chronic pain may help reduce its

effects. Commonly utilized methods

include cognitive behavioral

therapy, biofeedback, and guided

imagery. These techniques

teach stress management and reallife

coping skills. The goal for patients

is to improve their quality of life by

getting better sleep, and reducing

stress. Psychotherapy alone may not

eliminate your chronic pain, but it can

be effective in managing it.

Most of us listen

to the advice or recommendations

of someone who has lived the

experience. Participating in a

support group for other individuals

living with chronic pain can open

unexpected doors in your progress

towards control.

A new FREE chronic pain

support group is forming. Please

contact Jim Walsch at (504) 858-

7933 or painnola.gmail.com for

more information.


Vol. 27 LOUISIANA PAIN QUARTERLY 17

Got Pain?

If living with pain day after day is negatively

affecting your life.....YOU’RE NOT ALONE

Come Join our FREE chronic pain support group!

Jim Walsh, a 30-year chronic pain patient, is the group

facilitator. Our support group is open to anyone facing

chronic pain in their daily lives. Group members share their

stories, listen to speakers, receive supports in an

environment of hope and encouragement. You will also

learn new ways to cope with the chronic pain in your life.

New Orleans Healing Center

Room 252

2372 St. Claude Ave

New Olreans, LA 70117

American Chronic

Pain Association

New Orleans Chapter

Contact Jim Walsh for more info

504-858-7933

piratesalleyjim@gmail.com


18

LOUISIANA PAIN QUARTERLY

Vol. 27

PUZZLES

AND GAMES

How to play Sudoku

To solve a Sudoku puzzle you have to use the numbers 1-9 to fill in the blank spaces so that each row, each

column and each 3 x 3 square has all the numbers 1-9 appearing once. The only thing you need to solve a Sudoku

number place puzzle is logic. You don’t need any mathematical knowledge. In the easier puzzles you may be able to

see straight away where a particular number goes. Focusing on one particular blank square at a time, scan its row,

column & block.

Easy

Medium


Vol. 27 LOUISIANA PAIN QUARTERLY 19

Louisiana Pain Quarterly Word Search Puzzle

Find and circle all the words that are hidden in the grid. The remaining letters

spell an additional summer item.

J U N E S T S S S S Y K S E U L B M

U S M E A U Y E O U H I K I N G S A

S M W E E A N L U B N W A S E T R E

U T W I R R S G I C A B L N A R E R

N S H V M T C C L T E A U D T V L C

T Y U G I M Y S E A D B I R S S K E

A G L C I C I R N N S L R R N D N C

N R E U L F M N A U O S E A R G I I

O E A E J E R S G H S W E A B N R C

S E D A K B R E L L O R O S R I P R

C N A O F L O G T L T B T E E T S E

H G N I H S I F F A E O A E E A H C

O R C A M P I N G T W T H B Z O C C

O A C I N C I P A W A S P S E B A O

L S F L I E S K M O S Q U I T O E S

T S U G U A S I L L A B E S A B B O

G N I N E D R A G S U N S H I N E N

Ants

August

Barbeque

Baseball

Beach

Bees

Bicycle

Blue Sky

Boating

Breeze

Camping

Fishing

Flies

Flowers

Gardening

Golf

Green Grass

Hat

Hiking

Holidays

Hot

Ice Cream

July

June

Mosquitos

No School

Picnic

Roller Blades

Sandals

Skateboard

Soccer

Solstice

Sprinklers

Sunburn

Sunglasses

Sunscreen

Sunshine

Suntan

Sweat

Swimming

UV Rays

Wasps

Water Fights

Watermelon


Dr. Tarun Jolly

The founder of Louisiana Pain

Specialists. Double board

certified in pain management

and anesthesiology, with a strong

background in interventional

therapies for spine disease

and cancer.

Dr. Satvik Munshi

Raised in the New Orleans area, a

comprehensive pain management

specialist with advanced training

in interventional pain therapies,

double board certified in pain

management and physical medicine

and rehabilitation.

Dr. Neil Jolly

Completed ACGME accredited

fellowship and anesthesiology

residency. He performs a wide

variety of advanced interventional

procedures. He prides himself

on returning to New Orleans and

serving the community.

Your Louisiana Pain Doctors!

Interventional Pain Treatments Diagnostic Testing Medication Management

Scheduling An Appointment Is Easy

Call 504-434-7750 or visit us online at LouisianaPain.com

5 Clinic

Locations!

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