ANXIETY NOSTALGIA AND MISTRUST

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PRRI-AVS-2015-Web

24 ANXIETY, NOSTALGIA, AND MISTRUST

Raising the Minimum Wage: $10.10 vs. $15

More than three-quarters (76%) of the public supports raising the minimum wage from $7.25 to

$10.10 per hour. Support has ticked up slightly since last year, when 69% of Americans expressed

support for raising the minimum wage to $10.10 per hour.

Although much of the debate at the national level has focused on increasing the minimum wage

to $10.10, in certain localities the debate has centered on raising the hourly rate to $15. Nearly

six in ten (59%) Americans express support for raising the minimum wage to $15 per hour, but

there is less agreement, especially across political party lines, about the larger wage hike.

Roughly equal numbers of Democrats favor raising the minimum wage to $10.10 as they do to

$15 (91% vs. 84%, respectively). Independents are somewhat more likely to favor a $10.10 wage

hike than one that goes to $15 (72% vs. 58%, respectively). Among Republicans, the gap in support

grows even larger: while six in ten (60%) Republicans support raising the minimum wage to

$10.10, fewer than one-third (32%) say they favor raising it to $15.

Americans who perceive the highest amount of unfairness in the economic system (high scores

on the EII) are also more likely than those who believe the economic playing field is level to support

raising the minimum wage to $15 per hour (73% vs. 28%, respectively).

Paid Sick and Parental Leave

Americans overwhelmingly support requiring companies to provide all full-time employees with

paid sick days if they or an immediate family member gets sick, and requiring companies to provide

all full-time employees with paid leave for the birth or adoption of a child. Eighty-five percent

of Americans favor paid sick leave and 82% support paid parental leave.

While majorities of Americans across all categories of the Economic Inequity Index (EII) support

populist workplace policies, the intensity of support varies. Those who perceive a very high

amount of economic unfairness (high scores on the EII) are more likely than those who believe

the economic playing field is level (low scores on the EII) to support mandatory paid sick days

(93% vs. 64%, respectively) and paid parental leave for the birth or adoption of a child (89% vs.

62%, respectively).

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