2012-04

StChads

2012-04

April/May 2012

Delivered free to

5,250 homes in S8


WELCOME to Impact – the magazine of St Chad’s Church,

Woodseats. Impact is published every two months and distributed

to over 5,000 homes in S8.

St Chad’s Church is committed to serving you – the people of

Woodseats, Beauchief and Chancet Wood. To find out more about

St Chad’s visit our website at www.stchads.org or call the church

office on 0114 274 5086.

Here’s where to find us:

Abbey Lane

Linden Avenue

Church

House

Abbey Lane

School

St Chad's

Church &

Church

Office

Camping Lane

Front cover image © Waterfall Guy. Used by permission.

Chesterfield Road

Like most of us, I have spent almost all my

life living near a river. In London I would

enjoy long walks along the Thames Path, in

Cambridge I would go punting on the Cam, studying

in Durham I would walk along the River Wear as it

wound its way through some of the most attractive

landscapes in the North East. Even where I grew

up in Essex there was a small river (the Ching) that

I would hunt for frogs in. In Sheffield it seems you

can barely go anywhere without crossing a stream or

river.

Rivers fracture the English landscape. Most of

our towns are built on or near one – the names

giving them away (Sheaf-field, Don-caster, Rotherham).

They have provided us with transport links,

trading opportunities, barriers and boundaries.

More recently they are the source of a variety

of leisure activities and expensive riverside apartments.

Sometimes, as recent memory tells us, they are also destructive and

untamable.

We take our rivers for granted, but we do so at our peril. In May last

year I walked along the River Lathkill in Derbyshire – or rather I walked

along the bed of the River Lathkill. The dry winter had dried the river

up completely and fish had to be rescued and placed elsewhere. As

the South and East of England faces the most severe drought for over

30 years, rivers and reservoirs are perilously low. The health of our

rivers tells us a lot about the health of our society. Are they exploited for

agriculture to such an extent that they barely run? Are they so polluted

with industrial chemicals that they are unable to sustain life? Are they so

surrounded by urban sprawl that a heavy storm causes flash floods?

In the Bible rivers are an important feature. Eden, we are told, is built

upon four rivers. The Israelites find themselves enslaved by the Nile and

later on in exile by the rivers of Babylon. Jesus is baptised in the river

Jordan and the Bible ends with a vision of the City of God

with the river of life running through it, clear as crystal.

Easter imagery makes use of the image of crossing the

Jordan river – with Jesus by his resurrection bringing

us through the waters of death into eternal life. Rivers,

at least in the Biblical worldview, represent a source of

life, purity and hope. Next time you walk along a river,

whether it’s the Amazon or the Sheaf, think what

images you take from it.

Rev Toby Hole, Vicar,

St Chad’s Church, Woodseats

Going with the flow

St Chad’s Church, Linden Avenue, Woodseats

Church Office: 9 Linden Avenue, Sheffield S8 0GA

Tel: (0114) 274 5086

email: office@stchads.org

St Chad’s Church, Linden Avenue, Woodseats

Page 2 website: www.stchads.org

Church Office: 9 Linden Avenue, Sheffield S8 0GA

Page 3

Tel: (0114) 274 5086

email: office@stchads.org

website: www.stchads.org


What do

you get

when you

cross

a river

with an

elephant?

You get to

the other

side!

An American preacher was completing a sermon

on the dangers of drink. With great expression he

said, “If I had all the beer in the world, I’d take it and

throw it into the river.”

With even greater emphasis he said, “And if I had

all the wine in the world, I’d take it and throw it into

the river.” And finally, he said, “And if I had all the

whisky in the world, I’d take it and throw it into the

river.” He sat down.

The man leading the service stood cautiously and

announced with a smile, “For our closing song, let’s

sing hymn 65: Shall We Gather at the River.”

Noah’s

son Shem

was having

difficulty with

the parallel

parking

section of his

driving test.

How do

you talk to

a fish?

Drop it a

line!

Why

are fish

so smart?

Because

they swim in

schools!

Fun and Laughs

Martin Land

PLUMBING & PLASTERING SERVICES

• Professional & friendly • Reliable, high quality service

Please contact me for a free quote & advice

TEL: 0114 281 0545

MOB: 07882 955209

EMAIL: martinland@hotmail.co.uk

92 Fraser Crescent

Sheffield

S8 0JD

www.martinland.co.uk

St Chad’s Church, Linden Avenue, Woodseats

Church Office: 9 Linden Avenue, Sheffield S8 0GA

Tel: (0114) 274 5086

email: office@stchads.org

St Chad’s Church, Linden Avenue, Woodseats

Page 4 website: www.stchads.org

Church Office: 9 Linden Avenue, Sheffield S8 0GA

Page 5

Tel: (0114) 274 5086

email: office@stchads.org

website: www.stchads.org


What’s On

Send details of your event to impact@stchads.org or write to: Impact,

St Chad‟s Church Offices, 15 Camping Lane, Sheffield S8 0GB.

Send details of your event to impact@stchads.org

or Impact, 9 Linden Avenue, Sheffield S8 0GA.

Call 0114 203 9337.

National Health Walks Council for Divorced,

Single lMondays and – Widowed 10am: Graves Park.

Tuesdays Meet at the 8-11pm Animal Farm car park;

Norton

lTuesdays

Country

– 10.30am:

Club

Ecclesall

Woods. Meet at Abbeydale

Club offering friendship and social

Industrial Hamlet;

activities. lThursdays – 10.30am: Lowedges.

Meet Call at Magdalen the Community on 0114 Wing,

2394326. Lowedges Junior School.

& Call 0114 203 9337.

January 30 - February 5

AEGON Free computer British classes Tennis Tour

Graves

Wednesdays

Tennis

9am-4pm

and Leisure Centre

Fridays 9am-1pm

World

Sharrow

ranked

Community

players

Forum

compete

alongside South View local Road Sheffield S7 7UEplayers.

For Call complete 0114 283 beginners 9900. or those

who want to learn more. Open to

February people from 5 across Sheffield.

Book & Call Sale 0114 250 0613 or 0114 250

36 8384. Crawshaw Grove, Beauchief

10am-12pm

April 1

Good

Fooling

quality

Around!

second-hand books

for Bishops’ sale in House aid of the Alzheimer‟s

Society. 1-3pm Donations of paperback

novels An event or for biographies children. with in good John

condition Turner magician, are welcome puppeteer (but not and

larger fool, face books painting due to and space much more.

limitations).

& 0114 ​278 ​2600

April 7

February Bishops’ House 5 & the Civil War

Free Bishops’ Environmental House Activities

Millhouses 11am-2pm Park

10.30am-12.30pm

See a family group from the Sealed

Obstacle Knot and course Sheffield and War stream Games

dipping Society activities bring history for 8 alive. - 13 year

olds. & 0114 ​278 ​2600

Call 0114 263 4335.

Free Environmental Activities

Millhouses Park

April 21

Dore

1.30-3.30pm

Male Voice Choir

St Nature Oswald’s quiz Church, trail, stream Abbeydale dipping Rd

A and concert bug hunting by Dore activities Male Voice for 8 Choir - 13

enquiries@doremalevoicechoir.com

year olds.

Call 0114 263 4335.

April 22

Bluebells February And 12 Beanpoles

Ecclesall

Free Environmental

Woods Sawmill

Activities

11am - 4pm

Family

Ecclesall

fun

Woods

activities

Sawmill

celebrating

spring 10.30am-12.30pm

including beanpoles, willow

workshops, Nature quiz small trail, stream space gardening, dipping

coffee and bug and hunting cake, stories activities around for 8 the - 13

fire, year bluebell olds. walk and treasure hunt,

woodland Call 0114 crafts 235 and 6348. pond dipping.

& Call 0114 235 6348

February 20

April 28

Book

Why Not

Sale

Try A Bike

36 Greenhil Crawshaw Park Grove, Beauchief

10am-12pm

10am-2pm

Good Rediscover quality your second-hand cycling skills books in

for Greenhill sale in Park. aid of The the Alzheimer’s rangers will

Society. provide a bike, helmet and

Donations instruction. of Meet good at condition the Bowls

paperback Pavilion, Greenhill novels or Park. biographies

are Booking welcome is essential. (but not larger books

due

Call

to lack

0114

of

283

space).

9195.

Beauchief Abbey holds holds a a variety

variety of services of services and anyone and anyone is

is welcome welcome to to attend. attend. For For more details

see details the see Abbey the notice Abbey board. notice

board.

himself there two carucates and

thirty three villeins hold twelve

April caracutes 28 and a half. There are

Brass eight acres Band of Concert meadow and a

Woodseats pasturable Methodist wood. In Church the time of

7.30pm Edward the Confessor, the whole

The

manor

South

was

Yorkshire

valued at

Branch

eight marks

of

of

The Motor Neurone Disease

silver (£5.33) and now at forty

Association’s annual concert

with

shillings

Loxley

(£2.00).

Silver Band,

In Attercliffe

Michael

and

Hickman Sheffield, on two guitar manors, and vocalist Sweyn had

Kristina five caracutes Hickman, of accompanied land to be taxed by -

Michael this land Hickman is said to on have keyboard. been within

Tickets the land are of £8 the adults; manor £6 of Hallam”.

concessions;

T

£3 children, including

refreshments

his is a translation of part of

& Tickets

the

from

Domesday

M Hickman

Book,

(0114

the

250 0078), great or on land the survey door. of 1086

commissioned by William the

April Conqueror. 29 He wanted to assess the

Katherine’s extent of the Day land and resources

Bishops’ being owned House in England at that time,

12-3pm so that he could determine how much

Craft tax he activities, could raise. food, The music, survey and also

answers served as to a questions gauge of about the country's famous

Katherines. economic and social state.

& The 0114 name ​278 „Domesday ​2600 Book‟ was

not adopted until the late 12th century

- the huge, comprehensive scale on

which the survey took place, and the

irreversible nature of the information

collected, led the people to compare

it to the Last Judgement, or

„Doomsday‟ described in the Bible,

when people's deeds, written in the

Book of Life, were to be placed

before God for judgement! Royal

commissioners were sent out to

collect and record information from

thousands of settlements around

England. That information was

13,418 places listed in the book and

amazingly, almost all of those places

May

can

7

be found on present day maps,

Highland though many Flingof their names have

Graves been altered Park over time. You can find

10.30am-5.30pm

„Sceathfeld‟ (land, free of trees, on a

A frontier family day near out a river with - Highland Sheffield),

Cattle „Wodesettes‟ Show, craft (Norton market Woodseats), and food

stalls, „Totingelei‟ children’s (a watching fun fair rides, place Shire -Totley),

Horse „Handeswrde‟ cart rides, (an stalls enclosed and more.

homestead belonging to Hand -

May

Handsworth)

12

and „Aterclive‟ (a village

Endcliffe

near a cliff

Orchestra

- Attercliff).

- Beethoven’s

The

Violin Concerto with Robin Ireland

Domesday Book provides a valuable

All Saints’ Church, Ecclesall

historical insight into 11th century

7.30pm

A

Norman

concert by

England.

Endcliffe

It tells

Orchestra

us about the

with country's Robin wealth Ireland at on that violin. time and the

feudal system which existed.

May Through 26 the centuries, the Domesday

Sheffield Book has Philharmonic also been used Orchestra as

All evidence Saints’ Church, in disputes Ecclesall over ancient

7.30pm land and property rights - surprisingly

Sheffield enough, Philharmonic right up to the Orchestra 1960s!

performs Walton: Crown Imperial,

Beethoven: *The Earl Piano of Waltheof Concerto was no.3 Earl of

(Soloist: Northumbria, Benjamin too. Frith) He was and the last of

Tchaikovsky: the Anglo-Saxon Symphony earls still No.5. remaining

in England a full decade after the

Norman conquest. He was executed

in 1076 for his part in an uprising

against William1. His lands passed

to his wife, Judith of Normandy

(described as „Countess Judith‟ in the

Domesday Book), who was in fact

William the Conqueror's niece. The

lands were held on her behalf, as the

book tells us, by Roger de Busli,

tenant-in-chief and one of the

greatest of the new wave of Norman

magnates.

Chris Laude

What’s On

St Chads Church, Linden Avenue, Woodseats

email: office@stchads.org

Church Offices: 15 Camping Lane, Sheffield S8 0GB Page 6 website: www.stchads.org

Tel: (0114) 274 5086

St Chads Church, Linden Avenue, Woodseats

email: office@stchads.org

Church Offices: 15 Camping Lane, Sheffield S8 0GB Page 23 website: www.stchads.org

Tel: (0114) 274 5086

St Chad’s Church, Linden Avenue, Woodseats

Church Office: 9 Linden Avenue, Sheffield S8 0GA

Tel: (0114) 274 5086

email: office@stchads.org

St Chad’s Church, Linden Avenue, Woodseats

Page 6 website: www.stchads.org

Church Office: 9 Linden Avenue, Sheffield S8 0GA

Page 7

Tel: (0114) 274 5086

email: office@stchads.org

website: www.stchads.org


St Chad’s

Help to celebrate 100 years of St Chad’s

1912-2012

Scarecrows in Woodseats

Here are some of the events planned to

celebrate our centenary:

April - Love Sheffield event in Woodseats and

Beauchief

May 20 - Church Picnic and Open Air Service at

Chatsworth Park

June 9 - Marriage Celebration Service

June 29-July 1 - Visit by Roly Bain the Clown

July - Scarecrow event - TBA

September 14-16 - Flower and Art Festival

September 29 - Salvation Army band 7-9pm

October - Community Project TBA

November - Riding Lights Group TBA

December - Living Advent Calendar

December 7 - Sheffield Folk Chorale

We are planning to have

a bit of fun in Woodseats

this summer as part of

St Chad’s centenary

celebrations and will be

inviting you to make a

scarecrow and display it

anywhere at the front of

your house.

There will be a

competition but you don’t

have to enter if you don’t

want to - just make a

scarecrow for the fun of it

and make someone smile.

Look out for more details

in the June/July edition of

Impact.

AS part of our centenary celebrations we have had our

own special beer brewed. Chad’s Ton Up has been

brewed by the Two Roses micro-brewery in Darton

and is being sold at £2.50 a bottle or £25 for a case of 12.

In order to comply with licensing laws we will be selling it

on set days. If you would like to buy a bottle or case then

please complete the order form and send it in with payment

by April 28. Here’s to a happy 100th anniversary!

"

Chad’s Ton-up Spring Order

Please return this form to the parish office by April 28 with

payment. Beer will be available for collection on May 12.

I would like to order ___ bottles at £2.50 each

I would like to order ___ cases (12 bottles) at £25 each.

I enclose cash/cheque for _________ made payable to St

Chad’s PCC.

I confirm I am over 18 years of age and not buying this on behalf

of anyone under 18 years of age. Proof of ID may be required.

Showing

God’s love

On April 14 between

10am and 12 noon

groups of people from

St Chad’s Church

community will be on

the streets of Woodseats

and Beauchief offering

shoppers small tokens

of their love for the area

and its people and also

picking up litter.

We hope to brighten

up the day while

demonstrating, in a small

way, God’s love for the

people of the area.

Calling all couples

married at St Chad’s

Within the last 100 years many couples

have wed at St Chad’s and still live within

our city boundary. Others have moved

away.

As part of our centenary we plan to

hold a service to celebrate the many

long marriages which were blessed here

as well as the recent marriages not yet

celebrating their first anniversary.

Please will you help us to locate the

whereabouts of any couple? We want

to write and invite them to join us for a

Marriage Celebration Service in June.

If you can give us their name, current

address and date of their marriage, we

will do the rest. Please contact Yvonne

Smith, St. Chad’s Church Office, 9 Linden

Avenue, Woodseats, Sheffield S8 0GA,

phone 0114 274 5086 or email office@

stchads.org.

St Chad’s Church, Linden Avenue, Woodseats

Church Office: 9 Linden Avenue, Sheffield S8 0GA

Tel: (0114) 274 5086

email: office@stchads.org

St Chad’s Church, Linden Avenue, Woodseats

Page 8 website: www.stchads.org

Church Office: 9 Linden Avenue, Sheffield S8 0GA

Page 9

Tel: (0114) 274 5086

email: office@stchads.org

website: www.stchads.org


Wet ‘n’ Wild!

My love of swimming outdoors

definitely started as a child

when on holiday at my

grandparents’ house.

My sister, cousins and I on a

hot summer’s day would revel in

swimming in the cool clear waters of

the river that ran through the bottom

of their garden before stretching out

on a picnic rug in the sun with one of

Granny’s amazing picnics. They were

my favourite days.

As an adult now I find there is

nothing that makes me feel more

alive than when I am swimming

outdoors. There have been times in

my life recently when I have felt it to

be one of the only places I can really

find peace for my soul. One of my

favourite places to swim is where

the River Derwent runs through

Chatsworth grounds and I have

enjoyed many an evening taking a dip.

I tend to swim with a group of female

friends. We swim, scream, laugh and

drink hot chocolate together. It’s great.

This year I have decided to enter

the Great North Swim to raise money

for British Red Cross who I work for.

This will involve swimming a mile

in the Lake District with many other

enthusiastic (and hopefully not too

serious) swimmers. I imagine the

atmosphere will be brilliant!

If you are thinking of trying

something new this year why not try

getting into your local lake or river,

the ‘Wild Swimming’ website is full of

great suggestions and advice on how

to do it safely. Enjoy.

Naomi Gibbs

Kayaking is a great sport and a

brilliant way to spend quality time in

the outdoors with friends and family,

focusing on nothing but the plain and simple

fun of messing about on the water. But did

you know it is possible to paddle through

the centre of Sheffield and experience both

excitement and tranquillity amongst the

office blocks and traffic jams, whilst seeing

the city from a totally different perspective?

Kayaking allows you to go places and see

things that only paddlers get to experience.

Paddling allows you to silently take in

the nature and wildlife along the calm

stretches of river, as well as discovering the

architecture and history of the city, before

snapping you back into sharp focus as you

descend the next weir, with sections of fastmoving

white water to test your skills and

ability to stay upright.

I had no idea that messing about on the

river could be so much fun or that it could be

so easy to get completely immersed in the

sport right here in Sheffield. After returning

from a family holiday, where we enjoyed

using kayaks at the beach, it seemed a long

time to wait until the next holiday before

getting back on the water. After an internet

search I was surprised to find there are two

clubs in Sheffield. Sheffield City Kayak Cub

paddle on the River Don, from their base

at the Kelham Island Industrial Museum

Messing

about

on the

water

and Sheffield Canoe Club paddle further

upstream at Oughtibridge.

The clubs are a great way to get into the

sport and provide a safe, fun and friendly

way to get onto the water and develop

your skills. Both clubs are affiliated to the

British Canoe Union and provide structured

coaching and kayaks you can borrow.

There are swimming pool-based sessions

if you don’t fancy learning on the river in

winter, but most of all they provide a wealth

of like-minded people who want to get out

on the river as much as possible.

For me the great thing about kayaking

is that there is so much to learn, yet with

coaching it is possible to quickly learn the

right skills and technique. From the first

time on the water your confidence increases

as you learn the strokes to control your

kayak. The more you paddle, the more your

skills develop. I now find myself watching

the weather forecast, waiting for long

periods of heavy rain before heading off

with my mates to put my skills into practice.

Paddling in Sheffield is a special experience

and it’s easy to get involved. My advice is

to go and get wet and have a great time on

the Don.

Neil Furmidge

• To find out more go to www.

sheffieldcitykayakclub.co.uk or www.

sheffieldcanoeclub.co.uk

St Chad’s Church, Linden Avenue, Woodseats

Church Office: 9 Linden Avenue, Sheffield S8 0GA

Tel: (0114) 274 5086

email: office@stchads.org

St Chad’s Church, Linden Avenue, Woodseats

Page 10 website: www.stchads.org

Church Office: 9 Linden Avenue, Sheffield S8 0GA

Page 11

Tel: (0114) 274 5086

email: office@stchads.org

website: www.stchads.org


Sheffield’s River Sheaf

The city of Sheffield derives its

name from the River Sheaf,

although it would appear that

historians differ on the detail.

I read that the real meaning of

Sheffield is “boundary river passing

by open land”; Sheaf meaning

boundary between Mercia and

Northumbria and Feld meaning open

land - an area without trees, perhaps

appearing natural as compared to a

man made cleared area.

Until the 17th century the name

Sheaf was written as Scheth or

Sheath. Historians equate the origins

of this word with the Old English

shed (as in water-shed) or sheth,

which meant to divide, or separate.

Historically, the Sheaf — along with

its tributaries the Meers Brook and

the Limb Brook — formed part of the

border separating the Anglo-Saxon

kingdoms of Mercia and Northumbria;

it remained on the border between

Yorkshire and Derbyshire into the

20th century.

Northumbria, during its “golden

age” was the most important centre

of religious learning and arts in

the British Isles and spread from

Sheffield across to Cheshire and

up as far as Edinburgh. Mercia

consisted of an area that today would

be the Midlands. North Mercians

dwelt north of the River Trent and

the Pecsaete were an isolated group

of the Peak District under Mercian

control from the 7th century.

In the year 664 the Synod of

Whitby was held to discuss the

controversy regarding the timing of

the Easter festival. Much dispute had

arisen between the practices of the

Celtic church in Northumbria and the

beliefs of the Roman church.

Eventually, Northumbria was

persuaded to move to the Roman

practice and the Celtic Bishop

Colman of Lindisfarne returned to

Iona. In Mercia, St Chad arrived to

establish his Bishopric in 669AD and

the city of Lichfield grew to be the

ecclestiastical centre of the kingdom.

The River Sheaf also formed the

original western boundary of the

estate owned by the White Canons

of Beauchief, centred on Beauchief

Abbey. The Meers Brook was the

boundary that ran from the northern

end of their estate up to Norton in the

east.

Then a line was drawn from St

James’ Church at Norton to an

ancient land mark known locally as St

Quentin’ws well at Bradway, then due

west until the line came to the Sheaf

near Totley.

Water, of course, was essential

to the White Canons, not only for

cooking, brewing and washing, but

for the animals, the Abbey Gardens

and the vineyard. Incidentally the

wine from these grapes would be of

low quality and used only for altar

wines.

David Manning

Most people over a certain

age will start humming

along to this old favourite:

“By the rivers of Babylon,

there we sat down, Yeeah

we wept, when we

remembered Zion”

What a great song by

’70s favourites Boney-M!

But did you know that the

words of this song come

straight from the Holy

Bible, Psalm 137 to be

exact?

It was most likely

written and sung by the

Israelites when they were

taken forcibly into exile to Babylon

(in modern day Iraq) in 586 BC. The

‘rivers of Babylon’ were the rivers

Euphrates and Tigris. So it was a

song of lament, by a people who

were refugees in a foreign land. How

relevant today when we think of the

refugees in the Sudan, many of whom

have been forced to leave home,

jobs and families for ever? And how

appropriate to sing of rivers, when

many would have cried rivers of tears?

Rivers have an important place in

the Bible. Perhaps the most wellknown

river mentioned in the Old

Testament is the Nile, in which the

infant Moses was placed in a basket

by his mother to avoid being killed by

Pharaoh. In fact the name ‘Moses’

(Moshe in Hebrew) means ‘drawn out’

(of the water). Incredibly, Moses was

saved by Pharaoh’s daughter and

brought up as a Prince of Egypt!

In the New Testament we come

across the River Jordan where John

the Baptist baptised the Lord Jesus

Christ. Baptism is a symbolic action

which Christians are encouraged to do

once in their lives. Being submersed

under water symbolises dying to an

old life of disbelief and disobedience

to God, and then rising up from

the water (‘drawn out’ like Moses)

symbolises being raised to a new life

in Jesus.

• 1970s group Boney-M who sang

Rivers of Babylon

By the rivers of Babylon, there

was a man called Ezekiel, who was

himself a Hebrew exile around 586

BC. Ezekiel would no doubt have

sung Psalm 137, but he also wrote

an Old Testament book named after

him. Ezekiel describes how the River

Jordan flows into the Dead Sea.

The Dead Sea has such a high salt

content that it contains virtually no life

at all, but where the fresh water of

the Jordan flows into the Dead Sea,

there is an abundance of life (Ezekiel

Chapter 47).

If you would like to find out more

about a new life with Jesus, or would

even like to be baptised, why not

come along to St Chad’s this Sunday

morning? There are two services,

a traditional service at 9am, and a

family-friendly service with children’s

groups at 11am. If you can’t make

Sundays then there are various

other groups that meet during the

week – you’ll find all the details in

this Impact magazine! If you feel that

there is something missing in your life,

perhaps you might even feel ‘dead’,

come and see how Jesus can bring

you a fresh start and abundance of

life.

Daren Craddock

Rivers in the Bible

St Chad’s Church, Linden Avenue, Woodseats

Church Office: 9 Linden Avenue, Sheffield S8 0GA

Tel: (0114) 274 5086

email: office@stchads.org

St Chad’s Church, Linden Avenue, Woodseats

Page 12 website: www.stchads.org

Church Office: 9 Linden Avenue, Sheffield S8 0GA

Page 13

Tel: (0114) 274 5086

email: office@stchads.org

website: www.stchads.org


A river runs under it

There was a street near where

we lived in Islington which had

willow trees lining the pavement.

Willows need a lot of water to thrive

and whilst the street was not that

far from the Grand Union Canal that

rings north London, the canal wasn’t

the reason for the willows. In fact

underneath that street was a river

that runs underground for most of

Islington, joining to the river Lea in

Hertfordshire. The course of the river

was built in 1613 to provide fresh

water to disease-stricken London

and it still plays an important role in

London’s water supply today.

The New River (as it is called) is

only one of many rivers, small and

large that flow unnoticed underneath

the metropolis. Between the River

Lea in the east (the site of numerous

Olympic watersports this summer)

and the River Brent in the west there

is little evidence of rivers feeding into

the Thames.

Their names may mean little to us

now, although some will ring bells:

the Tyburn (now under Oxford Street

and once the grisly site of public

executions), the Fleet which flows

under the street bearing its name

and the Walbrook which would have

flooded the square mile long ago

had it not been tamed beneath the

pavements.

These rivers which once provided

a boundary marker and even a

means of transport in the city

were culverted for many reasons.

Flooding was an ever-present threat,

but so was sanitation. The rivers

carried London’s waste, spreading

contamination where-ever they went.

The Fleet was particularly notorious,

being a common dumping ground

for victims murdered in London’s

violent backstreets. In 1732 it was

bricked in but a hundred years later

the accumulation of toxic gases

caused it to explode with such force

that a steamboat was crushed by the

onslaught of sewage. It is now used

only as a storm sewer, the course

of the river having been diverted.

Excavations along the course of the

Walbrook revealed 48 human skulls,

their origins and fate uncertain,

although the speculation is that they

were Roman victims of Boudicca’s

invasion almost 2000 years ago.

The rivers lie buried but like the

willows in Islington their presence

can never be wholly erased. We

often treat our cities as the triumph

of human power over the forces of

nature, but we should not discount

what goes on secretly beneath our

feet – the secrets held there and the

power to be unleashed.

Rev Toby Hole

I

was in a bit of a hole! Now

I am not talking figuratively

here I am talking about an

actual hole. Picture the scene

– we had decided to take our

holiday in Scotland again this

year and wanted to be within

striking distance of our friends in

Aberfeldy who we were going to

spend a few days with as

part of our holiday.

Because of its location

close to our friends we

thought the River Tay

at Dunkeld would be a

good choice. The Tay,

the longest river in Scotland,

is one of those classic salmon

and trout rivers and, whilst I do

not have the equipment or the

wallet for salmon fishing, the river

is also excellent wild brown trout

territory.

I tackled up and put on a Dunkeld

Fly – well why not. The river was in

full flow but still I was able to step

off the bank and into the edge of

the river. It was at this point that I

discovered the first hole. I realised

that my waders, which were made of

rubber had perished over the winter

and there was now a small puddle

settling around my right foot. Still it

was too late I was here now and I

just had to make the best of a bad

job. The bottom was very stony and

slippery and I had quite a hairy time

trying to make progress into the river.

It was at this point that I

discovered the second hole.

It was not really a hole just a

deep depression in what was an

otherwise fairly even river bottom.

At this point the river was already

up to my thighs and the current was

constantly trying to push me down

stream. As I stepped into the hole I

stumbled forward and just managed

to retain my balance. However

because part of me was now lower

in the water the river started to lap

over the edge

of my waders.

It was at this

point that I saw the

wisdom in wearing

a buoyancy aid and

carrying a wading stick, but it was

too late for that now.

The problem was that I was

leaning forward, the flow of the river

was pushing me forward and I found

it impossible to step back. I was

stuck. I could lift my rear foot and

place it forwards but I knew that if

I did I would be balancing on one

foot whilst trying to place my other

foot on uncertain ground. Then the

answer came to me. My landing

net was one of the telescopic type

and at its fullest extension was

about four feet long. I managed with

some difficulty to get it off my back

and extend it. Using it I was able to

rotate both feet so that I was facing

up river and then step forward onto

more level ground. It was at this

point that the saying ‘discretion is

the better part of valour’ came to me

and I made it warily back to the bank

where I removed the waders, had a

cup of coffee and spent the rest of

the day fishing from the bank.

Did I catch anything – no, not a

thing. I think the fish had seen me

coming.

Steve Winks

A tale of two holes!

St Chad’s Church, Linden Avenue, Woodseats

Church Office: 9 Linden Avenue, Sheffield S8 0GA

Tel: (0114) 274 5086

email: office@stchads.org

St Chad’s Church, Linden Avenue, Woodseats

Page 14 website: www.stchads.org

Church Office: 9 Linden Avenue, Sheffield S8 0GA

Page 15

Tel: (0114) 274 5086

email: office@stchads.org

website: www.stchads.org


Services at St Chad’s


Sunday Services

The 9am Service

● Traditional in style

● Includes Holy Communion, a sermon & hymns

● Includes refreshments afterwards

● Taken from Common Worship: Holy Communion


the Lifted, 10.30am 11am Service

● Informal and relaxed in style

● An emphasis on families

● Includes music, led by a band

● Includes Refreshments refreshments served from before 10.15-10.45am

the service


Weekday Services

Morning Prayers

• Monday to Thursday at 9am

Evening Prayers

• Monday to Thursday at 5pm

The Thursday 10am Service

• Traditional in style

• Taken from Common Worship: Holy Communion

• Includes Holy Communion, a sermon & hymns

• Held in the Lady Chapel at the back of church


Other Services


Prayer and Praise

A Time to be Still

• To Sunday, be held February on Monday 13 at June 7.30pm 20 and Monday July

A service 18, 7.15-8pm of quiet reflection to be held on

April • A 25 contemplative and May 23 and from meditative 7.15 to 8pm. form of worship

with Wednesday, the theme March Seeking 9 at Stillness 7.30pm with Jesus .

Ash Wednesday Service

Easter M

ick Herron has

published six thrillers;

the most recent, Slow

Horses (2010), was

shortlisted for the Crime Writers’

at

Association’s

St Chad’s

Ian Fleming Steel

2012

Dagger, awarded to the year’s best

thriller, while his novella Dolphin

Junction won the Ellery Queen

Readers’ Award in 2009. Amy Hole

Monday asked him about 2nd his April work… -

What started you writing fiction?

It started with reading, of course.

9pm Compline

When I was young I preferred reading

to real life, so wanting to write was a

natural progression from that. I wrote

Thursday

stories as a child,

5th

poetry

April

as a young

adult, and started writing a novel once I

Maundy realised I didn‟t Thursday

actually need anyone‟s

permission to do so. Reading is always

7.30pm a catalyst for the young. That‟s just one

reason why the planned closure of so

many libraries is a long-term disaster in

the making.

A service of Holy Communion

remembering the events of

Maundy Thursday

Why thrillers?

I need a solid framework to hang

everything on, otherwise I flounder. I

was 18 months into my one serious

attempt at a non-genre novel,

10am

and had

written something like 100,000 words,

before realising that I didn‟t know what

it was about. The crime/thriller genre

provides a focus I lacked on that

attempt; and it works as scaffolding,

1pm

not

as a straitjacket. Slow Horses, for

instance, has a fairly complex plot, but

what interested me most was that it

involved a cast of characters who were

Sunday all, in one way 8th or another, April failures,

looking for redemption. In this, as in

much else, I‟ve been encouraged by

9am the work of writers like Reginald Hill,

who show what‟s possible within the

confines of genre.

Friday 6th April

How do you start writing a novel?

11am

By putting the moment off for as long

as possible. I have a vague idea for the

book after the one I‟m writing now – so

won‟t be ready to work on for another

year at least – but have pushed it to the

back of my mind where it can

grow quietly in the darkness. I

haven‟t committed anything to

paper yet, on the ground that if

I forget it that easily, it‟s

obviously not up to much.

When I‟m ready to start

work, on the other hand, I‟ll

throw as much as I can onto

paper as quickly as possible –

fragments, mostly; snatches of

dialogue, random descriptions

of places, much of which won‟t be used.

But I need a lot of material to hand

before I write the opening words, and

admit I‟ve started something new. It‟s a

way of avoiding blank page syndrome, I

suppose.

WORSHIP AT ST CHAD’S

Wednesday 4th April

EASTER 2012

When do you write?

Most days, between about 7.15 and

8.30. More at weekends.

What are the best - and worst -

aspects of what you do?

The best part of writing is redrafting.

The hard work‟s been done, and there‟s

a peculiar joy in deleting as many words

as possible. Some evenings I struggle

to get down Good 300 words Friday or so, but I

never have difficulty in removing that

many. Good Friday

As for the worst part: well, it‟s a selfinvolved

pursuit. And an anti-social one.

Family Service

My first thought (especially on receiving for children) any kind of

invitation tends to be: That‟ll cost me an

evening‟s work. Which is not a

response most people want to hear

from someone

Cross

they‟ve suggested an

outing to.

Meditations Around the

Which other authors do you like?

It might be simpler to list the books

I‟ve most enjoyed this year – Nicola

Barker, Burley Cross Postbox Theft;

Paul Murray, Skippy Dies; Jonathan

Coe, The Terrible Privacy of Maxwell

Sim; Barbara Trapido, Sex and

Stravinsky; Scarlett Thomas, Our Tragic

Universe. Seamus Heaney‟s latest

collection, Human Chain, is among his

best. And the books I‟m looking forward

to are the new novels by Kate Atkinson

and John le Carré, and Philip Larkin‟s

Letters to Monica.

Easter Sunday

Easter Celebration

with Holy Communion

Family Service with

Holy Communion

Palm Sunday April 1st 6-9pm;

April 2nd-April 4th 10am-7pm

GOD’S JUBILEE

Think, Worship, Act

ST CHAD’S LABYRINTH 2012

This labyrinth will be a journey in three

parts, moving us from where we are now,

through where God is in our lives and then

out into our community.

The labyrinth will be open inside

St Chad’s Church at the times above

St Chads Church, Linden Avenue, Woodseats

Church Offices: 15 Camping Lane, Sheffield S8 0GB Page 3

Tel: (0114) 274 5086

Come and celebrate the risen Jesus!

St St Chad’s Chads St Chads Church, Church, Linden Linden Avenue, Avenue, Woodseats Woodseats

email: email:

email: office@stchads.org

office@stchads.org

St Chad’s St Chads Church, Church, Linden Linden Avenue, Avenue, Woodseats Woodseats

email: office@stchads.org

Church Church

Office: Offices: Offices:

9 Linden 15 Camping 15

Avenue,

Camping Lane, Sheffield

Lane, Sheffield Sheffield

S8 0GA S8 0GB S8 0GB Page Page 316 14 website: website:

website: www.stchads.org

www.stchads.org

Church Church Office: Offices: 9 Linden 15 Camping Avenue, Sheffield Lane, Sheffield S8 0GA S8 0GB Page Page 1715 website: www.stchads.org

Tel: Tel: (0114)

Tel: (0114) (0114)

274 274 5086

274 5086 5086

Tel: (0114) St Tel: Chads (0114) 274 Church, 5086 274 5086 Linden Avenue, Woodseats

email: office@stchads.org

Church Offices: 15 Camping Lane, Sheffield S8 0GB Page 3 website: www.stchads.org


To advertise in

call 0114 274 5086 or

email impact@stchads.org

Mothers’ Union

A message from St Chad’s Mothers’

Union:

“It is with some sadness that we have

to announce the closure of the Mothers’

Union at St Chad’s. The branch has been

in existence for 90 years but lately it has

been difficult to find new members, and had

it not been for the wonderful leadership of

Barbara Fox as Enrolling Member/Secretary

and Ann Brown as Treasurer, we would have

found it even harder to continue. However,

at our recent meetings it was decided that

now was the time to close. Those members

who are able will attend the Mothers’ Union

meetings at St Oswald’s Church and those

unable to travel are welcome to meet

together informally at 57 Abbey Lane on the

fourth Wednesday of the month at 2.15pm to

continue the love and friendship which has

been formed over the years.

Our thanks must go to Barbara for the

sterling work she has done, and to the

Rev Toby Hole, our Vicar, the Rev Canon

Peter Wright and Yvonne Smith for taking

Communion Services before our meetings.

Before I finish, I must mention that we have

one wonderful lady, Mary Spalding, who is 93

years old and has been in the Mothers’ Union

for 72 years. Two other members are in their

nineties and the rest of us are creeping up!

Looking at these statistics, I think we can be

proud of our perseverance and fellowship so

far.

Members of the Mothers’ Union send loving

greetings to all our friends at St Chad’s.”

Sybil Wintle

For many years I was involved

in the travel arrangements for

crews of large merchant ships.

One company I dealt with operated

a round-the-world container service

that had, as one of its ports of call,

Manaus in the Amazon. I was

interested in this because I could not

understand how a city 1,000 miles

inland could take such large ships.

Manaus is a “one off” city. It is the

capital of the Amazon region with

a population of about 1.5 million.

Developed in the heyday of the

rubber industry by the Portuguese

(including an amazing opera house

which is a replica of the Grand Opera

in Paris) it sits at the confluence of

two rivers, the Amazon and the Negro

(so called because of its black water)

The Amazon at that point is five miles

wide!

I had the opportunity to visit

Manaus during a ten-day business

trip to Brazil and finally appreciated

how large ships could get there.

Where the two rivers meet is one of

the most incredible sights. The water

of the Amazon is fairly orange due to

the sediment and travels faster than

the black water of the Negro so the

waters do not mix. For three miles

after the junction there is orange

water on one side and black water on

the other with a very distinct line in

between.

One night our group were told to

meet at the docks at midnight. We

were ushered into a what really was

an overgrown canoe with an outboard

engine and off we went to the other

side of the river. After about an hour

the lights of Manaus has vanished

and in the pitch dark all we could hear

was the sound of the jungle at night.

Our guide switched off the engine

and got into the water and pushed us

silently along.

He was shining his torch around

and picking out pairs of yellow eyes

in the water looking at us. After a

splashing noise he returned to the

canoe with a crocodile!

It was fairly small, about three foot

long. After showing us, very clearly,

how to hold it, we each had to hold

it and stroke it. I expected it to be

wet and maybe slimy but is was silky

smooth, a bit like a handbag!

Brazil and Amazon is truly a

wonderful place.

Simon Hole

• The opera house in Manaus

The Amazon

• Do you live in St Chad’s parish?

• Are CALL you housebound? IN FOR A CUPPA

• Feeling lonely?

• Would love to At share Church a chat House and a

laugh? (56 Abbey Lane)

• Would like to 10am meet someone to 12 noon who is

willing to listen?

On the last Saturday of each month.

If so, please call the Church Office

on 274 Bring 5086 to & see Buy if (new our 3rd items) Age

Befrienders Handicrafts can help Home you, Baking a family

member or neighbour.

St Chad’s St Chads Church, Linden Avenue, Woodseats

email: email: office@stchads.org

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Church Church Office: Offices: 9 Linden 15 Camping Avenue, Lane, Sheffield Sheffield S8 0GA S8 0GB Page Page 318 website: website: www.stchads.org

Church Office: 9 Linden Avenue, Sheffield S8 0GA

Page 19

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website: www.stchads.org


my humble

favourite was Shepherd’s Wheel, of

beginnings”, boasts the course - such an idyllic spot though,

“Despite

River Sheaf, meandering I must say, the working conditions

inside down, on a board or piece of

through Millhouses Park, “I’m very certainly weren’t idyllic.”

old cardboard. Push a drawing pin

proud that I’m the one who gave your “Please don’t forget about me”,

through each marked point, all the

city its name.

calls out Meers Brook. “I know I’m

way through your pages, leaving you

“‘Sheth’ is an old name for ‘divide’ not as big as you, but I do play my

and ‘feld’ is a forest clearing. It was

with three

part, too.”

(or five)

The

holes.

River Loxley says

here, where I join the River Don, that

Then

nothing.

sew it

“You’re

up, using

rather

your

quiet

string

- what’s

an ancient settlement grew up and

or ribbon,

the matter?”

in the following

the River

sequence

Sheaf asks.

later, after the Norman Conquest, (for three-holed “I’m listening spines): to you all telling your

Sheffield Castle was built on the very stories, but my story’s such a tragic

same spot. Such a privilege to have one. I simply can’t forget about that

such a magnificent building on my dreadful night in March 1864 when the

banks!”

Dale Dyke Dam burst and 650 gallons

themselves”, “the “Excuse wages of me,” sin” interruptsTotley

and

of water flooded my valley, killing 250

“the root of all evil” Brook, are “did just I a hear selection you say ‘humble people and leaving a trail of destruction

of common phrases. Such is the

The rivers speak out

beginnings’? I may be small, but I flow

resonance of the through language some that beautiful many countryside,

subsequent translations as does my still friend, follow Old the Hay Brook.

AV in its phrasing.

Together we supply you with

These days comparatively wonderfully clean few water.”

churches in Britain

“So

use

do

the

I,”

AV.

says

From

Limb Brook coming

the end of the Nineteenth Century there

down from Ringinglow through

have been a plethora of new

Ecclesall Woods. “Did you know that

translations often known by confusing

part of my stream was diverted into a

initials (the RV, the RSV, the NEB, the

goit, long ago, to supply the millpond at

RNEB, the NIV and the TNIV are just a

the Abbeydale Industrial Hamlet? It’s a

few!). They are all however direct

descendants from

working

the 1611

museum

King James

now but, way back in

Bible and the influence

the 13th

of

century,

the AV

it

can

was busy producing

be seen in all of blades them. for scythes.

Not that the AV

“The

was

huge

flawless.

wheel,

There

which drove the

was a very limited machinery, print run was of the powered AV by the water

which missed out from a rather all of us.” crucial word

– “not”. The faulty “There’s text therefore no need read to brag about

“thou shalt commit your adultery”. water wheel,” It became says Porter Brook,

known as the “naughty slightly annoyed. Bible”. “There were nearly

St Chad‟s, in 100 common mills powered with many by water wheels

churches in Britain, along will the be banks celebrating of Sheffield’s rivers,

the 400 th anniversary as long of ago this as remarkable the 19th century. My

book with sermon series focussing on

specific books in the Bible – starting

with Genesis in January.

The congregation are also being

challenged to read the whole of the

Bible over the course of a year.

The AV‟s translation of Ecclesiastes

12 says “of making many books there is

no end; and much study is a weariness

of the flesh.” That may be true of many

books, but of the inexhaustible riches of

the Bible I‟m sure that it is not!

Toby Hole

as it tore through the city.”

Or, “Don’t for take five holes: on so,” says the River

Rivelin. “It wasn’t your fault. Cheer

up! And talking of cheers, there’ll

be a match on Saturday - I’ll see the

fans on my way to join the Don at

Hillsborough.”

Hearing his name, the River Don

sighs. “Typical,” he says. “I’m bigger

than the rest of you and I have the

most interesting stories to tell, yet you

never let me get a word in edgeways!

Once people caught salmon and trout

in my waters but, as Sheffield grew, I

became polluted. Every month, they’d

open the gate to Barker’s Pool and

flush the filth from the city streets and

open sewers, into me.

“Thanks to the Environment Agency,

people are fishing from my banks

again - they catch trout, but I don’t

think anyone’s caught a salmon yet!”

Chris Laude

THE BEAUCHIEF SCHOOL OF

SPEECH TRAINING

Pupils trained in the art of perfect

speech and prepared for examination

and stage work

BARBARA E. MILLS, L.G.S.M.,A.N.E.A.

(Eloc) Gold Medal

31 Cockshutt Avenue, Sheffield 8

Phone: 274 7134

Tie the ends into a knot or bow.

The Heavenly Man

by Brother Yun with Paul Hattaway

ISBN 185424597X

T

his

is a remarkable and true

story of a Chinese Christian

brother called Yun.

It presents like a modern day

parallel to the book of Acts in the

Bible: spiritual warfare, the power of

the Holy Spirit, visions, dreams,

miracles, near death experiences,

torture and escaping from impossible

situations.

There you have it –

Brother

a little book.

Yun experienced all these,

Now comes the fun part – filling the

after following God‟s calling since the

pages! You could insert photographs

age of 16. Through illegal house

or copy a poem into it to make a

present for a family

churches

member or

he helped spread

friend. Or give it, blank,

Christianity

to a child,

through

so

China, whilst

they can write and illustrate evading the their Chinese very authorities who

own story. It‟s a great saw way him to as a dangerous criminal.

encourage a reluctant After hand-writer. his conversion, Yun fasted for

And – you never know 100 – days it could on just be a bowl of rice,

just the start of a flourishing literary praying for a chance to

career.

glance at a Bible; his

Amy Hole family were concerned

for his sanity. To be

found with a Bible would

have meant serious

consequences and

punishment. God

honoured this fast and

prayer sending Yun a

Bible. He immediately

read and memorised

chapters from the Bible.

With few resources

other than his memory and God, he

started to take the good news of

Jesus to the people of China via

illegal house churches. This gentle

man brought many people into a

relationship with the Lord.

Yun suffered inhuman and

horrendous torture when captured by

the „Public Security Bureau‟. He

fasted for 72 days, having no food or

water, living only by God‟s grace.

During this fast Yun was repeatedly

tortured, humiliated and beaten by

Prison Guards and fellow prisoners. In

prison violent and dangerous men

observed Yun‟s faith and obedience

to God. They realised that he was not

a criminal, just a committed Christian

and came themselves into a deep and

loving relationship with Jesus.

Miraculous and loving interventions

helped Yun for example jumping over

a ten foot wall; walking through the

open doors of a high security prison

unobserved and walking after his legs

were so severely broken (he was told

he would be crippled for life after this

punishment).

Whatever Yun experienced, God

repeatedly demonstrated his

faithfulness never leaving him or his

family to cope alone. We will

probably never experience this kind of

persecution but this book is testimony

to the incredible power of God and his

Holy Spirit.

Sian Mann

CALL IN FOR A CUPPA

At Church House

(56 Abbey Lane)

10am to 12 noon

On the last Saturday of each month.

Bring & Buy (new items)

Handicrafts Home Baking

St Chad’s Church, Linden Avenue, email: Woodseats office@stchads.org

Church Office: 9 Linden Avenue, website: Sheffield www.stchads.org

S8 0GA

Tel: (0114) 274 5086

St Chads Church, Linden Avenue, Woodseats email: office@stchads.org

St St Chads Chad’s Church, Linden Avenue, email: Woodseats

office@stchads.org

email: email: office@stchads.org

Page 20Church Offices: 15 Camping Lane, Sheffield website: S8 0GB www.stchads.orgPage 11 Church Offices: Office: 915 Linden Camping Avenue, Lane, website: Sheffield www.stchads.org

S8 S8 0GA 0GB Page 2221

website: website: www.stchads.org

Tel: (0114) 274 5086

Tel: (0114) 274 5086


COLERIDGE RD

COLERIDGE RD

COLERIDGE RD

J E N K I N R O A D

J E N K I N R O A D

J E N K I N R O A D

Five Weirs Walk

As springtime beckons, why not

visit the Five Weirs Walk & Blue

Loop?

For those who don’t know the

riverside walk along the Don, passing

through the east-end of Sheffield,

from Lady’s Bridge to Tinsley wildlife

park, I can heartily recommend

that you try it! For those who do,

the approaching spring season will

be a very good time to revisit - the

flowers and birds may surprise you

and the children will love it. There

are interpretive boards along the way

to give some information about the

natural, social and industrial history

(some are being renewed – after 20

years’ service).

Depending on the time you have, or

the energy/shoe leather, you could go

onto the Rotherham Centenary Park

or turn around and complete the Blue

Loop, back to town along the canal

towpath. Both these treks are about

10 miles, but there are numerous

BULL & MOUTH

Park Square

Roundabout

To Upper Don

Walk

Lady's Bridge Blonk St.

BULL & MOUTH

Bridge

Victoria

Quays

ALEXANDRA

BULL & MOUTH

Park Square

Roundabout

To Upper Don

Walk

T H E W I C K E R

WC

BIG GUN

Lady's Bridge Blonk St.

Park Square

Roundabout

To Upper Don

Walk

Lady's Bridge Blonk St.

ALEXANDRA

ALEXANDRA

BLUEWATER

Hyde Park

Bridge Bridge

Victoria Victoria

Quays Quays

BIG GUN

WC

BIG GUN

S H E F F I E L D P A R K W A Y

Cricket Inn Road

Cobweb

Bridge and

Wicker

Arches

T H E W I C K E R

T H E W I C K E R

Hyde Park

BLUEWATER

Hyde Park

BLUEWATER

Walk

Mill

Weir

The

Bailey

Bridge

Norfolk

The Midland Railway

Bailey

Bridge

Norfolk

Bridge

Bridge

Norfolk

Midland Railway

Bridge

Norfolk

Bridge

S A V I L E S T

Burton Weir

S H E F F I E L D P A R K W A Y

Cricket Inn Road

Cobweb

Bridge and

Wicker

Arches

S H E F F I E L D P A R K W A Y

Cricket Inn Road

Cobweb

Bridge and

Wicker

Arches

Walk Walk

Mill Mill

Weir Weir

Nunnery Square

PARK and RIDE

KEY TO KEY MAP

TO MAP

S A S V A I V L I E L E S T S T

S A V I L E S T R E T S A S E V A I V S L I TE L E S T S R T E R E T T E A E S A TS T

A T T E R C L I F F E R D

Salmon Pastures

Nature Reserve

S T E V E N S O N

and and

and

Sheffield

Sheffield

Woodbourn Rd

Tinsley Canal

The Five Weirs Walk The The Five and Five Weirs Weirs Walk Walk and and

Public House Public Public House House

options Sheffield and Tinsley for Sheffield Canal Trail and and Tinsley Tinsley using Canal Canal Trail Trail public transport if

Refreshments

Refreshments

Connecting footpaths Connecting /cycleways

footpaths /cycleways

preferred.

Public Toilets WC Public Public Toilets Toilets WC WC

Supertram

Supertram

River

River River

Canoe Launch/Portage Canoe Canoe Launch/Portage

The and Wheelchair Five fishing and and Points Wheelchair fishing Weirs fishing Points Points

Canal Walk Canal Canal Trust resulted

from the meeting O N E M I L E O O N N E E M M I L I EL Eup of the Junior

O N E K I L O M E T O R O N EN E E K I K L I O L O M M E T E R T ER E

Chamber of Commerce and Wildlife

Trust, at the very first Environment

Week in Sheffield in 1984. With the

networks of both these organisations

and the Planning Department at

the City Council, we have raised

the funds; planned, designed and

managed the construction of the

buggy/wheelchair friendly walkway/

The

Bailey

Bridge

Burton Burton Weir Weir

Norfolk

Midland Railway

Bridge

Norfolk

Bridge

WOODBOURN

ARMS

Nunnery Square

PARK and RIDE

Nunnery Square

PARK and RIDE

T A T E R E C R L C I L F I F E E R R D

Salmon Salmon Pastures Pastures

Nature Nature Reserve Reserve

Washford

Bridge

BAR-CELONA

WOODBOURN

ARMS

WOODBOURN

ARMS

East Coast

Bridge

Washford

Bridge

BAR-CELONA

Washford

Bridge

BAR-CELONA

Woodbourn

Woodbourn

Rd

Rd

north

Sanderson's

Weir Weir

Sanderson's

Weir

East Coast

Bridge

East Coast

Bridge

R D.

Stevenson Rd.

Bridge

Attercliffe

S T E V E N S O N

S T E V E N S O N

KING'S HEAD

Tinsley Canal

Tinsley Canal

north

north

B R I G H T S I D E L A N E

B R I G H T S I D E L A N E

New Hall Bridge

R D.

R D.

Stevenson Rd.

Bridge

Stevenson Rd.

Bridge

Attercliffe

Attercliffe

N E W H A L R D

KING'S HEAD

KING'S HEAD

COCKED HAT

WORKSOP RD

THE

SPORTSMAN

DON

VALLEY

STADIUM

B R I G H T S I D E L A N E

New Hall Bridge

N E W H A L R D

N E W H A L R D

New Hall Bridge

v e

v e

i

i

r

r R R

A T T E R C L I F F E

COCKED HAT

WORKSOP RD

Arena/Don Valley Stadium

R i v e r

D o n

ENGLISH ENGLISH

INSTITUTE INSTITUTE OF OF

SPORT SPORT

ENGLISH DON DON

INSTITUTE VALLEY VALLEY OF

SPORT STADIUM STADIUM

COCKED HAT

WORKSOP RD

THE

SPORTSMAN

THE

SPORTSMAN

Abyssinia

Bridge

ICE ICE SHEFFIELD SHEFFIELD

SHEFFIELD

ARENA

ICE SHEFFIELD

C O M M O N

A T T E R C L I F F E

A T T E R C L I F F E

Arena/Don Valley Stadium

FRIENDSHIP

INN

Arena/Don Valley Stadium

BROUGHTON LANEGREENLAND ROAD

H A W KE S TREET

D o n

D o n

CHARLIE CHALKS

Wincobank Hill

C O M M O N

Brightside Weir

Abyssinia

Bridge

Abyssinia

Bridge

C O M M O N

FRIENDSHIP

INN

BROUGHTON

BROUGHTON

LANEGREENLAND

LANEGREENLAND

ROAD

ROAD

HAWKE S TREET

WENTWORTH

HOUSE HOTEL

SHEFFIELD SHEFFIELD

ARENA ARENA

FRIENDSHIP

INN

H A W KE S TREET

CHARLIE CHALKS

NOOSE AND

GIBBET

WC

Wincobank Hill

CHARLIE CHALKS

Wincobank Hill

THE PHEASANT

CENTRE-

TAINMENT

Weedon St.

Bridge

WENTWORTH

HOUSE HOTEL

THE BRIDGE

Brightside Weir Weir

WENTWORTH

HOUSE HOTEL

CARBROOK HALL

NOOSE AND

GIBBET

WC

ST

W E E D O N

S T

CARBROOK

Continues on 2nd pdf

THE BRIDGE

M E A D O W

W E E D O N

S H E F I E L D R O A D

S H E F I E L D R O A D

THE PHEASANT

THE PHEASANT

NOOSE AND

GIBBET

WC

CENTRE-

TAINMENT

CENTRE-

TAINMENT

Weedon St.

Bridge

Weedon St.

Bridge

THE BRIDGE

CARBROOK HALL

CARBROOK HALL

ST

ST

Continues from 1st pdf

W E E D O N

S H E F I E L D R O A D

Carbrook

Tinsley

Top Top Locks Locks

Tinsley

Top Locks

S T

CARBROOK

S T

CARBROOK

Continues on 2nd pdf

cyclepath. The walk has been adopted

by the city council as a dedicated

public right of way.

The path was planned and built

on a jig-saw basis, with each phase

seeing different sources of funding,

different landowners and construction

companies and different opportunities

and threats! We have a large group

of friends who have been generous

in so many ways – volunteering, fund

raising, sharing ideas, spreading the

word and supporting our campaigns.

The final section, with the Bailey Bridge

was opened in 2006, just in time for

the floods! The threats at the moment

include metal theft and fly-tipping.

Working with Ground Work and

the Environment Agency we have

established a social enterprise - The

River Stewardship Company, which

has grown a sustainable business, to

look after the river and canal and their

wildlife habitats. The regular presence

of the stewards reassures that

seemingly remote spots are cared for.

Working with the riparian owners

H A L L

R D

M E A D O W

M E A D O W

MEADOWHALL

SHOPPING CENTRE

WC

Carbrook

Carbrook

Meadowhall Interchange

H A L L

H A L L

Hadfield

Bridge

R R DD

Hadfields

Weir

To Trans Pennine

Main Trail

via Chapeltown

Meadowhall Interchange

Hadfield

Bridge

MEADOWHALL

SHOPPING SHOPPING CENTRE CENTRE

WC

WC

Meadowhall Interchange

Hadfields

Weir Weir

Junction 34 M1 Motorway

Hadfield

Bridge

To Trans Pennine

Main Trail

via Chapeltown

Motorway

Motorway

M1

M1 34

34

Junction Junction

Meadowhall South/Tinsley

To Trans Pennine

Main Trail

via Chapeltown

Tinsley Cooling

Towers

M

M E

E

A

A

D

D

O O W W B B A D A D

N N A A K K O O R

R

Tinsley Bottom Locks

Tinsley Bottom Locks

FOX AND DUCK

Meadowhall South/Tinsley

Meadowhall South/Tinsley

Halfpenny

Bridge

Tinsley Cooling

Towers

M E A D O W B A N K R O A D

R i

S H E F F I E L D

v e r

Tinsley Bottom Locks

FOX AND DUCK

FOX AND DUCK

Tinsley Cooling

Towers

Halfpenny

Bridge

Halfpenny

Bridge

R O A D

R i

BU

D o n

R i

F F I I F E E L L E E

D D

H H S S

Park Square

Roundabout

v e r

v e r

R R O O A A D D

D o n

D o n

ALEXANDRA

Jordan

Lock

Victoria

Quays

MAGNA SCIENCE ADVENTURE CENTRE

nk St.

Bridge

WC

Jordan

Lock

Jordan

Lock

G Holmes

G Holmes

oit

oit

Hyde Park

THE MINERS

ARMS

Holmes G oit

-

-

Canal

Canal

New Cut

New Cut

Keadby

Keadby

Sheffield

Sheffield

to

to

Sheffield to Keadby Canal - New Cut

BLACKBURN MEADOWS

NATURE RESERVE

BLACKBURN MEADOWS

NATURE RESERVE

MAGNA MAGNA SCIENCE SCIENCE ADVENTURE ADVENTURE CENTRE CENTRE

BLUEWAT

The Five Weirs Walk and

Sheffield and Tinsley Canal Trail

Connecting footpaths /cycleways

S H E F F I E L D P A R K W A Y

BLACKBURN MEADOWS

NATURE RESERVE

Holmes

Lock

Holmes

Lock

and local communities, they also

maintain and improve flood prevention

measures. Regular volunteer days and

educational events are programmed

– if you are interested in this please

email Hellen on hellen.hornby@the-rsc.

co.uk or go to the-rsc or riverlution

websites.

Riverlution is another joint venture,

to help everyone who has an interest

in the region’s watercourses keep

up to date with what’s going on in

terms of improvements and events.

At the launch, at the Riverside Pub on

Corporation Street, there were artists

and musicians; archaeologists and

local historians; ornithologists; anglers,

ramblers and kayakers!

Lisa Judson

THE MINERS

ARMS

Cricket Inn Road

KEY TO MAP

Supertram

Canoe Launch/Portage

and Wheelchair fishing Points

O N E K I L O M E T R E

THE MINERS

ARMS

O N E M I L E

Psalter Lane

he

Bailey

Bridge

Steel St

F E R H A M R O A D

To Rotherham

Holmes

Lock

S A V I L E S T

Burton Weir

Psalter Lane

Psalter Lane

Norfolk

Midland Railway

Bridge

Norfolk

Bridge

Steel St

F E R H A M R O A D

To Rotherham

Nunnery Square

PARK and RIDE

Public House

Refreshments

Public Toilets

River

Canal

Steel St

F E R H A M R O A D

To Rotherham

S A V I L E S T R E E T E A S T

A T T E R C L I F F E R D

Salmon Pastures

Nature Reserve

WC

WOODBOURN

ARMS

Five Weirs Walk

Washford

Bridge

BAR-CELONA

Sheffield and

Woodbourn Rd

East Coast

Bridge

S T E V E N S O N

Tinsley Canal

north

Sa

R D

Steve

Bri

Atterc

St Chad’s Church, Linden Avenue, Woodseats

Church Office: 9 Linden Avenue, Sheffield S8 0GA

Tel: (0114) 274 5086

email: office@stchads.org

St Chad’s Church, Linden Avenue, Woodseats

Page 22 website: www.stchads.org

Church Office: 9 Linden Avenue, Sheffield S8 0GA

Page 23

Tel: (0114) 274 5086

email: office@stchads.org

website: www.stchads.org


The Singing Stream

People have always been

attracted to rivers - poets, storytellers

and children particularly

so. And many composers have tried

to write down the music rivers make.

Among the first poems to be written

down were the Psalms, and rivers

run through lots of these. Many of

them were intended to be sung, but

the tunes they had are lost in time as

notation to write them down did not

exist.

But the river sings its own song,

and it is this which many writers have

tried to capture.

The four-year-old composer Edward

Elgar was found by his father among

the reeds by the Severn with pencil

and paper. “What are you doing

here?” he was asked. “I’m trying to

write what the reeds and river are

saying,” came the reply. His father

boxed his ears, “Well, you stupid boy,”

he said, “Don’t you know music is

written on five lines and four spaces,

not four and three like you’ve written?”

But the child already knew better than

his father that the song of the river is

far older than modern notation and he

was writing the language of plainsong,

the first notation of the early Church.

Another writer who captured the

music of the river was Kenneth

Grahame in Wind in the Willows.

Here, Mole learns to live with the

river: “He learnt to swim and to row,

and entered into the joy of running

water; and with his ear to the reedstems

he caught, at intervals,

something of what the wind went

whispering so constantly among

them.”

In Charles Kingsley’s Water Babies,

Tom, the little chimney sweep, also

hears the song of the river and is

drawn irresistibly towards it: “Down he

went... while the church-bells rang so

loud, he began to think that they must

be inside his own head, and the river

chimed and tinkled far below; and this

was the song which it sang:- Clear

and cool, clear and cool, By laughing

shallow, and dreaming pool;...”

Of course there is much more

of it, but you will have to read it for

yourself. So, as Tom went down to

the river and became a water baby,

having many adventures until he grew

up and became a man.

RL Stevenson, wondered where his

paper boats would come home:

“Away down the river,

A hundred miles or more,

Other little children

Shall bring my boats ashore”

And the forbidden Keepsake Mill:

“Years may go by, and the wheel in

the river

Wheel as it wheels for us, children,

today,

Wheel and keep roaring and foaming

for ever,

Long after all of the boys are away.”

What grown-up doesn’t shed a

tear on re-reading these verses?

Especially “Heroes and soldiers we

all shall come home; ... Honoured

and old and all gaily apparelled, Here

we shall meet and remember the

past.”

But the boys do not always come

home and some that do are deeply

traumatised. It is perhaps the exile

who sings the most poignant song

- like Ivor Gurney in his rat-infested

trench, longing for home and

pleading: “Do not forget me quite, O

Severn meadows.”

Or Edward Elgar, now grown up and

famous, writing from his dark mansion

in London to his friend Ivor Atkins, the

cathedral organist at Worcester: “If it’s

sunshiny just go round to the West

End of the Cathedral, look over the

view towards Malvern and bless my

beloved country for me.”

C Day Lewis’ poem Edward Elgar

ends: “in his music, I hear the famous

river - Always and never the same,

carrying far Beyond our view, reach

after noble reach - That bears its sons

away.”

Like our own life’s journey, that of

the river ends at the estuary, where

it pours its story into the sea, and oh

my, what a story!

Sylvia Bennett

St Chad’s is not the only one to

celebrate its centenary this year.

So too is the Royal Society

of Wildlife Trusts – a charity linking

together 47 individual Wildlife Trusts

with the aim of safeguarding wildlife

and habitats throughout the UK. A

hundred years ago it was formed

as the Society for the Promotion

of Nature Reserves, which marked

the beginning of systematic nature

conservation in our country.

Along with British Waterways, the

Wildlife Trusts are among the main

national organisations responsible

for protecting our rivers and streams,

which provide vital habitats and

food supplies for a diverse range of

animals. We tend to take for granted

mallard ducks and moorhens or

coots, geese and sometimes swans.

But these birds are only a few of the

many species who live in or near

rivers, or who rely on rivers for their

food.

Fish supported by our rivers include

brown trout, eel, stickleback, pike,

grayling, roach, perch and salmon.

These fish also attract other fisheating

predators, such as otters and

herons. A kingfisher is a rare but

delightful sight, skimming along the

river course in a bright blue flash.

The endearing little furry water vole

is sadly an endangered species. One

of the Wildlife Trusts’ projects is to

provide homes for water voles.

Even in upland areas, where

streams can be pretty feeble unless

there is heavy rain or melting snow,

and not much in the way of nutrients,

rivers still support insects such as

mayflies and caddisflies, which

provide food for salmon and brown

trout and birds like dippers. In lowland

areas, rivers tend to be richer in

nutrients and so are able to support

a wider range of species. Here, you

might find chub, dace, roach, and

other coarse fish, and even crayfish.

The rate of flow doesn’t vary so

much in lowland areas, so such parts

provide a more stable habitat. But

the benefit of waterways is that they

act as ‘corridors’, which wildlife can

use to move between fragmented

habitats.

The diversity of UK river habitats

and wildlife is so great that this can

be only a tiny snapshot of what is

there. To discover more, a good

starting point is the Wildlife Trusts’

website (www.wildlifetrusts.org) or the

feature on all sorts of different wildlife

on the British Waterways website

(www.waterscape.com/features-andarticles/features/wildlife).

Amy Hole

River Wildlife

St Chad’s Church, Linden Avenue, Woodseats

Church Office: 9 Linden Avenue, Sheffield S8 0GA

Tel: (0114) 274 5086

email: office@stchads.org

St Chad’s Church, Linden Avenue, Woodseats

Page 24 website: www.stchads.org

Church Office: 9 Linden Avenue, Sheffield S8 0GA

Page 25

Tel: (0114) 274 5086

email: office@stchads.org

website: www.stchads.org


Where’s that

from..?

Sold down the river

Meaning - cheated or betrayed

Derived from - the slave trade in North

America which began in the early 1600s.

Thousands of Africans were sold into

slavery and shipped to work on large

plantations growing sugar, tobacco, rice

and cotton. Conditions were harsh and

punishments often brutal. Slaves from the

northern states who persisted in causing

trouble, by using techniques such as “go

slows”, destroying property, or attempting

to escape as a way of protesting about

their enslavement, would be “sold down

the river” to plantations in the south.

Conditions here in the lower Mississippi

were much worse as the heat was intense

and the swamps were infested with insects.

I

love the song by Christian band

Delirious called I Could Sing of

Your Love Forever, which has the

lyrics: “Over the mountains and the

sea, Your River runs with love for me;

And I will open up my heart and let

the Healer set me free”.

The River of God appears

throughout the Bible. The Bible

describes an earthly river in Genesis

flowing out of Eden, and later

introduces the heavenly River of

God’s Power and love, through Jesus.

Psalm 36 verse 8 says: “You

give them drink from your River of

delights”; Psalm 46 verse 4 says:

“There is a River whose streams

make glad the City of God; and in

Psalm 72 verse 8 it says “He will rule

from sea to sea, from the River to the

ends of the earth”.

Ezekiel 47 describes the River of

God flowing out from the temple in

Jerusalem first east and then south.

First ankle deep, then knee deep,

then deep enough to swim in. The

leaves of the fruit trees on the banks

of the River bring healing to everyone

everywhere - see Daniel 12 and

Revelation 22.

When Jesus healed people he said,

“The Kingdom of God is here.” The

River is a place in the Kingdom of

God.

The Kingdom of God, though a

Spiritual place, is also a very real

place. The access to that place

is through Jesus Christ who calls

himself The Way.

In John 10:7 Jesus says, “I am the

Gate” and again in John 14:6, “I am

the way”.

In the River of God, healing takes

place of body, soul and spirit. God

is our Father who loves us. He sent

His Son Jesus to show us how much.

Apart from the teachings of Jesus on

how to follow Him, healing was His

major ministry on earth. It still is today.

Know the love and healing of Jesus

for yourself, and make this song by

Dougie Brown your own prayer to

Jesus, keep praying till you know you

are in His River.

River, wash over me

Cleanse me and make me new

Bathe me, refresh me and fill me

anew; River wash over me

Spirit, watch over me

Lead me to Jesus’ feet

Cause me to worship and fill me

anew; Spirit, watch over me

Jesus, rule over me

Reign over all my heart

Teach me to praise You and fill me

anew; Jesus, rule over me

Janet Bassindale

Woodseats Healing Rooms

The River of Healing

St Chad’s Church, Linden Avenue, Woodseats

Church Office: 9 Linden Avenue, Sheffield S8 0GA

Tel: (0114) 274 5086

email: office@stchads.org

St Chad’s Church, Linden Avenue, Woodseats

Page 26 website: www.stchads.org

Church Office: 9 Linden Avenue, Sheffield S8 0GA

Page 27

Tel: (0114) 274 5086

email: office@stchads.org

website: www.stchads.org


Mississippi Mud Pie

This indulgent, chocolaty pie

is definitely one for a special

occasion. Originating from America,

it’s named after the muddy banks of

the Mississippi River which it is said

to resemble – hopefully in looks and

texture rather than taste!

This recipe uses a pastry base, but if

you can’t be bothered with that I have

seen one version that has a base of

crushed Bourbon biscuits combined with

melted butter, pressed into the tin and

then chilled before adding the filling.

Ingredients

For the pastry case

200g plain flour

2 tbsps caster sugar

100g chilled butter, cubed

2-3 tbsps cold water

For the filling

150g dark chocolate

50g unsalted butter

2 tbsps golden syrup

3 eggs

250g dark muscovado sugar

1 tsp vanilla essence

Method: To make the pastry, sift the

flour, sugar and salt into a bowl. Rub

the cubed butter in with your fingertips

until the mixture looks like breadcrumbs.

Mix the cold water in gradually until the

mixture comes together and can be

formed into a ball. Wrap it in cling-film

and let it rest in the fridge for 30 mins.

Sprinkle flour over a clean surface and

roll out the dough. Use it to line a 23cm

greased flan tin or pie dish. Bake it blind

at 190°C/375°F/gas mark 5 for about 20

mins.

Meanwhile, break up the chocolate

and put it with the butter and golden

syrup into a heatproof bowl over a pan of

simmering water, until melted. Remove

from the heat and allow to cool a little but

not so much it hardens up.

In a separate bowl, beat the eggs,

then add the sugar and vanilla extract

and mix thoroughly. Fold in the chocolate

mixture. Pour the filling into the pastry

shell and bake in the oven, still at

190°C/375°F/gas 5, for about 35 mins

until the filling is set. Leave to cool.

Delicious served with vanilla ice cream

or whipped cream!

Registers 2012

Baptisms

January

22 Evie Louise DAVY

Maria Louise GARTLAND

February

19 Robyn Lillee SMITH

Funerals

January

26 Eileen MEMMOTT (91)

27 Clifford SMITH (97)

February

16 Jack Redman MORRIS (92)

For Weddings and Funerals

You don’t have to be a churchgoer to

have a wedding in church, nor do

you have to be ‘religious’ to

have a dignified and meaningful

funeral service at St Chad’s.

If you live in the Woodseats or Beauchief

area, St Chad’s would be delighted to help

you, whether it is planning the Big Day

or saying goodbye to a loved one. For

weddings please contact St Chad’s church

office. For funerals please tell your funeral

director that you would like to have a

church service.

l If you have recently had a new

baby and would like to celebrate that

baby’s birth with a service in church then

please come to one of our thanksgiving

and baptism mornings at St Chad’s.

The morning will explain the difference

between the two services and give parents

an opportunity to ask any questions.

Please call the church office on 0114

274 5086 if you are interested in attending

and to find out the latest dates.

St Chad’s Church, Linden Avenue, Woodseats

Church Office: 9 Linden Avenue, Sheffield S8 0GA

Tel: (0114) 274 5086

email: office@stchads.org

St Chad’s Church, Linden Avenue, Woodseats

Page 28 website: www.stchads.org

Church Office: 9 Linden Avenue, Sheffield S8 0GA

Page 29

Tel: (0114) 274 5086

email: office@stchads.org

website: www.stchads.org


Contacts@StChads

CHURCH OFFICE 9 Linden Avenue 274 5086

S8 0GA

Term time office hours: Mon - 10am-1pm;

Tues and Thurs - 9.30am-1pm;

Fri - 9.30am-11.30am

Church Office Administrator

Helen Reynolds

email: office@stchads.org

Vicar Toby Hole (Vicarage) 274 9302

email: toby@stchads.org

Reader/Assistant Minister Yvonne Smith 274 5086

for the elderly

Youth Worker Nick Seaman 274 5086

email: nick@stchads.org

Besom in Sheffield

Steve Winks and

Darren Coggins 07875 950170

Impact magazine Tim Hopkinson 274 5086

email: impact@stchads.org

Church Wardens Nigel Belcher 281 1750

email: nigel@stchads.org

Malcolm Smith 274 7159

Deputy Wardens

Jimmy Johnson

Linda McCann

Caretaker Mark Cobbold 274 5086

Uniformed Groups

Group Scout Leader Ian Jackson 235 3044

Guide Leader Jemma Taylor 296 0555

CHURCH HOUSE 56 Abbey Lane 274 8289

Bookings Helen Reynolds 274 5086

Visit our website: www.stchads.org

St Chads Church, Linden Avenue, Woodseats

email: office@stchads.org

Church Offices: 15 Camping Lane, Sheffield S8 0GB Page 3 website: www.stchads.org

Tel: (0114) 274 5086

PLEASE NOTE: The inclusion of advertisements in Impact in no way means the

advertiser is endorsed or recommended by St Chad’s Church.

St Chad’s Church, Linden Avenue, Woodseats

Church Office: 9 Linden Avenue, Sheffield S8 0GA

Tel: (0114) 274 5086

email: office@stchads.org

St Chad’s Church, Linden Avenue, Woodseats

Page 30 website: www.stchads.org

Church Office: 9 Linden Avenue, Sheffield S8 0GA

Page 31

Tel: (0114) 274 5086

email: office@stchads.org

website: www.stchads.org


St Chad’s Church, Linden Avenue, Woodseats

Church Office: 9 Linden Avenue, Sheffield S8 0GA

Tel: (0114) 274 5086

Page 32

email: office@stchads.org

website: www.stchads.org

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