Issue 11 / May 2011

bidolito

May 2011 issue of Bido Lito! Featuring STEALING SHEEP, MOTHER EARTH, DOMINIC FOSTER, LIVERPOOL SOUND CITY 2011 PREVIEW and much more.

Issue 11

May 2011

Stealing Sheep

Liverpool Sound

City Preview

Dominic Foster

Mother Earth

Stealing Sheeps by Joe Wills (Obscenic)

www.bidolito.co.uk

FREE


#SOUNDCITY11

THURSDAY 19TH MAY

FRIDAY 20TH MAY

SATURDAY 21ST MAY

THE VIEW

FRANK TURNER

THE WHIP • YUCK

WRETCH 32

STEVE MASON

FRANKIE AND THE

HEARTSTRINGS

PETE & THE PIRATES

DUTCH UNCLES

CHAIN & THE GANG

DINOSAUR PILE UP

HANDSOME FURS • TROPHYWIFE

WOLF GANG • ED SHEERAN

THE SAND BAND • FLASHGUNS

VERONICA FALLS • THE PUBLICIST

WINTER GLOVES • DELTA MAID

THE RIALTO BURNS • CHAD VALLEY

THE FUNERAL SUITS • THE DRAYMIN

WORRIEDABOUTSATAN

POLARSETS • THE BIG HOUSE

THE RED SUNS • JAY NORTON

MAN GET OUT • DIRTY GOODS

THE BLACK LIPS

WILLY MASON

MILES KANE

CLINIC • CULTS

YOUNG KNIVES

KURT VILE &

THE VIOLATORS

SET YOUR GOALS

ED SHEERAN • FOREST SWORDS

THREE TRAPPED TIGERS

WAVE MACHINES • KID BRITISH

COLOURMUSIC • SOUND OF RUM

CLOUD CONTROL

THE CHAPMAN FAMILY


THE LINES

MAZES • ENTREPRENEURS

MONUMENT VALLEY


FICTION

EMMY THE GREAT • ALLIE MOSS

OUR MOUNTAIN • ZEUS • GRIMES

WINTER GLOVES • WOODHANDS

SEEKAE • YOUNG BUFFALO

LET’S BUY HAPPINESS

VINYL JACKET • CATTLE AND CANE

PLUS MANY MORE

SPEAKERS INCLUDE

FUNERAL PARTY

CAST • MONA

SOUND OF GUNS

FUCKED UP

SPANK ROCK

JAMIE XX • PHILIP

SELWAY


YASMIN

THE PHOENIX FOUNDATION

LOWER THAN ATLANTIS

YOUNG LEGIONNAIRE

SBTRKT - LIVE • CREEP

MARQUES TOLIVER

LANTERNS ON THE LAKE

ALEX MILLS • AMANDA BLANK

NIKI & THE DOVE • THE JEZABELS

TEETH • FLY WITH VAMPIRES

COCKNBULLKID • MUGSTAR

DJANGO DJANGO • THE GOOD

NATURED • FIXERS

HOT CLUB DE PARIS • IDIOT GLEE

BEAT CONNECTION • ALESSI'S ARK

BRAIDS • FILMS • PRIZES

SIMON RAYMONDE (BELLA UNION) IN CONVERSATION WITH ERIC PULIDO (MIDLAKE) • MICHAEL BREIDENBRUECKER

(LAST.FM / RJDJ AND INCEPTION APPS) • ALEX WHITE (CEO OF NEXT BIG SOUND) • KEVIN CUMMINS IN

CONVERSATION WITH PETER HOOK (JOY DIVISION/NEW ORDER) • LSC APP PANEL - FEATURING AUDIOBOO, MOBILE

ROADIE, SHAZAM, BANDAPP AND RJDJ, MODRATED BY TNW’S OWN MATT BRIAN. • CHRIS DOURIDAS (KCRW DJ) •

MUSIC TECH PANEL - FEATURING SHUFFLR.FM, SOUNDCLOUD, LAST.FM, MUSIC HACK DAY, SOUNDOUT AND RADAR

MAKER. • TIM HEINEKE (SHUFFLR.FM) • SEAN ADAMS (DROWNED IN SOUND) • DAVE HAYNES (SOUNDCLOUD) •

RUPERT COGAN (LAST.FM) • ROBERT THOMAS (RJDJ) • MARK ROCK (AUDIOBOO) • ADAM PERRY (BANDAPP) •

MALCOLM DUNBAR (PLEDGE MUSIC) • DAVID COURTIER-DUTTON (SLICETHEPIE) • STEPHEN KING (BELIEVE DIGITAL)

• TIM DELLOW (TRANSGRESSIVE) • JOE DANIELS (ANGULAR RECORDS) • KAMILLA HANNIBAL (GOOD TAPE) • JOHN

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CHOOSE YOUR DAY TO SUIT YOUR TASTE

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Editorial

Given the lack of rambling that has commenced in this column over recent months on the subject of

Tranmere, you may be forgiven for thinking that either, A) all things are hunky dory over on God’s side of the

water, that Wirral’s whites are plodding along quite nicely thank you very much, or, B) we’ve gone bust. In

reality you’ll be glad or mildly disappointed, depending on your persuasion, to hear that neither is the case.

No, chronic inconsistency, flirtations with the trapdoor and the occasional misguided publicity stunt are still

very much the norm. It’s business as usual. The latest dalliance with the mainstream press - and the info bar

on Sky Sports News - came in the form of an announcement in the Daily Post that, ‘Club 9 Sports, a Chicagobased

investment company, is understood to be in negotiations with Tranmere’s chairman and controlling

shareholder Peter Johnson about a takeover at Prenton Park.’ That was in February. There’s been a silence

reminiscent of the Scull Shoals high street ever since. When questioned about it on the tele this week (by

former Daily Sport Editor and all round egghead, Tony Livesey) Les Parry basically expressed his satisfaction

that the whole thing had come to nothing. It makes you think that Sheffield Wednesday’s labelling of an

approach made to them last season by the same US group as ‘derisory’, may well have been a fair indication

as to the feasibility of the group as Tranmere owners. Anyway, nothing comes as a surprise, this time 21 months

ago we were up for sale on Ebay. Anything could happen.

From one misguided load of drivel to another. Eric Pickles. I tell you what, I’ve never before come across a

more irritatingly smug individual. Oh Eric, even in the world of these here politicians (thanks Woody) you stand

out as a thoroughly unlikeable toad. When pressed on Newsnight as to why

councils such as Liverpool and Nottingham, places of most economic need,

have had their budgets cut the heaviest, he spun a web of technical budget

jargon that would have kept Archimedes busy for weeks. At one point it

seemed as if he’d completely confused himself. This was then followed by a

thoroughly distasteful love-in between old man Pickles and the Tory leader

of Westminster Council. It’s a shame that Paxman was on his hols, he’d have

served up a Pickles piccalilli in minutes.

Paxman Piccalilli

Anyway enough of that - football and politics both just speed up the

wrinkles - Bido Lito! is ONE! It’s not half come around quickly and I’m pretty chuffed that we’ve managed to hit

our one year anniversary at all. When we started the magazine it was with modest intentions, between me

and you, I gave it a window of four months to see how it went. But, we’re here after a year and getting stronger

each month. So thanks for the support! To celebrate, we’ll be running an exhibition at Bold Street Coffee from

12th May and holding an official show at Liverpool Sound City. Full details of both events appear later in this

issue. Thanks to everybody involved for all your hard work in getting the magazine to this point. I’ve not got

enough room here to write a list so I won’t name individuals...you all know who you are.

You won’t need reminding that this month sees Liverpool Sound City erupt over town from 19th - 21st May.

As well as the ever-expanding band line-up and always informative conference, this year the festival will also

give you the opportunity to get a daily fix of pink ... as we present the Bido Lito! Sound City Daily Magazine.

Published on the morning of each day of the festival, the magazine will be packed with news from around the

festival, interviews, previews and reviews from the previous night’s shows. Copies will be available from all

Sound City venues and the usual city centre outlets. Enjoy the festival!

Craig G Pennington

Editor

Bido Lito!

Issue Eleven

bidolito.co.uk

Bido Lito

Static Gallery, 23 Roscoe Lane

Liverpool, L1 9JD

info@bidolito.co.uk

Editor

Bido Lito! May 2011 3

Craig G Pennington - info@bidolito.co.uk

Assistant & Reviews Editor

Christopher Torpey - reviews@bidolito.co.uk

Photo Editor

Jennifer Pellegrini - photos@bidolito.co.uk

Designer

Luke Avery - info@earthstudios.net

Words

Craig G Pennington, Christopher Torpey, John Still,

David Lynch, Jonny Davis, Bethany Garrett, Nik Glover,

Richard Lewis, Pete Charles, Samuel Garlick, The Glass

Pasty, Francis McEntergart, Leanne Durr, Mick Chrysalid,

Clarry M, Jordan Lynn, Pete Devine, Sebastian Gahan,

Tim Peacock.

Photographs

Jennifer Pellegrini, Joe Wills (Obscenic), John Johnson, Allegra

Whitehouse, Keith Ainsworth, Brian Plumridge, John O’Hara.

Illustrations

Adam Bresnen, Graham Cheal, Michael Cottage, Kieran Gabriel.

Proofreading

Debra Williams - debra@wordsanddeeds.co.uk

Adverts

To advertise in Bido Lito! please contact Another Media:

bidolito@anothermedia.org 0151 708 2841


Features

10

12

16

CATCHING BUTTERFLIES AND STEALING SHEEP.

For these three girls capturing hearts is as simple as catching butterflies, and you’re next.

LIVERPOOL SOUND CITY.

Sound City returns this May, promising to be a far grander and more eclectic event than previous years.

THE AMERICANS ARE COMING.

Our US cousins have been churning out new, essential bands at a rate and quality that the UK can’t get close to.

18 A POSTCARD FROM MOTHER EARTH.

“We’re squashing down layer upon layer of ideas into each piece to create something solid and long-lasting”

20

22

26

ONE.

An exhibition of photography and illustrations from a year’s worth of rose-coloured journalistic bliss.

FILMING THE CITY: DOMINIC FOSTER AND URBAN ESCAPISM.

“By definition, music and film should have escapist qualities”

ELASTIC SPACE TRAVEL.

Mugstar, Dogshow and Stealing Sheep’s collusion with Elastic Artists looks set to catapult them onwards and upwards.

28 VOX POP: PETER SERAFINOWICZ .

Regulars

His unique talent for a comically-skewed caricature showing why many have sought out the master of spoof.

8 NEWS 30 RANTS/COMMENT

32 PREVIEWS/SHORTS

36

REVIEWS


News

Diesel Island Discs

As part of the Diesel Island programme, Bido Lito! will be hosting a discursive panel event at the Bluecoat

on 4th May. Focussing on the constantly evolving and mobile nature of music production, the panel will

feature YOUSEF (Circus/Cocoon), LEWIS BOARDMAN (Circus/NRK) and DAN CROLL (MBF Young Songwriter of

the Year). The Diesel Island project focuses on aspirational workshops and creative communities around

the UK. Pick up your Diesel passport for free entry into the event at their L1 store. diesel.com/island

Macmillan Gigs

Want to put on a show, win festival tickets and make a difference? Macmillan Cancer Support are

offering promoters around the country a chance to put on events in the charity’s name. As part of

the MiniMix initiative, the event which makes the most money for Macmillan will receive tickets to

Bestival. If you have any idea for a gig or exhibition you should visit macmillan.org.uk/minimix. Entry

closes on 12th June.

Changeover

COMPETITION!

Bido Lito! are proud to support CHANGEOVER, a project which will see regular band exchange programmes

between Liverpool and Vienna. The scheme is the brainchild of long term Bido Lito! contributor Nadia

Baha, a resident of Vienna. As well as music, the project will involve all sorts of culture swapping, and April

saw inaugural events at FACT and Parr Street Studio 2. Updates on upcoming events will be available in

these pink pages and you can contact Nadia direct for details - nadia.baha@gmail.com

Francesco Mellina and David Knopov Exhibition

Legendary Italian Post-Punk photographer Francesco Mellina and graphic designer David Knopov,

have come together for an exhibition this month at Corke Gallery on Aigburth Road. Titled ‘Rock n Roll

heads North’, the show will feature Mellina’s iconic photography, including The Clash and The Ramones

amongst many others, taken during the Eric’s Post-Punk boom. Knopov’s CV includes work for Factory

Records, so the show should provide a truly intriguing prospect. myspace.com/francescomellina

Want to play at Chester Rocks?

CHESTER ROCKS are on the lookout for the hottest new bands in the area. The organisers have

announced plans to showcase new talent on Sunday 3d July, sharing a festival bill with the likes of Iggy

Pop & The Stooges and Echo & The Bunnymen. The stage will be run in conjunction with Dawsons Music,

Dee FM, BBC Radio Merseyside’s Dave Monks and Bido Lito! To enter, send a CD, short biography and

contact details to Mark Cowley, The Racecourse, Chester CH1 2LY. Closing date 3rd May. chester-rocks.com

This month Bido Lito! have teamed up with Liverpool Sound City to offer

one lucky reader the chance to win two, 3-day wristbands for this year’s

festival, to see the likes of The View, Cast, Black Lips, Willy Mason, Sound

Of Guns and much more. To be in with a chance of winning this great prize,

answer the following question:

Who headlined the Sound City launch party held

at the Kazimier in March?

To enter, please email your answer to competition@bidolito.co.uk. The closing date for entries is 13th May 2011. The first 10

correct answers will be put in a big pink hat, the winner drawn at random and notified by email. Best of luck!

Bido Lito! Dansette

Our pick of tracks for the month

The Pains Of Being

Pure At Heart

Belong

PLAY IT AGAIN SAM

New York’s coolest indie geeks,

TPOBPAH have perfectly timed their

return to soundtrack your summer, with

this opening salvo from new album

Belong seeing them go all shoegazey.

Coupled with their usual plundering of

late-‘80s/early-‘90s grunge-pop, it is a

wholehearted ‘welcome back’ from me.

Smoke Fairies

Hotel Room

V2

It turns out me and Richard Hawley do

have something in common: a love for

spectral and slightly moany folk-blues.

In particular the kind peddled by SMOKE

FAIRIES on their debut LP Through Low

Light & Trees. The intricate weaving of

plucked guitars and harmonies on this

track is sumptuous.

Kurt Vile

Baby’s Arms

MATADOR RECORDS

Taken from KURT VILE’s blisteringly

good debut LP, Smoke Ring For My

Halo, this tune has been lodged

between both my ears and on the office

turntable for weeks. The whimsical

vocal manages to be both throwaway

and arrestingly melodic all at once. No

fucking around people, just buy it.

The Loud

Amy’s Gonna Get You

PAYPER TIGER

RECORDS

Liverpool’s Payper Tiger Records’

debut vinyl release is this limited

edition, coloured 7” by local psych/

glam outfit THE LOUD. They’ve picked a

corker n all ... Marc Bolan scrubbed up

via a post-punk facelift. Bangin. Check

out the video by Bido Lito! featured

videographer, Dominic Francis Foster.

www.bidolito.co.uk


NEW ALBUM OUT 25/04/11

INCLUDES THE TRACKS TOKYO, JUMP INTO THE FOG AND ANTI-D

www.thewombats.co.uk

www.14thfloorrecords.com


Catching

Butterflies And

Stealing Sheep...

Words: David Lynch

Photography: Joe Wills (Obscenic)


Bido Lito! May 2011 11

Harmony. It’s a crucial aspect of popular music and not just in the way you might expect. Whilst

STEALING SHEEP are one of the greatest proponents of this musical element, they are also similarly

congruous as a group of artists. Becky, Lucy and Emily – yes their names even have a rhythmic

similarity – are that rare and great, unconscious occurrence of a brilliantly packaged group, which

works in every aspect. In a time where ‘bands’ are being thrown together by record executives in

a paint-by-numbers imitation of real music, it’s a refreshing throw back to a simpler time which

peculiarly points to the future of Liverpool music.

As I meet the girls for the first time at Make Art Studios they are enthusiastically throwing

themselves into various poses with quirky make-up on faces and dressed like they’d just dropped

in from Woodstock 1969. Needless to say, I’m eager to start the interview. We begin to talk about

the origins of the band, something I am particularly interested in, as, such is their natural synergy,

it’s hard to imagine a time prior to their existence in this form. I find that the girls floated in to

the group from other projects with quite different influences to their current incarnation. Becky

confesses that, “it was all a bit blind at first” as they had come from groups they described as

varying between “acoustic freak folk” and “60s pop psychedelic rock.” Whilst at first it’s hard to

understand how such wildly mismatched traits could come together to make something as coordinated

as their final product, one listen to Stealing Sheep is enough to see how these widerranging

influences have coalesced to become something new, something greater.

This something is beautiful, often haunting, reverb-laden, alternative-folk (and that might be the

most adjectives I’ve ever used in one of those descriptions) and, whilst they don’t cite them as an

influence, fans of Fleet Foxes looking for something a touch edgier might just fall captive of their

eerie harmony. Their recent EP The Mountain Dogs is a four-track introduction to the Sheep and

their harpy-like enchanting melodies, which gained much attention and is to be swiftly followed

by “double A and double B side single,” I am the Rain. Partially recorded at Abbey Road studios,

this release is set to propel Stealing Sheep into the wider consciousness after several very kind

words from those in the know at the BBC, XFM and, of course, Bido Lito!

I am keen to hear their thoughts on using the world-famous Abbey Road and, after Lucy laconically summed it up as, “We worked all night, then we finished at

eight in the morning, then we all got breakfast,” I eventually get them to elaborate. They tell me they were based in Studio One, the large building where orchestral

pieces are often recorded. Whilst this may seem a touch spacious for a group consisting of just three people, it actually transpired to be the perfect environment

for the group’s resonant harmonies. Becky explains to me that they were in the midst of a long tour at the point of recording and, after several whiskies, her

voice wasn’t in the best condition that night. However, video evidence exists (you can find it on

their website) of a live performance of Your Saddest Song at the studios which contradicts her

opinion. It’s an incredibly moving performance which I can only implore you to search out as an

introduction to Stealing Sheep.

Half way through our interview, Becky becomes distracted by a butterfly which has snuck

into the studios through a crack in the window. As she deftly catches it before gently releasing it

back to freedom with all the wonder of a child, I sit there unable to help but feel that somehow

it beautifully communicates the wide-eyed innocence of the Stealing Sheep ethos. Alluring. The

group are set to display this magnetism to a wider audience as, following the release of the single

on the 16th May, they are embarking on a European tour taking in Paris, Switzerland, Germany and

Belgium, followed by several festival dates including The Secret Garden Party. After this, thoughts

will turn to recording the group’s debut album and if their progression continues at its current rate

then I’m ready to tempt fate and predict its appearance on a lot of end of year lists already. They

tell me they are set to record with first time producer Richard O’Flynn in the south of France and

joke about whether or not this will make the album “sound a bit French.” What’s without doubt is

that if this is the case, then the Sheep will faultlessly absorb this alongside their already bumper

list of influences.

After wrapping up the interview I walk with Lucy towards a local cafe as she is tasked with

acquiring food for the group (from a vegetarian cafe, naturally). We share a joke and as she leaves,

I realise it’s happened. Stealing Sheep have done to me what they’ve managed to do to every

critic they’ve met thus far; beguile me with their boundless charm. It appears that for these three

girls capturing hearts is as simple as capturing butterflies and, most probably, you’re next.

Go to bidolito.co.uk to see an exclusive Stealing Sheep short film, featuring footage from this

interview with David Lynch and an intimate live performance!

stealingsheep.co.uk

www.bidolito.co.uk


12

Bido Lito! May 2011

Words: John Still

It’s back. After 2010’s triumphant event, Sound City returns to Liverpool this

May, promising to be a far grander and more eclectic event than has been

seen in previous years. LSC has garnered a reputation for bringing a mix of

established global artists and hotly-tipped newcomers to Liverpool, as well as

providing a stage for the cream of local talent. The festival has gained favourable

comparisons with the internationally renowned South By Southwest Festival

in Texas, and is run in much the same spirit as its transatlantic cousin. Both

comprise a mix of high profile showcases for both artists and

labels, and both spread the shows across several venues.

In addition to the performance aspect, Sound City runs two

days of conferences, discussing the finer details of the music

industry on a local, national and international level.

Topping the bill at the 2011 event are THE BLACK LIPS, selfproclaimed

‘flower-punks’, who headline The Masque theatre

on 20th May. Support includes Liverpool psychobillies EL

TORO!, whose recent album has been on constant rotation at

Bido Lito! HQ. Scottish upstarts THE VIEW return to Liverpool

promoting their upcoming third album Bread and Circuses.

The band received rave reviews for debut album Hats off

to the Buskers, and will hope that their new material fares

equally well at the O2 Academy on 19th May.

Fucked Up

A must-see for the weekend, Canadian hardcore rock outfit

FUCKED UP return to the North West for the third time in 12

months. The band have a universal appeal that their name

belies, finding fans amongst hardcore aficionados, rock fans

and even the indie-minded, having toured with Arcade Fire.

Their 2010 appearance at The Kazimier was one of the most

memorable of the year and they return to the same venue

on 21st May. Also at the Kazimier, new favourites of BBC

6Music YUCK return to the city after their support of Modest

Mouse in late 2010; and, with their debut album making

waves on both sides of the Atlantic, their show on 19th

May, supporting THE WHIP, is likely to be one of the hottest

tickets in town.

Leading the British contingent at LSC will be FRANK

TURNER, a hardcore frontman turned folk-troubadour. After

the short but memorable career of Million Dead, Frank

reinvented himself and discovered a talent for acoustic protest songs. Recent

albums Love, Ire and Song and Poetry of the Deed have made the UK charts;

and, in this day and age, Thatcher Fucked the Kids should become one of the

anthems of the festival.

A major coup for the festival is securing an appearance from PHILIP SELWAY.

Frank Turner

www.bidolito.co.uk


COLOUR OF THE TRAP

THE DEBUT ALBUM OUT 9TH MAY

WWW.MILESKANE.COM


14

Bido Lito! May 2011

Not a household name by himself, perhaps, but as drummer

for Radiohead he has had a major role in British music

over the last two decades. Following bandmates Yorke

and Greenwood into the world of solo recordings, Selway

released Familial in 2010, revealing a knack for low-key,

beautifully understated melody as well as the rhythm his

day job requires. Headlining the Bella Union showcase at

St Luke’s (bombed out) Church, the gig offers the chance to

see one of the unsung heroes of British music in unfamiliar

surroundings. A real treat.

Whilst all these visiting artists will be welcomed with

open arms, it hasn’t gone unnoticed that Liverpool’s

music scene is in robust health

these days, and naturally is

well represented in the upper

echelons of the Sound City lineup.

Former Rascal MILES KANE

and rockers SOUND OF GUNS

will play consecutive evenings at

the cavernous St. George’s Hall,

while local legends CAST play the

Metropolitan Cathedral Crypt.

Also flying the flag for the host

city will be FOREST SWORDS, who

received international critical

acclaim - and a Bido Lito! front

cover - for 2010’s Dagger Paths.

An ambient mix of dubstep and

soul, the album tapped into the

same zeitgeist mined by James

Blake and Jamie Woon. Releasing

a single through hyper-cool label

No Pain in Pop, Forest Swords

will perform at The Kazimier in

support of THREE TRAPPED TIGERS

and KURT VILE. Fellow Bido Lito!

cover stars CLINIC will appear at

St Luke’s Church on 20th May, and

with any luck they’ll be performing

their International Record Store Day, Cilla Black cover.

Charged with closing the festival are psychedelic dronerock

masters MUGSTAR, and after their mind-melting set at

our own Inside Pages festival there is no doubt that they

are more than up to the challenge. And no party could be

complete without the quick-fire mathpop of HOT CLUB DE

PARIS.

Philip Selway

With many more bands playing across the city over the

weekend, the LSC line-up is an indication of the pull that

Liverpool has. This year, more so than in the previous years,

the festival seems to be a celebration of what Liverpool

itself has to offer, with higher-profile slots being taken by

local artists, and undercards as exciting as the headliners

themselves.

liverpoolsoundcity.co.uk

John Still picks his highlights from

this year’s conference...

As well as offering a feast of music, Liverpool

Sound City will again be running industry conferences

concurrently, promoting discussion and debate in

and around the music business. With guest speakers

both local and international, the conference offers

delegates the chance to delve behind the scenes

in the industry and encounter some of the major

players along the way. Last year’s event provided food

for thought on many topics, ranging from the use of

music in video games to the lack of opportunities for

Urban artists in Liverpool, allowing space for some

frank discussion and strong reactions.

The 2011 Conference promises much the same

scope for debate, and the various panels will capture

the interest of artists, promoters, managers and

writers alike.

Thursday 19th May sees a brief introduction to

the events, as well as a panel on the relatively new

phenomenon of Microfunding, its application and

implications. Day One also sees a talk with MICHAEL

BREIDENBRUECKER, co-founder of Last.fm, on music

applications, and of particular interest to unsigned

bands, a discussion panel on the role of the record

label in the modern music industry.

Continuing the label theme on Friday 20th May

will be ‘A More Perfect Union’, the keynote speech

on labels with SIMON RAYMONDE. As bassist in

Cocteau Twins, and founder of Bella Union, Simon has

experienced independent record labels from both

sides. Also taking place on Friday will be a discussion

on modern technology and its role in the promotion

and marketing of music, plus the final roundtable

discussion of music bloggers. Blogging has become

one of the prime methods of communication amongst

tastemakers and trendsetters, and the panellists will

be putting some local artists through their paces as

well as taking on some audience demos.

The discussion of music is essential to the ethos of

the LSC event, stimulating dialogue surrounding the

Liverpool scene, and providing a forum for education,

promotion, argument and resolution.

The event will take place at The Hilton Hotel,

Liverpool One.

www.bidolito.co.uk


Bido Lito! May 2011 15

Jonny Davis picks out 10 of the best from the festival crop...

Capac

Described by Radio 1’s Huw Stevens as “Massive”, the post-rock

leanings of Capac are sure to open Thursday’s proceedings at the

Kazimier in style.

Wave Machines

Words: Jonny Davis

Not content to sit back and watch Sound City, Bido Lito!

wants a piece of the action. With that in mind, a stellar cast

will be rounded up on Friday 20th May at Static Gallery, for

a night of eclectic live music from Liverpool, Manchester

and Oklahoma.

Topping the bill are Merseyside’s own synth poppers

WAVE MACHINES. Once a well-kept secret, now on their

way to greatness, Wave Machines will be playing with

psychedelic overlords The Flaming Lips and British Sea

Power at Jodrell Bank Observatory in July. But before they

end up on Brian Cox’s Christmas card list it seems fitting for

them to headline a roster of diverse and exciting artists in

their home town. Look out for the slinky electro-groove of

Keep The Lights On and the rousing apathetic anthem Punk

Spirit from the debut album Wave If You’re Really There.

Next up are a band that have toured with both The

Flaming Lips and British Sea Power respectively (spotting

the theme here?). COLOURMUSIC describe their sound as

Oklahoma Sex Rock and as such they are guaranteed to

bring a bit of muscle into the evening with their distorted

guitars and ritualistic chanting. They have been likened

to The Polyphonic Spree but they possess a groove and

a wilful dissonance that Tim DeLaughter’s gang have

always lacked.

Currently on tour with Dum Dum Girls, Manchesterbased

MAZES deal in scuzzy lo-fi pop similar to Wavves

and Best Coast. There is always demand for music like this

and with good reason. Mazes are as good as anyone out

there for creating huge shimmering summer anthems

that sound like they have been squeezed through a pub

PA system.

Bido favourites THE WILD EYES will provide the scouse

garage for the evening. With their drone-psych jams

steeped in history and soaked in sonic narcotics, they are

sure to stage an unmissable performance.

If that wasn’t enough the BIDO LITO! DJS will be spinning

a heady mix of local and international music from Sound

City and beyond, filling the air with a joyous cacophony.

Handsome Furs

The synth-punk husband and wife duo boast hooks aplenty, as well

as a taste for the unexpected. Fronted by Dan Boeckner of Canadian

Chain And The Gang

supergroup Wolf Parade

The latest project from Ian Svenonius; musician, author, actor and talk show

host. Never one to stagnate, Svenonius is back with a politically infused

blues-rock record. He is sure to make a statement at Static on Thursday.

Three Trapped Tigers

Touring their as yet unreleased debut album, Route One Or Die, Three

Trapped Tigers have set the blogs alight with three incredible EPs. Think

glitchy Aphex Twin played live on drums, guitars and synthesizers.

Forest Swords

With a critically acclaimed debut album under his belt, Matt Barnes

aka Forest Swords brings his droney soundscapes to The Kazimier.

Pitchfork recommended and thoroughly Bido Lito! endorsed.

Zeus

Having soundtracked a Nissan advert then subsequently toured the

world, Zeus will land in their spiritual home and fill the Crypt with

golden, Beatles-indebted harmonies.

Owls*

Ahead of their hotly anticipated debut LP, due later this year, local favourites

OWLS* play with Kurt Vile at The Kazimier on Friday. Fans of Tindersticks

should make this a definite in their festival itinerary. Not to be missed.

Marquez Toliver

From busking on Brick Lane to a performance on Jools Holland and on

to SXSW, Marquez Toliver is a rising star and rightly so. Watch him fill

the bombed out church with soul.

Braids

Currently on tour with Toro Y Moi, Braids make ambient winding

textures to get lost in. The Kazimier provides the perfect setting for

this ethereal performance.

Those Dancing Days

Hailing from Stockholm, these girls specialise in big choruses

underpinned by the kind of drumming John Bonham would have

been proud to call his own.

www.bidolito.co.uk


16

Bido Lito! May 2011

THE

AMERICANS

ARE

COMING

Batten Down The Hatches

For a US Invasion

Words: Craig G Pennington

Illustration: Adam Bresnen

It’s not something that we tend to bark on about in these pink pages but, 47

years ago, CBS News in America ran a story on the impending ‘British Invasion’.

The centrality of our city’s role to the whole shebang and its place in the Brit-

Beat phenomenon has been studied, scribed and marketed ever since, to great

effect, but it seems that our friends from over the wash have ambitions of

getting their own back. Such is the strength of the US contingent at Liverpool

Sound City this year that we’ve been cooped up in Bido Lito! towers for weeks,

expecting some kind of American musical putsch.

This comes at perhaps the summit of an eighteen month to two year period,

during which our US cousins have been churning out new, essential bands at a

rate and quality - if we’re honest - that the UK can’t even get close to. To mention

a few ... Smith Westerns, Crystal Stilts, Best Coast, Sleigh Bells, The Pains Of

Being Pure At Heart, Surfer Blood and Vivian Girls have all broken through with

varying degrees of commercial success, yet universal critical acclaim. And that’s

not even scratching the surface (I can hear you thinking, “well, what about Beach

House, what about Girls, what about Ariel Pink’s long awaited breakthrough?”

Well you’re right, the list’s as long as that of the toppings choice board at your

local Dunkin’ Donuts).

Given my opening reference to the British Invasion, BEAT CONNECTION

probably provide a convenient starting point for a voyage through all things

star-spangled at this year’s festival. Yet this Seattle group resist the Rickenbakers

and mop tops and instead favour sample-aided, sun lovin’, jangling bliss.

The aforementioned Ariel Pink’s Haunted Graffiti probably provides a healthy

reference point, though these guys sound like they very much enjoyed last

year’s Glasser record, while factoring in a heavy dose of ‘90s deep house.

True, BLACK LIPS have been around for a while, but their constant form in

creating plain-old-good-time-rock-n-roll-garage means that you just never fall

out of love with them. Their new LP, Arabia Mountain, which is imminent on Vice,

sees them carry on in pretty much the same vein as where 2009’s 200 Million

Thousand left off. This is despite the understandable jitters of fans who may

have feared that having Mark Ronson behind the desk could have resulted in

a wholly more polished affair. Yet, it’s all gnarly melodic irony: these guys are

drugged-up hyenas with a knack for a tune. Expect stage invasions and unbridled

chaos, a thoroughly enjoyable experience during which Black Lips will manage

to provide complete escapism, while not taking themselves too seriously at all.

And that in itself is no mean feat. (Ed - And pick up 20th May’s Bido Lito! Sound

City Daily Magazine for a full exclusive interview with the band!)

We’ve been spreading the virtue over the past four or five months of Guards, a

little known New York band who released their debut EP on 3 Syllables Records

at the end of 2010. And it was on said EP that we first came across CULTS, who

contributed to the record. Cults have since emerged as a pretty scintillating

prospect in their own right, with their soulful, knee-jellying pop coming straight

out of the Wayne Coyne songbook. Like fellow American newcomers The Magic

Kids, this band seem to get away with utterly straight up, classic US pop, the

kind you get the feeling most groups don’t really have the balls to try, or the

charm to pull off. Essential listening.

FESTIVAL HIGHLIGHT ALERT! If you’ve not done so already, you’re going to fall

head over heels for KURT VILE & THE VIOLATORS. Kurt’s debut LP Smoke Ring For

My Halo has been on constant spin at the Bido Bat Cave since it landed and it

still sounds as gorgeously nocturnal and as bold as it did on its first rotation.

Comparisons to Neil Young have been prevalent, numerous and not without

grounds, as Kurt manages to bridge the gap between acoustic troubadour and

rock demigod with ease, without feeling forced or contrived in either context.

Not since the emergence of Ryan Adams from the ashes of Whiskeytown, and

the release of Heartbreaker in 2000, has a new American songwriter oozed so

much promise. Very, very exciting indeed.

So guys n gals, raise a bourbon to the mid-west, a Manhattan to the

skyscrapers, a Rolling Rock to the Rockies, kick on your cowboy boots and whip

on your Stetson, cos the Americans are coming. And I for one, can’t wait y’all.

www.bidolito.co.uk


18

Bido Lito! May 2011

A POSTCARD FROM

MOTHER EARTH

Words: Nik Glover

Illustration: Graham Cheal

NB: The following was sent to Bido Lito! Second Class after weeks of

chasing Mother Earth around for info. We know at least 60% of it to be

untrue ...

Bido Lito!: Mother Earth?

Mother Earth: We started life on the Isle of Man. There’s little-to-nothing

going for the city of Douglas aside from a constant in-flow of warm winds

and an abundance of crayfish tails. The venues are operated by tax-avoiding

aristocratic motorcycle enthusiasts, and the Island’s other bands are stuck in

a curious courtship with the U.S. ExPat line-dancing movement. In a flash of

the seasons, the Mother Earth boys broke out of their Irish Sea time-loop and

drafted in a third-cousin to stand ‘pon the left-hand-side, ripping on a friend’s

Telecaster copy. And the rest, depending on which old myth you pay attention

to, is recent ancient history.

BL!: How’s work on your album?

ME: We think of our tracks like rocks. We’re squashing down layer upon

layer of ideas into each piece to create something solid and long-lasting.

The record, as it will be, is currently in the form of our expanding/contracting

‘live set’. Our brainwaves for tracks tend to appear in lumps of two or three

at a time, like shards of pumice-stone. It’s like this: a timeless fossil of a

musical idea will be compacted under heaps of impermeable dirt, but we’ll

sift through that and clean it up for presentation purposes. Once this process

has been completed several times, you have a set of things that you’d like to

‘show and tell’. The ‘show’ aspect is obviously the playing of this material in

a gig setting. The ‘tell’ part is documenting these things once you’re content

with them, and is a little more intricate and complex. Like that scene in

Jurassic Park - Mother Earth needs to be both the skeleton of the dinosaur in

the lobby AND the live T-Rex that stomps through and demolishes everything

in the way. It can be difficult, but with time & effort it becomes a song and

dance.

BL!: How’s the Croxteth lodge ‘scene’ developing?

ME: Scenes are inevitable aren’t they? The notion of a scene will prevail, at

the very least. They exist in and out of music because, out of convenience or

otherwise, people tend to pigeon-hole what they know and what they don’t

into genres, sub-genres, anti-genres, sub-quarks and the like. We are powerstep,

igneous-riff and conglomerate-rock, feel free to call us and what we do

whatever you want if it helps you. We want to do just that.

The thing is that we crash-landed here really - put our anklebones in &

intruded on a peat bog party. We put word out on a few web forums, months

back, and received an offer from a bird keeper with a basement space. When

we got in the gaff it was so tidy. People were coming & going, playing on

a spoken-word record here, laying down a dubplate there. Everyone kept

busy, and the ‘lights out at eleven’ rule really helped productivity. We’ve since

shacked up in a refurb’d (en suite) changing room and the tectonic plates are

really shifting along nicely. That said, the underlying theme of a Lodge being

a place where old pals have bundled together in aid of a shared distaste for

boredom can only be a handy environs to exist in. We wouldn’t like to give

ourselves a grand title, because it’s just that. Back at the ranch you’re just as

likely to hear Ce Ce Peniston as you are a bit of the Webber.

BL!: Where does Mother Earth come from?

ME: Many pillars of the Manx community are VAT-dodgers so there’s a

tendency on the Island to ‘Google-proof’ the name of your company or firm,

to throw off the Scotland Yard sniffers. So really we’re just taking the mickey

out of that tendency, following suit with a band name that Black Sabbath

traded under for a fortnight.

BL!: Is Liverpool better now than in the past? Was it any good then?

ME: When we arrived it was completely overwhelming, shocking and

arresting - and now it’s even more so. Evolution takes a long time, so not

too surprisingly we’re living in a time within which you can draw a lot of

comparisons, because really, not that much has changed. Liverpool has a

good scene and there’s a lot of variety but it’s been that way for a while, not

all too surprisingly.

Over on the Island, there’s a gated amount of musical knowledge that

gets shared. We were all pretty well versed on the tried-and-tested bunch

– Cream, Rush, all that lot aren’t a secret. It was only when we got to these

shores that we realised Mersey Beat had upped and left, the British Invasion

had become a two-way war of attrition, and the decades had been unkind

to yesteryear’s Power Trios. We had to ‘jack in’ to 30-odd years’ worth of

sonic cavorting. Like in the film The Fifth Element where Leeloo gets up-tospeed

with the history of human civilisation in a flash. And I can tell you, our

revision sessions were not pretty. One dawn Jacob sat bolt upright behind

the kit and memorably uttered, “I know kung fu.”

The tools for documenting musical goings-on (posh computers, retro-fit

digi-cams, the information superhighway), are all too prevalent, but they

didn’t used to be. Scenes are more extensive and looked at, as is the term.

Time will tell if they really existed.

motherearth.bandcamp.com

www.bidolito.co.uk


20

Bido Lito! May 2011

Party poppers, paper hats and all

things pink and musically linked

in Liverpool … it could only be

Bido Lito!’s first birthday. To

celebrate a year (it’s flown

by, we know) since the

original publishing of our

pink pages, local hub Bold

Street Coffee will be playing

the perfect culinary host

to an exhibition showcasing

photography and illustrations

from a year’s worth of rose-coloured

journalistic bliss.

Dubbed ONE, the exhibition will

run from 12th May - 12th June, and

throughout the duration of Liverpool

Sound City, giving welcomed revellers

to our scouse metropolis an in-depth

insight into the Merseyside music

scene of the past twelve months

and a chance to admire some of

the most wonderful and wackiest

(thinking along the lines of the

Christmas special: Godzilla in a Santa

hat) illustration and photography

that Bido Lito! has had the honour

of publishing. With a launch party on

Thursday 12th of May including free

entry, live acts and Bido Lito! DJs, the

exposé is not one to be missed.

Stripped-down

soul-bearing

sessions on the night will come from

Danny Roberts, adroit guitarist,

singer and songwriter

of local rock n’ roll

magic-makers

The Sixteen

Tonnes,

and

deftly

dressed duo roots

gems the The Big House. With both

acts being first class honours

graduates of our pink pages, the

celebrations are set to be a

musical Mardi Gras -

the only thing lacking:

hoards of pink ticker

tape and vibrantly coloured

carnival masks.

From mid-May and the

weeks following, the people

of Liverpool and those

passing through will

be able to peruse

illustrations from our

dextrous

scribblers over

a marvellous mug of black gold. Both

live and feature photography since

the birth of our bonny publication

will be on display covering a range

of local acts from Clinic to The

Coral and Sound Of Guns to

Stealing Sheep.

Picking Bold Street

Coffee as the location for the

exhibition was an easy choice

with said coffee shop being

such an established nucleus

for the media and music scene

in Merseyside. Just the same

age as our young Bido and

offering some of Liverpool’s

best coffee, the café itself is

a mix between the classic

Italian

cool

white wash and modish style; the

turntables and LPs on the counter

deeming it ideal for the decks to be

hit. The photography and illustrations

will reside on the wall, alongside

the shop’s huge etched map, which

highlights coffee plantations

from around the world. The

familiar sketchy writing

telling of bacon butties and

breakfasts reminds us of their

‘Coffee for Everyone’ mantra. And

‘everyone’ is no understatement. For

example, on recent frequentations

to Bold Street Coffee, I have been

introduced to a Merseyside DJ, an

up-and-coming

singer/songwriter,

and the ex-goalkeeper for Penno and

Torpey’s beloved Tranmere Rovers.

Doesn’t happen in Costa now,

does it?

There are no pink promises of

sickly saccharine birthday cake

(contrary to what you may gather

from the photograph) though

Mother Pennington arduously slaved

over a hot oven night and day to

produce such a marvel. But if such

grand gateaux will be present for the

launch party you can guarantee Craig,

curls and all, will be jumping out of it

complete with editorial sash … Surely

worth popping in and having gander

for that pleasure, if good music, art

and coffee are not to your

refined tastes.

Words: Bethany Garrett

Photography: John O’Hara

Baking: Craig’s Mum

www.bidolito.co.uk


FILMING THE CITY:

www.bidolito.co.uk

Dominic Foster anD Urban escapism

Words: Samuel Garlick

Photography: Jennifer Pellegrini


Bido Lito! May 2011 23

DOMINIC FRANCIS FOSTER is one of the

most exciting new prospects in Liverpool’s

cultural hot pot. A videographer,

photographer and designer, he

possesses an adept ability to portray the

very essence of the bands with which he

works. Hotly received videos such as the

sombre All We Need by The Sand Band,

Luke Fenlon’s jaunty Summer, and pieces

for The Suzukis, Dustland, The Loud and

Picture Book have positioned Dominic at

the heart of the city’s music community.

Throughout his work are overriding

themes of escapism and surrealism, both

of which are sutured by an undisputed

apprehension of his surroundings.

After acquiring a degree in film and fine

art, Dominic shared his time between

playing in local bands and photography,

snapping up scenes of mayhem at every

gig he could attend. Honing his talent

and reputation, he extended his focus

to videography, creating the video for

The Suzukis’ Built In. “That got such a

hugely positive reaction from everyone

that I decided this was something I had

to pursue.” And this was a pursuit that

had to be carried out within familiar

financial restrictions. “The necessity to

create something out of nothing is the

perfect breeding ground for creativity

and originality,” he says. Possessing an

ethos of self-sufficiency, he was not only

able to achieve something remarkable

from very few resources, but also give

a distinctive personality to his work. “A

big obstacle for me was trying to focus

all of the ideas that I had into something

coherent, and channelling them for long

enough to create something tangible

with the tools that I possessed.”

Delivering pizzas for a daytime job

has seen Dominic roving around the city,

synchronizing him with his surroundings.

“It is a job that gives me a lot of time to

listen to music whilst I drive around the

city thinking up ideas for videos and

noticing cool locations to shoot in,” he

states. “It really keeps me in tune with

the vibe of the city.” This parallelism is

vital to his work; it’s the unique scenarios

within his pictures and the stories he

tells through his videos that display the

integration, all achieved with an intuitive

guerilla approach. “All you need is a

camera and your environment, if I used

expensive equipment then the product

ends up looking like everything else”.

As an agent of impulse, he always starts

a new project by travelling into the city

and letting the ideas develop naturally,

“the best approach is just seeing what

you can use around the city to generate

something original.”

Dominic shares influences from various

disciplines, “I am heavily influenced

by cinema as opposed to other music

videos and have a pretty wide range

of directorial influences such as Jean-

Pierre Melville and John Carpenter.”

This cultural integration is particularly

displayed in his music videos, as they

are often thematically driven. Reflecting

on this, Dominic states, “the mentality

of directors from the nouvelle vague

has affected my work, as I always strive

to apply that energy to the videos that

I make.” The energy that he describes

is that of youthful dissidence, rejecting

the traditional conventions of formulaic

cinema. By striving for innovation,

Dominic’s work possesses a vitality,

harmonised with escapist intentions,

“as by definition, music and film should

always have escapist qualities, even if it

causes you to flee to somewhere more

disturbing than your real world setting.”

Following in the same vein as Spike

Jonze, Dominic is hoping to even

further expand his horizons through the

medium of film. “I’m currently working

on a short script that Chris from The

Suzukis has written, he’s got loads of

dark existentialist tales, so hopefully

we’ll kick start a North West new wave of

indie filmmaking.”

dominicfrancisfoster.com

www.bidolito.co.uk


24

Bido Lito! May 2011

Reviews

www.bidolito.co.uk


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26

Bido Lito! May 2011

Words: Pete Charles

Illustration: Michael Cottage

Pink Eyes, lead singer of Canadian hardcore band,

Fucked Up, said during their recent Liverpool show

that, “There’s some great music coming out of this

city. Cold Ones, SSS, The Down and Outs ... fuck it,

all the best bands are from Liverpool.” He will soon

be able to add a few more to his list as MUGSTAR,

STEALING SHEEP and DOGSHOW fire their creative

rockets beyond our stars, having been headhunted

by influential booking agency Elastic Artists. Bido

Lito! caught up with Jason from Mugstar, Becky from

Stealing Sheep and Sam from Dogshow, over a cup

of tea in Mello Mello and found three musicians

clearly enjoying having some promotional muscle

behind their respective bands.

“They’ve got us on tours and given us opportunities

that we wouldn’t otherwise have,” says Sam. “They’re

negotiators; that’s what they do.”

Elastic Artists’ roster reads like a who’s who of

hip, innovative and original acts not specific to any

particular genre. Animal Collective, The Black Lips,

Coldcut, Deerhunter, Dum Dum Girls, The Fresh And

Onlys, and No Age all reside on their eclectic books.

In terms of what their latest additions are trying to

achieve musically, they couldn’t be further apart.

“I don’t know too many other bands that really

sound like us,” says Sam of his synth and drums

electro-disco machine Dogshow. “We often find

ourselves lumped in with DJs or weird mixes of

bands and I quite like playing to audiences that

aren’t really expecting us.” In case you’re unfamiliar

with Mugstar, their creative bent is a guitardriven

exploration of the dynamic possibilities

of repetition and volume, cacophonous at worst,

spine-tingling at best and like Dogshow, they see

vocals either as superfluous to music, or as Jason

puts it, “just another instrument.” By contrast,

Stealing Sheep reside on a cotton wool plain of

melody, their floating, delicate vocals being one

of their most prized assets (demonstrated neatly

by Becky singing absently to herself throughout

the interview). So, it is perhaps more the creative

energy flowing through the three bands that has

piqued the London-based agency’s interest, rather

than a common theme within their music.

www.bidolito.co.uk

nestled

Firmly

under the wing of Elastic

Artists, this is clearly a pivotal moment for the three

bands, not least for Stealing Sheep, whose gig

calendar will see them embark on a European tour

this summer - not bad for a band that began plying

its trade less than a year ago. At the other end of

the spectrum, scene veterans and Peel-favourites

Mugstar

have shown themselves

to be late bloomers.

“We’d been trying to hook up with a booking

agency for a couple of years without success,” says

Jason. “Then Mike [Mike Deane, Liverpool Music

Week Director] just sent us an e-mail saying he had

a proposal for us. We thought he was going to offer

us a gig or something, but he asked us to come on

the books with Elastic.”

In an unprecedented move, whilst continuing


Bido Lito! May 2011 27

his work in Liverpool,

Mike has joined the London agency as

a booking agent, opening the doors for the hugely

talented trio to be negotiated onto the books of one

of the most respected talent agencies in the world.

The importance of this juncture is evident in the

suggestion from all three musicians that they are

now starting to weigh up the responsibilities to their

bands against the other commitments in their lives.

Becky left her job as a shop manager in October;

Jason believes that all night road trips back from

London will soon be a thing of the past (all three

members of Mugstar currently have day jobs); and

Sam hopes that his main venture, co-running the

Kazimier, will soon become, “more autonomous”,

so that he can devote more attention to Dogshow.

Record releases are high on the agenda for the

trio. Mugstar’s back catalogue spans about seven

years, while Dogshow are still on their first album.

Stealing Sheep have two albums out this year, even

though Becky confesses to hating recording. It’s

also interesting to note that they do not see record

sales as the route to financial success, the converse

of which is perhaps a misconception amongst new

bands. They’re all in agreement that ownership of

music and the revenue it generates for bands is

becoming an increasingly blurry concept. Jason

still buys lots of vinyl, but is of the opinion that

nobody really owns music in the original sense of

the word.

“Somebody might ask me if I’ve got the new

Clinic album and I’ll be like, ‘well I’ve got it. You’ve

got it on shuffle in amongst 5000 other songs.’ I

think Spotify makes music more disposable.”

“I’d push for our music to be on Spotify,” ventures

Becky. “I don’t really buy albums, so I wouldn’t

expect anyone else to. Sam, would you?”

“I haven’t bought an album since I was a

teenager,” offers Sam.

Although the financial side of the music industry

is in such a rapid state of flux, Becky doesn’t see

depleted record sales as a bad thing. “I don’t care

too much about people buying our albums. I think

it’s much more interesting if you can get your music

synced to adverts or films - that’s a better source

of revenue.” Everyone nods their assent. It appears

obvious to them that, as the dissemination of music

relies ever more heavily on advertising subsidies,

with consumers paying less, it seems natural for

artists to become part of that cycle in as many ways

as possible.

In terms of future prospects, the general feeling

is that none of the bands have specific ambitions or

a concrete idea of what would constitute success

for them. Dogshow are hoping to break onto the

European circuit, Mugstar are excited about their

American releases along with their publishing deal,

and Stealing Sheep seem content to enjoy the

present. “It’s the lifestyle we’re after! Sex, drugs and

rock n’ roll!” jokes Becky, with more than a touch

of irony.

Mugstar, Dogshow, and Stealing Sheep’s

collusion with Elastic Artists looks set to catapult

them onwards and upwards and, with any luck,

they’ll be in orbit for a very long stretch.

stealingsheep.co.uk

myspace.com/dogshowdisco

mugstar.com

elasticartists.net

www.bidolito.co.uk


28

Bido Lito! May 2011

Vox PoP

Words: Christopher Torpey

Words: Christopher Torpey

Illustration: Kieran Gabriel

PETER

SERAFINoWICZ

Imagine being marooned on a desert

island with only five of your favourite

songs for company, what would you

take? A blast of sunshine pop to raise

the spirits perhaps, or some stirring

classical music to inspire a break for

freedom? Or how about wallowing in

some gothic misery as you ponder your

misfortune and cry yourself to sleep

with only a volleyball for company

… These were some of the questions

mulled over by the Belle Vale-born and

bred comedian, actor, director, giddy

buster and generally über-talented

PETER SERAFINOWICZ at the latest In

Conversation evening hosted by Club

Geek Chic.

Elevated if not marooned on an

island of polished wood and decadence

in the Concert Room at St. George’s

Hall, Serafinowicz sits awkwardly

in the limelight as he discusses his

career and achievements to date: a

man used to the background, he is

probably best remembered for his

vocal performances rather than his onscreen

antics, though when he does

appear on camera his cameo roles

are often the stuff of cultish legend.

Although, infuriatingly, Serafinowicz’s

profile is relatively low-key (“Peter

who? Never heard of him!”), he has had

a foot, or vocal chord, in the camp of

some of the most celebrated televisual

institutions of the past decade. An

impressive CV that includes voicing a

Star Wars baddie (the red-faced judo

gooseberry Darth Maul), and screengrabbing

turns as the sleazy Duane

Benzie (Spaced) and US-obsessed Tex

in I’m Alan Partridge, it is still a wonder

that his notoriety is not matched by his

creative output. “I always liked playing

dicks,” he confesses, which somewhat

downplays his ability to take someone

or something fundamentally flawed

and accentuate it to create comic gold,

but still doesn’t explain why he isn’t

a more treasured icon beyond the

stalwarts of Terry Wogan’s radio show.

Schooled at OLA and SFX, Catholic

schools in the Belle Vale/Gateacre area,

Serafinowicz has always had a unique

talent for mimicry that ultimately saw

him flying the nest to found a career

as a voice-over artist and impersonator.

To the delight of the crowd packed in

to this tiny space, he treats us to some

of the favourites, Al Pacino and Marlon

Brando sparring with Ralph Fiennes

and Leonard Rossiter; his unique

talent for creating a comically-skewed

caricature showing why the likes of

Simon Pegg and Steve Coogan have

sought out collaborations with this

master of spoof.

It must take a finely-tuned

musical ear to perfect the

art of the impersonation,

a trait that Serafinowicz

has always displayed,

most often in conjunction

with his vocal acrobatics.

Under the pseudonym Gelg he scored grabbing As the

the music for his Tomorrow’s Worldaping

TV series Look Around You, and

has recently embraced the medium of

the music video, directing Hot Chip’s

video I Feel Better and giving us a peek

at his new video for Swedish House

Mafia’s latest single (another spoof). As

the night unfolds and anecdotes about

his career are coaxed out of him by host

Mike Neary, Serafinowicz seems modest

and unassuming, graciously accepting

plaudits and nervously looking over his

shoulder at the big screen as clips of

his work are rolled out. It seems a relief

for him when the focus is shifted to the

musicians who are brought on to bring

life to his desert island picks. Watching

open-mouthed as Alex Berger delicately

deconstructed Steely Dan’s Reelin’ In

The Years, Serafinowicz’s appreciation

for the musical mastery on show was

evident as he mouthed the compliment

“fucking amazing!” as the crowd broke

out in applause. Similarly stage-

performances of Serafinowicz favourites

haunting strains of The Smiths’

followed, with Neil Campbell and Perri

Alleyne-Hughes’ stellar reworking of the

Tubeway Army hit Are Friends Electric?,

How Soon Is Now? waft across the

auditorium, I’m left wondering why

it takes nights such as this for us to

and local orch-pop, harp-wielding

sit up and take notice of our city’s

darlings Laura James & The Lyres

smashing Deerhunter’s Desirelines out

of the park. Unfortunately not enough

talented and creative luminaries: the

newspaper back pages are full of the

deeds of our sporting heroes, but what

time was given over to discussing these

of those at the cutting edge of theatre,

selections, and I would have loved to

television, music and comedy? Club

hear Peter’s reasons for making these

Geek Chic’s Karen Podesta and Gemma

choices, not least when it came round

Aldcroft are thankfully redressing this

to Helter Skelter. “I could have picked

imbalance, having already been in

any Beatles song, my favourite changes

conversation with Mike McCartney and

each day,” was as far as we got before

David Morrissey at previous events.

talk turned to the remake of Yellow

And, with Vassily Petrenko and Sue

Submarine in which Serafinowicz had

Johnston in the pipeline for future

been cast to play Paul McCartney. The

sessions, it seems as though this trend

project is now up in the air as Disney

is continuing: God bless the Geeks, for

have pulled out, but, as demonstrated,

they shall inherit the earth!

Serafinowicz could cut costs drastically

by voicing all four Fabs, even if he does

admit that Shameless’ Dean Lennox

Kelly does do a better Lennon.

peterserafinowicz.com

clubgeekchic.co.uk

www.bidolito.co.uk


30

Bido Lito! May 2011

Rants/Comment

The Glass Pasty

Post-it Notes From The Cultural Abyss

Post-it Notes From The Cultural Abyss

“Springtime for Hitler in Liverpool” to a standstill. In truth he caused

absolute pandemonium and this poor

Out of the winter abyss we emerge

readers, renewed, afresh and ready

for a Vitamin D binge, shake off the

inertia and let us convert absolutely

everything into serotonin. This month’s

mood food is a plethora of moronic

morsels from platter a la mongoose.

But before we dine let me lie back

on the couch deflect questions of an

Oedipean nature and pour out my

heart under the shadow of Justin

Bieber’s head. Buckle up and switch

on the twatometer we’re going in…

Pasty was caught in the crossfire. A

stampede of two hundred hysterical

schoolgirls came running at me and,

fearful with a face full of Greggs,

I thought either my true identity

had been revealed or someone had

been spreading scurrilous rumours

about my work experience days as a

researcher for Jonathan King, either

way I expected reprisals, I’d come to

the end of the line. My first thought

was one of survival, the old habits

kicked in readers and I used the

hot putrid cheese and onion pasty

Amoeba Bieber: My Story

filling as a deterrent to this army of

Last month the Paedo Pop spotty hormonal wenches, I fired jet

Puppet himself graced this fair after limp jet but nothing, the girls

northern city and brought Liverpool

trampled over me unabated, locked

Nik Glover

Normally I try to write something

who sound like The Move at the very

clever in this column but as it’s

beginning. Don’t Be Sorry is a standout

Liverpool Sound City from 19th to

track. CAPAC at The Kazimier are local

21st MAY I thought I’d go into Grand

lads and a must-see, and TROPHY WIFE

National tipster mode and give you

(on a wee bit later) sound pretty damn

the lowdown on some hot musical

good as well (and not dissimilar to

horses.

Liverpool-lads Outfit). A quick shuffle

If you’re one of those industry types

up to Heebie Jeebies’ first floor will get

(or just unemployed and happen to be

you BRONTO SKYLIFT, who should be

free and easy on a Thursday afternoon)

heavy as frozen swamp mud; ask for

try TOKYOU on Berry Street for some

Wolf, then jump around like a crazed

fodder and free Green Tea. THE PILGRIM

indie sprog. Also, stare at the floor

on Pilgrim Street has cheap booze

constantly and lose your baccy in the

and a little outdoor bit where all you

pit. Headliner for Thursday? Take a

smokers can sit in peace (except for

chance on WINTER GLOVES at Shipping

the occasional Steppenwolf track on

Forecast. If they’re rubbish, I’ll eat my

the jukebox).

tiger suit.

After that, you could do a lot worse

Friday! The SHIP & MITRE at the

first thing on Thursday than getting

bottom of Dale Street has fantastic

in to Static Gallery early (half 8ish

beers and good food, and SIR THOMAS

I’d guess) to see DEEP SEA ARCADE,

RIGBY’s down the road has a good

in and Bieber bound. I awoke semi

conscious to find the shimmering

computer programmed bonce of

Disney’s Dionysus himself looming

over me with the look in his eyes of

a pre pubescent Florence Nightingale

and a rabid Ronald McDonald, he

handed me the remnants of my half

chewed pasty, “there you go buddy”

he grinned, lifting me to my feet, I

stood up, checked my particulars,

looked the toddler of terror square

in the eyes and did the only decent

thing a man can do in that situation,

I slunk off and mumbled “cunt” under

my breath. Another victory for the little

man!

It is only thanks to intensive psychotherapy

and a looming deadline that I

can even put this horror into words.

At the Brain Wash!

Currently due to Tele-visual

meltdown I can only gain access to

one news channel: Russia Today

and

quiet beer garden.

Friday’s music begins a little earlier,

with WOODHANDS at the Crypt Hall

(download their electro ‘n’ hip-hop mix

tape when you get back to the flat)

then COLORAMA may be worth a punt

at the Masque Loft. Shipping Forecast

should be good for GRIMES, then

CLOUD CONTROL who have brilliant

artwork and at least one nice piece of

music called Meditation Song #2 (Why

oh Why) for fans of Neutral Milk Hotel

and early Beck.

Next it’s over to The Kazimier for

FOREST SWORDS, which will be jampacked.

His Rattling Cage has been

ruffling feathers for a long time, and

if (as rumoured) he’s DJ’ing his blend

of warped noughties US r’n’b and

dubstep… well, just watch and learn.

WAVE MACHINES headline Static

Gallery, and it’s probably only The

Kazimier’s THREE TRAPPED TIGERS who

offer a viable alternative. Friday done.

Saturday is a bit of a tester. Begin at

FRATELLI CAFFE VERGNANO (also known

as Toni’s) at the bottom of Sir Thomas

boy is it educational. Admittedly there

is only about forty five minutes of

actual output constantly looped and

is presented by people that make

Newsround Press Packers look like

the embodiment of professionalism

but still its alternative take on western

dominance is worth a look. For all you

suckers on the beebs teat, remember

your milk isn’t as pure and neutral as

you once thought, there is no such

thing as objectivity.

Such mild flirtations with the idiot

box have offset me in my attempt

to quell unnecessary rage, take 02’s

current Narnia based ad campaign,

hearing that Fawn’s self knowing

‘ironic’ musings on the contents on

another hideous company’s brain

would make even Ghandi himself

reach for an Uzi.

Adieu readers and join me next

month with obligatory wristbands.

Street, and try the Lasagne. For a drink,

try the new LEAF CAFÉ on Bold Street.

Their tea is excellent too.

For a headliner, DJANGO DJANGO at

Mojo looks extremely tempting, with

their Storm a great listen in a kind of

Archie Bronson Outfit meets Yardbirds

kind of light. Before that, LANTERNS ON

THE LAKE are followed by MARQUEST

TOLIVER at the Bombed Out Church. If

you’re watching Marquest, shout out

White Sails at the top of your voice,

you’ll be in for a treat (unless he’s

already played it, in which case you

might get annoyed looks from all

the guys with moustaches and puffer

jackets). PHIL SELWAY’s solo project

(headlining the Bombed Out Church)

sounds well worth a listen (from the

one track I’ve heard), but I’m sure Phil

wouldn’t mind me saying that if it was

me, I’d give Django the nod.

If you’d like me to talk about your

band in my column e-mail me at

takemeforanexample@gmail.com with

a link to your music.

www.bidolito.co.uk


BREW MASTERS

GUIDE

---V60---

Guest Column

Francis McEntegart, McEntegart Legal

Francis McEntegart, McEntegart Legal

Music contracts and dealings in the

music industry are full of potential

pitfalls and this is particularly true for

those new to the business. Below we

discuss three issues that musicians

should consider as they can have a

serious affect on your career and your

bank account! We have concentrated

on the perspective of the artist

although record labels, publishers

and promoters don’t escape the

problems.

Band agreements (like partnership agreements in business) deal

with things like how income is shared and who owns the band name.

Signing one at the beginning can save problems later on, such as when

a member leaves. Steve Adler, the original Guns N’ Roses drummer,

signed a termination contract for a lump sum agreeing to terminate his

interest in the band. Adler later sued for more money claiming he wasn’t

mentally fit to sign the contract. Slash admitted that Adler had been out

of it on heroin. The band settled out of court, paying Adler a further $2.5

million. These kinds of arguments can be avoided if a band agreement is

in place.

Song royalties (also known as publishing income) are a massive part

of potential earnings – just imagine how much money was generated

from Amy Winehouse’s cover version of The Zuton’s Valerie! A band should

decide early on how they will split the income from songwriting - will the

individual songwriter take the rights 100% or share them out with the

non-writing members of the band? If all the members write, will they split

the income equally or calculate it on a song-by-song basis? A songwriter

who only receives 20% of the income from a song he wrote alone may

get upset with the rest of the band ten years down the line. Sting wrote

Every Breath You Take and receives 100% of the songwriter rights. U2

share their income and still perform, record and get on well. Again, these

things can be clarified in a band agreement.

Artists signing record deals should take special notice of the release

commitment clause. This clause states the set period within which the

label must release the recordings once they have the masters. If it is a

long period, or if no time limit is set, then the artist could be tied into a

very long contract with no material being available to the public. Gina

G (remember her?) sued her label for their failure to agree tracks to be

recorded within a reasonable time. Miss G claimed that she had suffered

‘substantial damage to her career and future earnings’. History shall tell

us whether this is true. In any event this would not have been a problem if

she had a clear clause on release commitments in her contract. There are

hundreds more cases like these. To save yourself from becoming another

example, make sure you seek some legal advice!

1. Wet filter paper

with large amount

of boiling water.

Dispose of water

once cup and V60

are warm

2. Pour your choice

ground coffee into the

filter paper. Level out

by gently tapping.

3. De- gas coffee using as

little water as possible.

Start at he centre and

work outwards.

Once coffee is

covered leave for

30-45 seconds.

4. Once degassed, fill the V60

pouringas slow as possible in

a anti-clockwise direction.

When the 'bloom' is 1 inch

from the top the filter paper

stop pouring. This stage

should roughly take

2 mins.

SIT BACK AND ENJOY!

McEntegart Legal: 0151 255 0400 - francis@mclegal.co.uk

www.mclegal.co.uk


32

Bido Lito! May 2011

Previews/Shorts

GENTLEMEN’S DUB CLUB

GDC bring their ska, dub and roots reggae carnival to Liverpool. Following

supports with Roots Manuva, The Streets, and The Wailers, their live

reputation precedes them. Mojo’s dancefloor is likely to resemble a Two-

Tone themed episode of Top of the Pops circa 1979, as the band’s high-energy

show catches fire.

Mojo – 10th May – Tickets through gentlemensdubclub.com

YELLOWMAN

Talking of dub, one of the originators of the form, Jamaican dancehall

legend YELLOWMAN backed by THE SAGITTARIUS BAND appears as part of the

Black Routes tour at the Picket. Created by the Africa Oye Touring company,

the gig will whet the appetites of those waiting for the festival in June.

The Picket – 13th May - Tickets through Dr. Hermans and africaoye.com

ANNA CALVI

GROUPLOVE

Cerys Matthews

Following the demise of million-selling Welsh rockers Catatonia a decade

ago, CERYS MATTHEWS has pursued a highly impressive career as a bilingual

artist, her music venturing across different genres and styles. Alongside her

presenting duties on the wonderful BBC 6Music, documentaries on BBC4 and

her debut appearance as a children’s author, Cerys’ 2010 LP TIR was released

to huge acclaim. Following this triumph, the 2nd May sees the release of the

follow-up, Explorer. Last year’s album was accompanied by images from Cerys’

rich family history, with the music drawn from the eras that were shown in the

photographs, from the 1880s to the 1940s, taking in folk, traditional hymns,

Victorian tunes and working songs. The new disc looks set to continue the

theme, consisting largely of Cerys’ voice and simple musical backdrops.

The ‘Over Land and Sea Tour’ will see Cerys playing theatres, with the singer

treading the boards at the Pacific Road Arts Centre in Birkenhead. The set will

consist of songs that she has harvested from her childhood in South Wales,

journeys around the globe and her extensive back catalogue of solo and band

songs. With plenty of anecdotes and humorous asides it promises to be an

inspiring trip across the British Isles and the Southern States.

Pacific Road Arts Centre, Birkenhead - 13th May - Tickets through pacificroad.co.uk

The NME have secured ANNA CALVI and GROUPLOVE for their NME Radar

Tour this year. Indie/blues songstress Calvi is riding a huge wave of critical

acclaim, with her debut LP being tipped as one of the albums of the year, and

Brian Eno describing her as ‘the biggest thing since Patti Smith.’

O2 Academy – May 10th Tickets through NME.com

Sean O’Hagan’s cult act burrow their way underground to the Williamson

Tunnels on 14th May. The revered group have garnered massive critical praise

over the years, their sumptuous tunes a must for all fans of Pet Sounds-era

Beach Boys.

Williamson Tunnels - 14th May - Tickets through Probe Records

Chew Disco Volume Ten appears at The Kazimier on 7th May, the New

York/Liverpool DIY punk party are staging a fundraiser for Icebreakers, a LGBT

organisation in Uganda. Tuneful noisenik two-piece DIRTBLONDE, responsible

for the superb, Alan McGee approved The Hangmen head the bill.

The Kazimier – 7th May - Tickets through wegottickets.com

www.bidolito.co.uk

HIGH LLAMAS

CHEW DISCO FT. DIRT BLONDE

Fiesta Obscenic

In view of crises currently blighting both Japan and Libya, it is heartening to see

that fundraising gigs for both causes have begun to take shape. The good people

at Obscenic are one such example as FIESTA OBSCENIC returns, this year at the

Wolstenholme Creative Space for a Red Cross fundraiser to provide aid to victims

of the humanitarian crises taking place in both countries. Last year’s Fiesta was a

resounding success, with twenty bands taking part and May’s shindig is likely to

feature even more. Running from noon ‘til 2am, the line-up includes the best and

brightest the city has to offer, with more acts to be confirmed.

Bido Lito! will lending a helping hand to the fundraising, by running an auction

of signed copies of your pink monthly online in the run-up to the event. There

are copies signed by The Coral, Clinic, The Sand Band and Forest Swords amongst

others. Check the Bido Lito! Facebook for details.

Keep checking Fiesta Obscenic 2011 on Facebook for the latest line-up, but

highlights include, DOGSHOW, EL TORO!, OUTFIT, STIG NOISE, THE LOUD, BICYCLE

THIEVES, JEAN CLAUDE GOD DAMN, EMIY & THE FAVES,, SING FOR YOUR SUPPER,

THE KAZIMIER KRUNK BAND, DAN CROLL, DEAD BELGIAN and very many more. And

it’s all for a good cause. Need we say anymore? See you there.

The Wolstenholme Project – 7th May – £5 minimum donation on the door.


STORE NOW OPEN

BUY ONLINE: WWW.WEAVERSDOOR.COM

1 CAVERN WALKS HARRINGTON STREET LIVERPOOL L2 6RE TEL: 0151 236 6001


THE TRESTLES

What Do You See?

“The best debut album by a Liverpool band in years…”

Ian D. Hall, Liverpool Student Media

“Purveyors of heart-on-your-sleeve pop rock…”

Bido Lito

THE TRESTLES

What Do You See?

DEBUT ALBUM OUT NOW

Available online via paypal from www.thetrestles.wordpress.com

or in person at News From Nowhere Bookshop, Bold Street

W: thetrestles.wordpress.com | myspace.com/thetrestles


36

www.bidolito.co.uk

Bido Lito! May 2011

Reviews

THE PHANTOM BAND

By The Sea

bands. They like similar stuff, so

fucking what! The important thing to

ask is if it’s any good and do they pull

Harvest Sun & Evol @ The Bluecoat

it off. The answer is a glorious “yes”

to both. Old Coasts could have even

First up this evening are BY THE SEA,

a six-piece who seem to have been

listening to a lot of west coast ‘60s,

psych, etc. That’s no bad thing though,

and it’s their attention to detail that

been a stand out track on The Coral’s

last album, and I can also hear Richard

Hawley on the magnanimous last

song While In The Wood. This bodes

well for a far younger troupe.

stands out, not only McGuinn-era Byrds

Now THE PHANTOM BAND,

but also the Gram Parsons-inspired

version, with touches of country added

to the palette. Early on, the sound was

lacking in the harmony stakes, an

all-important factor in such delicate

material. Members of The Coral were

on hand to sort this, however, and the

sound engineer was put through his

paces. Not bad, eh? While obviously

reminiscent of The Coral it would be

too easy to compartmentalise such

overlooked twice for a Mercury music

prize nomination that could very well

push this band onto the next level,

whatever that means. They’re not

waiting for that level to come to them,

though. Where they are musically hard

to pin down I do hear an ambition

that could be their catapult: Scotland’s

very own The National? Granted their

music has a Krautrock spine but it’s

the sharp, robust folk needling its

The Phantom Band (John Johnson)

way in that defines this band (even

though, live, their 2009 single The

Howling sounds even closer to LCD

Soundsystem than on record).

It’s Folksong Oblivion that gets me,

however, with Rick Anthony (Vocals)

delivering the line, “I left home for an

empty space”. The second album Wants

hasn’t been as favourably looked upon

as their debut but in Everybody Knows

It’s True I find tonight’s triumph. This

show was a sell-out, and rightly so,

but you feel bigger venues wouldn’t

embarrass them. The Bluecoat befitted

them for the moment though, making

this another earnestly gratifying night

at a rejuvenated live venue.

WILD PALMS

Mick Chrysalid

Loved Ones – The Haxan Cloak

The Music Consortium @ Static Gallery

With the dregs of weekend-induced

hangovers slapped out by a freezing

cold Monday evening, I arrive at the

Static Gallery’s candlelit bar for a

weeknight live music fix.

First to appear onstage is THE HAXAN

CLOAK. As part of a small, curious crowd

huddled in the back corner, I don’t

quite realise that the set has begun, as

The Haxan Cloak’s one and only band

member sits onstage, guitar in arms.

He loops effect over effect to create

one long sonic piece, with rhythmic

elements fading in and out, and

sounds lingering and transforming,

reeling and circling, bending but never

breaking. The Cloaked one’s efforts

result in a gradually progressive surge

of electronic sound, mesmerising

and hypnotic. Any concept of time

seems to disappear, and he ends bent

forward on the floor over the array of

effects pedals, the sounds grinding

and churning to an end, guitar long

forgotten. This proves the sonic

brilliance of the manipulation of a

guitar and some decent effects pedals

- who needs a band anyway?

After stirring from my trance in

time to purchase another drink, local

band LOVED ONES take to the stage.

Fronted by The Seal Cub Clubbing

Club’s Nik Glover, the band are a sturdy

team of two consisting of violin, keys,

vocals and a little help from a laptop.

Magic is my clear favourite, with a

friendly pop-like bassline combined

with arousing vocals and with some

added vocal breathing acrobatics.

Their songs are charm-ridden, lulling

and contented, some offering wailing

Thom Yorke-esque vocals, and for a

more melancholic number, Nik reads

from a book (I’d love a little read).

Their final song is lilting, relaxing,

simultaneously sad and optimistic,

prompting the promoter to hail Loved

Ones the “best band in Liverpool.”

WILD PALMS commence

proceedings with a loud, powerful

driving sound which cuts through

the air and the soul, resulting in

a significant change of mood. As

a more regularly instrumented,

tight five-piece, their songs have a

celebratory tense moodiness about

them. The guitarist looks familiar, his

mysterious Haxan Cloak now drawn

back as he resumes the slightly more

conventional day job. Draw In Light

is a beat-driven, melodic tune with a

catchy chorus and heroic-sounding

guitar riffs. Caretaker sees three

members slamming various drums,

two on electronic drum pads, and

includes some tinkering with effects

pedals. Their consistently clear, crisp,

sharp sound echoes perfectly around

the venue, and with the large doses of

the epic factor throughout their songs

I can’t help but draw comparisons

with White Lies. To The Lighthouse is

darkly uplifting, with careering guitar

reverberations stroking the ears. Their

penultimate song, new single Delight

In Temptation, sees singer Lou Hill’s

voice certainly showing itself off.

I enjoyed this almost personal gig,

but surely the band deserve a larger

crowd, as they certainly played like

there was one present. Then again,

I heard someone won a game of

football on Sunday – perhaps the

revellers are at home regretting the

aftermath of their celebrations. At

least I’ve got my priorities right.

Clarry M


FRI 13th MAY

CERYS MATTHEWS

ALL TICKETS £22.50 8pm

RAKED www.cerysmatthews.co.uk

SAT 14th MAY

P.P. ARNOLD

TICKETS £16 (£15) 8pm RAKED www.pparnold.com

TUE 17th MAY

GLENN HUGHES BAND

TICKETS £22, £24 DOORS 8pm STANDING

www.glennhughes.com

WED 18th MAY

FAIRPORT ACOUSTIC CONVENTION

TICKETS £16 (£14) 8pm CABARET

FRI 20th MAY

THE CHRISTIANS

TICKETS £15 (£13), £16 DOORS 8pm STANDING

www.thechristianslive.com

THU 2nd JUNE

PENDRAGON

ALL TICKETS £15 8pm STANDING www.pendragon.mu

SAT 4th JUNE

LIVERPOOL MOZART ORCHESTRA

TICKETS £13 (£11, £5 STUDENT) 7:30pm

(PRE-CONCERT TALK, 6:45pm) RAKED www.livemozart.com

SAT 11th JUNE

WINE, WOMEN & SONG:

MATRACA BERG, SUZY BOGGUSS & GRETCHEN PETERS

TICKETS £17.50, £20 DOORS 8pm RAKED

PLEASE NOTE, FOR PERSONAL CALLERS THE BOX OFFICE IS LOCATED AT:

FLORAL PAVILION THEATRE, MARINE PROMENADE, NEW BRIGHTON, WIRRAL, CH45 2JS.

Sun 1st May, 7:30pm.

Essence of Ireland

Fri 13th May, 7:30pm.

The SoundPower Orchestra presents

A Night At The Movies

Tue 17th May, 7:30pm.

Ed Byrne: Crowd Pleaser

Mon 23rd to Sat 28th May, 7:30pm.

Wed & Sat Matinees, 2:30pm.

Agatha Christie’s Verdict

Fri 3rd June, 7:30pm.

Vienna Festival Ballet Cinderella

Sun 5th June, 7.30pm.

A Feast of Gilbert and Sullivan

Wed 8th June, 7.30pm.

Harlem Gospel Choir

WWW.PACIFICROAD.CO.UK 0151 666 0000

0151 666 0000 www.floralpavilion.com


38

Bido Lito! May 2011

Reviews

DECEMBER GIANT

Leaf

Responsible for the many ‘Year of the

Giant’ proclamations seen around the

city centre in recent weeks, DECEMBER

GIANT step forward to admit their part

in the ruse with their debut Liverpool

gig and EP launch at Leaf Drawing

from the strata of blue-collar American

rock instigated by Bruce Springsteen

in the mid ‘70s, with the torch carried

by modern-day adherents The Hold

Steady and The Gaslight Anthem,

onstage December Giant race through

their heart-on-sleeve tracks with a

breathless intensity.

December Giant, see, don’t do

pretension; they do however have

an impressive line in anthemic rock

songs. Today’s The Day tumbles out

of the speakers, with condensation

running down the windows as the

sizeable crowd moves stagewards.

The unashamedly emotive A Million

Ways, built around an Elbow-esque

music box arpeggio and deep-pile

harmonies, effortlessly switches

to stadium straddling sing-along

mode two-thirds of the way through.

Elsewhere, Before You Go’s heartswelling

verses sees vocalist Matty’s

Springsteen-esque conviction cutting

through brilliantly, as he bellows his

way assuredly through the set.

Aptly enough for a band named

after a natural phenomenon where

vast amounts of earth and rocks

disappeared into a sinkhole in

Alabama in 1972, the band are likely to

have won converts outside the venue

as well as in, as vast swathes of sound

are sucked out of Leaf’s windows onto

Bold Street below.

As the acoustic driven Don’t Wake

Me Up slows the pace, with the rhythm

section carrying much of the song, the

group’s three-part harmonies come

to the fore, the quartet brave enough

to include delicate vocal passages

in their tracks this early in their

development. Growing in confidence

over the course of the set, guitars

are played as though they are being

restrained from escaping as opposed

to being merely strummed, such is the

level of intensity on display.

Snowballing as they progress, the

final double-hit of songs effectively

sees the group smash it straight

out of the park. The Way, with its

ascending guitar line, on record

unwittingly evoking ace US college

rockers The Posies, is here sped up to

blitzkrieg bop proportions. Starting

All Over also seemingly has the spirit

of CBGB’s finest imbued in it, as it

accelerates into an almost Ramoneslike

rampage, yet still, despite the

increased velocity, consummately

navigates the stop-start dynamics of

the song. Possibly the only band to

play their own after-show party as

December Giant (Allegra Whitehouse)

part of a brass ensemble, the group

return to the stage as ‘The Ringers’

to joyously rip through a selection of

Stevie Wonder and Motown covers.

Rapturously received throughout by

the near-capacity crowd, December

Giant’s self proclaimed ‘Year of’ is well

and truly underway.

ELBOW

Villagers

Richard Lewis

Echo Arena

You get a word limit when you write

these reviews and this one is going to

be reluctantly difficult; I could write

the dissertation I should be writing on

this ELBOW gig, it was just that good.

VILLAGERS opened up the show

and I was unsure how their brand

of modern folk would transfer to a

space as big as the Echo Arena. These

worries were unfounded as the band

managed to make the massive room

seem far more intimate than it should

have done. Set closer Pieces was

the stand-out: haunting, moody and

melodic, a gem that dovetailed well

with the crowd that Elbow have drawn.

While waiting for them, we were

dubiously treated to pictures of each

band member in various grandiose

poses in leather-bound armchairs on

the huge TV screens. This worried me

somewhat: I have always liked Elbow

www.bidolito.co.uk


40

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.co.uk

Bido Lito! May 2011

BONGO BEAT

ROCKS IPO

LIVERPOOL. 2011

DAVE RAVE

CAVERN CLUB. MONDAY. MAY 23

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CAVERN CLUB. TUESDAY. MAY 24

BACK ROOM. MIDNIGHT

New Album:

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YOU KNOW

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CAVERN CLUB.

MONDAY. MAY 23

FRONT STAGE. 10:45PM

CAVERN CLUB. TUESDAY. MAY 24

BACK ROOM. 10:30PM

Debut Album:

ESCAPE THE LOWER END

Distributed by Proper Music.

Available: HMV.COM, iTUNES

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BONGO BEAT

www.bongobeat.com

label curated by Ralph Alfonso

Reviews

– never loved them, mainly because

I think Guy Garvey is an arrogant soand-so.

As the band stride on stage

and launch into the lead song Birds

from new album Build A Rocket Boys!,

my fears are not allayed. Garvey

seems his brash self but, damn it, I

fall for him. A charming front-man, his

crowd chatter is second-to-none, and

he never strays far from his audience

and repeatedly gets amongst them.

He sings with his arms open; he points

to and engages drunks and couples;

he’s a show man and, damn it again, a

bloody good one.

The band are also in top form: the

drums of Richard Jupp are merciless and

the rest of the band are not far behind.

Turning their attention to their Mercury

Prize-winning record The Seldom Seen

Kid, the band tear through Bones Of

You before smashing their new single

Lippy Kids. Elbow always walk a tightrope

between brilliance and sickening

sentimentality, I think, but they are

perfect tonight.

The stage is set up with a cat-walk

down to a smaller island in the middle

of the crowd and Garvey prowls to and

fro the entire night. After a beautiful,

melancholic rendition of The Night

Will Always Win, and an incendiary

Grounds For Divorce, the band take in

an acoustic set around a piano-cum-bar

on the island. Perfect Weather To Fly is

stripped down before being pumped

full of life thanks again to Jupp on the

drums. Closing their set proper with

sure-fire success Open Arms, the Echo

Arena is a bowl full to the brim with

euphoria.

Launching their encore with the

tantalising (and underrated) Starlings,

they finally play the big one that, let’s

be honest, is the only thing that many

people in here have come for, and

it doesn’t disappoint: One Day Like

This sees Garvey running around the

stadium, front to back, up and down

levels, and the crowd is invigorated.

The noise they make is incredible,

pure, unadulterated joy: while we’re

being honest, this is everything live

music should be.

Jordan Lynn

ESBEN AND

THE WITCH

Anna Lena & The Orchids

Harvest Sun & Liverpool Music

Week @ The Kazimier

A gig on Mothering Sunday can never

be an easy slot to fill: those less devoted

sons and daughters of Liverpool who left

the welfare of their Old Mother Hubbard

in the hands of siblings will feel later

that facing the wrath of the woman

who bore them was well-justified after

venturing out to take in the marvels of

ESBEN AND THE WITCH.

Opening act ANNA LENA AND THE

ORCHIDS, led by Anna herself (and her

sought-after boyish undercut) fronting a

six-strong team of quiffery, certainly look

the part and adhere sonically. A cellist

gives them the atmospheric edge over

their counterparts and the young front

woman’s sweetly nervous disposition

between songs reminds the seated

audience that humility is often amiss

in the rather arrogant world of indie

debuts.

While their keyboardist strategically

dodges plumes of smoke released from

a valve somewhere above his fringe,

Anna Lena, confident in song, has single

Child nailed, its haunting resonance

showcasing a strong vocal range. A

somewhat somnolent audience are

awoken by such towering vocals and -

led by friends in the crowd - a standing

Edben and the Witch (Keith Ainsworth)

ovation ensues, much to the band’s

modest delight.

Watching Esben And The Witch is

certainly a much more intense affair.

Commencing with Argyria from the gothic

debut album Violet Cries, the trio are led

by the incongruously straight-named

Rachel Davies, who seems the fairer of

the three musicians as she looms over

her drums, face shrouded by dirty blonde

hair. Like a marionette she throws herself

over the stage, mesmerising the crowd

who have arisen to watch this banshee

with a golden voice.

The threesome take a bewildering

setup of three floor toms with Davies

centre stage and a male comrade on

either side; one on guitar and drum,

the other providing the rhythm section.

Davies’ rich voice and sallow skin, set

against the hum of guitar and crashing

of cymbal, make her appear like a

mythical being, the smoke rising around

her in eerie reminiscence of the macabre

Danish fairytale from which the band

take their name.

For set closer and latest single

Marching Song, a magnificently moody

soundscape is built up, until their

athletic guitarist ditches his strings and

leaps into the crowd with drum in hands,

pounding the tight skin of the barrel

while the room shakes. The audience are

left astounded by these madcap marvels,

something that stays with them long

after the drooping flowers and leftover

chocolates have gone.

Bethany Garrett


42

www.bidolito.co.uk

Bido Lito! May 2011

Reviews

JAPANESE VOYEURS

MeanFiddler @ The Shipping Forecast

well it probably never died really, it just

evolved. What we have with Japanese

Voyeurs is definitely a grungeinfluenced

band, who combine the best

bits of grunge with alt. heavy metal.

From the moment Japanese Voyeurs

appear on stage it is hard not to be

struck by lead singer Romily Alice’s

petite and almost fragile-looking

In fact the female vocal adds a new

dimension, showing us that everyone

can feel loss, isolation and wanting,

and when the frank chorus is sung by

Currently being hailed as grunge

a woman it depicts that all people can

revivalists, Londoners JAPANESE

own their sexuality.

VOYEURS take to the stage of The

Shipping Forecast tonight. If this

description is accurate then it could be

no more fitting a gig on the anniversary

of Kurt Cobain’s death. While no-one

actually mentions Cobain by name

there is most definitely a nod in his

direction as we are treated to back-toback

Nirvana tracks before the band

take to the stage. So, a grunge revival:

Japanese Voyeurs are such an

accomplished band it is hard to

believe that they are relatively new

and that they haven’t even released

an album yet. Their stage presence

makes you gravitate towards them;

mix this with the exploding, angstridden

energy of their live sets and

what you get are a powerful band

that leave you wanting more.

Leanne Durr

MOUSE ON THE KEYS

Barberos – Enemies - Vasco

De Gama - Mother Earth

Leaf

Speciality tea, math rock and

frame, yet as she starts to play she

is a whirlwind of ferocious rage

which almost certainly qualifies her

for riot grrrl status. The band have a

quiet/loud dynamic yet they are still

melodic, which makes it harder for

those whose palate they may not suit

to dismiss them as simply ‘noise’; this

Friday nights aren’t usually terms I

would use as a great way to kickstart

a weekend. However, following

this triumphant gig put on by local

ones-to-watch Obscenic, no weekend

without a cup’a Blue Sapphire Earl

Grey and everything in 4/13.5 has been

complete since.

is a credit to the band as it highlights

MOTHER EARTH suitably started

their song-writing ability. Alice’s

proceedings with a calculated bang. Half

vocals are a blend of infantile sickly

sweetness, ready to erupt into a roar

at will, and the harder, gravelly tones

of QueenAdreena’s Katie Jane Garside,

also a contender for the queen of

grunge/alt. metal title.

Japanese Voyeurs are not a group for

the faint of heart, which is reiterated

by each band member throwing

themselves around the stage with

Seal Cub Clubbing Club, half Stig Noise,

all fantastic matching T-shirts; they played

a short set that saw their small stage

setup overcome the large open space

Leaf provided. While still a relatively new

outfit, their blend of Krautrock-inspired

post-rock sounds confident, unabashed

and fun all at once.

VASCO DA GAMA followed soon

after with an energetic performance

complete disregard for any moshing

injuries that they may sustain. They

maintain this through their impressive

set: highlights Milk Teeth and Get

Hole are both a dark, heavy assault

on the ears, while Smother Me wholeheartedly

drawing largely from their everincreasing

catalogue of post-hardcore

gems. Being clearly fans of all acts

associated with Dischord Records,

the four-piece recall elements of

Rites Of Spring and The Hot Snakes

reflects the sinister sounding simultaneously. A thoroughly

name of the band. Although Closer

doesn’t have the industrial elements

of the Nine Inch Nails original, it does

not lose any of its desolate isolation.

enjoyable set; if they had only been

based in Washington circa 1990 I have

a strong feeling they’d be filed next to

Q and not U in my CD rack today.

Irish lads ENEMIES continued

the math rock protocol of the night,

announcing they were borrowing

Obscenic’s equipment due to being

too broke to fly their own gear over.

This was hardly even noticeable as

they unleashed a tour-de-force of

instrumental post-rock within the first

few seconds. We’ve Been Talking and

Bits Of Parrots went down a storm,

despite a few expected equipment

errors later on. Having seen them many

times in Ireland, it was great to see

the four-piece buzzing off a different

venue, audience and city. If the rest of

Ireland was as tight and calculated as

Enemies are tonight, I doubt it would

be facing such a harsh recession.

Watching BARBEROS setting up

was a bit of a puzzle; but watching

them play, Lycra-suited to the backdrop

projections of dancing Soviets,

Japanese Voyeurs (Brian Plumridge)

Pennywise from It, and Eraserhead was

as mind-boggling as Charlie Sheen’s

2011. The use of two drummers at the

front of stage made sure it wasn’t

boring for a second, as they constantly

threw rhythms back and forth at each

other, be they tribal, jungle or drum and

bass. As entertaining as it was, it was

hard to tell if they wanted the music or

the performance to come first. At times

they genuinely blew my mind, yet at

others I thought they could have been

characters from The Mighty Boosh.

All the way from Japan, MOUSE ON

THE KEYS took to the stage to huge

applause just after midnight. The

venue, now with candle-lit tables and

a much more relaxed atmosphere,

perfectly suited MOTK’s ambient

mix of electronica-spiked jazz and

studied rhythms. Playing solidly

for nearly an hour, the band took a


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44

Bido Lito! May 2011

Reviews

seemingly trance-like audience into

their world of modern jazz/math rock.

A dedication to those who suffered

in the tsunami only a day before was

made to a gracious response and the

band seemed genuinely thrilled and

thankful to be in Liverpool.

Finishing off, somewhat hilariously,

with Black Sabbath’s Paranoid they

brought a successful night to a

microphone-swinging, rip-roaring end.

An absolute treat of a gig: spending

your Friday night with speciality tea

and math rock is, as Charlie Sheen

would say, “winning!”

Pete Devine

KATHRYN WILLIAMS

The Random Family

The Capstone Theatre

It was way back in 2001, when her

second album Little Black Numbers

was released, that I first discovered

the music of KATHRYN WILLIAMS, and it

instantly struck a chord with me. When

I spotted and snapped up her third

album Old Low Light in the unlikeliest

of locations (HMV in Tokyo to be

precise), Williams was in Liverpool

preparing to play what would be her

last show in her home town until

now. So, you’ll understand that I was

determined to let nothing get in my

way when I discovered that Kathryn

was playing at my new favourite

venue. Indeed, dodging traffic, people,

horses, and the odd marching band, I

finally found myself at the Capstone

and walked through its atmospheric

gardens into the sparkling venue for a

much awaited show.

Following excellent support from the

ever reliable RANDOM FAMILY, Kathryn

Williams came out to instantaneous

applause for her homecoming gig.

Playing eighteen songs, including a

massively requested encore, there

was much to enjoy, and the subtleties

of the night were as fascinating as the

obvious sense of enjoyment Williams

had throughout, even despite the

odd minor guitar hiccup. The moment

sound was restored there was a large

applause and the show continued

undisturbed. “If I knew it was that easy

to get you clapping…”

Quipping that being a musician

means you “only see your friends at

shows and you usually have to pay

them,” brought a welcoming feel to

the evening, and it all felt like a little

family get together around the fire. The

music was as warm and dreamlike as

ever, and songs I hadn’t heard in years

came flooding back like pleasant old

memories. There was a varied selection

from across her many albums and

despite her having, as she put it, “baby

brain” and not having much to say at

the beginning of the evening, Kathryn

gave a captivating performance

without having to worry too much

about a lack of conversational topics.

With a marvellous choice of

catalogue to raid, Williams performed

such classics as Soul To Feet, Daydream

And Saunter,

Wanting And Waiting,

Flicker, and covers taken from her

album Relations Of Thirteen and The

Velvet Underground’s Candy Says. Sure,

there were some personal favourite

songs I’d have loved to hear but the

fact remains that I was lucky enough

to see this, Williams’ only show for a

Kathryn Williams (John Johnson)

while, at an excellent venue, after so

many years of waiting. They say that

dreams never come true, but in the

case of this gig I say they’re wrong.

Sebastian Gahan

TERMINAL

CONVENTION

Decommissioned Airport Terminal -

Cyprus Avenue - Crane Lane Theatre

Cork

When an event challenges you to

question your next destination, you

know that gratuitous pleasure isn’t to

be found at every juncture. TERMINAL

www.bidolito.co.uk


tom johnson

email tom@lazy-genius.co.uk

go to www.lazy-genius.co.uk

call 07850 403 485

or find us on facebook


46

Bido Lito! May 2011

Reviews

The Loud (Jennifer Pellegrini

CONVENTION, the art and music festival

that was the brainchild of Liverpool’s

Static Gallery, took up this challenge

and left us contemplating the notion

that you only get out what you put

in. Opened by the legendary BILL

DRUMMOND, the festival takes its

name from the old decommissioned

airport terminal in Cork where – for ten

days – a series of artworks have been

installed for the public to peruse. While

the exhibition itself is fascinating,

strolling around the building (which

closed in 2006 to make way for the new

hi-tech Cork airport complex) feels eerie

and slightly disorienting.

The festival’s musical events took

place in the heart of Cork city itself, kicking

off with electro-acrobatics from Mordant

Records’ sonic shifters SHACKLETON,

EKOPLEKZ and VINDICATRIX at Cyprus

Avenue. Hosted by The Black Mariah,

the music programme proper got off to

a pulsating start thanks to the warped,

dub-heavy soundscapes produced by

some of the electronic underground’s

most accomplished performers. While

the Paddy’s Day celebrations raged

downstairs the air was full of more

bleeps, blips and whale noises than

you could shake a wonky stick at.

Proceedings then moved down a few

streets for the final two nights of the

music programme, to the atmospheric

Crane Lane Theatre, a fantastic venue

on the site of a former gentleman’s club

that has a broad, genre-straddling diary

of shows. Bido Lito! and Whisperin’

And Hollerin’ co-curated a Liverpool

invasion of sorts on day two, with

THE SAND BAND, THE LOUD and OWLS*

hopping over the Irish Sea to showcase

the breadth of Liverpool’s finest noise

makers: the refined delicacy of The Sand

Band and the woven-from-shadows

intricacy of Owls* were perfectly placed,

with The Loud bringing a garage-glam

stomp to proceedings. More than ably

assisted by Dublin wave-makers THE

GORGEOUS COLOURS, WINDINGS,

and local boys DAVID HOPE & THE

HENCHMEN, the night had a party feel

to it, with WILL SERGEANT giving a

masterclass on the decks and keeping

the dance floor moving all night.

For the closing night, we were

treated to five emerging independent

acts from the Richter Collective and

Osaka labels respectively. Dublinbased

post-hardcore trio JOGGING were

the first to hit the stage, their distinct

straight-edge/ Discord Records slant

bringing to mind the likes of Fugazi

and Rites Of Spring. By no means onedimensional,

their tumbling drums,

pneumatic bass lines and weirdo math

rock intrigue could almost have passed

as a hardcore Captain Beefheart.

PATRICK KELLEHER comes with

the frisson of a buzz gaining ground

around his heels. His debut album

on Osaka Records, You Look Cold,

picked up acres of smart press and,

on record, the best of his dark and

early ‘80s-inclined electro-pop (Contact

Sports especially) seems well-placed

in the current aesthetic climate. Live,

though, he struggled to convince: the

sound I heard was an awkward stylistic

mélange which fell between too many

stools to be effective.

Like Patrick Kelleher, Dublin duo

THREAD PULLS also make like they’ve

been teleported in from the cusp of the

minimalist ‘80s. Built around clipped

bass lines, James Chance-style trumpet

blasts, and snatches of disembodied

vocals, their best songs (notably the

sinewy grooves of Sink & Swim) often

seem little more than fleeting ghosts of

ideas, yet there’s still something about

their dark, mutant funk which lingers

and draws you in time and again.

The unfeasibly young Belfast-based

firebrands AND SO I WATCH YOU FROM

AFAR have been hauling their stunning,

vocal-free hardcore assault all over

Ireland, the UK and beyond for over five

years now and have built up a nighon

unassailable rep for themselves

along the way. For the best part of 90

minutes they were relentless, taking in

everything from potent Celtic jigs and

crunching, Black Sabbath-style riff logic

through to Sigur Ros-style ambience

and full-on Mogwai intensity (often

within the space of one intense five

minute burst), moving immense sonic

shapes that leave many of their versechorus-verse

colleagues standing.

With the venue bursting to capacity,

ASIWYFA can claim to have supplied the

perfect euphoric full stop to what has

been a fantastically diverse and vibrant

weekend at Terminal Convention.

Any closer to knowing your next

destination?

Tim Peacock –

whisperinandhollerin.com

Christopher Torpey


29TH MAY 2011

BANK HOLIDAY SUNDAY

THEATRE

SASHA

YOUSEF

NINA KRAVIZ

LEWIS BOARDMAN

LOFT

DJ SNEAK

NICK CURLY

GLIMPSE - LIVE

SEAN STEPHENSON

SCOTT LEWIS

(5HR ANYTHING GOES SET)

THE MASQUE, SEEL ST, LIVERPOOL.





INFO: 0151 706 80451, INFO@CHIBUKU.COM. VENUE: THE MASQUE, SEEL ST, LIVERPOOL.

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