ANXIETY NOSTALGIA AND MISTRUST

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26 ANXIETY, NOSTALGIA, AND MISTRUST

Concerns about Immigrants and Muslims

Rising Concern about Immigrants

Over the past couple of years, attitudes toward

immigrants have become increasingly negative.

Today, Americans are evenly divided as to

whether immigrants strengthen the country

because of their hard work and talents (47%) or

whether they constitute a burden on the U.S.

because they take jobs, housing, and health care

(46%). This current split reflects a drop in positive

sentiment since last year, when nearly six in ten

(57%) Americans said immigrants strengthen our

culture and only 35% said they burden it.

FIGURE 9. It bothers me when I come

in contact with immigrants who speak

little or no English, 2012 vs. 2015

Agree Disagree

70

57

60

51

48

50

40

40

30

20

Democrats and Republicans hold mirror opposite

views about the contributions of immigrants. By

a margin of approximately two-to-one, Democrats

are more likely to say that immigrants strengthen

the country than to say that immigrants are a burden

to the country (63% vs. 32%, respectively).

By a similar margin, Republicans are more likely to

10

0

2012 2015

Sources: PRRI 2015 American Values Survey; Pew

Research Center for the People & the Press, 2012

Values Survey, June 2012.

say the opposite—that immigrants burden the country as opposed to strengthen it (66% vs. 26%,

respectively). Notably, views of the Tea Party do not differ significantly from Republicans overall.

Compared to a few years earlier, Americans also currently report less tolerance when encountering

immigrants who do not speak English. Nearly half (48%) of Americans agree that they are

bothered when they come into contact with immigrants who speak little or no English, compared

to 51% who disagree. Negative feelings about immigrants have increased since 2012, when only

four in ten (40%) Americans reported that coming into contact with non-English speaking immigrants

bothered them.

There are major differences in how Americans view immigrants by race, ethnicity, and class. A

majority (55%) of white Americans report being bothered when they come into contact with immigrants

who speak little or no English, while only 40% of black Americans and about three in ten

(28%) Hispanic Americans agree. Roughly six in ten (59%) black Americans and more than seven

in ten (71%) Hispanic Americans say they disagree with the statement.

A considerable gap exists among whites by social class. More than six in ten (63%) white working-class

Americans say they feel bothered when they come into contact with immigrants who do

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