FS_102716

22ndcenturymedia

The Frankfort Station 102716

forming plans

D210 Board of Education discusses finances,

prepares to address student activity funds, Page 5

Discussing Issues

Sen. Dick Durbin addresses Will County’s heroin

problem with other Will County officials, Page 8

Election Time

Candidates for various Will County offices share their opinions

with The Station before the General Election, Pages 10-11

Frankfort’s Award-Winning Hometown Newspaper frankfortstation.com • October 27, 2016 • Vol. 11 No. 21 • $1

A

®

Publication

,LLC

Owner of Frankfort Culver’s location climbs the ranks by the age of 23, Page 3

Brandon

Davidson (left),

owner of the

Culver’s location

in Frankfort, chats

with customer

Lynn Grund

Friday, Oct. 21,

at the restaurant.

Julie McMann/22nd

Century Media

Set some tails wagging.

You’ll feel like wagging your own tail when you help PAWS help future pets. Every

day, our local animal shelter takes care of puppies, kittens, dogs, cats, rabbits and more who

are waiting for forever homes.

Through November, Town Center Bank will be collecting old cloth towels,

paper towels, bleach, laundry detergent, pine cleaner, collars, leashes, Science Diet®

dry and canned foods, or any gift cards.

Bring your donations to either Town Center Bank location today!

20181 S. LaGrange Rd.

Frankfort

815-806-7001

Donate to PAWS at either Town Center Bank location through November!

TownCenterBank.com

1938 E. Lincoln Hwy.

New Lenox

815-463-7002


2 | October 27, 2016 | The frankfort station calendar

frankfortstation.com

In this week’s

station

Standout Student...........16

Police Reports................18

Sound Off.....................19

The Dish........................33

Puzzles..........................35

Classifieds................ 36-49

Sports...................... 50-56

The Frankfort

Station

ph: 708.326.9170 fx: 708.326.9179

Editor

Rebecca Susmarski, x14

rebecca@frankfortstation.com

Sales director

Dana Anderson, x17

d.amderson@22ndcenturymedia.com

real estate sales

Tricia Weber, x47

t.weber@22ndcenturymedia.com

business directory Sales

Kellie Tschopp, x23

k.tschopp@22ndcenturymedia.com

Recruitment Advertising

Jess Nemec, x46

j.nemec@22ndcenturymedia.com

Legal Notices

Jeff Schouten, x51

j.schouten@22ndcenturymedia.com

PUBLISHER

Joe Coughlin 847.272.4565, x16

j.coughlin@22ndcenturymedia.com

Managing Editor

Bill Jones, x20

bill@opprairie.com

SALES MANAGER

Andrew Nicks

a.nicks@22ndcenturymedia.com

EDITORIAL DESIGN DIRECTOR

Nancy Burgan, x30

n.burgan@22ndcenturymedia.com

22 nd Century Media

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Unit SW Office Condo #3

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www.FrankfortStation.com

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POSTMASTER: Send changes to:

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Published by

www.22ndcenturymedia.com

F. Amanda Tugade

f.tugade@22ndcenturymedia.com

THURSDAY

The Roe Conn Show

3 p.m. Oct. 27, CD&ME,

23320 S. LaGrange Road,

Frankfort. The Roe Conn

Show with Anna Davlantes

will be returning to this

venue. Call the box office at

(815) 469-7315 for tickets.

The show begins at 3 p.m. and

ends at 7 p.m. For more information,

visit cdandme.com.

The Walkins

6 p.m. Oct. 27, CD & Me,

23320 South La Grange

Road, Frankfort. The

Walkins are to perform at

CD & Me. Tickets are $7.

The show is to start at 8

p.m., and the show is for patrons

21 and over. For more

information, visit cdandme.

com.

One Book, One Community

7-8 p.m. Oct. 27, Frankfort

Public Library District,

21119 S. Pfeiffer Road,

Frankfort. This month’s

selection is “How It Went

Down” by Kekla Magoon.

Prayer Journals

7 p.m. Oct. 27, Evilena’s

Red Dresser, 20887 S. La-

Grange Road, Frankfort.

Learn more about a prayer

journal and the benefits of

exploring emotions through

writing, as well as having

a deeper religious faith. The

cost to attend the class is

$15. For more information,

call (815) 464-2668.

The South Suburban Civil

War Round Table

7 p.m. Oct. 27, Smokey

Barque, 20 Kansas Street,

Frankfort. The round table

is to host speaker Brian

Conroy and his presentation

“Military Academies During

the Civil War.” From August

to May, the South Suburban

Civil War Round Table

meets the fourth Thursday

of the month. For more information,

visit southsuburbancwrt.com,

call (815)

274-5321 or email sscwrt@

gmail.com.

FRIDAY

Sensory Play Date

10:30-11:15 a.m. Oct. 28,

Frankfort Public Library

District, 21119 S. Pfeiffer

Road, Frankfort. Registration

is ongoing for those interested

in taking part in this

play date. The session is for

children ages 1 and 3 and

their caregivers. Activities

include listening to music

and stories.

SATURDAY

Madcap Puppets: ‘Legend of

Sleepy Hollow’

2-3 p.m. Oct. 29, Frankfort

Public Library District,

21119 S. Pfeiffer Road,

Frankfort. Registration has

begun for those interested in

attending this presentation of

author Washington Irving’s

“Legend of Sleepy Hollow,”

a story with schoolmaster

Ichabod Crane and the headless

horseman. This viewing

is recommended for children

ages 5-12 and family audiences.

For more information,

visit frankfortlibrary.org.

MONDAY

Trick or Treat at FLPD

10 a.m.-4 p.m. Oct. 31,

Frankfort Public Library

District, 21119 S. Pfeiffer

Road, Frankfort. Trick or

treat at the library.

Spooky Little Story Time

10:30-11:15 a.m. Oct. 31,

Frankfort Public Library

District, 21119 S. Pfeiffer

Road, Frankfort. Children of

all ages are welcome to stop

by the library for a morning

of stories and songs about

pumpkins, ghosts and more.

Costumes are welcome.

Trick or Treat Hours in

Frankfort

4-7 p.m. Oct. 31.

TUESDAY

Genealogy Open Lab

6-8 p.m. Nov. 1, Frankfort

Public Library District,

21119 S. Pfeiffer Road,

Frankfort. Frankfort librarian

Jill Ganeshan is to help

patrons who are interested

in learning more about their

family heritage. Registration

is required to attend. Frankfort

library cardholders have

priority registration for this

event. For more information,

visit frankfortlibrary.org.

Holistic Health Meet Up

Nov. 1, New Horizons

Family Chiropractic located

at 21000 S. Frankfort Square

Rd. Unit B, Frankfort. This

gathering is for those interested

in taking a closer look

at understanding wellness

and staying healthy. All are

welcome to attend this free

event. For more information,

contact Liz Kelchak at

lizkelchak@gmail.com.

WEDNESDAY

With the Beatles

7-9 p.m. Nov. 2, Frankfort

Public Library District,

21119 S. Pfeiffer Road,

Frankfort. Beatles historian

Robert Rodriguez is to present

his popular talk and documentary

“The Beatles’ Performing

Years 1957-1966.”

The 50-minute documentary

includes photos, interviews,

concert segments, promos

and more. Registration is

required. For more information

or to register, visit

frankfortlibrary.org or call

(815) 534-6173.

UPCOMING

Winter Garden Party

7-8 p.m. Thursday, Nov.

3, Frankfort Public Library

District, 21119 S. Pfeiffer

Road, Frankfort. Registration

is still ongoing for those

interested in attending the

Winter Garden Party. Activities

include decorating

mason jars, cutting flowers

to create arrangements and

making a variety of home

decorations or holiday gifts.

A non-refundable $5 art supplies

fee is required and payable

at the Adult Services

Desk prior to the program.

Registration is required and

limited to FPLD cardholders

18 years and older. For more

information, call (815) 534-

6173 or register online.

Author Meet and Greet

2-4 p.m. Sunday, Nov.

6, Frankfort Public Library

District, 21119 S. Pfeiffer

Road, Frankfort. Registration

is ongoing for those interested

in meeting Natalie Y.

Moore, author of “The South

Side: A Portrait of Chicago

and American Segregation.”

For more information, visit

frankfortlibrary.org.

Village Board Meeting

7 p.m. Monday, Nov.

7, Village Administration

Building, 432 W. Nebraska

St., Frankfort. The Village

Board is to host its meeting.

Design a 3D Snowflake

Ornament

7-8 p.m. Wednesday, Nov.

9, Frankfort Public Library

District, 21119 S. Pfeiffer

Road, Frankfort. Registration

is still ongoing for

adults and teens interested in

designing a 3-D snowflake

using Tinkercad, an online

3D design tool. Registration

is required to attend. For

more information or to register,

visit frankfortlibrary.

org or call (815) 534-6173.

Veteran’s Day Concert

6:30-7:30 p.m. Thursday,

Nov. 10, Hickory Creek

Middle School, 22150 116th

Street, Frankfort. The Hickory

Creek Middle School

Tiger Band is to perform.

Mayor Jim Holland is to narrate

the concert. For more

information, contact HCMS

at (815) 464-8131.

Plan Commission Meeting

6:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov.

10, Village Administration

Building, 432 W. Nebraska

St., Frankfort. The Plan

Commission is to host its

meeting.

Holiday Craft and Vendor

Show

9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday,

Nov. 12, Founders Community

Center, 140 Oak

St., Frankfort. This show

includes a diverse selection

of crafters and vendors, including

Tastefully Simple,

Pampered Chef, Avon, Premier

Design Jewelry, Origami

Owl and more. For

more information or booth

availability, contact the

Frankfort Park District office

at (815) 469-9400 or

visit frankfortparks.org.

Vendors can download an

application for the show at

frankfortparks.org/specialevents.aspx.

ONGOING

Lincoln-Way Area Business

Women’s Association

6-8 p.m. third Tuesdays of

each month from September

through June. Dinner meetings

take place at Little

Joes, 1300 N. Cedar Road,

New Lenox. The LWABWO

is a nonprofit club formed

in 1971 that supports the

interest and networking of

the business women. The

club’s focus is to provide

scholarship funds to young

women in high school and

adult women interested in

continuing education. The

club is always looking for

new members. For more information

or to learn how to

join, visit LWABWO.org.

To submit an item to the printed

calendar, contact Rebecca

Susmarski at (708) 326-9170

ext. 14, or email rebecca@

frankfortstation.com. Deadline

is noon Thursdays one week

prior to publication.


frankfortstation.com news

the frankfort station | October 27, 2016 | 3

Working his way to the top

Open HOuse • Oct. 30 • 12-4pm

Davidson, 23, climbs

the ranks to become

the owner of the

Frankfort Culver's

F. Amanda Tugade

Assistant Editor

Brandon Davidson’s love

for Culver’s dates back to

his very first bite of the fast

food chain’s Deluxe burger.

“I eat that every day,” Davidson

said. “That’s what I

ate the first time I went to

Culver’s.”

From that point on, Davidson’s

story took a different

turn. The 23-year-old,

originally from Marseilles,

Illinois, is now the owner of

the Culver’s on LaGrange

Road in Frankfort.

His journey to his current

position took six years of

hard work and dedication,

but when asked to share

how he began his journey,

Davidson remained candid.

He was 16 when he was first

hired to work at a Culver’s

in Ottawa.

“I just needed a job, pretty

much,” he said. “That

was about it, actually. I

wanted a car; I wanted to

pay for insurance. My mom

said, ‘You need to pay for

your phone,’ and I said, ‘All

right.’”

From there, Davidson began

to move up.

“By 17, I was promoted

to what Culver’s calls Crew

Chiefs; it’s like an assistant

manager,” he said. “And

right before I turned 18, I

was promoted to manager.

[That’s] right before I graduated

high school.”

After stepping and settling

into the role of a manager,

Davidson decided to

“take the year off” and not

go straight to college.

That decision opened

up another opportunity for

Brandon Davidson, the 23-year-old owner of the Frankfort

Culver’s location, pours some iced tea for a customer

Friday, Oct. 21, at the Frankfort Culver’s.

Photos by Julie McMann/22nd Century Media

• half price every sunday for kids

Davidson poses inside of the Frankfort Culver’s restaurant,

under 11 [kids menu only]

which he came to own after working for Culver’s and

climbing the ranks since the age of 16.

him, and with the help of his

mentors Bobby Maier and

Tony Milazzo, Davidson

was able to see a career at

Culver’s.

The road to becoming a

restaurateur

Maier and Milazzo are

both owners of various

Culver’s restaurants across

Illinois, and as young businessmen

themselves, they

look for people like Davidson

who carry the same enthusiasm

and eagerness to

learn.

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have a ‘whatever it takes’

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4 | October 27, 2016 | The frankfort station News

frankfortstation.com

From Oct. 19

Frankfort police turn over search for

armed robbery suspect to Chicago FBI

Rebecca Susmarski, Editor

Frankfort police have

turned over the search for

a suspect in a Frankfort

armed robbery incident to

the FBI Chicago Field Office,

according to an email

sent by Frankfort Deputy

Chief Kevin Keegan this

afternoon.

The armed robbery occurred

on Oct. 18 at a bank

in the 9000th block of Lincoln

Highway. A male suspect

entered the bank at

about 2:33 p.m. and reportedly

demanded money from

bank staff members.

The suspect implied he

had a handgun on his person,

and footage taken

by a surveillance camera

shows the outline of a gun

in the suspect’s waistband,

Keegan said. The suspect

did not remove a handgun

from his person during the

robbery.

Witnesses told police that

the suspect took the money

and then fled the scene

westbound on foot. The

name of the suspect and

the amount of money taken

could not be released as of

Oct. 19.

The suspect has been described

as ranging in age

from 30 to 40 years old,

For updates to this story and

other Breaking News, visit

www.frankfortstation.com.

The Frankfort Police

Department posted this

photo on Facebook Oct. 18

of a suspect in an armed

robbery incident that took

place that day in Frankfort.

Photo submitted

Former building inspector pleads guilty to soliciting bribe

Rebecca Susmarski, Editor

A Frankfort resident and

former City of Chicago

building inspector pleaded

guilty on Oct. 20 to soliciting

a bribe from a Chicago

property owner, according to

a press release from the U.S.

Department of Justice’s Illinois

office.

Roberto Uribe, 55, demanded

a $300 bribe from

the owner of a two-story

Chicago building, according

to the release. The building

owner had been cooperating

with federal authorities

at the time and recorded the

bribery demand, as well as

an ensuing conversation at

the property, according to

the release.

One of the recorded conversations

reveals that Uribe

demanded the bribe on Nov.

9, 2015, according to the release.

A few days later, the

property owner gave $300 in

cash to Uribe at the property

and recorded their exchange.

Uribe pleaded guilty to

one count of attempted extortion

under color of official

right, a charge punishable by

up to 20 years in prison and a

maximum fine of $250,000,

according to the release.

Uribe’s sentencing has been

set for 11 a.m. Thursday,

Feb. 2, 2017.

Frankfort man charged in

alleged Orland Park Jewel

purse-snatching incident

Bill Jones, Managing Editor

A Frankfort

man

who allegedly

reached

out of a vehicle

to grab

a purse from

a 66-year-old Frighetto

woman Thursday,

Oct. 20, outside an Orland

Park Jewel was arrested

later that day at a motel in

Cicero.

Vincent Frighetto, 24, of

22211 Clary Sage Drive,

was charged with one count

of robbery as well as one

misdemeanor count apiece

of leaving the scene of an accident

and no valid driver’s

license, along with the petty

offense of no insurance, according

to a press release issued

Friday, Oct. 21, by the

Orland Park Police Department.

Shortly before 11:30 a.m.

Oct. 20, the victim was putting

groceries in her car outside

Jewel, 9350 W. 159th

St., when a Dodge Intrepid

pulled alongside her, police

said. The driver reached

out of the vehicle and took

the purse from the woman’s

shoulder, police said. The Intrepid

reportedly then struck

a parked car next to the

woman and fled the scene.

As officers arrived on the

scene, there was a report of

a delayed purse-snatching at

the Wal-Mart in Orland Hills

involving a vehicle with a

similar description, according

to the press release. In

that incident, an employee

of Wal-Mart ran after the

suspect and recovered the

purse, obtained a license

plate number and relayed information

to officers, police

said.

With the assistance of the

Frankfort Police Department,

Frighetto was identified

as a possible suspect,

according to the press release.

At 6:30 p.m., the Intrepid

was located by Cicero

tactical officers at the Shamrock

Motel, 1212 S. Cicero

Ave. in Cicero, police said.

Frighetto reportedly was

arrested, and Judge Russell

W. Hartigan set a bond of

$25,000 on Oct. 21 at the

Cook County Courthouse in

Bridgeview.

Frankfort attorney sentenced to 30 years in prison for soliciting the murder of his ex-wife

Rebecca Susmarski, Editor

the Frankfort Police Department

wrote in an Oct.

18 Facebook post. A surveillance

photo of the suspect

— which the Frankfort

posted on Facebook shortly

after the robbery occurred

— shows a man wearing

blue jeans, a black or dark

grey long-sleeved shirt and

sunglasses on top of his

head.

The case is still under

investigation, and updates

can be found at bandittrackerchicago.com.

A former

Frankfort attorney

who

solicited the

murder of his

ex-wife received

a prison

sentence of 30 Gold-Smith

years today at

the Will County courthouse.

From oct. 19

Will County Circuit Judge

Daniel Rozak sentenced

Robert Gold-Smith, 54, seven

months after Gold-Smith

had been found guilty of

solicitation of murder. The

sentencing for the enhanced

class X felony could have

ranged from 20 to 40 years

in prison, said Chuck Pelkie

of the Will County State’s

Attorney’s office.

On or about Oct. 3, 2012,

Gold-Smith asked Brian

McDaniel, a fellow detainee

at the Will County Adult Detention

Facility, to kill his

ex-wife for a fee. McDaniel

testified against Gold-Smith

at the latter’s bench trial and

officials played their wirerecorded

conversation in

court, according to a press

release from the Will County

State’s Attorney’s office.

Gold-Smith made the offer

while he was jailed on

charges stemming from an

incident that took place on

Nov. 19, 2010, in which

Gold-Smith allegedly approached

his ex-wife at the

Will County courthouse and

struck her about the body.

The three charges from that

incident — aggravated domestic

battery, aggravated

battery and unlawful violation

of an order of protection

— are still pending.

Gold-Smith has also been

charged with communicating

with a witness for allegedly

contacting McDaniel while

the solicitation case was

pending and offering McDaniel

money “to prevent him

from testifying freely, fully

and truthfully,” according to

a charging document. That

charge is also still pending.

For updates to this story and

other Breaking News, visit

www.frankfortstation.com.


frankfortstation.com News

the frankfort station | October 27, 2016 | 5

Lincoln-Way D210 Board of Education

Past, present financial status of schools examined at meeting

Board members to

address negative

student activity fund

balances on Nov. 17

Meredith Dobes

Freelance Reporter

For the first time in

more than one year, there

was no comment made by

any member of the public

Thursday, Oct. 20, during a

regular meeting of the Lincoln-Way

Community High

School District 210 Board

of Education.

The board focused on

the present and future of

its financial situation and

also spent time recognizing

student achievements and

the work of its three principals

for National Principals

Month.

Superintendent R. Scott

Tingley reported that the

district made a tax anticipation

warrant payment of $20

million to Old Second Bank

and borrowed $13 million

to start the fiscal year. He

gave reports on revenues

and expenditures for each

of the district’s funds.

In many cases, revenues

had increased, and expenditures

had decreased yearto-date.

Tingley said that for the

total operating fund, revenue

was up 10.6 percent,

and expenditures were

down 11.4 percent compared

to last year.

“I don’t believe we’ll be

able to maintain the 11.4

percent throughout the

year,” Tingley said. “We’ll

need to stay 5 percent better

to capture those savings

we anticipated. We’re on a

good track, and we’ll continue

to monitor.”

Board Member Christopher

Lucchetti requested

the district provide a memo

along with future treasurer’s

reports — similar

to what the district is now

pairing with its student activities

reports — to note

variances in the budget and

offer more context, particularly

for when the district

begins posting its Board-

Docs online for the public.

When the student activities

report was presented,

Tingley said there are eight

negative fund balances that

are to be addressed within

the month, and some accounts

will be closed out.

Director of Finance Kelly

Luzzo said funds from all

remaining Lincoln-Way

North accounts would either

be transferred to Lincoln-Way

East accounts or

split among accounts for all

three schools, depending on

the situation.

Luzzo also said she aims

to have a report to the board

at its November meeting to

discuss how the district can

generally organize its student

activities accounts for

better efficiency and to ensure

there are no accounts

in the group that should

not be categorized as such.

At that meeting, she would

take board recommendations

of what to do with the

accounts, she said.

Looking ahead financially

When the board initially

discussed the amount of

tax anticipation warrants

District 210 needed to borrow

this fiscal year, it was

mentioned that the district

may need to borrow an additional

approximately $7

million beyond the $20 million

total that Old Second

Bank had already approved

for the district for FY 2017.

At the Oct. 20 meeting,

Tingley said that additional

amount may be closer to

$4 million, and with cash

flows and treasurer’s reports,

the district could go

back to banks to show it is

“trending in the right direction.”

“I think we need to pursue,

actively, a bank for

TAWs,” Lucchetti said.

“We don’t know about State

funding or when it’s going

to come. We don’t want to

rely on that. We need to

keep informing the banks

we’re staying on budget.”

Tingley said he aims to

meet with Old Second Bank

in the next week, as it is the

end of the first financial

quarter.

“The quicker we can get

a commitment, the better,”

he said. “That is the most

crucial piece out there right

now. If we need to borrow

from the State, that is not a

good situation.”

Looking even further

ahead, Tingley said the

board would soon need to

discuss its long-term bond

structure, as it has bonds

that will become callable in

2019 and 2023. He is meeting

with financial experts to

discuss options the district

might be able to pursue and

is to bring information back

to the board for discussion,

he said.

Student, staff recognition

D210 students took the

PSAT on Oct. 19, and nearly

2,100 students took the

test, according to Assistant

Superintendent of Curriculum

Tim Reilly.

This year, the PSAT 8/9

is being introduced to the

district’s feeder junior high

schools, and Reilly said this

gives the district a far more

comprehensive report of

student readiness for transitioning

to high school than

ever before.

Because students are taking

the PSAT 8/9, the PSAT

and the SAT, the district is

able to observe four years’

worth of data for each

student in order to track

strengths and weaknesses,

and better help students, he

said.

After taking the first test

in eighth grade, students

receive an online account

with The College Board

that allows them to practice

skills daily that are individualized

by how they did on

the test.

Reilly also announced

that the district received

the results of its report card

from the State. Though

the exact results were embargoed

at the time of the

meeting, he gave the board

an overview of the results,

noting the district improved

in categories of on-track

freshmen, Advanced Placement

participation, graduation

rates and Partnership

for Assessment of Readiness

for College and Careers

scores.

A big piece of the improvement

is due to teacher

assessment, Reilly said. Director

of Instruction Aimee

Feehery and department

chairpersons are currently

providing assessments by

focusing on teachers, using

text evidence in their classrooms,

he added. Students

are being asked to prove

their answers and ideas

by using facts in reading,

math, social science, science

and English classes.

Once student successes

were discussed, one student

from each school recognized

the three principals

— Steven Provis at Lincoln-Way

Central, Sharon

Michalak at Lincoln-Way

East and Monica Schmitt

at Lincoln-Way West — for

National Principals Month.

Michalak was honored

for her positive involvement

in the lives of families

in the East community and

her overall accessibility.

Schmitt was honored for

her commitment to and concern

for the success of students,

and her school spirit.

Provis was honored for his

leadership, accessibility to

students and caring nature.

Other business

The School Board gave

Tingley direction to pursue

a request for qualification

for childcare providers for

the 2017-2018 school year.

The request for qualification

would not bind the district

to providing in-house

childcare services next

year, as the board would

make the final decision after

the RFQs are reviewed,

Tingley said.

If the district is to provide

in-house childcare services

next school year, the board

must make a decision on a

provider by Dec. 15 to give

the provider enough time

to receive approval by the

State before August 2017.

The RFQ will contain a

minimum fee of $60,000

for providers. Tingley said

it costs the district approximately

$12,000 in resources

per school for the childcare

centers, so the additional

money is part of a cost recovery.

The board also discussed

and unanimously approved

a temporary work easement

for the Village of Frankfort

for the far western portion

of the Lincoln-Way East

property, between the soccer

field and homes bordering

it. The district is to

receive $16,500 from the

Village for the easement,

and Tingley said he did not

believe the easement would

have any long-term impact

on East.

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8 | October 27, 2016 | The frankfort station News

frankfortstation.com

Durbin addresses Will County’s heroin problem

U.S. senator visits with

State’s Attorney, drug

court participants

Tim Carroll, Contributing Editor

United States Sen. Dick Durbin

from Illinois visited the Will County

Clerk’s Office in Joliet Oct. 18

for a discussion about the spreading

heroin problem and the Will

County Drug Court’s attempt to

help nonviolent offenders subdue

their addictions.

The round-table discussion also

featured Will County State’s Attorney

James Glasgow, Will County

Coroner Patrick O’Neil, Will

County Specialty Courts Coordinator

Julie McCabe-Sterr, clinical

director of Stepping Stones Treatment

Center in Joliet Paul Lauridsen

and two drug court participants.

Durbin began the discussion by

addressing the shift in attitude toward

narcotics and addiction.

“We’ve had a pretty dramatic

change in thinking in America

when it comes to narcotics and addition,”

he said. “And it’s because

we’ve reached a point where what

used to be an inner-city issue —

heroin overdose and death — has

now become an issue for every

corner of every state. There isn’t

a town too small or a suburb too

wealthy to avoid heroin deaths.”

Durbin noted that many people

first become addicted to prescription

opioids and later turn to the

cheaper — and more deadly — alternative:

heroin.

Christopher Marr, a Mokena native

and one of the participants in

drug court who attended the discussion,

said his addiction to heroin

resulted from use of prescription

narcotics after he severed his

seventh thoracic vertebra when he

was 13 years old. After using more

and more prescription drugs, his

use became suspicious and doctors

cut him off.

“At that point, I realized that

I could just drive to Chicago ... a

40-minute drive, and purchase as

much heroin as I wanted, which is

stronger and 10-20 times cheaper,”

Marr said.

He said that he used heroin for

two and a half years, during which

time he overdosed and his heart

ceased beating three times.

After being charged with heroin

possession for the third time, he

said he was offered the drug court

option.

“As an addict, my first thought

was, ‘No thank you,’” he said. “I

was fully intent on serving my

time, getting out and going right

back to the same thing, because

that’s how sick it makes you. It

makes you not care about anything.

“Drug court is the only thing that

I’ve seen, in my experience, that

works,” said Marr, who noted after

the discussion that he is nearing a

full year of being clean.

“It saved my life,” added Sabrina

McSherry, another participant

in the Will County Drug Court

who spoke during the discussion.

“That’s the truest statement that

anyone can say, that drug court

saved my life.”

Durbin said that drug courts

across the country “have really

made a difference.”

The Will County Drug Court,

which recently received a federal

grant of $100,000 for each of the

next three years, is one of 50 in Illinois

and more than 1,500 adult drug

courts nationwide, according to

the National Drug Court Resource

Center website. Since the Will

County Drug Court’s inception in

the spring of 2000, it has graduated

more than 350 nonviolent offenders

whose charges were dropped

following their completion of the

intensive program, which requires

participants to submit to random

drug testing, seek employment and

attend weekly drug court sessions.

Glasgow lauded the Will County

Drug Court’s success, saying that

only around 5 percent of graduates

have committed another offense involving

drugs.

“The most rewarding thing is

when a heroin addict who’s managing

his addiction comes up to you

after court and says, ‘I’d be dead

if it wasn’t for this court,’” he said.

“And we see with the numbers now

that that’s absolutely true.”

Glasgow said that, while drug

courts are the “backbone of the

fight against heroin right now,”

Will County is currently on pace

for 70 heroin-related deaths in

2016, which would surpass the record

of 53 deaths reported in 2012

and 2015.

There are a three things that need

to change in order for the volume

of heroin-related deaths — both in

Will County and across the country

— to decrease, according to

Durbin.

The first involves the availability

of treatments. Paul Lauridsen

explained that Medicaid will not

pay for treatment at institutions for

mental disease, which are outlined

as centers that treat mental health

(including substance abuse) that

have more than 16 beds.

“I’ve tried to raise it to 40

[beds],” Durbin said. “I’m almost

embarrassed to say 40, when you

think about it. The argument was

in the old days you’re just going

to warehouse patients, at great

expense... The alternative is even

more expensive, continuing on

without a treatment.”

Durbin also pointed to the increased

production of opioids by

pharmaceutical companies over the

past 20 consecutive years.

“This year, pharmaceutical companies

will make 14 billion opioid

tablets. Fourteen billion,” he said.

“Enough for every adult in America

to have a one-month prescription

of opioids.”

Durbin said that for the first time

in 20 years, though, the Drug Enforcement

Agency reduced the

approval of opioid production for

2017 by 25 percent.

Finally, the senator said that doctors

have to have standards and

rules in place on the amount of opioids

they can prescribe to any one

patient. He noted that the Centers

for Disease Control and Prevention

recently sent out guidelines for

doctors to keep the number of people

becoming addicted to opioids

— and potentially subsequently

graduating to heroin addiction —

in check.

“These doctors need to be educated

and trained, and there’s resistance

there,” Durbin said.

Discussion speakers, including (left to right) drug court participant

Sabrina McSherry, Will County State’s Attorney James Glasgow, drug

court participant Christopher Marr and U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin, discuss

the heroin problem in Will County Oct. 18 at the Will County Clerk’s

Office in Joliet. Tim Carroll/22nd Century Media

“I think [the doctors] know what

they’re doing, because each visit

I went to was like five minutes

long,” Marr said. “I would go in

and they would say, ‘What do you

need this week? What do you need

this month? And do you want to up

the dose?’”

Glasgow mentioned another

problem for Will County residents:

access to drugs within a short distance.

“The heroin highway to Chicago

is wide open. And if a kid’s

got a car, he can go up there and

in 40 minutes buy all the heroin he

wants, and I don’t see that ending

in the near future,” Glasgow said.

Marr also spoke to the availability

of heroin in southwest suburbs

like Mokena.

“When I was using, I knew five

or six people that had basically

unlimited quantities on them at all

times,” Marr said after the roundtable

discussion. “And that’s just

people that were in my circle, that

I knew ... So, the availability’s

there.”

Following the discussion,

Glasgow expanded on the “heroin

highway,” saying that his office has

had talks with Cook County law

enforcement about restricting that

access. But he said exigent circumstances

in Cook County prevent

law enforcement there from making

heroin trafficking a priority.

“They’re going to have over 700

murders this year, probably 3,500

shootings,” Glasgow said. “Their

police are spread so thin ... The

police just don’t have enough manpower

to handle it.”

He said that local law enforcement

agencies, however, are on the

lookout for people bringing heroin

back to Will County.

“We have the [Joliet] Metropolitan

Area Narcotis Squad and the

[Will County] Cooperative Police

Assistance Team,” Glasgow said.

“Those are county-wide, and there

are officers from almost every department

involved with those task

forces ... That’s why I say if you’re

pitching heroin in any amount of

significance, we’re going to get

you. It’s just a matter of time.”

Marr said it is important to keep

in mind that drug courts like Will

County’s help nonviolent offenders,

many of whom are not bad people.

“They are good people; they

have a lot of potential,” Marr said.

“Most of the addicts I know are

very intelligent and can be really

important parts of society.”


frankfortstation.com News

the frankfort station | October 27, 2016 | 9

Magical party set for area children

Costumed guests

scheduled to attend

inaugural Princess

and Superhero Party

Staff Report

Young princesses and

superheroes can meet their

fairy-tale and comic-book

favorites at 22nd Century

Media’s upcoming Princess

and Superhero Party.

The party will be held

from 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Saturday,

Nov. 5, at Georgios

Banquets Quality Inn and

Suites Conference Centre,

8800 W. 159th St., Orland

Park.

“We’re really excited to

bring this event to the southwest

suburbs,” said Heather

Warthen, 22nd Century Media

chief events officer. “It

should be a great opportunity

for children to meet some

of their favorite characters

and have some fun.”

The party will feature fun

and games with Cinderella,

Princess Beauty, Ice Queen,

Ice Princess, Olaf, Batman

and Spider-Man. Children’s

author Amy Logan will

read her book, “A Girl With

A Cape” and have copies

available to purchase and

sign.

All tickets offer a breakfast

buffet.

“We also encourage

young princesses and superheroes

to wear their costumes,”

Warthen said.

Tickets are $35 for one

adult and one child or $50

for a Family Pass of four

tickets. Tickets are limited

and available through

Wednesday, Nov. 2.

Tickets will not be

available at the door.

To purchase, visit

www.22ndcenturymedia.

com/princess.

For more information,

call (708) 326-9170 ext. 16.

RIGHT: Ice Queen, Ice

Princess and Olaf will be

just three of the special

guests, along with Batman,

Superman and more, at

22nd Century Media’s

Princess and Superhero

Party on Saturday, Nov.

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10 | October 27, 2016 | The frankfort station Election 2016

frankfortstation.com

Will County Board Member District 12 3 for 2 Two-Year Terms

Name: Larry Gilman

Age: 34

Town: New Lenox

Affiliation: Democrat

Occupation: Office assistant,

Stateville Correctional Center

Record Office

Elected Political Experience:

None

Gilmann

Why are you running for a seat in the

12th District?

I am running for Will County Board for

District 12, because I want to make sure that

the county stays on the right path for my son.

I want to work to grow existing businesses

and bring new opportunities to Will County.

I want to make sure we continue providing

vital services for our residents, and that we

have the proper resources necessary to do so.

What makes you the best candidate for

this position?

I feel I am the best candidate for this

position because I bring a unique perspective.

Being from Los Angeles, originally,

as well as having lived in different portions

of Illinois and Wisconsin, has given

me exposure to a variety of societies,

which I feel is very beneficial in being able

to consider the needs of all of Will County

with its different landscapes and communities.

I am actively working to bring some

of my ideas to fruition that would bring

alternative revenue sources to our county,

so taxpayers are not asked to contribute

even more. I want to look for areas of improvement

in our government and ensure

that our county employees have every opportunity

for success providing their vital

public service.

What are the Top 3 issues you see facing

the district, and what would you do to

solve them?

From my discussions with residents, the

three top issues facing this district that relate

to the county board are our roadways,

the heroin crisis and public safety on our

trails.

To address our roadways, I will continue

to do what I have already done: lobby our

elected officials for our communities on

the importance of our infrastructure. Even

before becoming a candidate, I advocated

for projects such as Route 6 and Laraway

Road, improvements that are vital safety

concerns in our area, and am very pleased

to see these projects moving forward.

For the heroin crisis, I want to work with

our health department to ensure that we have

the resources in place to fight this problem. I

also want to work with our county executive

to expand the project his office is leading to

provide education about the effects of heroin

and other drugs.

For trail safety, again, my plan is to continue

my current work with our forest preserve

staff to explore all opportunities to increase

awareness of what our residents can

do to protect themselves, as well as looking

for new ways we may be able to implement

additional safety protocols for our entire trail

system.

Name: Tom Weigel

Age: 73

Residence: New Lenox

Affiliation: Republican

Occupation: Retired Environmental

Engineer from

EJ&E Railway Co.

Elected Political Experience: Weigel

11 years Will County Board

Member, former New Lenox Village Trustee

Why are you running for this position?

I want to continue to provide assistance to

local residents concerning issues which the

county has some control over. The county

board determines the zoning of the majority

of land left in Will County for development.

We need to maintain a proper mix of residential,

commercial, industrial and open space

land. We need to continue to improve our

roadway system to eliminate traffic delays.

We need to replace our outdated courthouse

with a modern building and more court

rooms. We need to provide new sheriff’s facilities

on Laraway Road. We need to do all

these things without increasing tax rates.

What makes you the best candidate for

this position?

I have 11 years of experience as a Will

County Board member. I am currently

chairman of the Land Use and Development

Committee, where during my tenure

we have adopted new Conservation Design

Subdivision, Building Codes and Water Resource

Ordinances. I have assisted residents

with zoning issues, flooding problems and

changes in speed limits. I have supported

road intersection improvements and signalization

to increase traffic flow. I serve as

vice-chairman of the Finance Committee for

the Will County Forest Preserve District, a

member of the Local Emergency Planning

Committee, a board member and treasurer of

New Century Federal Credit Union, a member

of St. Jude Church and Knights of Columbus.

I have been endorsed by the mayors

of New Lenox and Mokena. I have the support

of Republican Party leaders, individual

citizens, business and labor organizations.

What are the Top 3 issues you see facing

the district?

Outdated Will County courthouse – I have

supported the plans to build a new courthouse

west of the existing courthouse. A 10-story

building is in the planning stages, which will

serve our needs well into the future.

Outdated sheriff’s facility – I have supported

plans to consolidate several sheriff’s

facilities into one larger facility on Laraway

Road, along with consolidating 911 Emergency

Telephone System Board Dispatch

Centers and administrative offices with the

sheriff’s facility.

Improve County Roadways – I have supported

and will continue to support the improvement

of the County Highway System.

We need to widen roadways, add signalization

and turn lanes to increase traffic flow.

We need to lobby the State of Illinois to add

lanes to Interstate 80, which has too many

delays, and build the Illiana Expressway to

relieve truck traffic on local roads.

Name: Raymond

Tuminello

Age: 45

Town: New Lenox

Affiliation: Republican

Occupation: Selfemployed,

owner of Tuminello

Quality Glass Block

Elected Political Experience: 12

Years

Why are you running for a seat

in the 12th District?

I am running for re-election to

the 12th District because there is

still more work to be done. We

have started on a journey to accomplish

not only many capital

improvements, technology improvements,

but to improve our

road infrastructure, as well. I want

to make sure that the 12th District

remains in the hands of conservative

voters with fiscally sound and

conservative values. I also want to

make sure that every resident in the

district has a voice. Throughout my

tenure, I have always put the residents

first. That is exactly what I

intend to do for the next four.

What makes you the best candidate

for this position?

My experience not only in the

political arena but as a 25-year

business owner makes me the

best candidate for this position.

Not only do I understand how to

balance a budget, I fully understand

the responsibilities of the

position. Providing the residents

with the services, amenities and

protection that they each deserve.

I have a long-standing record of

delivering these services within

budget and to satisfaction. I have

been the chairman of many committees

during my time as an

elected official. I currently sit on

the legislative, land use, capital

improvements and finance committee

at the county and am currently

the chairman of finance at

the forest preserve. Within the

first eight months of being on the

county board, my peers selected

me to be the chairman, citing my

many years of experience not only

as a business owner but as a board

member, as well. [Response truncated

for exceeding word limit]

What are the Top 3 issues you

see facing the district, and what

would you do to solve them?

The Top 3 issues that currently

face the County are the lack of capital

improvements, inferior technology

and the road infrastructure.

The first one, capital improvements,

has been discussed recently

in the news. We have committed to

building a sheriff’s station, courthouse

as well as a health department.

These buildings are nearly

50 years old, and the county had

outgrown them decades ago. Understanding

the need was met with

the challenge of doing this within

budget and not raising the taxes on

the existing residents. After nearly

two years, we had found a way to

not only pay for the projects but to

deliver them without raising taxes.

The second one is inferior technology.

As we continue to grow

as a County, the left hand didn’t

always know what the right hand

was doing. Our departments got

larger and continued to grow out

of existing buildings. As we expanded,

our technology did not

grow at the same pace. We are using

many outdated and antiquated

systems. Our case management

software is just one example. Currently,

our sheriff’s department,

public defender’s office, and

State’s Attorneys don’t use a system

that “talks” to each other. This

continually costs the county and

its residents more money through

redundancy. There are many more

examples like this within the

County of inferior technology.

The third is what I consider

the biggest. Road infrastructure.

As many of you are aware, Will

County is home to the largest inland

port in North America. Every

year, additional trucks continue

to pile onto our roads. [Response

truncated for exceeding the word

limit.]


frankfortstation.com Election 2016

the frankfort station | October 27, 2016 | 11

Will County Circuit Clerk 2 for 1 Four-Year Term

Name: Andrea Lynn

Chasteen

Age: 40

Town: Frankfort

Affiliation: Democrat

Occupation: Director

of Operations, Chasteen

Will County Circuit

Clerk’s Office

Elected Political Experience:

None

Why are you running for Will

County Circuit Clerk?

I have been able to serve the

residents of Will County throughout

my career working in the Will

County Circuit Clerk’s Office,

now going on 21 years. When I

was first hired as a counter clerk

in customer service, I knew that

one day I wanted to run for Circuit

Clerk. I am very passionate about

the office and role that the clerks

play in the judicial process. Our

office is the starting place for individuals

to access the courts, so it

is extremely important to me that

their interaction with our office

is effective and efficient to their

needs. [Response truncated for

exceeding word limit.]

What makes you the best candidate

for this position?

If I am elected, it will be a seamless

transition, as I am already

knowledgeable with all aspects of

the judicial process, budgets and

technology initiatives for customers

and staff. I will focus on the

fundamentals of court operations

so that we continue to celebrate

what we do well and find out how

we can do better. I will continue to

move the office forward with transparency,

accountability and the integrity

of services provided. My

extensive hands-on experience —

as well as my business knowledge,

ability to lead, manage and motivate

— are just some of the skills I

bring to the office every day.

I believe in cross-training and

developing staff to ensure that our

clerks are up to the task of serving

you and promoting within. I have

overseen much progress in the office,

and I have been involved in

many achievements. We are very

proud of our new mobile-friendly

website, collections efforts and

the ability to accept electronic filing

of pleadings in civil cases and

process copy requests electronically

from your home or office.

[Response truncated for exceeding

word limit.]

Editor’s Note

Despite multiple attempts

to contact Republican

candidate Marlene Carlson,

she did not return a candidate

questionnaire by deadline

for inclusion in 22nd Century

Media’s election coverage.

Culver's

From Page 3

attitude, [who are] not going

home because it’s time,

but getting the job done and

sticking with it until we accomplish

what we need to,”

Milazzo said.

Maier and Milazzo both

saw that in Davidson, who

later entered into the Culver’s

training program for

those interested in becoming

an owner-operator, a

franchisee.

The 16-week program is

divided into taking classes

as well as learning firsthand

what the day-to-day schedule

looks like at the restaurant,

Davidson explained.

Maier, who formerly owned

the Ottawa Culver’s, worked

closely with Brandon.

“It’s been a very eventful

ride,” Davidson said.

“Throughout the whole

system, there are many different

stories of those who

start as a team member and

work through that. Culver’s

is very big on that; they like

the idea of that.”

For Davidson and Milazzo,

the Culver’s mission

centers on finding ways to

help their employees grow.

“I started out at 16,” Davidson

said. “I was a young,

shy kid. I wasn’t all that

awkwardly shy, but I wasn’t

the first to go out and introduce

myself. I remember the

first time I had to go out and

do "hospitality runs," which

is what Culver’s calls when

you come out here and offer

your assistance to the guests

whether they need refills or

taking their trash or offering

samples, anything like that.

“I was like, ‘What do I

possibly say to these people?’

Now I have no problem

doing that.”

Understanding the true

meaning behind customer

service, working together

as a unit with his team and

taking the time to know the

community that the restaurant

serves are just few

more lessons Davidson has

learned.

Beyond that, Davidson

said he has gained a new

perspective of the restaurant

industry, and he hopes others

will be able to see that, too.

“Don’t let people knock

down the restaurant industry

as something that’s not a

viable career opportunity,”

he said. “It definitely is. I

was skeptical, too, at first,

but I have seen since I’ve

worked through this entire

process that maybe the restaurant

path isn’t for everybody.

“I think a lot of people

think, ‘Oh, you’re going to

work there when you’re 16,’

and I like to share my story

so that other people can see

that there is a chance for an

actual career out of this.”

U.S. Representative 1st District 2 for 1 Two-Year Term

Name: August (O’Neill)

Deuser

Age: 60

Town: Mokena

Affiliation: Republican

Occupation: Retired

police officer, teacher

Elected Political Experience:

None

Deuser

Why are you running for a seat in

the 1st District?

I’m running for Congress in the 1st

Congressional District because I would

like to change the culture of politics. I

have been on the front line as a police

officer and teacher of students with

emotional conditions for 22 years. I

have a master’s degree in education,

but more importantly I have common

sense. I am about: 1) Reducing the nondefense

discretionary budget ... for a

savings of about $400 billion dollars.

2) Spend money to build K-8 schools

in Illinois. Illinois is last in the United

States in educational spending. 3) Repeal

Obamacare, because all that did

was put everyone into Medicaid. [Response

truncated for exceeding word

limit.]

What makes you the best candidate

for this position?

What makes me the best candidate

for the position is that I want to change

the culture of politics. I’m not in this

for myself. I’m in the process to make

our state a better place to live in for all

people. Politicians keep signing bills

to spend money that isn’t in the budget?

Forest Gump says, “Stupid is as

stupid does.”

This nonsense has to stop. I have

never been a person that goes along

with the status quo. We need wholesale

changes in our government at both the

federal and State level. If I am elected,

I can promise the people that I would

be a pain in the ass of the Congress in

a positive way. The first thing to happen

is to have a bill that has all political

offices for two four-year terms and

you are done serving. [Response truncated

for exceeding word limit.]

What are the Top 3 issues you see

facing the district, and what would

you do to solve them?

The biggest problem facing the

district is education. Illinois is last in

educational spending in the country. I

would have a lottery for each city, and

the proceeds go directly to education.

In other words, the Chicago lottery

would go for Chicago schools. The

Mokena lottery would go to Mokena

schools. We all know that the lottery

money was supposed to go to education,

but that hasn’t happened.

In fact, we need an audit from the

federal government to actually see

where the lottery money goes? It’s

ironic that [Michael] Madigan hid [millions]

in a Jessie White fund and then

built a new school in his ward? What

about the other 49 wards in Chicago?

What about Gresham and Englewood?

We also need to find a better

way to pay for schools other then raising

taxes.

The second biggest problem facing

our district and many others is Obamacare.

Obama has thrown everyone into

Medicaid. Most people’s insurance

has gone up, because we have to pay

for everyone thrown into Medicaid.

Seniors are being charged double what

they were paying. Insurance should

be driven by the free market economy

and competition for insurance companies.

Some people are actually making

less money because of their insurance

cost.

The biggest problem we face is if

Hillary [Clinton] gets elected president.

I am pro-life and pro-Second

Amendment. I was a third-generation

police office, and I believe in the

right to bear arms. We don’t have a

gun problem in our country; we have

a mental illness problem. [Response

truncated for exceeding word limit.]

Editor’s Note

Despite multiple

attempts to contact

Democratic

incumbent Bobby

Rush, he did not

return a candidate

questionnaire Rush

by deadline for

inclusion in 22nd Century Media’s

election coverage.

VISIT US ONLINE AT FRANKFORTSTATION.COM


12 | October 27, 2016 | The frankfort station Frankfort

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frankfortstation.com community

the frankfort station | October 27, 2016 | 13

Sink’s Shots

Frankfort resident Dale Sink took this photo of a seagull who “was curious about”

Sink and his wife as they sat on a beach in Chicago.

“My bird books had a lot of black-headed gulls and my best guess is that it’s a

Franklin’s Gull, which breeds north the west side of the Mississippi,” Sink said.

Dale Sink is a Frankfort resident who enjoys photography and regularly submits photos to The Station.

Photo Op

the 2016

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homes and businesses!

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Wednesday, Nov. 23, 2016

(Day before Thanksgiving)

Space reservation deadline: Wed, Nov. 9

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Frankfort resident Margaret Shook recently took this photo of “sun-dappled copper

plumes on maiden grass” in her backyard.

To submit photos for The Frankfort Station’s Photo Op, email rebecca@frankfortstation.com or mail

them to 11516 W. 183rd Street 3SW, Orland Park, IL 60467.

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14 | October 27, 2016 | The frankfort station FRANKFORT

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November 20, 2016

10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

tours • information • refreshments

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frankfortstation.com FRANKFORT

the frankfort station | October 27, 2016 | 15

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house vacuum, M&S home intercom system,

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16 | October 27, 2016 | The frankfort station School

frankfortstation.com

BUYING OR SELLING? CALL

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What is one essential you must have when

studying and why?

To always stay focused because you need

to get work done.

What do you like to do when not in school or

studying?

Play with my friend Elise.

What is your dream job and why?

When I grow up I want to be a secondgrade

teacher because I think it is fun to read

and do math.

What is one thing people don’t know about

you?

People do not know that I have a twin

brother.

Whom do you look up to and why?

I look up to my mom because she is very

confident and can accomplish anything.

Who is your favorite teacher and why?

My favorite teacher was my second-grade

teacher Mrs. [Katie] Milosovic because she

taught me to always do my best.

What is your favorite class and why?

Photo submitted

My favorite class is science because I get

to be creative!

What is one thing that stands out about

your school?

One thing that stands out about my school

is the teachers because they all try their hardest

to help us.

If you could change one thing about school,

what would it be?

If I had to change one thing about school it

would be to have longer recesses.

What is your favorite thing to eat in the

cafeteria?

My favorite thing to eat in the cafeteria is a

hot dog because they taste very good.

What is your best memory from school?

My best memory from school is from second

grade when my teacher made me a disc,

but this year I might make more memories in

third grade.

Standout Student is a feature for The Frankfort

Station. Nominations come from Frankfort area

schools.


frankfortstation.com FRANKFORT

the frankfort station | October 27, 2016 | 17

ORLAND PARK COMMUNITIES

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18 | October 27, 2016 | The frankfort station News

frankfortstation.com

FROM THE ORLAND PARK PRAIRIE

Orland Park mayoralty to be

full-time, come with $150K

salary come April 2017

election

The winner of the April

mayoral election in Orland

Park is in line for a payday,

as the Village Board of

Trustees voted 6-0 Monday,

Oct. 17, to make the mayoralty

a full-time position that

pays $150,000 annually over

the four-year term.

Mayor Dan McLaughlin,

who intends to run for reelection

in the spring, abstained

from voting.

After the motion was

made to consider the ordinance,

Trustee Carole Ruzich

— chairperson of the

VENDORS WANTED

Our Healthy Living Expo will be 9am to 1pm

Saturday, January 14th, 2017, at the Tinley

Pacrk Convention Center 18451 Convention

Center Drive, Tinley Park

This event will be the answer to

getting the New Year’s resolution off

to a solid start by offering health

screenings, fitness tips, healthy eating

ideas and more to start off the New

Year with a New You.

For more information, call

(708) 326-9170 or visit

www.22ndcenturymedia.com/events.

EVENTS

Deadline: December 7th, 2016

finance committee that first

broached the idea a month

and a half ago — read a prepared

statement that made

reference to a robocall that

went out to residents over

the weekend that contained,

in her estimation, a number

of “misleading statements

and claims.”

“As Orland Park grows, its

needs to continue to evolve

and expand,” she said. “A

community in demand like

ours requires that we keep a

close eye to purposeful planning

and a laser-like focus

on maintaining the quality of

life we all enjoy. With that in

mind, the Village commissioned

a study that among

other things strongly recommended

two new professional,

managerial positions be

created — a second assistant

Village manager and a fulltime

economic development

coordinator.

“As the finance committee

contemplated filling these

positions, we discussed the

possibility of a less costly

solution — a solution that

would also eliminate the

need for a learning curve

which often results in missed

opportunities that can never

be captured again.”

Reporting by Jon DePaolis,

Freelance Reporter. For more,

visit OPPrairie.com.

FROM THE NEW LENOX PATRIOT

New Lenox Scouts Food

Drive strives to continue

success

Brent Thomson spent

seven years donating his

time and efforts to the New

Lenox Scouts Food Drive.

Now, this year will be his

first year co-organizing the

event.

The Lincoln-Way Central

sophomore will oversee approximately

750 area Cub

Scouts, Boy Scouts and Girl

Scouts expected to participate

in the 14th annual food

drive. From Nov. 2-8. Scouts

are to head to homes all over

town to drop off an empty

bag on each doorstep with

instructions and information

for the cause.

He said approximately

12,000 bags will placed

around town, and at noon

Sunday, Nov. 13, the Scouts

will pick up the bags and

meet at a location to sort and

distribute the canned items.

The upcoming drive will be

a tough act to follow after

last year’s record-breaking

effort of roughly 45,600

items.

Thomson, who is part

of New Lenox Troop 755,

added his own wrinkles for

the upcoming drive in hopes

of delivering the same success

or possibly hit its goal

of 50,000 items. He is seeking

donations from local

businesses to use as prizes

in drawings for those who

retweet and share their social

media posts to help get

the word out.

The food drive has come

a long way from donating

more than 1,000 items in its

inaugural event. This year,

Thomson is taking over at

the height of its success.

“It’s great, because once

everything’s said and done

you really feel like you’ve

accomplished something,

and helped out many people

and families at the end of the

day,” he said.

Reporting by James Sanchez,

Editor. For more, visit

NewLenoxPatriot.com.

FROM THE MOKENA MESSENGER

Halloween Hollow offers

Mokena residents frights,

delights

Driving on La Porte Road

past Main Park in Mokena

Oct. 14, one would have

found it difficult not to notice

the array of flashing and

pulsating lights area residents

know can mean only

one thing: the return of the

carnival known as Halloween

Hollow.

The Mokena Community

Park District presented its

35th annual autumn festival

Oct. 14-16 at the largest park

in the village. The sprawling

carnival may have been

the most expansive incarnation

since the event began

in 1982 as a children’s party

and costume contest.

Favorable and unseasonably

warm October weather

also drew the masses Saturday

and Sunday, and the

festival grounds were crawling

with youths and families

with small children who

scampered from one attraction

to the next.

Under the oak trees south

of the rides were more lowkey

attractions, including

a bounce house, inflatable

haunted house, horseback

rides and games. There also

were pie eating and Hula-

Hoop contests, and after a

several-years absence the

return of the trail through the

woods at the far south end of

Main Park.

Reporting by Jason Maholy,

Freelance Reporter. For more,

visit MokenaMessenger.com.

FROM THE TINLEY JUNCTION

TEDx event writes new

chapter at Tinley Park Public

Library

Remaining curious

throughout one’s life. Embracing

one another’s differences.

Living a life dedicated

to serving others. Those

were among the topics presented

to 100 people at an

event that was the first of its

kind to be held in the southwest

suburbs.

The Tinley Park Public Library’s

TEDx event Oct. 12

was the culmination of eight

months of planning and

preparation by library staff

and members of the greater

Tinley Park community, said

library marketing and adult

program coordinator Sue

Bailey. TED is owned by a

nonprofit, nonpartisan foundation

that states its mission

is to share ideas that spark

conversation. The ‘x’ denotes

the event is organized

by members of the local

community, with no assistance,

input or interference

from TED.

Two Tinley Park residents

were among the four who

shared very personal stories

with the audience. Amber

Holup spoke about her experiences

as a bullying victim

while Garrett Gray discussed

how his unexpected relationship

with a cat he named Mr.

T profoundly impacted his

perspective on how people

relate to one another.

Reporting by Jason Maholy,

Freelance Reporter. For more,

visit TinleyJunction.com.

Police Reports

Police: Man

pushes yard

decoration

An unidentified man reportedly

damaged a lighthouse

decoration valued at

$600 located at a residence

in the 20000th block of

Frankfort Square Road.

A home security camera

reportedly captured the man

pushing over the decoration,

which had been located adjacent

to the home’s driveway.

The case is still under investigation,

according to the

Will County Sheriff’s office.

Oct. 13

• Carlos Rodriguez, 20, of

2284 184th St., Lansing, was

cited for reckless driving and

speeding at the intersection

of Harlem Avenue and Cox

Avenue. Rodriguez had been

driving 35 miles over the

zone’s speed limit.

Oct. 17

• A person or persons unknown

reportedly attempted

to break into a residence in

the 20000th block of Frankfort

Square Road. The offender

or offenders damaged

the wooden front door but

did not enter the residence,

according to the Will County

Sheriff’s office.

• Corey J. Spencer, 32, of

1443 Ogden Ave., Benton

Harbor, Michigan, was cited

for having no registration

and driving on a suspended

license at the intersection of

St. Francis Road and Harlem

Avenue.

EDITOR’S NOTE: The Frankfort

Station’s Police Reports

are compiled from official

reports found online or releases

issued by the Frankfort Police

Department and other agencies.

Individuals named in these

reports are considered innocent

of all charges until proven guilty

in a court of law.


20 | October 27, 2016 | The frankfort station Frankfort

frankfortstation.com

Inspiring health and

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Staying on the cutting edge of medicine

is only part of what we do at Franciscan

Physician Network. Our doctors and

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while teaming with you to help prevent it

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PARK FOREST

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Larina

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Leonard

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Lance

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Ann Davis, MD

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Kathleen

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Richard

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Ashley

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Yvonne

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James

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Michael

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the frankfort station | October 27, 2016 | frankfortstation.com

Counting Down

Only five days left to enter 22nd Century

Media’s Halloween Costume Contest, Page 22

Fresh Fish for Fall

Bonefish Grill in Orland Park offers seasonal

selections of seafood, Page 33

Sebastian Khattabi,

playing the role of

George in “Little Miss

Christie,” dials a rotary

phone Thursday, Oct.

20, during a rehearsal

for the fall play at

Lincoln-Way East.

Rebecca Susmarski/22nd

Century Media

Lincoln-Way

East students

to perform ‘Little

Miss Christie,’

Page 23


22 | October 27, 2016 | The frankfort station Life & Arts

frankfortstation.com

Once a week is weak.

You don’t have to wait until the paper

arrives for your news.

Join today to get all the news from your newspaper

as it happens—online anytime, anywhere.

Visit FrankfortStation.com/Plus

to become a member.

Brought to you by THE FRANKFORT STATION

Nearing the end of

our costume quest

Halloween Costume

Contest wraps up

Wednesday, Nov. 2

Bill Jones, Managing Editor

Don’t be scared.

No! Don’t look behind

you.

What were you thinking?

Look forward to Wednesday,

Nov. 2.

That is when the entry

deadline for publisher 22nd

Century Media’s 2016 Halloween

Contest hits, and if

you have not entered yet,

it’s going to be a close call.

Some of you may not make

it. We’re only trying to help.

Or are we?

(We are.)

Seriously, though, send us

pictures of your most creative

costumes, and you can

win prizes in one of two categories:

ages 17 and older,

and 16 or younger.

Maybe you have paid

tribute to professional wrestling’s

classic alliance by

recruiting three of your best

friends to join you in the

Four Horseman. Did you

create a homemade version

of your favorite character

from [insert your favorite

children’s program here]?

Or maybe you’re just some

random monster, but like, a

really cool random monster?

Just send them!

We’re going to pick just

one winner across each category

from all seven of our

southwest suburban towns:

Orland Park, Tinley Park,

Frankfort, Mokena, New

Lenox, Homer Glen and

Lockport. So your entries

need to be good.

We have just a few rules,

which you can check out in

one of the accompanying

sidebars.

The rules

1) You have to be the person in the costume. You

cannot submit for anyone else, with the exception of

parents who submit their children.

2) Each person can only submit one costume for an

entry (basically, you cannot send yourself in multiple

costumes — pick one), though families can send one

entry per person (and they can be submitted together)

from different members of the family.

3) We understand there may be a bit in the way of

scary imagery (such is the nature of the holiday), but

the costumes have to be relatively family friendly to be

considered and published. Nothing beyond PG-13.

4) Entries must be submitted no later than 10 a.m.

Wednesday, Nov. 2, to bill@opprairie.com or 22nd

Century Media, c/o Managing Editor Bill Jones, at

11516 W. 183rd St. Unit SW Office Condo 3, Orland

Park, IL, 60467 (physical entries cannot be returned),

along with names, email addresses and/or phone

numbers, and towns for each of the entrants.

5) The entries will be judged by 22nd Century Media’s

editorial staff, with winners being chosen based on

creativity, successful execution of an idea, quality of

craftsmanship and consideration of the holiday/season.

6) All entries are subject to being published.

The Prizes

A breakdown of the prizes available in 22nd Century

Media’s 2016 Halloween Costume Contest.

Best Adult Costume

• A $25 gift certificate to Artesá Baking Company,

14045 S. Bell Road in Homer Glen.

• Two hours of free bowling for up to six people —

along with a pitcher of pop and a 12-inch pizza — at

Laraway Lanes, 1009 W. Laraway Road in New Lenox.

Best Children’s Costume

• A $25 gift certificate to Odyssey Fun World, 19111

Oak Park Ave. in Tinley Park.

• Four passes good for one free child admission

apiece at The Children’s Museum in Oak Lawn, 5100

Museum Drive in Oak Lawn.

While the competition

may be tougher this fall, the

prizes are well worth it, as

a number of area business

have stepped up to sponsor

our two categories (the prizes

are detailed in the other

accompanying sidebar).

The Early Entry Prize

deadline has passed.

Questions can be directed

to Managing Editor Bill

Jones at bill@opprairie.com

or (708) 326-9170 ext. 20.


frankfortstation.com Life & Arts

the frankfort station | October 27, 2016 | 23

Coming together to help create ‘Christie’

Large Lincoln-Way

East cast to perform

mystery play for

onstage audience

Rebecca Susmarski, Editor

Though acting always involves

creativity, the cast

members of this year’s fall

play at Lincoln-Way East

truly used their imaginations

to breathe life into the show.

The thespians in “Little

Miss Christie,” a comedic

mystery play scheduled to

run beginning Thursday, Oct.

27, needed to envision all of

the rooms inside their main

set, a supposedly haunted

house. The actors also improvised

much of their blocking,

lines and actions — such as

a part where a character tries

to press a button on a rotary

phone — to add more humor

to the show.

Play director Jennifer

Reusz also encouraged the

students to create detailed

background stories for their

characters and give their

characters full names, if they

did not originally have them.

“This show particularly

doesn’t define the roles for

them, so it really falls on

the students to discover that

depth for themselves,” Reusz

said. “By allowing them

to feel their character in different

scenes by doing some

improv, then they can have a

greater portrayal onstage.”

The play, which Reusz and

some of the actors described

as having a “Scooby-Doo”

tone, focuses on the happenings

at Saltmarsh Manor, a

100-year-old home adjacent

to a boarding school. When

the home’s owners begin to

witness supernatural occurrences,

Christie Blake — a

student and devoted fan of

Agatha Christie — decides

to investigate whether or not

ghosts truly haunt the home.

Many of the actors had

participated in theatre at

Lincoln-Way East or Lincoln-Way

North previously,

but “Little Miss Christie”

offered new opportunities to

delve into different characters.

Noor Hasan, who plays

the role of Aunt Martha, said

she typically played the role

of a strong mother figure in

previous performances.

In “Christie,” her character

has a more frightened, nervous

personality. To help get

into character, Hasan practiced

lines with her fellow

cast member, Isabella McKenna,

and developed her own

quirks for the character.

“I have Aunt Martha’s habits

where I’m always rubbing

my hands together or pulling

on my hair, and I was sitting

in class the other day and I

started rubbing my hands,”

Hasan said. “I don’t do that

but I found myself doing it,

so I think just rehearsing a lot

really helps with your character

— and when it starts

to seep into your everyday

life, you know you should be

good to go.”

Lily Regan, a senior who

plays the lead role of Christie,

also found her character

to be different from others

she has played in the past.

“I typically play an evil

person or a fun, lighthearted,

flirty kind of person, and this

time I’m the complete opposite,”

Regan said. “I’m very

serious and to-the-point, so

that’s just been kind of hard

for me to dial it down a bit

and be more realistic. I just

think about how I would say

[a line] if I was stressed out

or thinking about something,

and then just filter it through

the Christie lens.”

Character adjustments had

not been the only thing the

cast members needed to adapt

to for the show. While North

traditionally put on plays

with larger casts, the “Christie”

cast of about 25 students

Tayo Omoniyi, playing the role of Officer Moriarty,

contemplates during a scene in “Little Miss Christie”

Thursday, Oct. 20, during rehearsal in Lincoln-Way East’s

auditorium. Photos by Rebecca Susmarski/22nd Century Media

proved to be a novelty for

many of the actors who had

performed with smaller casts

at East previously.

The size of the cast meant

the actors needed to use the

entire stage to their advantage,

and many of them run,

jump or perform other complex

movements from scene

to scene. Sebastian Khattabi,

a senior playing the role of

George, said his character

is punched once and tackled

three times throughout the

show.

Khattabi said he also enjoys

the dynamic that the

larger cast brought to the

play.

“I think it’s more fun,” he

said. “You get to play off of

each other, you get to react

to each other. And I think as

we get closer and closer to

the show and [are] spending

more time with each other,

we have to have that sort of

energy, and I think that sort

of translates to our energy

during the performances.”

Since the audience will be

seated onstage for the show,

the setup allows for a more

intimate connection with the

performers. For many of the

actors, that connection keeps

their love of performing

‘Little Miss Christie’

When:

7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 27

and Saturday, Oct. 29

2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 30

Where: Auditorium at

Lincoln-Way East, 201 S.

Colorado Ave., Frankfort

Tickets will be available

at the door and cost $5

for students and $10

for adults and senior

citizens. Seniors will

receive a reduced rate

of $5 for the Thursday

performance.

For more information,

call (815) 464-4000.

alive, no matter which show

they perform.

“I have this little seed of

doubt in me before every

performance, like ‘Am I going

to remember my lines,

[and] am I going to do it

ok?’” Regan said. “And then

the second I open my mouth

to say those first words, all

of those doubts just disappear

and it just all comes out

of me because we’ve been

practicing for so long, and

we just know exactly what

to do.”

The cast of Lincoln-Way East’s production of “Little Miss

Christie” acts together during a Thursday, Oct. 20 rehearsal

at East.

Lily Regan (right), playing the role of Christie Blake, rehearses

a scene with Emily Grice (left) and Emma Fishman.

“Little Miss Christie” actors (left to right) Sebastian

Khattabi, Amanda Pohrte and Noor Hasan act out a scene

during a rehearsal at Lincoln-Way East.


24 | October 27, 2016 | The frankfort station Faith

frankfortstation.com

Faith Briefs

Good Shepherd Lutheran Church (177

Luther Lane, Frankfort)

Mornings with Mommy

10-11 a.m. Wednesday,

Nov. 2. Mornings with

Mommy is to take place.

This one-hour class is to

focus on music and instruments.

Living Streams

Women’s Acts Study

9 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 12.

These studies take place

every second Saturday of

the month. Women are encouraged

to join in on the

conversation about the

Book of Acts. Each session

includes a Bible teaching,

small group discussion and

prayer. Free study guides for

each chapter are available

for download at lstreams.

com. For more information,

contact joyfullife@lstreams.

com.

Weight Watchers

9:30-10:30 a.m. Mondays

Divine Service

8-9 a.m. Sundays.

Alcoholics Anonymous

10 a.m.-Noon Saturdays

Contemporary Service

10:46 a.m. Sundays. The

service blends the best of

both ancient tradition and

modern music and instruments

Answers Class

7 p.m. Tuesdays. Everyone

is invited for an in-depth

study of what we believe.

For more information, call

(815) 469-2549.

FUNERAL SERVICES DIRECTORY

Kim O’Neil Golob

Kelli Hartseil Mores

Kelly Furlong Foresman, Secretary

ADVERTISE

YOUR

FUNERAL

SERVICES.

Frankfort United Methodist Church (215

Linden Drive, Frankfort)

The Craft Group

10 a.m. Every second and

fourth Thursday. The next

meeting is to take place

Thursday, Oct. 27.

Daybreak Homeless Ministry

6:30-8 p.m. Monday, Nov.

7. All youth interested in

earning community service

hours are encouraged to

join this ministry. For more

information, contact Kris

Warning or the church office

at (815) 469-5249.

Book Club

9:30 a.m. Wednesdays

Worship Service

9-10 a.m. Sundays. For

more information, call (815)

469-5249.

Children’s Church

9-10 a.m. Children attend

service for the first half,

then children ages 4-10 have

choir practice and a story or

craft for the second half. For

more information, call (815)

469-5249.

Sunday School

10:15-11:15 a.m. For

more information, call (815)

469-5249.

Peace Community Church (21300 S.

LaGrange Road, Frankfort)

Food Pantry

Peace’s food pantry is

open the first Sunday of every

month. For more information

on the pantry’s services,

contact the Deacons at

deacons@peaceinfrankfort.

org.

Worship Services

9:30 a.m. Sundays. We offer

a staffed nursery during

the service, Sunday School

programs and biblically

based teaching. For more

information, visit www.peaceinfrankfort.org.

Healing Hope

7:30-8:30 p.m. every other

Sunday

Women’s Bible Study

9:15-11:15 a.m. and 6:30-

8 p.m. Wednesday

Men’s Meeting

7-8:30 a.m. Saturdays in

the Fellowship Room

Amazing Love Lutheran Church (21301 S.

Pfeiffer Road, Frankfort)

Teen Group

Teens in sixth- through

12th-grade are welcome to

join. There will be a meeting

with new activities

every second Saturday of

the month. For more information,

visit www.amazinglove-ministries.org.

Women’s Group

9:30-11:30 a.m. every

first and third Saturday of

the month, at the church.

The group is currently reading

Esther and led by Bible

teacher Erin Atherton. Participants

do not need to

come with a book, but study

workbooks will be sold at

the group meeting for $15.

Men’s Group

6:30-8 a.m. every second

and fourth Saturday of the

month, at the church. This

group uses the Men’s Fraternity

curriculum, which is

currently focusing on “Winning

at Work and Home.”

Please see Faith, 25

In memoriam

Bob Buchanan

Bob Buchanan, 70, of

Frankfort, died Oct. 18. He is

survived by his wife, Denise

(nee Bozec); children, Gina

(Sloan) Rolando, Colleen

(Ed) Dampf and Michelle

(Tom) Buell; grandchildren,

Kira, Tommy, Gregory,

Johnny, Lucy, Clare, Samantha

and Nick; and numerous

loving cousins. Buchanan

was a member of Trinity

Lutheran Church in New

Lenox. He loved horses, tar-

Colonial Chapel

Family Owned Funeral Home

edward damstra, owner

Private On-Site

Crematory Orland Park

colonialchapel.com

Contact Jessica Nemec

@708.326.9170 ex.46

www.22ndcenturymedia.com

get shooting, cars and motorcycling.

Services were held

at Trinity Lutheran Church.

Interment private. In lieu of

flowers, donations to Trinity

Lutheran Church would be

appreciated. Arrangements

by Kurtz Memorial Chapel.

Have someone’s life you’d like

to honor? Email rebecca@

frankfortstation.com with information

about a loved one who

was a part of the Frankfort

community.


frankfortstation.com Faith

the frankfort station | October 27, 2016 | 25

Pastor Column

Pulling a trick on God

Rev. DR. Kurt Kruger

Peace Community Church

For many children,

Halloween is all

about the candy.

The objective on trickor-treat

night is not only

to bag a large quantity

of candy, but also highquality

candy. A plastic

pumpkin full of Milk Duds,

Tootsie Roll candies and

Dum Dums lollipops is not

going to cut it. Kids want

the good stuff like Twix,

Snickers and the holy grail

of Halloween candy – the

Reese’s Peanut Butter Cup.

For other children, Halloween

is all about the

costumes. Some kids dress

up as their favorite fantasy

character like Batman or

Princess Jasmine. Others

want to be a scary creature

like a monster or a vampire.

Perhaps the ultimate oldschool

Halloween costume

is the classic ghost-in-awhite-bedsheet

costume. It

is simple, and it works.

Regardless of what

costume children decide

to wear, mostly all of them

like the idea of hiding

behind a mask and tricking

people they know. Kids

trick-or-treating in their

own neighborhood will

often ring the door bell,

shout “trick or treat” and

when their neighbor opens

the door, they will ask, “Do

you know who I am?”

For some reason, many

kids enjoy pulling a trick

on people they know by

hiding behind a mask and

having them guess their

identity. After leaving them

in suspense for a brief time,

they pull up their mask and

shout, “It’s me!”

Dressing up in a costume

starts to lose its appeal after

about the fourth or fifth

grade. The junior high kids

in my old neighborhood

thought that the best trick

on Halloween was to run

around town throwing eggs

at people’s cars and houses.

A few of them found out

the hard way that throwing

eggs at other people’s

property is not a Halloween

trick. It’s called vandalism

and it is against the law.

In Luke 3:1-9, the Bible

gives us the account of

some people who were

coming out to be baptized

by John the Baptist. These

people were trying to pull a

trick on God.

If you recall, John the

Baptist had been given the

task of preparing the way

for Jesus by calling people

to repent of their sins. He

baptized those who came

out with repentant hearts,

desiring to be made right

with God.

But for those who came

out in an attempt to trick

God, John the Baptist had

some harsh words. Luke

3:7 states:

“He said therefore to

the crowds that came out

to be baptized by him,

‘You brood of vipers! Who

warned you to flee from the

wrath to come?’”

At first glance, it almost

appears that John

the Baptist is disappointed

that someone warned them

to flee from the wrath to

come, and that they were

turning up to repent and

be baptized. But that is not

what was going on.

The implied answer to

John the Baptist’s question

is, “Not me!” He is saying

that somewhere, somehow,

they got the idea that by

merely going through the

motions of completing an

outward religious act of

piety (John’s baptism), that

they could escape God’s

wrath and judgment.

The people on the receiving

end of John’s harsh

words had been deceived

into thinking that it was

possible to obtain God’s

blessing and forgiveness by

participating in an insincere

outward ritual. In reality,

their hearts were far from

God.

They wanted to be given

the sign that signified they

were among God’s people,

but they were a people that

refused to give God their

heart and their lives. They

were trying to pull a trick

on God.

Sadly, people still try to

pull this trick today, and

not just at Halloween. The

deceptive nature of sin

leads people to think they

can trick God into blessing

them and granting them

forgiveness and eternal life

without ever truly repenting

and believing in Jesus.

For example, some

people mistakenly think

that living a good life and

refraining from murdering

anyone is sufficient to

be counted as righteous in

God’s sight. Others think

that going to church is

enough to trick God into allowing

them into heaven.

The thinking is, “As

long as I do these things,

I can go and live my life

however I want and still be

on God’s good side in the

end.”

The Bible repeatedly

teaches that no one can

trick God, because God

sees our hearts. God is not

tricked by the face paint of

outward piety or religious

ritual. God will not be

fooled into allowing anyone

into the kingdom just

because they have put on a

costume called religion.

God is looking for people

to take off their masks and

stop pretending to be “good

enough.” He calls us to

acknowledge that we are

sinful human beings who

are morally accountable to

him and his revealed word,

the Bible. No one can trick

God, and no one can ever

be good enough to enter

heaven.

The good news is that

God has sent Jesus to pay

the penalty for our sin on

the cross. When we repent

of our sin and turn to

Jesus Christ in faith, God

promises to forgive our sin

and to credit Jesus’ perfect

righteousness to us.

Instead of a scary costume

of self-righteousness

that can never hide our sin,

the Bible teaches that we

receive the righteousness of

Jesus Christ.

This Halloween, how

about we resolve not to

play any more tricks, and

instead be honest with ourselves

before God? If we

have any hope of entering

the kingdom of God, we

need God’s Son, Jesus.

The views expressed in this

column are those of the author.

They do not necessarily represent

those of 22nd Century

Media and its staff.

Faith

From Page 24

The Family Hearth (119 Kansas St.,

Frankfort

Women and the Abundant

Life

9:30 a.m. Mondays.

Classes have started for the

“Women and the Abundant

Life,” a study of authentic

femininity, holiness of

life and women’s purpose

and their mission in today’s

world. The cost to participate

is $35, which includes

the fee for the class materials.

Study of Women in the Bible

9:30 a.m. Tuesdays.

Classes for the “Study of

Women in the Bible” have

begun, and studies cover

the Old and New Testament.

The cost to participate is

$35, which includes the fee

for the class materials.

Scripture Reflection (Bible

Study) Group

5:30 p.m. Tuesdays. Men

and women are welcome to

join the Bible study. They

are encouraged to bring a

Bible, and there is no fee to

attend.

Christian Cancer Support

Group

5:30 p.m. Thursdays.

These sessions are for patients

and family members

affected by cancer.

Kind Deed for a Family in

Need Ministry

Those interested in performing

kind deeds for families

in need should contact

the Family Hearth General

Store at familyhearthfrankfort@gmail.com

or (708)

334-1988.

St. Peter’s United Church of Christ (12 W.

Sauk Trail, Frankfort)

Sew What?

This is an ongoing gathering

for beginning to advanced

sewers that alternates

on Fridays and Saturdays.

For dates and more information,

call (815) 469-2220.

USO Drop-off

The church serves as a

drop-off location for donations

to the USO from 9

a.m.-1 p.m. every weekday.

The church accepts

entertainment items such

as movies and games; food

including beef jerky, powdered

drink mix and coffee;

hygiene items such as baby

wipes, shampoo and toothpaste;

and miscellaneous

items such as bug spray, sunscreen

and fabric softener.

For a list of things that can

and cannot be donated, or for

more information, call (815)

469-2220.

Bible Study

7 p.m. Tuesdays and 10

a.m. Thursdays

Alcoholics Anonymous

7 p.m. Tuesdays. All those

currently struggling or who

have struggled with an alcohol

addiction are welcome.

Meetings are confidential.

For more information, call

(815) 469-2220.

Sunday School

9:30-10:45 a.m. Sundays

Sunday Worship with

Communion

9:30 a.m. every first Sunday

of the month.

Lighthouse Fellowship (8128 W. Lincoln

Highway, Frankfort)

Revolution Youth Group

7-9 p.m. Wednesdays.

This youth ministry is for

those in grades 7-12. Meet

for worship, games, food and

Bible study. Enter through

the upper-west doors. For

more information, call (815)

469-0611.

To have your church’s events

included in Faith Briefs, email

them to Editor Rebecca Susmarski

at rebecca@frankfortstation.com,

or send a fax to

(708) 326-9179. Deadline is

noon Thursdays one week prior

to publication.


26 | October 27, 2016 | The frankfort station Frankfort

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26 | October 27, 2016 | The frankfort station Frankfort

frankfortstation.com

"months free"

No need for

When everything you need

one affordable fee!

is included for

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Senior Living Community

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One of a kind premier senior living community offering you relaxing,

maintenance free living along with the following amenities:

• 3 chef prepared meals served daily

• Full daily activity program,

entertainment & trips

• Weekly housekeeping

• All utilities included

• Library, chapel, coffee shop and

beauty/barber shop on premises

• Private Formal Dining Room available

• Home health care services available

on premises

• Walking distance to Tinley

shops & restaurants

• Veterans Financial Assistance Available

Call for questions or to schedule a private tour!

16301 S Brementowne Rd.

Tinley Park, IL

708.532.7800

www.tinleycourt.com

Member of Tinley Park Chamber of Commerce Since 1994


28 | October 27, 2016 | The frankfort station Frankfort

frankfortstation.com

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30 | October 27, 2016 | The frankfort station FRANKFORT

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the frankfort station | October 27, 2016 | 31

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MLS 09247005... Townhouse has had many

recent updates! 1,565 sq ft, 2 bedrooms,

1.5ba, 19x18 loft has vaulted ceiling &

used as fam rm, kit/liv rm combo with fpl.

$139,999

22732 S Olympia Dr, Frankfort

MLS 09261641...Modular home in active adult

community south of town, 1,262 sq ft, 3 bedrooms,

2ba, all appliances, 1.5 car gar, com-

munity clubhouse & fishing pond. $65,500

2930 Kingsway Ave, New Lenox

MLS 09283594... 4 bedroom 3ba split-level

with sub-bsmt finished on all 4 levels! $75K

kitchen remodel/sun rm addition! New hardwood

flrs thruout, vaulted ceilings. $297,500

Linda

Hentsch

Kim

Katsenes

Bridgette

Kavanagh

7859 W North Ave, Frankfort

MLS 09218965... Split-level with sub-bsmt

in unincorporated area, 4 bedrooms, 2.5ba,

attached plus 4 car detached garages.

$279,000

15617 W Waterford Ln, Manhattan

MLS 09332965... Updated 2 bedroom duplex

in Foxford. Open flr plan with 10’ ceilings

& hardwood flrs on main level. 10x22

eat-in kit, main flr laundry. Fin bsmt fam rm

with Pergo flring. No HOA! $159,999

393 W Joliet Hwy, New Lenox

MLS 09345164... Custom home in Wildwood

Club Estates near town, approx 3,000

sq ft, 23x15 master suite, open main level

with vaulted ceiling, archways & hardwood

flr. $369,900

1760 Edmonds Ave, New Lenox

MLS 09331710...On 86x160 lot near I-355,

approx 3,500 sq ft, 4 bedrooms, loft, 3ba, 9

in office, liv & din rms, bsmt. $345,000

25412 Spring St, Manhattan

MLS 09330478... Overlooks the pond in

Brookstone Springs, approx 2,600 sq ft, 4

bedrooms, loft, hardwood in liv/din combo

& kit with island that opens to fam rm.

$257,900

Michele

Kosel

Julie

Kubinski

Mary Jo

McFadden

Lorecia

McGowan

Maria

Pennington

Pam

Schlafer

2552 Martin Ct, New Lenox

MLS 09368062... 1-owner split-level with

fin sub-bsmt on corner lot, lower level has

17x21 fam rm with fpl, 4th bedroom & 3rd

full bath. $299,000

19910 Mokena St, Mokena

MLS 09368644... Split-level on nearly half

acre needs updating, lots of potential! Possible

related living! 4 bedrooms, 3ba, vaulted

fam rm with fpl, 2 kitchens. $279,000

3705 Alamosa Ct, New Lenox

MLS 09307512... All brick, 3 bedrooms,

2.5ba, hardwood flring in kit with island &

vaulted liv/din combo with fpl. Fin bsmt,

lge stamped concrete patio with gazebo.

$324,900

105 Front St, Manhattan

MLS 09094982... On large corner lot in town

zoned C-2 so could be used for business! 4

bedrooms incl main flr master, updated windows

& carpet, appliances. $152,900

13404 Florence Rd, Mokena

MLS 09261057…Brick ranch on over half

bsmt, 3 full baths, 2 fpl, 2.5 car attached gar

plus lge shed with loft. $268,000

Jayne

Sinchak

Mike

Smetana

Amy

Zuidema

OPEN SuNDAy 12-3pm

512 The Hague, Peotone

MLS 09356364... Refinished hardwood

floors thruout! Approx 3,400 sq ft, 4 bedrooms,

2.5ba, vaulted fam rm with fpl & skylites,

3 car garage, in ground pool. $299,900

26157 S Center Rd, Monee

MLS 09175161... 1-owner brick ranch on

1.5 acres, approx 2,400 sq ft, 3 bedrooms,

2.5ba, new wood laminate flrs in kit, fam rm

& liv/din combo. Partly fin bsmt. $289,000

14025 W Joliet Rd, Manhattan

MLS 09318275... Remodeled home on 1.5

acres! Wood flrs in both bedrooms & kit,

14x21 liv rm with fpl, bsmt, 3 car gar, 30x40

storage she with attached 12x40 lean to.

$177,900

25444 Abbey Ln, Manhattan

MLS 09356525... On corner lot, 2,856 sq

ft, 4 large bedrooms incl 14x20 master, loft,

3.5ba, kit has island & opens to fam rm with

fpl, partly fin bsmt. $257,900

450 S. Park St, Manhattan

MLS 09254594... On 66x140 lot in town,

completely remodeled in 2007! 1,500+ sq

ft, 2 bedrooms down plus upstairs master,

$194,900

20126 Burr Oak Ln, Mokena

MLS 09370177... Renovated split-level on

100x200 lot near town & Metra, 3 bedrooms,

2ba, kit opens to vaulted liv rm with fpl &

hardwood flr, lower level fam rm. $239,900

15540 Ridgefield Dr, Manhattan

MLS 09316124... Split-level on corner lot,

wood laminate floors in all 3 bedrooms, 2ba,

vaulted ceiling in liv rm & kit, lower level fam

rm with fpl. $227,900

8042 W Offner Rd, Peotone

MLS 09254697... 5 Acres! 10 ft, vaulted, tray

& turret ceilings! 6,000+ sq ft, 6 bedrooms,

5.5ba, 6 fpl, 2 staircases, cherry flooring

thruout, bsmt, 3 car gar. $724,999

2853 Cole Ln, New Lenox

MLS 09263640...All brick, 2,400+ sq ft, 3

bedrooms, 2.5ba, 15x22 fam rm with fpl &

& library. Bsmt, patio with pergola. $339,900

15750 W Barr Rd, Manhattan

MLS 09261005...10 acres! Approx 4,000 sq

bsmt, 3 car gar, 36x50 barn. $569,900

505 S Schroeder Ave, Peotone

MLS 09304603... 4 unit apartment bldg, all 2

bedroom apartments, storage units in bsmt,

tenants pay electric, 2 yr old roof. $279,900

417 Blaine St, Peotone

MLS 09172215... Approx 3,100 sq ft, 1st flr

master bedroom, 2 bedrooms & bonus rm

up, 2 story fam rm with fpl, island & hardwood

flr in kit, sun rm, bsmt. $294,900

cbhonig-bell.com

LOCAL SALES OFFICE

1413 E. Lincoln Highway

New Lenox

815-485-3401


32 | October 27, 2016 | The frankfort station Life & Arts

frankfortstation.com

Publisher 22CM’s Active Aging Expo comes to Tinley Park

Ryan Esguerra

Freelance Reporter

For all of us, aging is a

part of life.

And those transitioning

into the next phase of their

lives face many difficult decisions.

It was the goal of

22nd Century Media and its

sponsors to help make those

decisions as easy as they

can be.

In partnership with its

gold sponsor Evergreen Senior

Living, 22nd Century

Media hosted the Active

Aging Expo Saturday, Oct.

22, at the Tinley Park Convention

Center.

Additional Sponsors for

the event were DuPage

Medical Group, Vascular

Specialists and Ingalls

Health System.

Individuals ages 50 and

older were encouraged to

come and prepare for their

golden years with the assistance

of more than 40 vendors

from around the area.

This is the second installment

of the Active Aging

Expo this fall, with the first

held Oct. 15 in Northbrook.

“For years [the Active

Aging Expo] has been a

successful special section

in our publications,” said

Heather Warthen, chief

events officer at 22nd Century

Media. “It actually

started three years ago in

our North Shore branch.

This is for anybody in that

age bracket that needs help

with financial planning, are

looking for a new doctor, or

are trying to find a new senior

living facility for themselves

or their parents.”

The expo gave seniors the

opportunity to learn about

the issues important to them

in a fun and inclusive way.

In addition to the services

of vendors on hand at the

expo; there were free bingo

games, a caricature artist,

a stage featuring live performers

and a globe-rolling

juggler. Free flu shots provided

by Jewel-Osco also

were available at the expo.

“You gain a lot of information

in a short period of

time,” said Amanda Mauceri,

director at Evergreen

Senior Living. “This event

gives folks the ability to educate

themselves on what the

marketplace is and what services

are offered to them.”

Attention Builders:

Advertise with

22nd Century Media

Reach 92,000+ Southwest Suburban homes.

®

Contact

Lora Healy

Melanie Monga, a representative for Bath Planet, shows a

walk-out bathtub to seniors at the Active Aging Expo.

708.326.9170 ext. 31

l.healy@22ndcenturymedia.com

Mary Slight, distributer of Young Living Essential Oils, shows products to Judy Alberico, of

Joliet, Saturday, Oct. 22, during publisher 22nd Century Media’s Active Aging Expo at the

Tinley Park Convention Center. Photos by Mary Compton/22nd Century Media

According to Mauceri, a

big obstacle facing seniors

is the missing feeling of camaraderie.

Events like the

Active Aging Expo and environments

like Evergreen

Senior Living can help lead

to social connections for

which they are longing.

“I think that some people

can become isolative in

their homes as they begin

to age,” Mauceri said. “A

big question I always get

when someone moves into

our communities revolves

around social engagement

and meeting people.”

Sitting at a table with a

bright smile on her face,

78-year-old Carolyn Doyle

said that she came to the

expo with a friend,71-yearold

Mary Jo-James, in order

to learn more about her options

going forward, as she

basks in the glow of her

golden years.

Elaine Buck (left) and Stanley Zimla, both of Tinley Park,

play a few games of bingo at the Active Aging Expo.

“I was interested in the

assisted living and explored

places that I could move

to,” Doyle said. “I am going

to be selling my house and

downsizing. I am looking

for an easier life.”

While the expo is a great

venue for seniors to come

and be social, the objective

is to make it so that they are

ready for the rest of their

lives.

“It’s all about getting

the knowledge and being

prepared,” Warthen said.

“Coming to these events,

there are people here who

are available to answer any

questions you may have.”


frankfortstation.com Dining Out

the frankfort station | October 27, 2016 | 33

The Dish

Bonefish Grill’s staff partial to fall flavors

Orland Park

restaurant pairs four

seasonal offerings

with wine

Bill Jones, Managing Editor

Ask Orland Park Bonefish

Grill managing partner

Nicholas Kapellas about the

restaurant’s seasonal selections,

and it quickly becomes

evident that he has a bias.

“The fall lineup is probably

my favorite of the year,”

he said Thursday, Oct. 20,

during National Seafood

Month. “The fish that’s in

season in fall are my favorite.”

And with choices like

swordfish ($21.90), Norwegian

salmon ($22.90), snapper

($23.90) and wild mahi

mahi ($24.90), it is not hard

to see why.

For server Emily Sheehan,

on the other hand, the libations

are the true highlight of

the fall menu.

“Our cocktail list, our

martini list, is hands down

one of the best out there,”

she said.

Supporting her claim are

the fall apple martini ($8.70)

and the fresh pear martini

($9.70).

The former features vodka

that has been infused for

three days with fresh fall

apples. It is finished with

a touch of honey and cinnamon

sprinkle. The latter

mixes hand-muddled fresh

pears and with Absolut

Pears vodka, St-Germain elderflower

liqueur and fresh

lemon juice, garnished with

an edible flower.

“It’s because we’re making

of lot of these [ingredients]

in house,” Sheehan

said of the drinks’ success.

The restaurant also — as

part of a Dine & Discover

Dinner for Two promotion

that runs through the end of

October — has been featuring

four 90-point wines for

$9 a glass next to each of the

fish. The section is designed

to offer high-quality wines at

reasonable prices, while also

helping diners who may be

interested in wine but do not

come in quite as well-versed

on the alcoholic beverage as

others.

“There’s still a lot of people

out there who are nervous

about ordering wine,”

Kapellas said. “We take

the guesswork out of it. ...

It makes it more approachable.”

There is no doubt the fish

still takes center stage at

Bonefish Grill, but it might

be best to consider them side

by side, according to Sheehan.

The snapper is served with

a tangy, spicy sauce Sheehan

likes to pair with the Eroica

riesling, which offers and

off-dry sweetness and fruit

flavors that contrast well

with the kick of the dish.

The wild Oscar mahi mahi

is topped with lemon butter

and fresh crabmeat, which

makes the King Estate Signature

Collection pinot gris’

tropical citrus notes a good

complement.

“Hands down, that’s a

wonderful pairing,” she said.

The sweetness of the

pumpkin ravioli, vegetable

butter, feta, crispy shallots

and red onion meet a formidable

match in the Broquel

malbec, which has a slightly

spicy and bold profile, Sheehan

said.

Finally, the salmon works

well with the “bold cabernet

blend” of the restaurant’s

Charles & Charles offering,

which finishes quickly

and lets the bourbon of the

fish’s sauce linger, Sheehan

explained.

Wild Oscar mahi mahi

($24.90) is best paired

with a glass of King Estate

Signature Collection pinot

gris.

Bonefish Grill

15537 S. LaGrange

Road in Orland Park

Hours

• 11 a.m.-10:30 p.m.

Monday-Thursday

• 11 a.m.-11:30 p.m.

Friday and Saturday

• 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Sunday

For more information ...

Web: www.bonefishgrill.

com

Phone: (708) 873-5170

The cedar plank bourbon salmon ($22.99) at Bonefish Grill in Orland Park features

Norwegian salmon, served here alongside rice, tri-color carrots and charred lemon.

Photos by Bill Jones/22nd Century Media

The sides should not be

overlooked either, Sheehan

said. In particular, she said

she loves the tri-color carrots

suggested with the Norwegian

salmon. While the color

itself adds a nice touch to the

plate, the varieties of carrots

actually offer slightly different

flavors, as well, which

may surprise some people.

“They’re really its own

thing,” she said.

While the mahi mahi and

swordfish are seasonal favorites

making their returns,

both the snapper and salmon

offer new preparations

this season. The snapper,

in particular, is designed to

appeal to those looking for

something a little spicier,

which Kapellas said has

been a trend in recent years

— something he attributes to

the rise of sriracha and how

cooking shows — the Food

Network is always running

on at least one of the televisions

at the bar inside Bonefish

— have led to people

being more open to new culinary

experiences.

“People are more apt to

try things that they haven’t

in the past,” Kapellas said,

noting it makes things a lot

of fun for a restaurant.

Sheehan said after going

table to table on a daily

basis, she can attest to that

changing mentality.

“People are definitely interested

in something that’s

out of the box,” she said.

Bonefish Grill’s fresh swordfish ($21.90) comes with a fall

side of pumpkin ravioli.

And while that gives Kapellas

and his crew plenty

of room to experiment more

than ever before, the driving

word for Bonefish continues

to be “fresh,” both in terms

of the quality of the restaurant’s

dishes and its everchanging

menu.

“We want to have the

freshest ingredients possible,”

Kappelas said. “It’s

all about taking advantage of

those seasonal flavors.”


34 | October 27, 2016 | The frankfort station Real Estate

frankfortstation.com

Buying

or

Selling

Mike McCatty

and associates

708.945.2121 mccattyrealestate.com

The Frankfort Station’s

Relocation out of state

forces the sale of this

beautiful custom home.

of the

WEEK

Over a Half Billion

in sales since 1999

Named as one of the top brokers in the country

Palos Heights, Westgate Valley

$568,000

Custom built 5 bedroom ranch home with

over 3800 SF on 3 levels of separate living

quarters. Elevator. Pond view.

New Lenox, Rachael Ridge

$559,000

Style and grace shine through in this HGTV

inspired masterpiece. 6 bedrooms. 4

baths. Related living potential.

#1 Worldwide

Orland Park, Georgetown

$249,000

Stylish 3 bedroom townhome with a walkout

basement. Oversized 2 car garage.

Walk to cinema, gym, shopping, & more.

What: Four bedroom, 3.1

bath home complete with

a finished basement in

the upscale Flagstone

subdivision.

Where: 11856 Granite

Court, Frankfort

Amenities: Impressive

quality and craftsmanship

are evident in the details.

Extensive millwork, custom

white oak staircase,

wrought iron spindles,

huge kitchen with walk-in

pantry and an oversized

island. The ideal floor plan

offers an abundance of

living space with additional

office space on the first

floor, a second-floor

recreation room and a

huge bonus room off of

the master. Make your

appointment today!

Price: $549,900

Listing Agent: Jessica

Jakubowski, Baird

& Warner. For more

information, call (312)

810-6722 or email

jessicajakubowski.

bairdwarner.com

Want to know how to become

Home of the Week? Contact

Tricia at (708) 326-9170 ext.

47.

Tinley Park, Meadow Park

$289,000

Makeover Success! 3 bedroom split level

with sub-basement redesigned with attention

grabbing open concept layout.

Orland Park, Deer Point Estates

$449,000

Meticulously maintained, true ranch home

with spacious rooms throughout, a loft, &

open concept finished basement.

Frankfort, Lincoln Estates

$399,000

Uniquely designed ranch home with

related living potential. Rec. room and sun

room. Peaceful large lot to enjoy nature.

Orland Park, Catalina

$329,000

Ranch with style & elegance! Meticulously

updated with beautiful finishes. Finished

basement. Lushly landscaped yard.

Homer Glen, Meadowcrest

$429,000

Spacious 4,800 sq. ft. of living space home

offers one of the largest kitchens, family

rooms & master bedrooms available.

Orland Park, Somerglen

$549,000

North Shore Style on the South Side defines

this refreshing, one-of-a-kind floor plan,

which raises the bar.

Mokena

$279,900

4 bedroom quad-level home w/over

2,000sqft of living space on a half-acreplus

corner lot. Vaulted ceilings & skylights.

Orland Park, Orland Trails

$339,000

This recently renovated home offers 3

bedrooms, 2 baths, & a bright, open floor

plan. Partial basement & crawl.

Palos Park

$

Circle drive leads you to this charming

4400 SF French provincial home marked

with style & distinction throughout.

Sept. 2

• 24919 S. Center Road, Frankfort,

60423-8498 - Federal Home Loan Mtg

Corp to Eleazar Farias, Misael Farias,

$193,000

• 541 Cottonwood Road, Frankfort,

60423-1009 - Ervie J. Albright III to

Joseph W. Kirk, $227,500

• 7361 W. Hickory Creek Drive,

Frankfort, 60423-9098 - David Beaudry

to Traci Jarolim, Victor J. Peterson,

$237,000

Sept. 6

• 10750 Oakton Court, Frankfort,

60423-8540 - VA to Maurice S.

Andrews, $277,419

Sept. 7

• 680 Hawthorne Drive, Frankfort,

60423-9517 - Kathy Dyer to William

Crowden, Elizabeth Crowden, $462,000

Sept. 8

• 10934 Settlers Pond Court, Frankfort,

60423-7969 - Alderson Trust to Yvonne

Banik, $265,000

• 22061 Pembrook Drive, Frankfort,

60423-7902 - Jerald P. Ducay to

Andreas Westphal, $344,000

Sept. 9

• 21958 Heritage Drive, Frankfort,

60423-8519 - Toni L Shattuck to John

A. Cummings, Lisa A. Cummings,

$410,000

The Going Rate is provided by Record

Information Services, Inc. For more

information, visit www.public-record.com or

call (630) 557-1000.


frankfortstation.com Puzzles

the frankfort station | October 27, 2016 | 35

crosstown CROSSWORD & Sudoku

The crosstowns: Frankfort, Homer Glen, Lockport, Mokena, New Lenox, Orland Park, Tinley Park

Crossword by Myles Mellor and Cindy LaFleur

Across

1. Hospital V.I.P.’s

5. Proctor’s call

9. “The Invisible Man

Returns” actress, Grey

12. With the back of the

tongue

14. Artist who presented

his work at the

Orland Park Public

Library, Randy

15. Mode intro

16. Male duck

17. Fans make some

18. Sheep in the UK

19. Ouster

21. Small demon

22. Thing to tip

23. Separate

25. Outdoorsy girl

29. Greek wines

32. Expect

33. Donkey sound

34. Pubs

35. Class

37. Venom

40. Courtyard

42. Antiquated

43. Road slated for

Orland Park construction

project

45. Old record holder

46. Margarines

47. Greeting

48. Bank card

49. Bored clerk

55. Enough

56. Trojan War epic

57. Kind of skeleton

60. Female lobster

61. V.P. John ___ Garner

62. Chewy snack

63. Break bread

64. Picnic pest

65. Distribute

Down

1. Movie format

2. Across, in poesy

3. Suited

4. Pseudonym of H. H.

Munro

5. Pueblo people

6. Western blue flag, e.g.

7. ___ Verde National

Park

8. Mascara site

9. From sea to shining

sea

10. She has a degree

11. Cone sections

13. Did a double take

14. Make a sweater

20. Mother __ I?

24. At risk

25. ___ chi ch’uan

26. Have legal possession

of

27. Business owners

28. Casual eatery

29. Group etch with

ketch

30. Aquarium denizen

31. Golf essential

35. Vice

36. Jerk

38. Bulgarian coin

39. Wind direction, for

short

41. Hoarse

42. Behind the times

43. Can’t take at all

44. Tennis great Gibson

45. Help request

47. Model pose sometimes

50. Distinctive style

51. Columbus’s transport

52. Bond

53. Oral, e.g.

54. Epidemic

58. Back of the boat

59. Soapmaking need

How to play Sudoku

Each sudoku puzzle consists of a 9x9 grid that

has been subdivided into nine smaller grids of 3x3

squares. To solve the puzzle, each row, column and

box must contain each of the numbers 1 to 9.

LEVEL: Very easy

Sudoku by Myles Mellor and Susan Flanagan

answers

FRANKFORT

Pete Mitchell’s Bar & Grill

(21000 Frankfort Square

Road, Frankfort; (815)

464-8100)

■6-8 ■ p.m. Wednesdays:

Free N’ Fun Bar Game.

Free to play.

LOCKPORT

The Outpost Pub & Grill

(14929 Archer Ave., Lockport;

(815) 836-8893)

■8 ■ p.m. Tuesdays and

Thursdays: Live DJ and

Karaoke

Strike N Spare II

(811 Northern Drive,

Lockport; (708) 301-

1477)

■9:30 ■ p.m.-12:30 a.m.

Mondays: Quartermania

■Fridays: ■ Live bands

HOMER GLEN

Mullets Sports Bar and

Restaurant

(14903 S. Bell Road,

Homer Glen; (708) 645-

7000)

■7 ■ p.m. Wednesdays:

Trivia

MOKENA

The Alley Grill and Tap

House

(18700 S. Old LaGrange

Road, Mokena; (708) 478-

3610)

■9 ■ p.m. Tuesdays: Karaoke

Fox’s Restaurant and Pub

(11247 W. 187th St., Mokena;

(708) 478-8888)

■6 ■ p.m. Thursdays,

Fridays and Saturdays:

Performance by Jerry

Eadie

Jenny’s Southside Tap

(10160 191st St., Mokena;

(708) 479-6873)

■6 ■ p.m. Tuesdays: Acoustic

Avenue, Psychic

night - second Tuesday

every month.

■9 ■ p.m. Thursdays:

Karaoke

Fridays and Saturdays:

Live bands

NEW LENOX

Little Joe’s Restaurant

(1300 N. Cedar Road,

New Lenox; (815) 463-

1099)

■5-8 ■ p.m. Tuesdays:

Piano Styles by Joe

To place an event

in The Scene, email

b.kapa@22ndcenturymedia.

com.


36 | October 27, 2016 | The frankfort station Local Living

frankfortstation.com

K. Hovnanian® Homes Hosts Open House At Hanover Estates This Weekend

K. Hovnanian® Homes is holding

an open house this weekend from

11 a.m. to 6 p.m. at Hanover Estates

in Manhattan. The neighborhood

of all-new single-family homes is

ideally situated within highly rated

and sought-after Lincoln-Way

Community High School District

#210. And while Manhattan maintains

its quaint, small town charm,

Hanover Estates homeowners are

just a few miles from everyday

conveniences, recreational amenities

like golf courses and forest

preserves, and even Interstates 80

and 355.

In all, K. Hovnanian® Homes is

offering eight home designs at

Hanover Estates…giving the community

architectural diversity. They

range in size from 2,448 to 3,635

square feet and in base price from

$271,995 to $356,995. (All homes

are available for immediate sale and

therefore price and availability are

subject to change.) Buyers can

choose their favorite design then

add their own personal touches

with options like a morning room,

upgraded gourmet kitchen and

luxurious owner’s bath.

Available to tour this weekend will

be three Quick Move-In Homes: the

Yorkshire, Rosewood and Jasper.

Located at 24300 Jennifer Street,

the Yorkshire is a classic two-story

featuring 3,308 square feet of living

space, four bedrooms, 2-1/2 baths,

a first-floor office, upstairs bonus

room, and three-car garage. Positioned

on an oversize homesite

allowing for a big back yard, this

home is complete and ready for

move-in. It boasts countless

designer finishes such as granite

countertops, stainless steel appliances

and 42-inch upper cabinets

in the gourmet kitchen; hardwood

flooring on the first floor; an arched

opening between the dining and

family rooms; and ceramic tile and

a double-bowl vanity in the

owner’s bath. The Yorkshire on

homesite #275 even includes

rough-in plumbing in the full

basement…all for a price of

$331,689.

The Rosewood at 24301 Jennifer

Street is an open-concept ranch

that offers convenient single-level

living. With 2,498 square feet, three

bedrooms and two full baths, this

home is ready and waiting for the

right buyer to move into it. Accents

such as a coffered ceiling in the

foyer, French doors to the office,

and hardwood flooring add charm

and elegance. The kitchen is a

must-see with stainless steel appliances,

granite countertops, a

center island, and ceramic tile

backsplash. Additional features

included in this home on site #233

are two walk-in closets in the

owner’s suite plus a separate

shower and dual vanities in the

adjoining luxury bath, a full basement,

and two-car garage. With a

price of $381,538, the Rosewood is

an outstanding value for any ranch

lover.

Next door at 14257 Ethel Street is

the Jasper, also available for immediate

move-in. This 3,237-squarefoot

two-story has everything

today’s families desire—including

formal living and dining rooms plus

a wide-open informal space where

the family room, dining area and

kitchen all flow together. This home

is fully appointed with fine details

such as a center island, granite

countertops, 42-inch upper cabinets,

and double oven in the

kitchen; hardwood flooring on the

first floor; a butler’s pantry; walk-in

closets in every bedroom; and a

coffered ceiling in the owner’s suite.

There’s even a HovHall—a computer

nook for doing homework,

picking out recipes, or paying bills.

With four bedrooms plus a loft, 2-1/2

baths, a full basement, and a

2-1/2-car garage, the Jasper on

homesite #233 is priced at $362,589.

In addition to these Quick Move-In

Homes, visitors can tour two decorated

models at Hanover Estates.

Both are open from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

daily. The sales center is at 14351 W.

Rose Street—on the east side of

Cedar Road south of Laraway Road.

For more information on Hanover

Estates or this weekend’s open

house, call (331) 701-7847 or visit

www.khov.com/HanoverEstates.


frankfortstation.com Local Living

the frankfort station | October 27, 2016 | 37

Looking to Build and Move into Your New Home This Year?

It’s Possible at Prairie Trails in Manhattan!

Distinctive Home Builders provides homeowners the

highest quality home on the Market from the low $200s

with zero punch list items in 90 days

Distinctive Home Builders

continues to add high quality

homes to the Manhattan

landscape at Prairie Trails; its

latest new home community,

located within the highlyregarded

Lincoln-Way School

District. Many families are

happy to call Prairie Trails

home and are pleased that

Distinctive is able to deliver

a new home with zero punch

list items in 90 days. Before

closing, each home undergoes

an industry-leading checklist

that ensures each home measures

up to the firm’s high

quality standards.

“Actually our last average

was 81 working days from excavation

to receiving a home

occupancy permit - without

sacrificing quality,” said

Bryan Nooner, president of

Distinctive Home Builders.

Recently closed Prairie Trails Arbor Model

Recently closed Prairie Trails Ashley Model

cording to Nooner.

“When we opened Prairie

Trails we wanted to provide

the best new home value for

the dollar and we feel with

offering Premium Standard

Features that we do just that.

So why wait? This is truly the

best time to build your dream

home!”

Distinctive offers custom

maple kitchen cabinets featuring

solid wood construction

(no particle board), have solid

wood drawers with dove tail

joints, which is very rare in the

marketplace. “When you buy

a new home from Distinctive,

you truly are receiving custom

made cabinets in every home

we sell no matter what the

price range,” noted Nooner.

Nooner added that all

homes are highly energy efficient.

Every home built will

have upgraded wall and ceiling

insulation values with

energy efficient windows and

high efficiency furnaces. Before

homeowners move into

their new home, Distinctive

Home Builders conducts a

blower door test that pressurizes

the home to ensure that

each home passes a set of very

“Everyone at the company

works extremely hard to continually

achieve this delivery

goal for our homeowners. Our

three decades building homes

provides this efficient construction

system. Many of our

skilled craftsmen have been

working with our company

for over 20 years. We also

take pride on having excellent

communicators throughout

our organization. This translates

into a positive buying

and building experience for

our homeowners and one of

the highest referral rates in

the industry for Distinctive.”

In all, buyers can select

from 13 ranch, split-level and

six two-story single-family

home styles; each offering

three to eight different exterior

elevations. The three- to

four-bedroom homes feature

two to two-and-one-half

baths, two- to three-car garages

and a family room, all

in approximately 1,600 to

over 3,000 square feet of living

space. Basements are included

in most models as well.

Distinctive also encourages

customization to make your

new home truly personalized

to suit your lifestyle.

Oversize home sites; brick

exteriors on all four sides of

the first floor; custom maple

cabinets; ceramic tile or hardwood

floors in the kitchen,

baths and foyer; genuine

wood trim and doors; granite

countertops and concrete

driveways can all be yours at

Prairie Trails. All home sites

at Prairie Trails can accommodate

a three-car garage; a

very important amenity to the

Manhattan homebuyer, acstringent

Energy Efficiency

guidelines.

The available models that

home shoppers can walk

through can vary. Typically

a wide variety of homes are

available to tour that include

ranch and two-story homes.

As of this writing, an Arbor

and Ashley; both ranches, and

a FoxGrove, Prairie and PrairieView

models are available

to tour.

Distinctive is also offering

a brand new home, the Stonegrove,

a 3,000 square foot

open concept home with a

split foyer entry, formal living

and dining rooms, a two-story

great room, four bedrooms

and an upstairs laundry room.

The Stonegrove will be available

for walk through in late

September.

Prairie Trails is also a beautiful

place to live featuring a

20-acre lake on site, as well

as direct access to the 22-mile

Wauponsee Glacial Prairie

Path that borders the community

and meanders through

many neighboring communities

and links to many other

popular trails. The Manhattan

Metra station is also nearby.

Besides Prairie Trails, Distinctive

Home Builders has

built hundreds of homes

throughout Manhattan in the

Butternut Ridge and Leighlinbridge

developments, as well

as thousands in the Will and

south Cook county areas over

the past 30 years.

Visit the on-site sales information

center for unadvertised

specials and view the numerous

styles of homes being

offered and the available lots.

Call (708) 737-9142 for more

information or visit us online

at www.distinctivehomebuilders.com.

The Prairie Trails

new home information center

is located three miles south of

Laraway Rd. on Rt. 52. The

address is 16233 Pinto Lane,

Manhattan, IL, 60422. Open

Daily 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Closed Wednesday and Thursday

and always available by

appointment. Specials, prices,

specifications, standard features,

model offerings, build

times and lot availability are

subject to change without notice.

Please contact a Distinctive

representative for current

pricing and complete details.


38 | October 27, 2016 | The frankfort station Classifieds

frankfortstation.com

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Automotive

$52 4 lines/

7 papers

Help Wanted

$13 4 lines/

per line 7 papers

1003 Help

Wanted

1003 Help

Wanted

1027 Arts and Craft Fairs

Sell It 708.326.9170 | Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It | DEADLINE - Friday at 3pm

1003 Help Wanted

Real Estate

$50 7 7 papers

lines/

Help

Wanted

Merchandise

$30 7 4 papers

lines/

Part-time Telephone Work

calling from home for

AMVETS. Ideal for

homemakers and retirees.

Must be reliable and have

morning &evening hours

available for calling.

If interested,

Call 708 429 6477

M-F, 10am - 1pm Only!

1023 Caregiver

Help Wanted- Immediate

Openings- $200 sign-on

bonus!

Peace Village is hiring!

F/T cook positions and

P/T server and dishwasher

positions are available in

the Dining Services

Department. Server &

Dishwashing shifts

available Mon-Sat from

3:30 p.m.- 7:30 p.m., 4

p.m.-7:30 p.m., and Sun

from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. All

candidates need to pass a

physical, background

check & drug screen.

Please send your resume to

careers@peacevillage.org

or submit an application in

person at Peace Village,

10300 Village Circle Dr.

(Commons Building),

Palos Park, IL 60464.

You will get an immediate

interview after completion

of application when you

apply in person.

Cleaning person wanted 3

days/week for commercial

properties, Mokena area.

Must be self-motivated,

multi-tasker that can clean,

paint, work outside, lift

over 50lbs & have own

car. Send resume to

admin@s4b.bz

Medical Billing Clerk

Established medical group

in Tinley Park seeking a

medical billing clerk with

medical coding and light

bookkeeping experience.

Follow up with insurance

companies for payments

and keep accounts current.

Contact insurance

companies regarding

reimbursement. Experience

with electronic claims.

Send Resume to

Simba17333@yahoo.com

up to 35 hours / week

Medical Secretary

Established medical group

in Tinley Park seeking a

secretary. Knowledge of

administrative and clerical

procedures and experience

with word processing,

Excel, managing files and

records, transcription,

designing forms and other

office procedure and

medical terminology. Send

resume to

Simba17333@yahoo.com

SEASONAL HELP

WEATHERTECH is hiring

seasonal help for

Stockroom Assistants &

Showroom Customer

Service Representatives.

Please send resume to:

careers@weathertech.com

Our patient-focused, high

quality Orland Park dental

office is looking for a P/T

receptionist to join our

growing team. We are seeking

someone who is personable,

hardworking, reliable &

desires to learn. Must be

willing to work some nights

& Sat. If interested, please

email resume to

mcg@gorskidental.com

F/T Heating Technician

Min 2 yrs HVAC exp

required. Dependable w/ a

positive, energetic, can-do

attitude. Ability to troubleshoot

& repair portable

heaters, AC units,

generators, etc. Wage

negotiable & health care

benefits paid. Email

resume or work exp to

resume@allairsolutions.com

Start a new career in

time for the holidays!

AMERICAN SCHOOL

BUS NOW HIRING.

CALL NOW:

708.349.1866

Company Flat Bed Driver

needed. Midwest area.

Home weekly. Pay is

approx. $900/week. Email:

recruiting@shipgt.com

2016 Southwest Choice

Award winner Pet Patrol

is looking for dog walkers

& pet sitters in Orland &

Tinley Park. For more info

& to apply:

www.pet-patrol.net

Custodian

4 hr. Part-Time &

Substitute Pos. Avail.

Evening Shift. $10.60/hr.

Kirby School Dist. 140

in Tinley Park. Apply online:

ksd140.org/employment

Margaret’s Agency Inc.

State Licensed & Bonded

since 1998.

Providing quality care

for elderly.

Live-in/ Come & go.

708.403.8707

1037 Prayer /

Novena

Oh most Beautiful Flower

of Mt Carmel, Fruitful vine,

splendor of heaven, blessed

mother of the Son of God,

Immaculate Virgin, Assist

me in this my neccessity, oh

star of the sea help me .Oh

holy Mary, Mother ofGod,

Queen ofHeaven and Earth,

I humbly beeseach you

from the bottom of my heart

to succor me in my necessity

(make request) there are

none that can withstand

your power, oh show me

herein you are mymother,

oh Mary conceived without

sin, pray for us who have

recourse tothee (3x). Holy

Mary, Iplace this cause in

your hands (3x). Say this

prayer for three consecutive

days, you must publish it

and it will be granted to

you. BB

1050 Community

Events

HALLOWEEN

BAKE SALE

DATE: 10/29/2016

TIME: 2PM ADDRESS:

12318 PARTRIDGE LANE

ORLAND PARK IL 60467

ALL PROCEEDS WILL BE

DONATED TO

EVEREST ACADEMY

1052 Garage Sale

Homer Glen 13112 W. Creekside

Dr 10/27-29, 8-3p. Avon,

curio, sew mach, hshld, tools.

Garage is full; new items daily!

Lockport, 16432 W. Split Rail

Dr. 10/28 Friday Only 8-3p.

Selling contractor tools, 4pc

girl bedroom set, queen size

bedframe, & misc items.

New Lenox 180 E. Wood St.

10/27-28, 9-2. Vintage pieces,

toys, home decor, tools, and

much more! Don’t miss.

New Lenox, Crystal Springs.

Joliet Hwy & Teal Dr, Blue

Stone, & Mallard. 10/27 &

10/28, 9am-2pm. Hshld items,

toys, clothes.

Orland Park, 14121 S. 87th

Ave. 10/28, 9-3p. Furn, sofa

bed, Honda lawn mower,

freezer, dehumidifier, tools,

hshld items, frames, oil paintings,

electro lux vacuum, gas

grill, & more!

Palos/Orland Park, 8201

Hillcrest Dr. 10/29, 9-3p. Misc

household items & more!

HIRE LOCALLY

Reach over 83% of prospective

employees in your area!

CALL TODAY 708-326-9170

www.22ndcenturymedia.com

Garage

Sale

1057 Estate Sale

Homer Glen, 15156 W. 163rd

St. Sat, Oct 29. 8-2p. Kitchen,

Christmas, ladies clothes &

shoes, furn, vintage art work &

more!

Palos Park 8819 W. 119th St.

10/27, 9-3, 10/28, 9-2, 10/29,

9-1 (Everything 50% off).

6,000 sq. ft. of furn (bdrm &

din), baby grand piano, pinball

machine, double door fridge,

leather sofas, large outdoor

fountain statues, Hoyer lift,

and much more.

Tinley Park, 7003 Plymouth

Ct. 10/28 & 10/29 9-3p.

MOVING! Everything must

go! Furniture, household items

& more!

1058 Moving Sale

Orland Park 15251 Primrose

Ln. 10/29, 8-4. One big day!

Can’t take itwith, socome and

get some great bargains. Hshld

decor, wine fridge, exercise

equip, garden &power tools,

lawnmower, snow blower,

deck & dock storage, and lots

more. Sale by Creative Home

Services. Pictures on Craig’s

List Event Post.


frankfortstation.com Classifieds

the frankfort station | October 27, 2016 | 39

Automotive

1061 Autos Wanted

1074 Auto for

Sale

2002 Toyota Sequoia

206k mi. Good condition.

$2,200 or best offer.

708.334.3356

2005 Mercury Monterey Mini

Van, 89k mi. Very good

condition. Runs well. $3,500.

(708)301-5883

1225 Apartments

for Rent

New Lenox

1BR, upstairs apt, $900/mo

utilities included gas &electric,

no cable or garbage. W/D

in unit, possible garage.

Credit check required.

2BR, 1Ba upstairs apt,

$1,300/mo, garage included,

W/D in unit. Must pass credit

check, no cable or garbage.

Gas & electric included.

Both Available Dec. 1st

2004 Asphalt Paving/Seal Coating

D&J

jmzarack@aol.com

Rental

1223 Roommates

Wanted

New Lenox

2BR, 2nd floor, freshly

painted, new flooring, no pets,

one month security deposit.

Available now. Call

708-829-6294

HIRE LOCALLY

Reach over 83% of prospective

employees in your area!

2006 Basement Waterproofing

Looking for roommate to split

rent. 2 BDRM condo in

Crestwood. Female only.

Would consider 1 child.

Call for info 708.254.0473

1224 Rooms for

Rent

Business Directory

2003 Appliance

Repair

Mokena Area

Room &kitchen for rent,

retired person, $370/

month. Call Dennis

630-917-2245

1225 Apartments

for Rent

QUALITY

APPLIANCE

REPAIR, Inc.

• Air Conditioning • Furnaces

Refrigeration • Dishwashers

Stoves & Ovens • Microwaves

Garbage Disposals

Washers&Dryers

Family Owned &Operatedsince 1986

Someone you can TRUST

All work GUARANTEED

BEST price in town!

708-712-1392

Oak Forest

2BR, 1st floor, newly remodeled,

heat &water included,

no pets. Close to metra, credit

check &security deposit required.

815-666-9418

Lockport

1BR apartment for rent

$700/month, heat &water

included, central location,

no pets.

815-838-3898

2004 Asphalt

Paving/Seal

Coating

2007 Black Dirt/Top Soil

Sawyer

Dirt

Pulverized Black Dirt

Rough Black Dirt

Driveway Gravel Available

Bobcat Services Available

For Delivery Pricing Call:

815-485-2490

www.sawyerdirt.com

HIRE

LOCALLY

Reach over

83% of

prospective

employees in

your area!

CALL TODAY FOR RATES

&INFORMATION

708-326-9170

www.22ndcenturymedia.com


40 | October 27, 2016 | The frankfort station Classifieds

frankfortstation.com

REAL ESTATE ATTORNEYS

CLOSINGS ANDALL REAL ESTATE NEEDS

THOUSANDSOFTRANSACTIONSCLOSED

2011 Brick/Chimney Experts

OCAL REALTOR

DIRECTORY

•RECOGNIZEDASAN

INDUSTRY LEADER FOR

OUREXPERIENCE AND

PROFESSIONALISM

•FEATURED INCHICAGO

REALTOR MAGAZINE

•SELECTED BYCHICAGO

AGENTMAGAZINE ASA

"WHO'S WHO" IN

CHICAGO REALESTATE

SELLING: $200 Flat Fee*

BUYING: $500 Flat Fee*

*Must mention Ad

OFFICESINORLANDPARK & CHICAGO

WWW.DUFFINDORELAW.COM• 312.566.0911

708.966.0692

Attorneys At Law

www.duffindorelaw.com

DUFFIN &DORE

2025 Concrete Work

Commission Rates

3 % !

as

Low

as

Ask me How

Kim Wirtz, Associate

Broker

(708) 516-3050

www.KimWirtz.com

Residential, Commercial and Short Sales Specialist

AWARD WINNING

AGENT

Buying or Selling?

"Expect the Best"

with

Cindi Maus

Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

Broker Associate

Multi-Million Dollar Producer

Cell: 708-819-0909

Email: cindi.maus@cbexchange.com

Visit my website: www.cindimaus.com

2032 Decking

Guaranteed The LOWEST Selling Fees!

2 %

3.5 % Total

To

Selling Fees

708 •460 • 8101

Sturdy

Deck & Fence

Repair, Rebuild or

Replace

Make It Safe - Make it Sturdy

708 479 9035

Advertise

your

RENTAL

PROPERTY

in the

newspaper

people turn

to first

CALL US TODAY: 708.326.9170

www.22ndcenturymedia.com


frankfortstation.com Classifieds

the frankfort station | October 27, 2016 | 41

2017 Cleaning

Services

Barb’s Cleaning

Service

We clean your home the

way YOU want it

cleaned! Good

Quality, Professional,

Reliable, and

Experienced.

Please call for

estimate.

2060 Drywall

2080 Firewood

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Sell It 708.326.9170 | Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It | DEADLINE - Friday at 3pm

2090 Flooring

Automotive

$52 4 lines/

7 papers

Real Estate

$50 7 7 papers

lines/

Help Wanted

$13 4 lines/

per line 7 papers

Merchandise

$30 7 4 papers

lines/

708-663-1789

2070 Electrical

EXPERIENCED

ELECTRICIAN

R E A S O N A B L E

D E P E N D A B L E

SMALL JOBS

CALL ANYTIME

(708) 478-8269

2097 Furniture Refinishing & Repair

2075 Fencing

2018 Concrete

Raising

A All American

Concrete Lifting

Concrete Sinking?

We Raise & Level

Stoops Sidewalks

Driveways Patios

Garage Floors Steps

& More!

All Work Guaranteed

FREE ESTIMATES

Ask About Special

Discounts!

(708)361-0166

2080 Firewood

Ideal

Firewood

Seasoned Mixed

Hardwoods

$120.00 per FC

Free Stacking &

Delivery

708 235 8917

815 981 0127

2090 Flooring

GroundsKeeper

Landscape Services!

Get Your Firewood

Early This Year

FREE Local Delivery

Contact us at

708.301.7441

or

Visit our website

www.groundskpr.com

2100 Garage Doors/Openers

2120 Handyman

2060 Drywall

Drywall

*Hanging *Taping

*New Homes

*Additions

*Remodeling

Call Greg At:

(815)485-3782

...to place

your

Classified Ad!

CALL

708.326.9170

CARRARAREPAIRSERVICE


42 | October 27, 2016 | The frankfort station Classifieds

frankfortstation.com

2120 Handyman

2130 Heating/Cooling

2132 Home Improvement

HANDYMAN SERVICE —WHATEVER YOU NEED

"OVER 30 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE"

Windows, Doors, Decks Kitchen & Bathroom Remodeling, Plumbing Interior and

Exterior Painting Wall Paper Removal Professional Work At Competitive Prices

CALL MIKE AT 708-790-3416

Kitchen, Baths, Basements

Quartz Countertops

Electrical & Plumbing

Carpentry, Trim & Finish

Tile/Wood & Laminate Floors

Handyman Services

www.custombuilthomeimp.com

JEROME

2130 Heating/Cooling

Buy

It! SELL It! FIND It!

in the

CLASSIFIEDS

CALL

708.326.9170

...to place

your

Classified Ad!

CALL

708.326.9170


frankfortstation.com Classifieds

the frankfort station | October 27, 2016 | 43

2135 Insulation 2140 Landscaping

2150 Paint & Decorating

2145 Lawn Maintenance

THE

2140 Landscaping

2150 Paint & Decorating

HIRE

LOCALLY

Reach over

83% of

prospective

employees in

your area!

CALL TODAY FOR RATES

&INFORMATION

708-326-9170

www.22ndcenturymedia.com

MARTY’S

PAINTING

Interior / Exterior

Fast, Neat Painting

Drywall

Wallpaper Removal

Staining

Free Estimates

20% Off with this ad

708-606-3926

Advertise your

RENTAL

PROPERTY

in the newspaper

people turn

to first

CALL US TODAY: 708.326.9170

www.22ndcenturymedia.com

2180 Remodeling

MORTGAGE

ALERT!

LOCK-IN MORE BUSINESS.

ADVERTISE LOCALLY.

CONTACT THE CLASSIFIED DEPARTMENT

708-326-9170

22ndcenturymedia.com


44 | October 27, 2016 | The frankfort station Classifieds

frankfortstation.com

2170 Plumbing

Save 10% with this ad

10% of All Rodding Will Go To The American Cancer Society

for Breast Cancer Research

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Sell It 708.326.9170

Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It

DEADLINE -

Friday at 3pm

2200 Roofing

Automotive

Real Estate

$52

4 lines/

7 papers Help Wanted

$50

7 lines/

7 papers Merchandise

$13

per line

4 lines/

7 papers

$30

4 lines/

7 papers

Family Owned & Operated • Over 40 Years

Licensed - Bonded - Insured

Call 24 hr. Service | Free Estimates

We will rod any main line

with clean out in lawn area

for

Lic# SL2599

(708)-846-2252 | (815) 329-4019

(708) 942-1943

royalflushplumbingandsewerinc.com

$

75 .00

inside slightly higher

You need your pipes repaired or

installed, we have all the newest

equipment,Underground TV

Cameras, Radio, Hydro Jetting.

• Rodding

• Water Jetting

• Kitchen Sink

DISCOUNT to SENIOR CITIZENS & VETERANS

with this ad

• Bathroom Sink

• Laundry Tubs

• Shower Drains

• Floor Drains

• Repair Work

• New Line Installs

Written guarantee on all work | Written estimate for insurance work

KASCH PLUMBING Inc.

• Waterheaters

•SumpPumps

• Faucets

Lisense #055-043148

Complete Plumbing Service

• WaterLeaks

• RPZ Testing

• Ejector Pumps

•Disposals

• Toilets

815.603.6085


frankfortstation.com Classifieds

the frankfort station | October 27, 2016 | 45

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Automotive

$52 4 lines/

7 papers

Help Wanted

$13 4 lines/

per line 7 papers

2200 Roofing

2276 Tuckpointing/Masonry

Sell It 708.326.9170 | Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It | DEADLINE - Friday at 3pm

Real Estate

$50 7 7 papers

lines/

Merchandise

$30 7 4 papers

lines/

2200 Roofing

2294 Window Cleaning

2390 Computer Services/Repair

2255 Tree Service

2296 Window

Fashions

Blinds &

Shades

Repair

I Do Windows &

Interiors

Call Pat

815 355 1112

815 485 1112

o f f i c e

I Do House Calls

Too!

2489

Merchandise

Wanted

Metal Wanted

Scrap Metal, Garden

Tractors,

Snowmobiles,

Appliances, Etc.

ANYTHING METAL!

Call 815-210-8819

Free pickup!


46 | October 27, 2016 | The frankfort station Classifieds

frankfortstation.com

2474 Appliances

Used Appliances For Sale

Washers, Dryers, Refrigerators

Many to choose from!

Apple Appliance

708.227.4477

2701 Property for

Sale

SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ES-

TATE at 10500 Yankee Ridge

Drive, Frankfort, IL 60423 (Residential).

Onthe 17th day of November,

2016 to be held at 12:00

noon, at the Will County Courthouse

Annex, 57 N. Ottawa Street,

Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432, under

Case Title: Interstate Intrinsic

Value Fund A LLC Plaintiff V.

Michael Jenkins; et. al. Defendant.

Case No. 14CH 1330 in the Circuit

Court of the Twelfth Judicial

Circuit, Will County, Illinois.

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%)

at the time of sale and the balance

within twenty-four (24) hours;

plus, for residential real estate, a

statutory judicial sale fee calculated

at the rate of $1 for each

$1,000 or fraction thereof of the

amount paid bythe purchaser to

the person conducting the sale, not

to exceed $300, for deposit into the

Abandoned Residential Property

Municipality Relief Fund. Nojudicial

sale fee shall be paid by the

mortgagee acquiring the residential

real estate pursuant to its credit bid

at the sale or by any mortgagee,

judgment creditor, or other lienor

acquiring the residential real estate

whose rights inand to the residential

real estate arose prior to the

sale. All payments shall be made in

cash or certified funds payable to

the Sheriff of Will County.

In the event the property is a condominium,

in accordance with 735

ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and

(H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and

765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are

hereby notified that the purchaser

of the unit, other than amortgagee,

shall pay the assessments and legal

fees required by subdivisions

(g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9and

the assessments required bysubsection

(g-1) of Section 18.5 of the

Illinois Condominium Property

Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03

(J) ifthere is asurplus following

application of the proceeds of sale,

then the plaintiff shall send written

notice pursuant to 735 ILCS

5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the

proceeding advising them of the

amount ofthe surplus and that the

surplus will beheld until aparty

obtains a court order for its distribution

or, in the absence of an order,

until the surplus is forfeited to

the State.

For Information Please Contact:

Codilis & Associates, P.C.

15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite

100

Burr Ridge, Illinois 60527

P: 630-794-5300

F: 630-794-9090

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR

DEBT COLLECTION PRAC-

TICES ACT YOU ARE AD-

VISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM

2701 Property for Sale

VS S W

IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT

COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO

COLLECT ADEBT AND ANY

INFORMATION OBTAINED

WILL BE USED FOR THAT

PURPOSE.

SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ES-

TATE at 21414 OLD NORTH

CHURCH ROAD, FRANKFORT,

IL 60423 (Single family home). On

the 10th day of November, 2016 to

be held at 12:00 noon, at the Will

County Courthouse Annex, 57 N.

Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet,

IL 60432, under Case Title:

PLANET HOME LENDING, LLC

Plaintiff V. EUGENE C MO-

JEKWU AKA GENE C. MO-

JEKWU; UCHE AJENE-MO-

JEKWU AKA UCHE MO-

JEKWU; FIRST UNITED BANK;

ILLINOIS DEPARTMENT OF

REVENUE, ARCHER BANK

S/I/I TO ALLEGIANCE COM-

MUNITY BANK, ARCHER

BANK S/B/M WITH ALLE-

GIANCE COMMUNITY BANK;

GEORGETOWN HOMEOWN-

ERS ASSOCIATION OF

FRANKFORT; I LLINOIS

HEALTHCARE AND FAMILY

SERVICES Defendant.

Case No. 15CH 1007 in the Circuit

Court of the Twelfth Judicial

Circuit, Will County, Illinois.

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%)

at the time of sale and the balance

within twenty-four (24) hours;

plus, for residential real estate, a

statutory judicial sale fee calculated

at the rate of $1 for each

$1,000 or fraction thereof of the

amount paid bythe purchaser to

the person conducting the sale, not

to exceed $300, for deposit into the

Abandoned Residential Property

Municipality Relief Fund. Nojudicial

sale fee shall be paid by the

mortgagee acquiring the residential

real estate pursuant to its credit bid

at the sale or by any mortgagee,

judgment creditor, or other lienor

acquiring the residential real estate

whose rights inand to the residential

real estate arose prior to the

sale. All payments shall be made in

cash or certified funds payable to

the Sheriff of Will County.

In the event the property is acon-

dominium, in accordance with 735

ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and

(H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and

765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are

hereby notified that the purchaser

of the unit, other than amortgagee,

shall pay the assessments and legal

fees required by subdivisions

(g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9and

the assessments required bysubsection

(g-1) of Section 18.5 of the

Illinois Condominium Property

Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03

(J) ifthere is asurplus following

application of the proceeds of sale,

then the plaintiff shall send written

notice pursuant to 735 ILCS

5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the

proceeding advising them of the

amount ofthe surplus and that the

surplus will beheld until aparty

obtains acourt order for its distribution

or, in the absence of an order,

until the surplus is forfeited to

the State.

For Information Please Contact:

marinosci law group, p.c. - illinois

134 North La Salle St., Ste 1900

Chicago, Illinois 60602

P: 312- 940-8582

F: 577- 571-4228

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR

DEBT COLLECTION PRAC-

TICES ACT YOU ARE AD-

VISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM

IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT

COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO

COLLECT ADEBT AND ANY

INFORMATION OBTAINED

WILL BE USED FOR THAT

PURPOSE.

2703 Legal

Notices

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR

DEBT COLLECTION PRAC-

TICES ACT YOU ARE AD-

VISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM

IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT

COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO

COLLECT ADEBT AND ANY

INFORMATION OBTAINED

WILL BE USED FOR THAT

PURPOSE.

STATE OF ILLINOIS )

) SS.

COUNTY OF WILL )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF

THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIR-

CUIT

WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

Interstate Intrinsic Value Fund A

LLC

Plaintiff,

vs.

Michael Jenkins; et. al.

Defendant.

No. 14 CH 1330

NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE

Public notice ishereby given that

pursuant to ajudgment entered in

the above cause on the 10th day of

August, 2016, MIKE KELLEY,

Sheriff of Will County, Illinois,

will on Thursday, the 17th day of

November, 2016 ,commencing at

12:00 o'clock noon, at the Will

County Courthouse Annex, 57 N.

Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet,

IL 60432, sell at public auction to

the highest and best bidder orbidders

the following-described real

estate:

LOT 110, OF YANKEE RIDGE

SUBDIVISION, UNIT ONE, BE-

ING ASUBDIVISION OF PART

OF THE SOUTH EAST 1/4 OF

SECTION 20, TOWNSHIP 35

NORTH, RANGE 12 EAST OF

THE THIRD PRINCIPAL ME-

RIDIAN, ACCORDING TOTHE

PLAT THEREOF RECORDED

JANUARY 5, 1988 AS DOCU-

MENT NO. R88-00363, IN WILL

COUNTY, ILLINOIS.

Commonly known as:

10500 Yankee Ridge Drive, Frankfort,

IL 60423

Description of Improvements:

Residential

P.I.N.:

19-09-20-406-002-0000

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%)

at the time of sale and the balance

within twenty-four (24) hours;

plus, for residential real estate, a

statutory judicial sale fee calculated

at the rate of $1 for each

$1,000 or fraction thereof of the

amount paid bythe purchaser to

the person conducting the sale, not

p g ,

to exceed $300, for deposit into the

Abandoned Residential Property

Municipality Relief Fund. Nojudicial

sale fee shall be paid by the

mortgagee acquiring the residential

real estate pursuant to its credit bid

at the sale or by any mortgagee,

judgment creditor, or other lienor

acquiring the residential real estate

whose rights inand to the residential

real estate arose prior to the

sale. All payments shall be made in

cash or certified funds payable to

the Sheriff of Will County.

In the event the property is acon-

dominium, in accordance with 735

ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and

(H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and

765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are

hereby notified that the purchaser

of the unit, other than amortgagee,

shall pay the assessments and legal

fees required by subdivisions

(g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9and

the assessments required bysubsection

(g-1) of Section 18.5 of the

Illinois Condominium Property

Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03

(J) ifthere is asurplus following

application of the proceeds of sale,

then the plaintiff shall send written

notice pursuant to 735 ILCS

5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the

proceeding advising them of the

amount ofthe surplus and that the

surplus will beheld until aparty

obtains acourt order for its distribution

or, in the absence of an order,

until the surplus is forfeited to

the State.

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE

CONTACT:

Codilis & Associates, P.C.

15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite

100

Burr Ridge, Illinois 60527

P: 630-794-5300

F: 630-794-9090

Plaintiff's Attorney

MIKE KELLEY

Sheriff of Will County

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR

DEBT COLLECTION PRAC-

TICES ACT YOU ARE AD-

VISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM

IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT

COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO

COLLECT ADEBT AND ANY

INFORMATION OBTAINED

WILL BE USED FOR THAT

PURPOSE.

STATE OF ILLINOIS )

) SS.

COUNTY OF WILL )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF

THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIR-

CUIT

WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

PLANET HOME LENDING, LLC

Plaintiff,

vs.

EUGENE C MOJEKWU AKA

GENE C. MOJEKWU; UCHE

AJENE-MOJEKWU AKA UCHE

MOJEKWU; FIRST UNITED

BANK; ILLINOIS DEPART-

MENT OF REVENUE, ARCHER

BANK S/I/I TO ALLEGIANCE

COMMUNITY BANK, ARCHER

BANK S/B/M WITH ALLE-

GIANCE COMMUNITY BANK;

GEORGETOWN HOMEOWN-

ERS ASSOCIATION OF

FRANKFORT; I LLINOIS

HEALTHCARE AND FAMILY

SERVICES

2703 Legal Notices

Defendant.

No. 15 CH 1007

NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE

Public notice ishereby given that

pursuant to ajudgment entered in

the above cause on the 11th day of

August, 2016, MIKE KELLEY,

Sheriff of Will County, Illinois,

will on Thursday, the 10th day of

November, 2016 ,commencing at

12:00 o'clock noon, at the Will

County Courthouse Annex, 57 N.

Ottawa Street, Room 201, Joliet,

IL 60432, sell at public auction to

the highest and best bidder orbidders

the following-described real

estate:

LOT 35 IN GEORGETOWN

SUBDIVISION, A SUBDIVI-

SION OF PART OF THE

SOUTHEAST 1/4 OFSECTION

24, TOWNSHIP 35 NORTH,

RANGE 12 EAST OF THE

THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN,

AND ALSO BEING ARESUBDI-

VISION OF PART OF LOTS 5

AND 6 IN GEORGETOWN

SQUARE SUBDIVISION, AC-

CORDING TO THE PLAT

THEREOF RECORDED MAY

30,1989, AS DOCUMENT NO.

R89-25414, AND AFFIDAVITS

RECORDED FEBRUARY 14,

1990 AS DOCUMENT

R90-008411 AND RECORDED

FEBRUARY 26, 1990 AS DOCU-

MENT R90-010328, IN WILL

COUNTY, ILLINOIS.

Commonly known as:

21414 OLD NORTH CHURCH

ROAD, FRANKFORT, IL 60423

Description of Improvements:

Single family home

P.I.N.:

19-09-24-476-014-0000

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%)

at the time of sale and the balance

within twenty-four (24) hours;

plus, for residential real estate, a

statutory judicial sale fee calculated

at the rate of $1 for each

$1,000 or fraction thereof of the

amount paid bythe purchaser to

the person conducting the sale, not

to exceed $300, for deposit into the

Abandoned Residential Property

Municipality Relief Fund. Nojudicial

sale fee shall be paid by the

mortgagee acquiring the residential

real estate pursuant to its credit bid

at the sale or by any mortgagee,

judgment creditor, or other lienor

acquiring the residential real estate

whose rights inand to the residential

real estate arose prior to the

sale. All payments shall be made in

cash or certified funds payable to

the Sheriff of Will County.

In the event the property is a condominium,

in accordance with 735

ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and

(H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and

765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are

hereby notified that the purchaser

of the unit, other than amortgagee,

shall pay the assessments and legal

fees required by subdivisions

(g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9and

the assessments required bysubsection

(g-1) of Section 18.5 of the

Illinois Condominium Property

Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03

(J) ifthere is asurplus following

application of the proceeds of sale,

then the plaintiff shall send written

notice pursuant to 735 ILCS

p

5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the

proceeding advising them of the

amount ofthe surplus and that the

surplus will beheld until aparty

obtains a court order for its distribution

or, in the absence of an order,

until the surplus is forfeited to

the State.

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE

CONTACT:

marinosci law group, p.c. - illinois

134 North La Salle St., Ste 1900

Chicago, Illinois 60602

P: 312- 940-8582

F: 577- 571-4228

Plaintiff's Attorney

MIKE KELLEY

Sheriff of Will County

The Village ofFrankfort is seeking

proposals from qualified contractors

to provide dirt removal services

and hauling. Specifications

may be obtained online at

www.villageoffrankfort.com under

the tab doing business with the Village

oratthe Village Administration

Building, 432 W. Nebraska

Street, Frankfort, Illinois 60423

(815) 469-2177 beginning Friday,

October 21. Submittals must be received

no later than 10:00 AM,

November 1, 2016.

Legal Notice

Official notice ishereby given that

sealed bids will be received in the

Office of the Director, Frankfort

Public Library District until 5:00

p.m. local time Monday, November

14, 2016, and then atsaid office

publicly opened and read

aloud for the following:

RFB ON: hvac replacement

Scope of work includes: Purchase

and installation of HVAC system.

Purchase and installation of heater.

Specifications and bid forms may

be obtained atthe office of the Director,

Frankfort Public Library

District, 21119 S. Pfeiffer Rd.,

Frankfort, IL 60423 or downloaded

from the library website at:

www.frankfortlibrary.org

All bids shall be accompanied bya

Bid Bond, Certified or Cashier’s

Check made payable to the Frankfort

Public Library District for not

less than ten percent (10%) of the

bid amount.

All work under this contract shall

comply with the Prevailing Wage

Act ofthe State ofIllinois, 820

ILCS 130/0.01 et seq. &the Employment

ofIllinois Workers on

Public Works Act (30 ILCS

570/0.01 et seq.).

Offers may not be withdrawn for a

period of ninety (90) days after

closing date without the consent of

the Board of Trustees.

Any Bid submitted unsealed, unsigned,

fax transmissions or received

subsequent to the aforementioned

date and time, may be disqualified

and returned tothe bidder.

The Frankfort Public Library District

reserves the right to reject any

and all bids or parts thereof, to

waive any irregularities or informalities

inbid procedures and to

award the contract inamanner best

serving the interest ofthe Library

District.

Dated: 10/12/2016

Pierre Gregoire

Library Director


frankfortstation.com Classifieds

the frankfort station | October 27, 2016 | 47

2703 Legal

Notices

LEGAL NOTICE

We hereby give notice that apublic hearing will beheld before the Village

of Frankfort Plan Commission/Zoning Board of Appeals on November 10,

2016, at 6:30 p.m., in the Board Room of the Frankfort Village Hall, 432

W. Nebraska Street, Frankfort, Illinois 60423.

Gander Builders, Inc. has filed anapplication for a building materials variance

to permit the use of composite siding in the construction of asingle

family home proposed at 231 Oak Street. The property is legally described

as follows:

PIN: 19-09-28-226-015-0000

PARCEL 1: THAT PART OFTHE EAST HALF OFTHE NORTHEAST

FRACTIONAL QUARTER OFSECTION 28, NORTH OF THE INDIAN

BOUNDARY LINE, TOWNSHIP 35 NORTH, RANGE 12 EAST OF

THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:

BEGINNING AT A POINT 60.00 FEET WEST AND 325.00 FEET

SOUTH OFTHE NORTHWEST CORNER OFLOT 1, IN BLOCK 1,IN

HOLDEN’S ADDITIONS TO THE TOWN OF FRANKFORT (THE

PLAT THEREIN RECORDED IN BOOK 63, BETWEEN PAGES 100

AND 101), SAID POINT BEING ON THE WEST RIGHT-OF-WAY

LINE OF ASH STREET, THENCE SOUTH 32.00 FEET, ALONG SAID

WEST RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF ASH STREET, TO THE NORTH-

EAST CORNER OF LOT 77, IN MCDONALD’S SUBDIVISION, AC-

CORDING TOTHE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED DECEMBER 6,

1901, AS DOCUMENT NO. 2134222; THENCE WEST 264.00 FEET,

LONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID LOT 77, TO A POINT OF THE

EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF OAK STREET; THENCE NORTH

32.0 FEET, ALONG SAID EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF OAK

STREET; THENCE EAST 264.00, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, IN

WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS.

PARCEL 2: LOT 77 AND THAT PART OFLOT 76, IN MCDON-

ALD’S SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE NORTHEAST FRAC-

TIONAL QUARTER OF SECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 35 NORTH,

RANGE 12 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, AC-

CORDING TOTHE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED DECEMBER 6,

1901, AS DOCUMENT NO. 213422, LYING NORTH OF ALINE DE-

SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE INTERSECTION OF

THE WEST LINE OF SAID LOT 76 WITH THE SOUTH LINE OF THE

NORTH 18.00 FEET OF SAID LOT 76, THENCE SOUTH 88DE-

GREES 10 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST 80.87 FEET, ALONG SAID

SOUTH LINE OFTHE NORTH 18.00FEET OFLOT 76, THENCE

SOUTH 59DEGREES 05 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 5.81 FEET;

THENCE SOUTH 88 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 100 SECONDS EAST

11.38 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 86DEGREES 41 MINUTES 47 SEC-

ONDS EAST 86.30 FEET; THENCE NORTH 52 DEGREES 12 MIN-

UTES 17 SECONDS EAST 4.69 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 80DEGREES

59 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST 10.22 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 09

DEGREES 33 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST 4.00 FEET; THENCE

NORTH 63 MINUTES 38 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST 15.25 FEET

TO A POINT ON SAID SOUTH LINE OFTHE NORTH 18.00 FEET OF

LOT 76; THENCE SOUTH 88DEGREES 10 MINUTES 47 SECONDS

EAST 52.94 FEET, ALONG SAID SOUTH LINE OFTHE NORTH

18.00 FEET OF LOT 76, TO ITS INTERSECTION WITH THE EAST

LINE OF LOT 76 FOR THE POINT OF TERMINUS, IN WILL

COUNTY, ILLINOIS.

PARCEL 3: THAT PART OFTHE EAST HALF OFTHE NORTHEAST

FRACTIONAL QUARTR OF SECTION 28, NORTH OF THE INDIAN

BOUNDARY LINE, TOWNSHIP 35 NORTH, RANGE 12 EAST OF

THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:

BEGINNING AT A POINT 60.00 FEET WEST AND 250.00 FEET

SOUTH OFTHE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 1IN BLOCK 1,IN

HOLDEN’S ADDITION TO THE TOWN OF FRANKFORT (THE

PLAT THEREOF RECORDED INBOOK 63 BETWEEN PAGES 100

AND 101), SAID POINT BEING ON THE WEST RIGHT-OF-WAY

LINE OF ASH STREET; THENCE WEST 70.00 FEET; THENCE

SOUTH 75.00 FEET; THENCE EAST 70.00 FEET, TO A POINT ON

SAID WEST RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF ASH STREET; THENCE

NORTH 75.00 FEET, ALONG SAID WEST RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF

ASH STREET, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, INWILL COUNTY,

ILLINOIS.

PARCEL 4: THAT PORTION OF THE VACATED ASH STREET LY-

ING EAST AND ADJACENT TOLOT 77 AND THE NORTH 18.00

FEET OF LOT 76 IN MCDONALD’S SUBDIVISION OF PART OF

THE NORTHEAST FRACTIONAL QUARTER OF SECTION 28,

TOWNSHIP 35 NORTH, RANGE 12 EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCI-

PAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RE-

CORDED DECEMBER 6, 1901, AS DOCUMENT NO. 213422, EX-

CLUDING THEREFROM ANY PORTION OF THE VACATED ASH

STREET LYING WITHIN LOT 2 AND LOT 3OFPROPREITORS

SUBDIVISION OF PART OF THE NORTHEAST FRACTIONAL

QUARTER OFSECTION 28, TOWNSHIP 35 NORTH, RANGE 12

EAST OF THE THIRD PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, ACCORDING TO

THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED DECEMBER 12, 1966 AS DOCU-

MENT NO. R66-18426, ALL IN WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS.

The Village of Frankfort- accepting

applications for a part time

snow plowing position with the

Public Works Department. Applications

will be accepted until November

14, 2016 at 5:00 p.m. A

valid CDL Class “B” driver’s license

is required for this seasonal

position. Applications are available

at the Village Hall or www.villageoffrankfort.com.

Please submit

your application/resume to the Village

of Frankfort, 432 W. Nebraska

St, Frankfort, IL 60423.

The Village of Frankfort Police

Department is seeking applications

for qualified towing vendors to

provide vehicle towing and secure

storage services for vehicles in violation

ofIllinois Complied Statutes,

Village ordinances, and regulations.

Specifications can be obtained

online at www.villageoffrankfort.com

under the tab doing

business with the Village oratthe

Frankfort Police Department,

20602 Lincoln Way Lane, Frankfort,

Illinois 60423 (815)

469-9435. Submittals must be received

no later than 10:00 AM, October

31, 2016.

BID NOTICE

The Village ofFrankfort is accepting

bids for the removal of Ash

trees. Bid packets can be picked up

from the Village Hall orVillage

website at: villageoffrankfort.com.

Bids will be accepted until November

15, 2016 at 10:00 am. Questions

should be directed to Terry

Kestel, (815) 469-2177.

Advertise your

RENTAL

PROPERTY

in the

newspaper

people turn

to first

CALL US TODAY:

708.326.9170

www.22ndcenturymedia.com

2703 Legal Notices

ANNUAL TREASURER’S REPORT

VILLAGE OF FRANKFORT

FISCAL YEAR ENDED APRIL 30, 2016

REVENUE SUMMARY:

PROPERTY TAX $3,547,862; SALES TAX 6,078,143; USE TAX 410,480; REPLACEMENT TAX 57,438; MOTOR FUEL

TAX 487,332; INCOME TAX 1,818,863; LICENSE & PERMITS 1,606,092; FINES 209,637; CHARGES FOR SERVICES

985,875; WATER &SEWER FEES 7,726,967; INTEREST 81,370; MISCELLANEOUS 678,427; TOTAL REVENUES:

$23,688,486

COMPENSATION SUMMARY

EMPLOYEE NAME

UNDER $25,000.00

ALLAN, A; ANDERSON, B;ATTAR, J; BABKA, S; BELL, O;BLASGEN, Z; BLOOMFIELD, M; BORRELLI, A; BROWN,

S; CHILLON, C; COX, M; DERMODY, T; DOYLE, B; DUCAY, JP; DUCAY, JC; ENNS, G; FLETCHER, J; FORD, M; GER-

ICKE, C; HEATH, C; HERDER, J; HERDER, K; HOLLAND, J; JAROSZ, K; KAMINSKI, D; KAMINSKI, C; KENNEDY, M;

KENNEDY, R; KOSOLA, R; LYEN, C; MAHOLOVICH, JE; MAHOLOVICH, JM; MARINIER, M; MARTELLO, D;

MCGIVERN, S; MORGAN, T; MURPHY, D; O'DONNELL, T; OGLE, KE; OGLE, KH;OLALEYE, AB; OLALEYE, A;

PARKER, J; PAULING, G; PISCIA, A; POMORSKI, N; PROVIS, D; RADECKY, C; RUVOLI, A; RUVOLI, G;

SALETTA-KERRIGAN, T; SCHULTZ, J; STEVENS, M; TEACH, E; TREVARTHAN, R; VANDERPOOL, D; VIDOR, C;VI-

DOR, G; WALKER, R; WEAVER, M; WELLER, M; WYBOURN, S; ZAMBRANO, M; ZUPANCIC, J

$25,000-49,999.99

BARTNIK, T; BLASGEN, J; CORK, T; DELGROSSO, K; FLAMMOND, P; GINDER, K; GLASS, B; GROTE, B; HARTUNG,

K; ITTERSAGEN, W; KAMINSKI, J; LESIAK, E; LYNCHEY, S; MARTINEZ, R; MARTINO, D;MEDEMA, K; MORGAN,

R; ORTIS, J; OSBORNE, J;REGAN, T; REILLY, C;REZACK, R; SCHAEFER, L;SCHAEFER, R; SCHMIDT, C;SMITH, H;

TREVARTHAN, R

$50,000 - $74,999.99

ADENT, S; CAM; CRAVEN, J; DEMPSEY, C; FALEJCZYK, M; HACK, K; JOHNSTON, J; KOVACH, W; LEE, M; LONG,

G; MAROSS, R; MATHER, L; MCCLUSKEY, M; MCDERMOTT, G; MIRELES, C;NIELSEN, A; RICHARDS, J; RIFF, C;

ROESEL, D; SAVAGLIO, F; SCHUBBE, M; TRIEZENBERG, M; TYSSEN, R; WALSH, D

$75,000 - $99,999.99

BANKES, W;BOERSMA, W; BROWN, Z;BUIVIDAS, T; CHELEPIS, L;COOK, J; DOWDING, W; EISENBRANDT, L; HU-

MENIK, J; JAICOMO, M; JOHNSON, K; LANZ, K; MAROSS, M; MINEO, T; MINETTE, A; MISEK, M; MONREAL, K;

PANATTONI, J; PANATTONI, J; PAZERA, M; POTTER, S; REED, T; SANDERS, J; SIBICK, J; SKANBERG, M;SROKA, J;

THOMPSON, M; WAKEFIELD, L

$100,000 - $124,999.99

BOOTH, J; KEEGAN, K; KESTEL, T; KRAUSE, R

Over $125,000.00

BURICA, J; DUCAY, J; PISCIA, R

TOTAL COMPENSATION $6,249,025.09

1ST AYD CORPORATION 4,358.81; 22ND CENTURY MEDIA LLC 5,771.68; APROFESSIONAL PAVING IN 64,818.00;

ACRES GROUP 190,908.00; AFFORDABLE CONCRETE RAIS 3,250.00; AIRY'S INC -TINLEY PARK 39,685.82; AIS

69,908.46; ALADDIN LANDSCAPING 5,500.00; ALEXANDER EQUIPMENT RENT 14,585.00; ALL TRAFFIC SOLUTIONS

13,720.00; ALL-PRINT 2,769.60; ALSIP NURSERY 3,466.84; AM-COAT PAINTING INC 273,690.00; AMERICAN WATER

WORKS ASC 3,461.00; AMES/KERRI 5,500.00; AQUAFIX 23,548.80; ARBOR CARE INC 6,500.00; AREA LANDSCAPE

SUPPLY 31,970.46; ARRIBA CONSTRUCTION & SU 5,200.00; ARRO LABORATORY INC 21,067.87; ATLAS COPCO

COMPRESSORS 18,595.33; AURELIO'S PIZZA 2,852.89; AUSTIN TYLER CONSTRUCTIO 946,283.82; AVI SYSTEMS

INC 7,641.85; AVTS GROUP INC 7,410.00; B&HPHOTO-VIDEO-PRO AU 16,448.31; BANKES/WILLIAM 4,135.49;

BARCO PRODUCTS COMPANY 12,184.03; BARTNIK/THOMAS 8,627.30; BAXTER &WOODMAN, INC. 770,447.04;

BEARY LANDSCAPING INC 10,760.50; BERRYMAN EQUIPMENT COMPA 11,832.72; BILL'S LAWN MAINTENANCE

288,777.50; BLASGEN/JODI 6,476.82; BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIELD O 1,086,450.53; BLUE OLDE STONE, LLC 88,000.00;

BOERSMA/WILLIAM L 5,148.42; BRACING SYSTEMS, INC. 9,034.05; BROOKSIDE II HOA 5,850.00; BUIVIDAS/THO-

MAS P 7,340.06; BURDELIK BUILDERS INC 6,000.00; BURICA/JOHN J. 5,537.67; BURNS &MCDONNELL ENGINE

402,332.25; BURRIS EQUIPMENT CO 3,881.75; CALL ONE 21,562.52; CAMILLERI/GIACOMO 13,408.23; CARGILL INC

137,079.67; CARIBBEAN POOLS INC 12,000.00; CARROLL DISTRIBUTING &C8,684.52; CB&I INC 273,973.50; CDW

GOVERNMENT INC. 11,289.58; CELTIC CONSTRUCTION INC 5,000.00; CHAMPLIN/SCOTT & KAREN 7,000.00;

CHASE VISA 4,735.19; CHASE-VISA 4,258.66; CHELEPIS/LEANNE M5,521.65; CHICAGO BACKFLOW INC 2,660.00;

CHICAGO TRIBUNE 13,309.28; CHRISTOPHER BBURKE ENGI 8,942.74; CHUBASCO LAWN SPRINKLERS 38,836.00;

CICCOTELLI SIGNS INC 18,880.00; CINTAS CORPORATION #344 5,112.14; CLARENCE DAVIDS &COMPAN 4,529.00;

CLARKE AQUATIC SERVICES 2,820.00; CLARKE ENVIRONMENTAL MOS 109,773.76; CNG 8,226.94; COBBLESTONE

WALK HOA 3,037.00; COMAR DRILLING COMPANY I 11,650.00; COMCAST CABLE 6,297.29; COMCAST CABLE

COMMUNICAT 2,596.04; COMMONWEALTH EDISON CO 110,462.46; COMPLETE EQUITY MARKETS 14,360.84; COM-

PUTER SOFTWARE INC 3,000.00; CONSERV FSINC 6,275.32; CONSTELLATION ENERGY SER 607,553.95; CONSTITU-

ENT OUTREACH 2,988.00; CONSTRUCTION SOLUTIONS O 1,081,178.00; COOK/JEFFREY W 6,821.07; CORRPRO

COMPANIES INC 7,015.00; COUNTRY CONCRETE INC 12,725.00; COUNTY OF WILL 7,680.00; COYNE TEXTILE

SERVICES 7,414.88; CRAVEN/JOHN E 13,461.95; CTC 9,569.88; CURRIE MOTORS 464,925.17; D&TSERVICE INC

21,580.00, D &TVENTURES LLC 4,800.00; DACAV INDUSTRIES INC 2,745.00; DAHLMAN SHEET METAL CO

3,923.00; DAHME MECHANICAL INDUSTR 7,737.30; DESKS INC 66,940.55; DISASTER SOLUTION INC 6,107.14; DON

MORRIS ARCHITECTS PC 31,532.26; DRINKER BIDDLE &REATH L 15,056.00; DUCAY/JERALD 3,192.17; DUKE'S

ACE HARDWARE #777 6,451.19; DUNHAM JR/JOHN E2,800.00; EZDUZ IT PRODUCTS INC 12,380.00; E.F.R. FIRE

EQUIP. CO., 3,255.77; EHLERS &ASSOCIATES INC 23,897.50; EJ EQUIPMENT INC 3,925.29; EJ USA INC 8,471.17;

ELITE BUILDERS INC 15,436.62; EMPAXX 2,725.00; EMPLOYEE BENEFITS CORPOR 5,270.00; ESRI 25,000.00; EXCEL

ELECTRIC INC 187,536.18; EXPERT CHEMICAL & SUPPLY 3,553.50; FALEJCZYK/MATTHEW M 6,118.96; FASTENAL

COMPANY 12,584.17; FLAHERTY BUILDERS INC 6,000.00; FORCE ENTERPRISES 5,920.00; FRANCZEK RADELET

14,003.45; FRANKFORT BLUEGRASS FEST 5,000.00; FRANKFORT CHAMBER OF COM 4,625.00; FRANKFORT FIRE

PROT. DIS 20,385.46; FRANKFORT HISTORIC BUSIN 6,500.00; FRANKFORT PARK DISTRICT 53,176.70; FRANKFORT

POST OFFICE 57,499.86; FRANKFORT PUBLIC LIBRARY 33,963.93; FRANKFORT SCHOOL DIST. 1 376,786.91;

FRANKFORT SQ PARK DISTRI 22,790.56; GCOOPER OIL COMPANY INC 12,787.30; GALLAGHER MATERIALS CORP

5,214.33; GALLS 4,581.77; GALLS LLC 3,854.07; GASKILL &WALTON CONSTRU 24,830.00; GASVODA & ASSOCI-

ATES, IN 18,830.08; GEA WESTFALIA SEPARATOR 24,719.91; GEMPLER'S 9,352.04; GEOCON PROFESSIONAL SERV

34,044.00; GLASS/BEVERLY H 5,848.05; GLOBAL EQUIPMENT COMPANY 5,841.45; GOLDY LOCKS INC. 4,644.59;

GORDON ELECTRIC SUPPLY I7,997.38; GORMAN GROUP LTD/THE 6,800.00; GRAEFEN DEVELOPMENT 13,245.00;

GRAINGER 4,986.35; GREAT SPACE LLC 32,191.69; GREEN MILL RADIO SUPPLY 3,815.34; GUARDIAN-ALTERNATE

FUNDE 64,085.45; GUARDIAN-APPLETON 8,953.08; HACH COMPANY 17,157.25; HACK/KEVIN 4,265.03; HAWKINS

INC 82,574.22; HAWKINSON NISSAN 2,665.21; HD SUPPLY WATERWORKS LTD 165,188.92; HERITAGE FS INC.

61,431.55; HICKORY CREEK WATERSHED 7,000.00; HOME DEPOT #6919 99,942.31; HOMER TREE CARE INC

227,552.72; HOMERDING/NANCY 4,778.78; HR GREEN INC 237,488.89; HUTCHINSON DESIGN GROUP 4,785.00; HY-

DRO-VISION TECHNOLOGY 105,329.42; IDES5,064.00; ISL2,626.67; ID NETWORKS 3,413.00; ILLINOIS ENVIRON-

MENTAL P 96,506.26; ILLINOIS EPA 48,500.00; ILLINOIS SECTION AWWA 3,900.00; ILLINOIS TRUCK &EQUIPME

21,725.00; IMAGE 360 23,101.27; INDUSTRIAL CHEM LABS & 4,899.64; INLAND ARTS &GRAPHICS 5,277.03; INSITU-

FORM TECHNOLOGIES 89,821.82; INTERSTATE BATTERY SYSTE 4,641.00; ISABEL'S JOURNEY 10,000.00; ITTER-

SAGEN/WILLIAM 7,079.96; IVES-RYAN GROUP INC 10,426.65; JAICOMO/MICHAEL 2,515.46; JEWEL FOOD STORES

#3052 3,939.24; JOHNSON/KEVIN S 3,238.62; JOLIET JUNIOR COLLEGE 6,339.90; JOLIET SUSPENSION INC 6,979.76;

JONES PARTS &SERVICE IN 6,975.53; JULIE,INC. 8,722.67; K&JLANDSCAPING 60,678.00; K BROTHERS FENCE

INC 4,750.00; KAESER & BLAIR INC 3,307.49; KALINOWSKI/EUGENE F. 3,762.75; KEEGAN/KEVIN 4,384.24;

KESTEL/TERRY J 3,052.06; KIDSWORK CHILDREN'S MUSE 8,600.00; KIESLER'S POLICE SUPPLY 16,004.77; KI-

WANIS CLUB 5,343.49; KNOLLCREST LANDSCAPE &D4,500.00; KONING CONCRETE INC 16,040.00; KOREMAN

LANDSCAPE CO 2,942.00; KOVACH/WENDY 7,973.56; KRAUSE/ROBERT 4,026.85; L-3 COMMUNICATIONS 14,311.00;


48 | October 27, 2016 | The frankfort station Classifieds

frankfortstation.com

2703 Legal Notices 2703 Legal Notices

, ; , ; , ; , ;

LANDSCAPE SUPPLY 118,079.59; LANZ/KEVIN E 12,449.83; LARAWAY INVESTMENTS LLC 75,735.00; LAUTER-

BACH & AMEN LLP 28,250.00; LAWSON PRODUCTS INC 12,810.01; LAYNE CHRISTENSEN COMPAN 110,814.60; LEN

COX & SONS EXCAVATIN 44,986.10; LESIAK/ERIC M 4,057.32; LEXIPOL LLC 2,850.00; LINDEN GROUP INC

16,332.00; LIVING HABITATS 8,208.00; LOCKE LORD LLP 52,008.41; LONG/GEORGE G4,103.62; L-W HIGH SCHOOL

DIST 210 133,703.12; L-W PUBLIC SAFETY COMMUN 337,746.00; LYNCHEY/SUSAN 5,635.15; M COOPER SUPPLY CO

4,514.93; M.E. SIMPSON CO INC 35,192.50; MAHONEY, SILVERMAN & CRO 133,809.58; MARATHON SPORTSWEAR

13,240.07; MARTIN LEASING INC 3,094.00; MARTIN WHALEN OFFICE SOL 4,597.00; MARTINEZ/JULIO & SUREIA

5,000.00; MARXMAN &ASSOCIATES INC 10,816.39; MASTER AUTOMOTIVE SUPPLY 8,972.27; MATHER/LANE

4,698.36; MATTHUIS TRUCKING INC 117,369.58; MCCLUSKEY/MARK A5,989.30; MCMAHON CUSTOM BUILDERS

4,000.00; MEADE ELECTRIC COMPANY, 8,400.00; MEDEMA/KYLE E 12,586.98; MEDWORKS NEW LENOX 4,836.77;

MEIER BROTHERS TIRE SUPP 4,708.59; MESIROW INSURANCE SERVIC 8,015.00; METRO POWER INC 13,288.06;

METROPOLITAN COMPOUNDS I12,189.50; MIDWEST OPERATING ENGINE 69,660.00; MIDWEST WATER GROUP

INC 7,200.00; MINETTE III/ANTHONY 7,155.27; MINORITIES &SUCCESS 2,995.00; MOKENA PARK DISTRICT

3,997.14; MONREAL/KENNETH R 3,539.48; MONROE TRUCK EQUIPMENT 94,086.52; MR DAVID'S FLOORING INTL

36,078.00; MRS BPARKING LOT MAINTE 13,005.00; MUTUAL OF OMAHA 9,041.03; NADEAU'S ICE SCULPTURES

6,220.00; NATIONAL CONSTRUCTION 2,844.45; NEXTEL COMMUNICATIONS 5,302.86; NICOR GAS 27,699.39; NIEL-

SEN/ADAM P 7,748.29; NORMOYLE/ROBERT J19,895.00; NORTHERN TOOL &EQUIPMEN 2,906.93; NORWALK

TANK CO. 3,292.86; NU-WAY DISPOSAL SERVICE, 1,379,036.37; OFFICE DEPOT 2,827.92; OLD PLANK RD TRAIL

MGMNT 2,600.00; OLD PLANK TRAIL COMM BAN 15,818.78; ON TIME DESIGN 21,984.00; ORGANIC SEDIMENT RE-

MOVAL 64,525.00; ORKIN PEST CONTROL 4,252.25; ORTIS/J GUADALUPE 2,711.10; P. T. FERRO CONSTRUCTION

123,159.46; PATTEN INDUSTRIES INC 10,928.86; PAZERA/MICHAEL 6,247.64; PEOTONE CUSD #207U 21,701.75;

PETTY CASH 3,440.12; PHILLIP'S CHEVROLET INC 293,422.74; PISCIA/ROBERT 3,678.39; PLAZA CLEANERS 3,631.75;

POLYDYNE INC 13,800.00; POMP'S TIRE SERVICE INC 5,125.00; POSTMASTER 4,502.09; PRAIRIE MATERIALS

SALES 32,985.76; PRECISE TREE CARE 14,780.00; PRINTING PRESS OF JOLIET 9,881.33; PRO-TECH SECURITY

SALES 7,565.00; PROVANTAGE LLC 3,797.50; PROVEN BUSINESS SYSTEMS 24,596.28; PUBLIC SAFETY DIRECT INC

3,713.12; RAMIRO GUZMAN LANDSCAPIN 12,865.00; RAY O'HERRON CO., INC. 4,551.59; REILLY/CYNTHIA M

3,703.29; REQUORDIT INC 2,840.00; RICHARDS BUILDING SUPPLY 17,544.10; RICHARDS/JASON 5,947.84; RICMAR

INDUSTRIES 4,880.31;RIDGELINE TRUCKING LTD 5,500.00; ROADSAFE TRAFFIC SYSTEMS 3,755.35; ROBINSON

ENGINEERING LTD 606,469.33; ROMA FC LLC 6,066.35; RUDER TECHNOLOGIES 14,247.80; RUGGED DEPOT

9,113.56; RUSH TRUCK CENTER OF IL 143,570.89; RUSSO'S POWER EQUIPMENT 21,653.87; S&JDOOR INC

12,135.00; S&SMECHANICAL SERV-AT 32,621.95; S. W. A. R. M. 449,297.00; SAM SCHWARTZ ENGINEERING

6,724.80; SAM'S CLUB 6,389.62; SANDERS/JAY 2,952.29; SAUNORIS' NURSERY 3,260.29; SCHAEFFER'S 5,017.10;

SCHINDLER ELEVATOR CORP 7,661.28; SCOTT'S PAINT &CARPET 3,719.18; SHERWIN-WILLIAMS 9,887.35;

SIBICK/JOSEPH A 3,159.30; SLIGO 5 INC 6,500.00; SOUTHSIDE COLLISION 8,470.14; SPEEDWAY SUPER AMERICA L

90,292.13; STANDARD EQUIPMENT COMPA 482,567.93; STAPLES ADVANTAGE 14,885.15; STAPLES CREDIT PLAN

3,619.99; STATE TREASURER 16,670.40; STRAND ASSOCIATES INC 452,197.00; STUMP'S TREE &STUMP INC

2,800.00; STURDI IRON 15,000.00; SUBURBAN LABORATORIES IN 31,083.94; SUMMIT HILL SCHOOL DIST. 47,128.16;

SUNSET SEWER &WATER INC 31,408.73; SYNAGRO 550,342.74; T. R. L. TIRE SERVICE 23,013.65; TABRON/AL

19,600.00; TALLGRASS RESTORATION LL 10,680.00; TASER INTERNATIONAL 2,588.76; TESTAMERICA 9,363.00;

THOMAS INTERIOR SYSTEMS 12,234.51;THOMPSON ELEVATOR INSP S 9,410.00; THOMPSON/MARK W 6,494.82;

TIMBERS EDGE HOA 2,950.00; TOM'S TRUCK REPAIR SOUTH 9,333.43; TRIEZENBERG/MICHAEL T5,600.00;

TRIEZENBERG/MIKE 7,342.13; TRI-R SYSTEMS INCORPORAT 26,030.00; TRI-STATE BRICK COMPANY 54,495.62;

TRUGREEN 34,608.00; TSK CONSTRUCTION 3,000.00; TTS GRANITE INC 4,651.00; TUCKER HOMES 4,000.00; TYCO

INTEGRATED SECURITY 3,606.24; TYSSEN/RONALD A6,273.29; UNDERGROUND PIPE & VALVE 8,162.53; USA

BLUE BOOK 38,745.33; USA FIRE PROTETION INC 2,968.74; VANDERPOOL/DANIEL 2,691.13 ;VERIZON WIRELESS

4,982.68; VICKERY/JUDE 5,300.06; VISA-OLD PLANK TRAIL BAN 62,117.29; VISUALGOV SOLUTIONS LLC 31,966.87;

VISU-SEWER OFILLINOIS L 2,695.00; VSP 9,925.14; WAKEFIELD/LARRY T 3,671.18; WAREHOUSE DIRECT OFFICE

11,830.55; WATER SOLUTIONS UNLIMITE 72,352.23; WELSCH READY MIX INC 8,791.00; WEST SIDE TRACTOR

SALES 4,102.74; WETLAND MITIGATION OF IL 27,000.00; WILL COUNTY COLLECTOR 23,321.32; WILL COUNTY

GOVERNMENTAL 15,407.80; WILLIAMS BROTHERS CONST 517,399.11; WINGREN LANDSCAPE 25,477.50; WOOD-

LAND COMMERCIAL LAND 170,319.40; XEROX BUSINESS SERVICES 28,479.03; XYLEM WATER SOLUTIONS US

14,025.00; ZIEBELL 18,347.40

18,870,486.70

Vendors under $2500

398,856.38

Vendor Total

19,269,343.08

SUMMARY STATEMENT OF CONDITIONS

(Excerpt from Comptroller Report AFR)

SPECIAL CAPITAL DEBT

DISCRETELY

GENERAL REVENUE PROJECT SERVICE ENTERPRISE FIDUCIARY PRESENTED

COMPONENT

UNITS

Revenues 4,205,300 11,334,345 338,871 - 7,809,970 918,813 -

Expenditures 2,025,544 11,359,502 2,899,756 - 9,077,684 603,854 -

Excess of Revenues

Over (Under)

Expenditures 2,179,756 (25,157) (2,560,885) - (1,267,714) 314,959 -

Transfers In 2,636 1,203,700 4,891,228 - - - -

Transfers Out (3,203,700) (2,891,228) (2,636) - - - -

Bond Proceeds - - - - - - -

Other - 11,168 2,419 - - - -

Net Increase

(Decrease) in (1,021,308) (1,701,517) 2,330,126 - (1,267,714) 314,959 -

Fund Balance

Previous Year

Fund Balance 2,456,397 7,085,507 5,587,701 - 94,446,087 10,582,427 -

Other - - - - (1,128,876) - -

Current Year

Ending Fund

Balance 1,435,089 5,383,990 7,917,827 - 92,049,497 10,897,386 -

TOTAL DEBT OUTSTANDING ISSUED RETIRED OUTSTANDING

BEGINNING OF CURRENT CURRENT END OF YEAR

YEAR FISCAL YEAR FISCAL YEAR

1,544,101.00 - 96,506 $1,447,595

Subscribed and sworn to this 27th day of October, 2015.

S/Judith Hageman

Judith Hageman, Village Treasurer

I, Adam Borrelli, Clerk ofthe VillageofFrankfort, Will and Cook Counties, Illinois, do hereby certify thatthe above isatrue copy

of the Annual Treasurer's Report for the fiscal year ending April 30, 2016.

S/Adam Borrelli

Adam Borrelli, Village Clerk

ANNUAL STATEMENT OF AFFAIRS SUMMARY FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 2016

Copies of the detailed Annual Statement ofAffairs for the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 2016 will be available for public inspection inthe school

district/joint agreement administrative office by December 1, 2016. Individuals wanting to review this Annual Statement of Affairs should contact:

Frankfort School District 157C 10482 W. Nebraska Street, Frankfort, IL 815-469-5922 Monday-Friday 7:30A-4P

School District/Joint Agreement Name Address Telephone Office Hours

Also by January 15, 2017 the detailed Annual Statement of Affairs for the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 2016, will be posted on the Illinois State Board

of Education's website@ www.isbe.net.

SUMMARY: The following is the Annual Statement of Affairs Summary that is required to be published by the school district/joint agreement for the

past fiscal year.

Statement of Operations as of June 30, 2016

Educational Operations & Debt Transportation Municipal Capital Working Tort Fire

Maintenance Services Retirement/ Projects Cash Prevention

Social Security

& Safety

Local Sources 1000 20,961,512 4,163,182 3,569,497 1,611,032 724,376 410,073 14,667 3,053 3,547

Flow-Through Receipts

/Revenues from One

District to Another

District 2000 0 0 0 0

State Sources 3000 2,033,101 0 0 1,052,255 0 0 0 0 0

Federal Sources 4000 470,687 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Total Direct Receipts

/Revenues 23,465,300 4,163,182 3,569,497 2,663,287 724,376 410,073 14,667 3,053 3,547

Total Direct

Disbursements

/Expenditures 19,980,526 3,515,962 4,347,386 1,807,556 639,061 0 0 0

Other Sources

/Uses of Funds (485,068) (250,000) 735,068 0 0 0 0 0 0

Beginning Fund

Balances - July 1, 2015 19,854,688 6,752,138 1,541,396 2,483,260 794,285 (1,597,513) 5,042,908 8,726 55,299

Other Changes in

Fund Balances 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Ending Fund Balances

June 30, 2016 22,854,394 7,149,358 1,498,575 3,338,991 879,600 (1,187,440) 5,057,575 11,779 58,846

GROSS PAYMENT FOR CERTIFICATED PERSONNEL

Salary Range: Less Than $25,000: ALLISON, KATHRYN ANN; ARCELLA, ALEXANDRA ELISE; AVILA, LAWRENCE; BABICH, LYDIA A;

BACKLIN, MARISSA LEIGH; BELTZ, CARRIE A;BETTENHAUSEN, ANNKARYN AMANDA; BEVERIDGE, JAMIE LYNN; BOLTON,

LUREITHA MACHERYL; BRISKY, SUSAN L; BROWN, TERESA SUE; CALOMBARIS, ELIZABETH FRANCES; CARLSON, ROSE M; CHAN-

DLER, DEBORAH JEAN; CHILLON, JENNIFER SUE; CHOLLY, JULIE A; CHRISMER, SADIE NICOLE; CONRAD, PETER; DEFILY, ELIZA-

BETH ANN; DEIST, JENNIFER MARIE; DEMMA, JEANNE M; DOBRICH, RACHEL ANN; DRENTH, AMY BRIANNE; DROGEMULLER,

NOREEN KAREN; DUFFY, KATHLEEN LYNN; Enright, Colleen Erin; ENSKAT, SARAH ASHLEY; EVERHART, BELLA CHRISTINE; Falaschetti,

Laura Lynn; FARRELL, JENNIFER L;FEIL, COURTNEY ELIZABETH; FOLTZ, COLLEEN P; FOLTZ, JENNIFER ELLEN; FOX,

HEATHER L; FREUND, HOLLY ANN; GALLAGHER, DIANNE; GEHL, JULIE JO; GENET, KAMI DAWN; GIERLING, GREGORY WALTER;

GLUCH, AMY TERESA;GREENAWALT, PAUL M;GROVE, CYNTHIA J;GRUBBS-MAHOOD, CYNTHIA S; HANNIGAN, JULIE P;HINDEL,

NANCY JEAN;JOHNSON, CHRISTINA; KINGSBURY, MELISSA; KIRK, ROBBIN CAMPER; KLENE, MARGARET LEE; KRIHA, SHARON

D;KURZ, PATRICIA G;LADONSKI, LISA LUCILLE;LAMANTIA-PAGE, JENNIFER LAURA; LEBEAU, SARAH S; LEONARD, KATIE ELIZA-

BETH; LINKUS, KATHRYN ANN; LINKUS, RICHARD MICHAEL; LOVINGFOSS, SHARON ELIZABETH; LUTHER, PEGGY P; MACEK,

KRISTI LYNN; MADORMA SR, JAMES VINCENT; MAHY, APRIL LEANNE; MAJOR, JACQUELINE MELISSA; MAY, KATHLEEN TERESE;

MCCORMICK, STEPHEN MICHAEL; McCray, Vera; MCGUIRE, KRISTINE; MCKNIGHT, KATHLEEN ANNETTE; MEADE, JONATHON L;

MIRITELLO, MICHELE TERESE; MUEHLNICKEL, SHANNON THERESE; MURRAY, MEGAN MARIE; NAPIER, JOSHUA A; NATHAN,

RICHARD DAVID; NEISLER, MICHELLE ELIZABETH; NELSON, DENNIS ROBERT; NEWMAN, ROSANNA JEAN; NORDEN, DANA LOU-

ISE; NORTON, CAROL J;OBRIEN, KIMBERLY A; OBRIEN, MAUREEN; OLIVER, MARY MARGARET; OROURKE, SHERYL LYNN;

OSHEA, SHANNON FRANCIS; OSTROWSKI, MICHELLE DIANE; PANCZUK, JOJANNYE GERALDINE; PESAVENTO, BETH ANNMARIE;

PETTAY, CAROL A; PLECHATY, ALICE ROSE; PUGH, TERRYL L; RAYOLA, JENNIFER LYNN; READER, SANDRA L; RIGONI, GREG;

RODRIQUEZ, SARA ANN; ROHLWING, ELLEN L; ROLDAN, NICOLE SUSANNE; ROTHROCK, DIANE E; ROUPAS, ELAINE; RUZANSKI,

KATHLEEN MARIE; SAMALEA, MARYLYNN POPER; SANTORO, DEANNA M; SCHLESINGER, NANCY ELLEN; SCOTT, CHRISTOPHER

JOSEPH; SHANAHAN, ELIZABETH A; SHANAHAN, SHANNON ELIZABETH; SIMPSON, JULIE MARIE; SLATTERY, LISA A; SMIT, JASON

M; SMITH, DAYNA LEE; SMITH, STEFANIE MARY; SMOLIK, EILEEN; SPESIA, DANIEL RYAN; SPIKINGS, BARBARA LOUISE; SPILLER,

KATHLEEN M; STEARNS, MONICA SHER; STLASKE, MARGUERITE; TARALA, KERRY R; TENCZA, JULIE ANN; THOM, MARLEEN

ROSE; TROEGER, TODD ALAN; TRSAR, REBECCA FARRIS; ULANOWSKI, TRACI MARIE; ULSTAD, BONNIE M; VANDERKOOI, AN-

GELA RAE; VANDERWELL, DEBORAH A; VASI, ALEFIYA; VICTOR, COURTNEY ALEXANDRA; WALKER, MARLA A; WILLIAMS,

DONNA STENSON; WINKLER, YVONNE M; WOLFF, KIMBERLY J; WOLSKO, JOELLEN MATTIO; Woods, Doriane M; YOST, DONALD;

ZAREMBA, RICHARD; ZENERE, ELAINE KATHRYN Salary Range: $25,000-$39,999: BRIDGES, KELLY NICOLE; DETTMAN, PAMELA M;

FLYNN, BRIDGETT M; GRIFFIN, JENNY M;MELBY, AMY SUE; NEWMAN, LINDA K;REISER, NICHOLE E; SNYDER, PAMELA; YOUNG,

MATTHEW S; CAMPBELL, BARBARA R; DORENCZ, JULIE M; GREGORY, JENNIFER LYNN; KLINE, LINDSAY MARIE; MILOSOVIC, KA-

TIE ANNE; OSWALD, BRITTNEY; RUGGIO, JENNIFER L; SVOBODA, BETH A; ZITO, DEANNE MARIE PEROZZI Salary Range:

$40,000-$59,999: ADAMOW, MELISSA; ARANOWSKI, KELLIE KATHLEEN; ATTANASIO, LINDSAY E; BANAS, JENNIFER LYNN; BAR-

TOLOMEO, JOHANNA; BATY, SHELBY; BECKES, JILL MARIE; BELITZ, JENNIFER LEIGH; BERTUCCI, PATRICIA; BOHMS, MARY KAY;

BORDEN, BARBARA; BOUCK, SEAN MARIE; BRANNIGAN, LAURA M;BRUINIUS, LEAH MARIE; BUIVIDAS, KENDRA LYNN; CAM-

POS, JENNIFER LYNN; CHRONOS, STACI A;CLOUSING, CARI LYN; CONNOLLY, SEAN W;CUMBEE, AMY BETH; CURRAN, ANN

MARY; DEFRANK, MARY KATHLEEN; DEHAAN, JANE; DONAGHUE, KIMBERLY ELLEN; DONOVAN, CHERYL L; DRAEGER,

AMANDA D; DYKEMA, MATTHEW JUSTIN; DZIEDZIC, KRISTINA M; ELLINGHAUS, KATIE L; ELLIS, KRISTIN N;FLETCHER, KARISSA

J; FREIBERG, CHRISTINE MARIE; GAERTIG, DAWN RENEE; GATSIOS, TONIA; GEMMELL, KRISTEN LEE; GIAMMARCO, VANESSA

MARIE; GRAF, KAREN MICHELLE; HAAS, DIANE JOY; HARDY, MICHELE LYNN; HEIMLICH, DIANE; HERMES, KARYN SIGNE;

HOLTHOUSE, NICOLE MARIE; HYLAND, KATRINA MAUREEN; INNOCENTI, RICHARD J; JACKSON, THERESE MARIE; JARAL, JENELL

W; JEGLINSKI, DIANE ELAINE; JOHNSON, KORINNE ELIZABETH; JORGENSEN, COLLEEN MEGGIN; KELLY, JEANNA LEE; KIM-

BROUGH, TAYLOR RENEE; KOSZULINSKI, ALISON ROSE; KRAATZ, ERIC ROBERT; KRAMER, REBECCA ALLYSON; LADALSKI, JAN-

ELLE E; LEGRAND, CAROLYN F; LEMMONS, GEORGIANA MARY; LYNN, JOANNE ELIZABETH; MAGANA, KAREN ANN; MALKUSAK,

MICHELLE ANNE; MALONE, KATHLEEN A; MARCOWKA, MICHELLE MARIE; MARGALUS, SARAH ELIZABETH; MCCURDY, LORI

ANNE; MCKURAS, KRISTINA K; MILLS, CARI ANN; MONACO, KAREN M; MORACK, ERICA LYNN; NELSON, SHANNON MARIE; NOE-

SEN, AMY LYNN; PETROVIC, JOHANNA DENISE; PINCIAK, LEAH K; PITSOULAKIS, DIANNE; PIZZOLATO, DANIELLE JEAN; PUR-

PURA, JOSHUA J; REISER, COLLEEN PATRICIA; ROACH, KAREN LYNN; ROGERS, ELIZABETH ANNE; RONEY, ANDREA LYN;

RUFFING, LAUREN ELIZABETH; RYAN, KAREN MARIE; SANDOWSKI, SUZANNE D; SANTEFORT, DEBRA ANN; SAVAGLIO, ALEXAN-

DRA LYNN; SEIBERT, ROBERT PATRICK; SIMEK, MELISSA SUSANNE; SOPHA, MARY SARAH; SPENGLER, KRISTI; STOIT, JENNA

RAE; STRUTZENBERG, BRENDA D; SUTTER, MEGAN A; TALAGA, RYAN MICHAEL BENJAMIN; TURNBOUGH, BROOKE MICHELLE;

VANASSEN, MARC W; VEGA, TRISHA NICOLE; VENABLE, AMY K; VONCH, JOSEPH T; WALTON, LESLIE; WHITE, NICOLE J; WILSON,

TANIA R; WINANS, LYNN T; WOJNAROWSKI, CHERYL A; WOLTKAMP, MARY A;WONDER, DAVID ANTHONY Salary Range:

$60,000-$89,999: ADAMS, JOHN DOUGLAS; BECKER, SCOTT; BRENDLINGER, JACLYN F; BUNNELL, DIANE; BYSINA, FELICIA J;

CLEVELAND, REBECCA JOAN; DOTSON, TRICIA ANN; DYOKAS, LAURA A; ELAM, KAY L; ELIA, JENNIFER M; FAGAN, MARIBETH G;

FEEHAN, PATRICK T; FERRARO, JOHN M; FINAN, DANIEL M; GRADY, RENEE LYNN; HANNIGAN, MICHELE L; HARRIS, CHERYL

LYNN; HERMANSON, WILLIAM J; JOZAITIS, COLLEEN M; KAZMIERCZAK, SUSAN MARGARET; KLOSOWSKI, RANDY J;

KLUTCHARCH, ELIZABETH C; LANDOW, ROSANNE L; LANG, CINDY J; LARSEN, EILEEN JOANN; LAZZO, TRACEY M; MARTIN,

CAROLYN M;MEADE, CHRISTINE M;MICHALSKI, KRISTEN ANN; MILLER, MARY K;NEWCOMB, RACHEL A; NIENDORF, SUSAN;

OBRIEN, CHERYL L; OHEA, TARA KRISTINA MARCHIO; PIUNTI, MICHELLE J; PLESTINA, DAWN E;PROVIS, JENNIFER LYNN;

REIPSA, LINDSAY A; RHOADS, SEAN M; RITTER, DONNA L; RODGERS, JENNIFER JOY; ROWLAND, SUSAN M;RUTOVIC, STACY

LYNN; SCHNEIDER, RICHELLE IRIS; SCOTT, SUSAN M; SHANAHAN, BARBARA M; SLECHTER, CHRISTINE ANNE; SMITH, JULIE A;

SOMMER, MICHELLE MARIE; STANEVICIUS, LORI ANNE; STEELE, AMY T; STEIN, MITCHELL S; SWIERCZEWSKI, PAMELA ANN;

SWIES, MATTHEW J; SZKOLNY, TAMMY LYNN; SZUDY, KIMBERLY BETH; TRUESDALE, VINCENZA; ZOKO, MARY A Salary Range:

$90,000 and over: BAJDA, JENNIFER L;MCCLARENCE, JANET ELIZABETH; NELSON, EILEEN ELIZABETH; PAVER-NEPOTE, SHARON

M; RUFF, DANA CLARE; SAINDON, CURTIS JAMES; SEIDELMANN, WILLIAM ZACHARY; ZINNI, MAURA

GROSS PAYMENT FOR NON-CERTIFICATED PERSONNEL

Salary Range: Less Than $25,000: ANDERSON, DEANA BETH; BEECHAM, KRISTINE LYNN; BORTMESS, JEANNETTE N; BURNS, JEAN

C; CHENEY, BECKY ANN; CIRULLO, TAMMY L; COLLINS, NANCY JEAN; CORKERY, SUSANNE L;COTTA, THOMAS E; DEVAL, BON-

NIE LOU; FIDANZA, RINA ANN; FILICETTE, MARY DIANE; FLORES, ADRIANA; FORD, LAURIE MARIE; FOWLER, LAURA DIANE;

GALMINES, STEPHANIE; GRAEFEN, JEANINE M; HALDORSON, RALPH J; HOGAN, CHARISSA LYNN; HOULIHAN, JOANNE M;

IRVING, LORI; JANKOWSKI, DEBORAH JOAN; JONKMAN, CYNTHIA A; JURICEK, CANDACE BROOKE; KEENE, EILEEN M; KLABISCH,

SUSAN MARIE; KOMARCK, SHARON M; KOWATCH, MARY BETH; LANG, PAYTON ANN; MANGIA, LAUREL A; MEADE, RYAN TODD;

MURRAY, MELISSA LYNN; NEPOTE, NICOLE M; NIKOLIC, RAELENE COLLINS; OBICHERE, LAMIKA MICHELL; PIZZA, PATRICIA A;

POP, LORELLE JEAN; REIDY-ARNOLD, MEGHAN T; ROSS, KATY L; ROW, SARAH KATHERINE; SCHMITT, DAWN MARIE; SCI-

ALABBA, KRISTIN LEE; SNITOWSKY, KATHERINE M; TAYLOR, KIMBERLY ELAINE; TOOSLEY, MEREDITH; ULAS, MARY H;

WALKER, SUSAN B; WANINSKI, LINDA L; WEYKER, ELIZABETH; WILLIAMS, LATASHUA; WILSON, LORA ANN; ZIMAN, AUSTIN MI-

CHAEL;ZOTTARELLA, DEBRA ANN Salary Range: $25,000-$39,999: ARREGUIN, JESSICA SANDY; BARRERA, MICHELLE DIANE;

BUSCH, DEBORAH S; DAVIS, DAWN MARIE; DITURI, ANTHONY A; DUROCHER, GAIL B; DYER, JEAN M; FEIGEL, REBECCA L; HAN-

SO C S O O SO A AS A OS S SA OO A A O A A


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the frankfort station | October 27, 2016 | 49

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

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Automotive

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SON, CHRISTOPHER; JOHNSON, JEANINE F; KASPER, RENAE L; KOJS, SUSAN M; MOORE, DEANNA LYNN; POPEK, ALEXANDER B;

RAYNES, MARYBETH; RYAN, MARGARET E; SCHIPIOUR, SUSAN THERESE Salary Range: $40,000-$59,999: BAKER, SUSAN M; EBERT,

WILLIAM P; FATH, WILLIAM J; GRAF, KATHLEEN A; KOHUT, DANIEL A; KOLB, DONNA MARIE; MCGEE, MARYANNE; NELSON,

KAREN J; PECHTOLD, SANDRA A; PUZON, SALLY ELLEN; RUHBECK, CHARLOTTE A Salary Range: $60,000 and over: ALLEN, RICH-

ARD G; DAVIS, RODNEY LEO; HALL, GERALD W; HEATH, CYNTHIA A; NELSON, JACOB A; WHITE, PAUL R; ZIMAN, BRIAN M

Payments over $2,500, excluding wages and salaries

ABC TRANSPORTATION 3,085.00; ACHIEVEMENT CENTERS, INC.-ACACIA ACADEMY 39,984.64; ALLIANCE PUBLISHING 7,089.53; AS-

SET CONTROL SOLUTIONS, INC 3,315.00; ATT LONG DISTANCE 10,810.19; AUTOMATION LIBERATION GROUP 76,606.22; B CREATIVE

SCREEN PRINT CO 4,500.00; BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON 4,115,956.50; BETTENHAUSEN DODGE 30,278.65; BLUE CROSS BLUE

SHIELD 2,768,248.97; BRIGHT STAR 2,583.25; CAMP MANITOQUA 5,452.92; CDW GOVERNMENT 31,295.97; CENTRAL PARTS WARE-

HOUSE 6,209.55; CHICAGO AUTISM ACADEMY 9,589.32; CLASS ACT PERFORMING ARTISTS &SPEAKERS 3,532.00; COM ED 81,489.89;

COMMUNICATIONS DIRECT 3,555.78; CONSTELLATION 181,795.51; CPI QUALIFIED PLAN CONSULTANTS 4,963.00; CUTTING EDGE

CATERING 5,578.50; DEARBORN NATIONAL LIFE 21,835.51; DELTA DENTAL OFILLINOIS 176,774.59; DESIGN GRAPHICS 18,192.90;

DOUBEK, KELLIE 52,400.00; DUNLAP NATIONWIDE DISTRIBUTING 2,606.40; ELIM CHRISTIAN SERVICES 73,167.18; ENERGY PUR-

CHASING SERVICE 9,380.00; ENGLER CALLAWAY BAASTEN &SRAGA, LLC 14,094.00; EQUITABLE EQUI-VEST 208,733.09; ETHIS TRS

SYSTEM 98,045.52; EXCEL ELECTRIC 8,466.88; EZ SIGN 7,435.00; FESTIVALS OF MUSIC, INC 5,267.00; FICA-FICA/MEDICARE

307,538.04; FOLLETT 60,036.40; FRANK COONEY COMPANY 3,090.00; FRANKFORT SCHOOL DISTRICT 78,161.26; FRANKFORT SDEDU-

CATIONAL FOUNDATION 26,327.45; FRANKFORT TEACHERS ASSOCIATION 3,460.00; FSD FSA 41,662.15; FUNDSOURCE ASPIRE

31,314.02; GIANT STEPS 64,329.03; GLEN OAKS THERAPEUTIC DAY SCHOOL 33,777.28; GREENWOOD HEINEMANN 11,032.48; HALO

BRANDED SOLUTIONS, 3,624.58; HOME DEPOT 28,342.81; HONOR FLIGHT CHICAGO 6,600.14; HORTON GROUP 33,184.50; ILLCO INC

5,209.07; ILLINOIS COUNTIES RISK 134,144.00; ILLINOIS EDUCATION ASSOCIATION 113,730.30; ILLINOIS MUNICIPAL RETIRE FUND

401,179.91; ILLINOIS PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 5,677.00; ILLINOIS PRINCIPAL ASSOCIATION 2,693.10; ILLINOIS STUDENT ASSIS-

TANCE COMMISION 5,621.04; ING/RELIASTAR 42,810.00; INTEGRITY FITNESS 11,630.00; INTERNATIONAL READING ASSOC 5,489.00;

JANOR SPORTS 2,737.25; KLEIN HALL CPA 17,800.00; LAKESHORE LEARNING 13,144.33; LAMINATOR.COM 2,754.27; LEXIA 4,000.00;

LINCOLN WAY COMMUNITY HS 210 1,392,682.95; Lincoln-Way Area Special Education 1,654,936.76; LINCOLN-WAY SPECIAL RECREA-

TION ASSOC 4,883.07; LOWES 4,622.15; MARGALUS, SARAH 2,500.34; MASTER AUTO SUPPLY 2,964.90; MCMASTER-CARR 11,115.21;

MEDIEVAL TIMES 5,018.18; MIDWEST HELICOPTER AIRWAYS 4,500.00; MONDO PUBLISHING 3,596.40; NCS PEARSON 18,023.04; NEW

YORK LIFE INSURANCE 3,900.00; NICOR GAS 27,804.92; NUWAY TINLEY PARK DISPOSAL 19,648.00; OLD PLANK TRAIL BANK LEAS-

ING 34,067.74; OPEN KITCHENS 16,086.00; ORIENTAL TRADING 5,351.47; PACIFIC LIFE INSURANCE CO 26,000.00; PAVEMENT SYS-

TEMS 3,101.00; PEARSON EDUCATION 30,493.52; POEHNER, DILLMAN & MAHALIK, INC. 5,619.00; PRECISION CONTROL SYSTEMS

189,198.55; PYRAMID EDUCATIONAL 2,866.02; RELIANCE COMMUNICATIONS, LLC 4,250.00; REVTRAK (GENERAL) 13,047.63;

RUNNION 5,440.00; SAINDON, CURTIS 3,654.03; SCHOOL HEALTH CORP 2,615.33; SCHOOL SPECIALTY 8,772.68; SENTINEL TECH-

NOLOGIES 176,205.36; SHOREWOOD HOME AND AUTO 16,600.21; SIX FLAGS GREAT AMERICA 11,785.39; SOUNDWORKS PRODUC-

TIONS 6,044.29; SOUTHWEST 3,743.56; STATE DISBURSEMENT UNIT 7,280.00; SUPPLYWORKS 5,678.50; TEACHERS RETIREMENT

1,147,121.38; TECH4 LEARNING 3,067.45; THE READING WAREHOUSE 4,368.02; TIME FOR KIDS MAGAZINE 2,846.10; TRANE COM-

PANY 4,101.76; TRSAR, REBECCA 22,700.00; URBAN ELEVATOR SERVICE, LLC 6,011.72; US BANKCORP GOVERNMENT LEASING &

FINANCE, INC 201,000.00; VALIC GROUP 6,827.83; VERIZON WIRELESS 7,775.17; VILLAGE OF FRANKFORT EFT WATER 18,404.92;

VORTEX ENTERPRISES 44,531.00; W HOTEL FT LAUDERDALE 2,763.90; WALMART 7,234.78; WILLIAM H BLAIR 2,750.00; ZARLENGO'S

ITALIAN ICE 9,099.00; SCHOOLDUDE 5,340.28; SOUNDTREE 3,980.23; STAPLES 31,158.86; THIS 140,169.14; TRSAR, REBECCA

8,100.00; UPBEAT 15,713.75; WEX 13,879.51; ACTION SPORTS 17,969.22; AMAZON 50,175.38; AT&T 30,281.68; AURELIOS PIZZA

39,818.76; B&HPHOTO 5,139.50; BANK OF MONTREAL 16,519.97; BESSE SHIRT LETTERING 8,256.50; BILL'S LAWN MAINTENANCE

25,400.00; BORNQUIST 11,166.29; BSN 14,430.34; CARNEGIE LEARNING 11,145.00; CENTERPOINT ENERGY 71,520.35; CHC WELL-

NESS 4,395.00; CHOICE OFFICE EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES 5,091.10; CLASSIC HARDWARE 5,361.35; COMCAST 58,287.35; CONFER-

ENCE TECHNOLOGIES, INC 6,738.00; COSGROVE CONSTRUCTION 3,400.00; CURALINC, LLC 4,368.00; DATA RECOGNITION CORP

61,627.62; DECKER EQUIPMENT 3,441.16; DELTA/FREY SCIENCE 3,227.84; DONOHUE CONSULTING, INC 5,200.00; DRURY LANE

10,351.26; ECOLAB 5,725.66; EMERALD DATA SOLUTIONS 3,000.00; ETERNALLY GREEN LAWN CARE, INC 5,520.00; EVERLAST

CLIMBING INDUSTRIES, INC 13,241.00; EYE MED 13,766.83; FEDERAL W/H FIT 1,419,818.41; FGM ARCHITECTS 32,080.36; FLOORS

INCORPORATED 7,900.00; FP MAILING SOLUTIONS-EFT PAYMENTS 9,504.00; FRANKFORT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 5,600.00;

FRANKFORT SD ACTIVITY 9,119.19; FRONTLINE 9,446.30; FSP 89,850.63; GAIL BOHNENSTIEHL CONSULTING 32,400.00; GIOR-

DANOS 21,659.26; GREEN, TIM 5,000.00; GROTH MUSIC 2,986.50; HAUSER IZZO, LLC 13,676.09; HOMEFIELD ENERGY 197,468.98;

HORACE MANN COMPANIES 6,730.00; HP PRODUCTS 49,568.21; ILLINOIS ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOL BOARDS 14,016.00; ILLINOIS

DEPARTMENT OFREVENUE 445,855.21; INFOSNAP, INC. 10,400.00; INTEGRATED SYSTEMS CORPORATION 7,085.00; INTERNA-

TIONAL CONTRACTORS 101,546.18; ISU 3,977.00; JUNIOR LIBRARY GUILD 3,669.00; KRYSTAL DAIRY 39,607.88; LAMBERT ILLI-

NOIS MANAGEMENT LLC 5,316.00; LARAWAY LANES 3,582.00; LINCOLN INVESTMENT 30,317.00; LOWERY MCDONNELL 58,901.23;

MAHONEY'S GRADUATION SERVICES 11,722.05; MARTIN WHALEN OFFICE 60,307.59; MATSMATSMATS.COM 3,116.00; MEDIA

LEADERS, LLC 4,800.00; MEIJER 2,689.60; MOKENA SCHOOL DISTRICT 159 13,321.29; N2Y 4,794.00; NEUZIL, NANCY 13,298.82;

NEWSELA 6,000.00; NOVANIS IT SOLUTIONS 8,502.00; OLD PLANK TRAIL BANK 89,892.22; OMNI CHEER 4,228.59; OPPENHEIMER

FUNDS INC 64,300.00; OTIS ELEVATOR COMPANY 3,192.30; PAVEK, ADRIENNE 3,000.00; PAYPAL 3,802.80; PERFECTION LEARNING

7,498.43; PROGRESSUS THERAPY 91,564.63; REIDY PEDIATRIC THERAPY, LLC 47,587.50; REVTRAK (ACTIVITY) 14,696.62; ROBERT

CROWN HEALTH CENTER 5,310.00; S AND J DOOR 3,265.00; SAMS CLUB 10,503.31; SCHOOL OUTFITTERS 2,930.40; SCHOOL TOOL

BOX 4,623.25; SHORELINE GALAXY 4,484.37; SIMPLEX GRINNELL 9,482.32; SKYWARD 23,253.00; SOUTHSIDE CONTROL 3,798.26;

SSCIP 67,873.00; STEPS TO LITERACY 8,209.16; TEACHER RETIREMENT NEC 70,500.30; TEAM WAREHOUSE 3,417.40; TELESOLU-

TIONS, LLC 3,906.17; THERAPY CARE 140,131.00; TONY'S VILLA ROSA 3,424.00; TRI-ELECTRONICS 4,009.80; TYCO 4,774.28; US

BANK 50,777.92; VANGUARD FIDUCIARY TRUST 28,300.00; VICTORIA SUPPLY 4,358.00; VISTA LEARNING 6,246.60; VWR INTERNA-

TIONAL INC 4,448.29; WADDELL REED FINANCIAL 5,550.00; WENGER CORP 8,241.00; WW GRAINGER 17,183.89; ARAMARK

857,738.61; BRAINPOP 3,045.00; BURGETT, JAMES 2,917.65; COMMUNICATION REVOLVING FUND 2,700.00; COSTCO 10,484.11;

DELL 5,199.22; EDMENTUM 2,700.00; EZ FLEX 2,611.00; FUN ONES, INC 3,400.00; IGSMA 3,012.50; IXL 7,541.00; LEARNING A-Z

4,812.20; MAWI, INC. 5,500.00; MEDICARE 376,776.26; NATIONAL LOUIS UNIVERSITY 4,200.00; NEXT DAY PLUS 21,343.78; NSBA

2,675.00; PCS INDUSTRIES 51,022.10; SAE INTERNATIONAL 4,635.00; SCHOLASTIC 16,710.99

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50 | October 27, 2016 | The frankfort station Sports

frankfortstation.com

This Week In ...

Griffins Varsity Athletics

Girls Volleyball

■Oct. ■ 27 — at IHSA regional, 6 p.m.

Girls Soccer

■Oct. ■ 28 — at Plainfield Central, 4:30 p.m.

Girls Swimming and Diving

MONDAY

• Denver Omelette

• Liver Onions

• Breaded Pork

Tenderloin

THURSDAY

• Chopped Steak

& Eggs

• Corn Beef

& Cabbage

TUESDAY

• Bacon & Cheese

Omlette

• Charboiled Pork

Chops

• Meat Loaf

FRIDAY

• Potato Pancake

Combo

• Roast Chicken

• Sausage/Sauerkraut

WEDNESDAY

• Pork Chop & Eggs

• Fried Chicken

• Pot Roast

SATURDAY

• Biscuits & Gravy

• Chop Steak

• Stuffed

Pork Chops

SUNDAY

• Roast Pork

• Waffle Combo

• Roast Chicken

• Roast Turkey

NEW PUMPKIN

PANCAKES

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HOURS Mon-Wed 6am-8pm • Thu- Sat 6am-8:30pm • Sun 6am-7pm

■Oct. ■ 28 — at SWSC meet, 5 p.m.

■Oct. ■ 29 — at SWSC meet, 10 a.m.

Girls Cross Country

■Oct. ■ 29 — at IHSA sectional, 1 p.m.

Boys Cross Country

■Oct. ■ 29 — at IHSA sectional, 2 p.m.

Spend 20 - Get $ 2 OFF

With this coupon. Dine-in only. Not Valid with any other. Offers or prior purchases.

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19137 S. Wolf Rd.

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Buy One Breakfast

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two beverages

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19137 S. Wolf Rd.

Mokena | 708.478.8748

Patriots

From Page 55

win a championship without

a great quarterback, and

Tony is great. He also understands

that he’s the most

important player, but every

player is important. He respects

all his teammates and

what they do.”

Indeed, the Patriots were

dominant in all facets: offense,

defense and special

teams. They won their

MSFL games by an average

of 25 points.

“It’s hard to have a dominating

football team,” Mc-

Clelland said. “Even great

teams have ups and downs

and the best team doesn’t

always win the Super Bowl.

“You have to have great

players, a good coaching

staff, and you have to have

some luck to avoid major

injuries. If you have all

three of those, you can have

a special team. That’s what

we had this year.”


frankfortstation.com Frankfort

the frankfort station | October 27, 2016 | 51

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52 | October 27, 2016 | The frankfort station Sports

frankfortstation.com

Athlete of the Week

10 Questions

with Kevin Bullington

Bullington is a Lincoln-Way

East junior and a member

of the high school’s varsity

golf team.

How did you get started

playing golf?

My brother [Brian] plays

it professionally. My whole

family’s involved. Right

now [Brian’s] playing in the

PGA [Tour] Latinoamérica.

What’s your favorite

part about golf?

It’s relaxing, and it’s individual

for the most part.

All the work you can put in

shows in your scores. The

more practice you put in, the

better you perform no matter

what.

What is the hardest

part about playing golf?

Staying focused, and

throwing away the bad shots

and moving on.

What have you learned

from your East coaches?

Just to be confident with

PRESSBOX PICKS

Our staff’s predictions for

the top games in Week 10

No. 19 Lincoln-Way Central (6-3) at No. 14 Reavis (7-2)

No. 18 Lincoln-Way East (7-2) against No. 15 Taft (8-1)

No. 27 Lockport Township (6-3) at No. 6 St. Charles East (9-0)

No. 31 Lincoln-Way West (5-4) at No. 2 East St. Louis Sr. (9-0)

No. 11 Marist (8-1) hosts No. 22 New Trier (7-2)

myself and to throw away

the bad stuff. They have

confidence in me, so I need

to put confidence in myself

then.

Who is your favorite

professional golfer?

Jordan Spieth. Just his

whole attitude about life and

putting. [It’s] just his style

and how good he is at that,

and I try to model that as

much as I can.

Do you plan to play in

college?

Yes I do. Hopefully somewhere

in the warmer states,

but I’ll take anything.

What’s your dream job?

Probably working for a

golf equipment company.

One of the major ones, like

Titleist or Callaway. Going

places and traveling the

world, that would be sweet.

Who is your role model?

My brother, just because

he sets a great example on

how to get better and if I

need him I can always go to

31-14

Tim Carroll | Contributing

Editor

• LW Central 46, Reavis 37. This is

a tough one, but I will take the

Knights in a shootout on the road.

• LW East

• St. Charles East

• East St. Louis Sr.

• Marist

him, whether it’s with golf

or anything else.

What is your dream

vacation?

The Bahamas. Not going

to lie. There’s a lot of

cool golf courses there, nice

weather. I don’t have to

freeze my hands off.

30-15

Tom Czaja | Contributing

Editor

• Reavis 34, LW Central 27. Rams

take early lead and hold on

late to end Knights’ season and

advance.

• LW East

• St. Charles East

• East St. Louis Sr.

• Marist

James Sanchez/22nd Century Media

If you could own any

exotic pet, what would

it be?

Probably a cow because I

could get fresh milk every

day, and it’s fun to have.

Interview by Rebecca Susmarski,

Editor.

30-15

Max Lapthorne |

Contributing Editor

• Reavis 20, LW Central 14. The

Knights and Rams take it down

to the wire, but the home team

survives and advances.

• LW East

• St. Charles East

• East St. Louis Sr.

• New Trier

26-19

Joe Coughlin | Publisher

• LW Central 38, Reavis 28.

Knights’ tough schedule has them

prepared for big program win.

• LW East

• St. Charles East

• East St. Louis Sr.

• Marist

Football

From Page 54

“He’s really picking up

our offense well, and he’s a

great athlete as you can see,”

said Lockport coach Dan

Starkey of Karli. “I’m really

proud of the way he stepped

in tonight. It could have been

really tough, and we wanted

to be really careful to not put

him in any bad situations.

We wanted to do things he

could do, and he did some

good things tonight.”

Starkey also credited his

team for sticking in there

against a tough opponent.

“I’m really proud of our

kids and our coaches for putting

together a great plan for

a sophomore quarterback

who only practiced with us

five days – one day last week

and four days this week,” he

said. “I’m really proud of

our coaches and our players

for a great effort against

a good team. We had some

opportunities to put some

points on the board, but we

just couldn’t do it tonight.

Give Lincoln-Way East

credit. They are a good team

and well coached.”

Zvonar also had nice

words to say about Karli’s

performance.

“Defensively … I thought

we were on our heels a lot

tonight, and I give Lockport

a lot of credit for that,”

he said. “I know they were

without their quarterback,

Davis — who is one of the

better ones around — but as

you can see, that sophomore

is going to be [tough] on us

the next couple of years.”

24-21

Heather Warthen | Chief

Operating Officer

• Reavis 27, LW Central 17. Reavis

continues to roll to Round 2.

• LW East

• Lockport

• East St. Louis Sr.

• New Trier

Lockport also got a nice

night from running back Tavares

Moore, who rushed the

ball 25 times for 110 yards.

He also caught two passes

for 37 yards.

On defense, linebacker

Michael Mata had a sack and

a fumble recovery. Defensive

back Kyle Miller also

had a sack.

The focus now shifts to

the postseason for the Porters.

Starkey said the plan is

to take it one game at a time,

but noted that Davis is “out

until further notice.”

“We will learn from this

game, and we will turn the

page,” Starkey said. “As

soon as we find out who we

are playing, we will start

preparing. Our kids will be

ready to go next week, and

I’m sure our coaches will put

together a great game plan.”

The Griffins also are preparing

now for the postseason.

“We just want to stick

with what we’ve been doing

all year,” Arthur said.

“We want to attack the line

of scrimmage every single

play. We’re going to focus

on our opponent each week

and never look ahead of anyone.

Next week is the biggest

week we have all year.”

The immediacy of the

playoffs isn’t lost on Arthur

or his teammates.

“It is win or you’re leaving,

and we know that,” he

said. “We are staying motivated

throughout the entire

game, and we’re going to

be telling each other, ‘Guys,

we’re not going to make this

our last snap.’ We know some

of the kids aren’t going to be

back playing college football,

so we’re just going to stay focused

throughout the whole

entire game next week.”

In the opening round of

the Class 8A playoffs, the

Porters (Seed No. 27) will

travel to St. Charles East (9-

0), the No. 6 seed in 8A. No

time or date has been set yet.

The Griffins (the 18th

seed in 8A) are slated to face

15-seed Taft High School.


frankfortstation.com Sports

the frankfort station | October 27, 2016 | 53

Girls Cross Country

East's Couwenhoven claims individual championship at regional

Couwenhoven seals

her first career

victory by several

seconds

Frank Gogola

Freelance Reporter

Lincoln-Way East sophomore

Jenna Couwenhoven

thought Lincoln-Way West

senior Jenna Diers was pulling

away. A step here. A step

there.

So, Couwenhoven kicked

it into high gear at the start

of the final lap, passing Diers

and holding on to win

the IHSA Class 3A Andrew

Regional individual championship.

It’s the first career

victory for Couwenhoven,

who was East’s top finisher at

state last season.

“We told Jenna, ‘Go for

the win. Run smart,’” said

East coach Wendy Hegarty.

“She’s just finally figuring

out what she’s capable of.”

Couwenhoven also runs

track but enjoys cross country

more because she prefers

running longer distances and

running on grass as opposed

to a track. She displayed her

endurance when she overtook

Diers after two miles with

about one mile left in the race.

“I really wanted to win

it,” Couwenhoven, who

won by seven seconds, said.

“I thought she was going to

come up behind me [at the

end] and beat me, so I was

going all out.”

Lincoln-Way Central, East,

West and Andrew advanced

to sectionals by finishing in

the top six by team score in

Saturday’s regional at Turtlehead

Lake. Providence finished

seventh but advanced

one runner as an individual.

Central won the team

title with 32 points, as six

runners finished in the Top

10. Sophomore Mackenzie

Brownrigg (18:58) finished

third, and freshman Rachel

Baumgartner (19:16) placed

fifth. Freshman Lexy Sams

(19:17), senior Madison

Brownrigg (19:17), junior

Gretchen Zirgaitis (19:25)

and sophomore Samantha

Waters (19:28) finished seventh,

eighth, ninth and 10th.

The Knights sat their top

runners, sophomore Kelly

Robbins and senior Madison

Smith, because of “nagging

injuries,” said Central coach

Jack Young. He said both will

be back for sectionals.

“Our strength this year has

been our depth and how hard

our team works,” Young said.

“To see them come together

today and how tight a pack

they were, that’s how they

battle with each other in practice

and push each other.”

East placed second with

46 points and had two Top

10 finishers. Champion Couwenhoven

finished with a

time of 18:42, and freshman

Olivia Jacobs (19:16) took

sixth.

“It’s pretty cool to win,”

Couwenhoven said. “But I

really want the whole team to

make it to state. It’s not really

just my goal.”

West took third place with

83 points and had two Top

5 finishers. Diers (18:49)

placed second, and senior

Teagan Lyke (19:02) finished

fourth.

“Jenna and Teagan both

had fantastic races,” said

West coach Matt Bowden.

"They both went out smart

and didn’t try to win it in the

first lap. I think that helped

them maintain their strength

throughout the race.”

Andrew finished in fifth

place with 162 points as six of

the seven runners set personal

records on the same course

they ran one week earlier in

the conference meet. Junior

Olivia Tesher (20:54) led

Andrew and took 27th, cutting

32 seconds off her time.

Sophomores Brigid Tunney

(21:16) and Alexandra

Dennis (22:04) shaved 1:08

off their times. Juniors Sam

Termunde (21:30) and Kristina

Karstensen (21:31) ran

33 seconds faster. Sophomore

Cailin Robertson (22:08) lowered

her time by 48 seconds.

“We knew we had to run

our best races,” said Andrew

coach Mark Luttrell. “The

six girls who ran PRs, I was

happily surprised at how

well they improved from last

week."

Providence Catholic didn’t

advance as a team, but sophomore

Savannah Baker (19:43)

advanced as an individual.

She finished 14th overall

and second among individuals

who didn’t qualify with a

team. The Top-5 runners who

weren’t on a qualifying team

moved on as individuals.

“She’s had a great year

and come into her own as

a sophomore,” said Providence

coach Rob Kodura.

"She’s healthy. She’s running

well. Her mile splits are

good. She’s just strong right

now. She made it to sectionals

last year, so she’s trying

to beat her sectional accomplishment.”

Boys Cross Country

LW East finishes first in regional at Turtlehead Lake

Frank Gogola, Freelance Reporter

Lincoln-Way East coach Ross

Widinski wanted his team to win a

regional title, but he also knew that

a finish among the Top 6 teams was

the only thing necessary to move

on to the sectionals.

“Our goal this week was to run

hard and just stay healthy,” Widinski

said.

Four Griffins runners finished

in the Top 7 as East won the Saturday,

Oct. 22 regional hosted by

Andrew High School at Turtlehead

Lake in Orland Park. Lincoln-Way

Central, Lincoln-Way West and

Andrew placed second, third and

fourth to advance to the Saturday,

Oct. 29 sectional at Southern Illinois

University at Edwardsville,

respectively.

East finished first with 32 points

and was led by senior Noah Healy

(15:27), who won the regional by

six seconds. Freshman Brett Gardner

(15:45), senior Scott Platek

(15:54) and junior Mike Trost

(16:05), finished third, fourth and

seventh, respectively. Junior Will

Evans (16:38), a transfer from

Utah, placed 17th to round out the

scoring.

“Central had a great race today,

too,” Widinski said. “They’re always

tough, so we’re just happy to

show we could compete with them.

We had a couple nice workouts this

week, and they stepped up given the

colder-than-normal conditions.”

Central and West finished second

and third in a bit of a repeat of

their conference meet performance

the prior week, when they placed

first and second. At conference, the

teams were tied through the usual

five runners, so the tiebreaker of

the sixth runner’s place gave Central

the win.

On Oct. 22, it was Central’s pack

running that again made the difference.

West placed two runners

in the Top 5 to Central’s zero, but

Central placed all five scorers in

the Top 13 while West’s 3-4-5 runners

finished 14th, 23rd and 25th.

Central took second with 51

points, and its top finish came from

junior Zak Hutchinson (16:00)

in sixth place. Freshman Jared

Kreis (16:08) was ninth, junior

Nate Rittenbacher (16:14) came in

11th, sophomore Andrew Englert

(16:24) finished 12th and senior

Josh Perch (16:27) took 13th.

“We stressed to them to pack it

up and work as a team,” said Central

coach John Taylor. “The key to

success is team-wise in cross country.

You have to have that pack and

work together and count on your

fellow runner when you’re not

feeling good.”

West finished third with 69

points. Junior Ryan Taylor (15:33)

placed second, and sophomore

John Stiglic (15:58) took fifth. Senior

Casey Gervase (16:31) took

14th and ran a personal record

in his first year on cross country,

while senior Brady Green (17:02)

took 23rd and sophomore Cade Vetor

(17:04) was 25th.

Even though West finished behind

Central again, Warriors coach

Jason Van Swol thought the tie and

Saturday’s finish without top runner

Evan Mitchell — who was resting

for sectionals — will benefit

West as it seeks to qualify for state

for the first time as a team. West is

in its first year in 3A after winning

five consecutive 2A regional titles.

“It keeps you hungry,” Van Swol

said. “You don’t get complacent because

you didn’t win. You weren’t

first, you don’t have any hardware

to bring home for your school. So,

you want to do better next week. It

helped us stay angry and hungry

for more, not just [for] winning a

trophy, but getting better.”

Andrew placed fourth with 119

points, finishing three points clear

of Joliet Central’s 122. Sophomore

Moe Maro (16:10) finished 10th.

Seniors Tommy Doyle (16:58),

Justin George (17:07) and Matt

Ryan (17:09) took 22nd, 28th and

29th. Sophomore Jeffrey Serafini

(17:11, personal record) placed

30th in his first career varsity race.

“We know we’re not quite at

the level of the three Lincoln-Way

schools right now, so getting a Top

3 spot was out of the question,”

said Andrew coach Bobby Matz.

“ We said our first place is fourth.

If we could get fourth, it’s just as

good as first.”


54 | October 27, 2016 | The frankfort station Sports

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Griffins beat Porters

28-0 in their final

regular-season game

Jon DePaolis

Freelance Reporter

In a Week 9 battle of 6-2

teams Friday, Oct. 21, both

the Lincoln-Way East and

Lockport Township football

teams knew the game would

come down to making big

plays at key times. For the

Griffins, it just so happened

to be their first defensive

play of the game.

After an opening series

during which the Griffins

offense wound up with a

total of -12 yards, the game

looked to be following a

similar pattern to the team’s

Week 8 loss to Bradley-

Bourbonnais. But on senior

night, one of East’s elder

statesmen made sure the

script was flipped.

On Lockport’s first play

from scrimmage on offense,

sophomore quarterback Jacob

Karli – in for starter Ben Davis,

who was out with an illness

– dropped back and flung

the ball right into the leaping

arms of East defensive back

Kyle Costanzo, who took it

back more than 20 yards to

give the Griffins great field

position at the Lockport 15-

yard line.

Two plays later, quarterback

Jake Arthur ran in a

10-yard touchdown and the

Griffins never looked back,

cruising to a 28-0 win to end

the season 7-2 heading into

the playoffs.

“That was a big deal,”

East coach Rob Zvonar said

of the interception. “Kyle

Costanzo has been a great

senior for us all year and

got his opportunity tonight.

... I thought he was going to

go in to score, but he got us

down there for the offense to

punch it in.”

The defense continued to

disrupt the Porters throughout

the game, notching four

sacks – by John Christensen,

Dugan Bolsoni, Kyle Julius

and Sam Broda – and forcing

a fumble, which was recovered

by Collin Thibault.

Many of the Griffins had

memories of the previous

week’s letdown against the

Boilermakers in their heads.

“To have to sit there with

that [loss] in the pit of your

stomach all week – if that

doesn’t motivate you, I’m

not sure what else will,”

Zvonar said. “It was honestly

a long and somewhat

miserable week, but the kids

persevered. They prepped

hard, and things kind of

went our way tonight. It’s

what we needed.”

The Griffins offense also

shined. Early in the second

Lincoln-Way East defensive back Kyle Costanzo tries to

outrun the Lockport defense Friday, Oct. 21 during a game

in Frankfort. Julie McMann/22nd Century Media

quarter, Arthur found Nick

Zelenika (2 receptions, 23

yards) over the middle for a

15-yard, diving touchdown

play. Then, right before halftime

and after back-to-back

15-yard runs by senior quarterback

Max Shafer (2-of-4

passing for 17 yards, 2 receptions,

34 yards, 3 rushes,

37 yards), senior running

back Nigel Muhammad

broke through the line for

a 16-yard touchdown run.

Muhammad finished with 63

yards on 10 carries.

Late in the third quarter –

after a 40-yard run by East

running back Brendan Morrissey

(8 rushes, 75 yards)

put the East offense at the

Lockport 4 – East running

back Ryan Scianna scampered

in for a 4-yard score to

make it 28-0.

“We’ve had a three-headed

monster there all year,”

Zvonar said of his running

back trio. “They are pretty

special.”

Arthur, who once again

saw the majority of the snaps

behind center, also had a

nice night. He went 9-of-13,

passing for 112 yards. He

also rushed three times for a

total of 12 yards.

“It definitely starts with our

O-line, and when they win

the attack and they get Nigel

that open on those runs, it’s a

big relief to our offense,” Arthur

said. “I greatly appreciate

what they do.”

On the receiving end, senior

Jeremy Nelson wowed

the crowd with another

highlight-reel, 27-yard catch

in the fourth quarter. On a

third-and-17 play, Arthur

rolled to his left and put up a

pass that was high.

But Nelson went up and

grabbed it with a defender in

his face, and still managed to

get a foot in bounds before

falling backward and out of

play.

“I just threw that pass intending

to go high – either

Jeremy was getting it or no

one [was],” Arthur said. “It

was a ridiculous play. One of

the top ones I’ve ever seen in

high school football.”

Nelson finished with two

receptions for 38 yards,

while tight end Turner Pallissard

nabbed four receptions

for 31 yards.

On the other side, the Porters

(6-3) faced a tough task

having to play without their

starting quarterback. But

after the opening turnover,

Karli settled down and put

together a nice game, going

just 3-of-8 passing for 46

yards but rushing nine times

for a total of 100 yards.

Please see Football, 52


frankfortstation.com Sports

the frankfort station | October 27, 2016 | 55

fastbreak

Lincoln-Way Patriots win MSFL championship

Semi-pro team

brings home trophy

after undefeated

MSFL season

Catalina Marquez/Lincoln-

Way Patriots

Steve Millar

Freelance Reporter

1st-and-3

Lincoln-Way Patriots

edition

1. Terrific Tony (ABOVE)

Quarterback Tony

Powell was named

the Mid States

Football League

Most Valuable Player

for the third straight

year. He threw eight

touchdown passes

against the Quad City

Raiders earlier this

season.

2. Beginning a legacy

Defeating the Door

County Destroyers

31-0 earlier this

month earned the

Patriots their firstever

MSFL title.

3. Packing the defense

The drive all the way

up to Wauwatosa,

Wisconsin was not

an issue, as the

Patriots defense

stepped up at the

right time with its

first shutout of the

year coming in the

championship game.

Members of the Patriots come together for a group picture

after winning the title.

In 2015, the Lincoln-Way

Patriots went undefeated

through the Mid-States

Football League regular

season, only to drop the

championship game to the

Racine Raiders.

This year, the Patriots

were out for vengeance. On

Oct. 1, they got it, rolling

to a 31-0 win over the the

Door County Destroyers in

the MSFL Championship

Game in Wauwatosa, Wisconsin.

It was the semi-pro team’s

first MSFL title.

“This was really a progression

for us over a year,”

coach Jim McClelland said.

“After losing in the championship

game last year, we

felt we were ready this year.

There’s no substitute for experience.

We prepared ourselves,

and we got the job

done.”

The Patriots finished

12-0 in the MSFL and 13-1

overall for the summer

season. Next, they plan to

play champion teams from

other leagues over the fall

and winter, beginning Nov.

5 with a game against the

Midwest Chargers at Illinois

Wesleyan University in

Bloomington.

“We’re looking for a

chance to be crowned national

champions,” McClelland

said. “We’ll have this

game at Illinois Wesleyan,

my alma mater, and then

we’re looking to set up another

game with a national

power in December.”

In the MSFL championship,

the Patriots jumped

out to a 24-0 halftime lead,

getting a pair of defensive

touchdowns, and rolled to

the win.

It was in sharp contrast to

last year’s title game, when

they fell behind early and

could not recover.

“Last year, Racine returned

the opening kickoff

for a touchdown, we

fumbled the ball, they got a

couple long passes, and all

of a sudden we’re down 21-

0,” McClelland said. “This

year, we came out and made

sure we didn’t make those

mistakes. We weren’t going

to come up short again.”

Chris Muhammad, who

plays wide receiver and

safety and returns kicks for

the Patriots, wasn’t with the

team last year, but he saw

the determination his teammates

possessed after that

loss.

“Pretty much the whole

motivation all year was

based off last year,” Muhammad

said. “The guys

came so close and we knew

that they were supposed

to win it all last year and

didn’t, so this year, we came

out and played the way we

know we can and made sure

we’d get it done.”

Muhammad was part of

an explosive offense that

averaged 43 points per

MSFL game.

“We had a lot of weapons,”

Muhammad said.

“(Quarterback) Tony Powell

is amazing. He’s great

at drawing up certain plays

and reading the ‘D’. It was

a fun offense to be a part of

Lincoln-Way Patriots quarterback Tony Powell holds up

the MSFL Championship trophy after defeating the Door

County Destroyers 31-0 earlier this month.

Photos by Catalina Marquez/Lincoln-Way Patriots

and to watch.”

Powell was named the

MSFL’s Most Valuable

Player for the third time.

“Quarterback is the

toughest position to play in

all of sports, physically and

cognitively,” McClelland

said. “You almost never

Please see Patriots, 50

Listen Up

“After losing in the championship game last year, we felt we

were ready this year. There’s no substitute for experience.

We prepared ourselves, and we got the job done.”

Jim McClelland — Lincoln-Way Patriots coach, on winning the first Mid

States Football League championship in team history

TUNE IN

Girls Volleyball

6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 27

• The Lincoln-Way East girls varsity volleyball

team wraps up its regular season at the IHSA

regional at Oak Forest High School.

Index

52 – Pressbox Picks

50 – This Week In

FASTBREAK is compiled by Contributing Editor James

Sanchez. Send any questions or comments to james@

newlenoxpatriot.com, or call (708) 326-9170 ext. 48.


Frankfort’s Hometown Newspaper | www.frankfortstation.com | October 27, 2016

Reigning Champs

Lincoln-Way Patriots

decimate opponents to claim

championship title, Page 55

Moving forward

LW East's boys and girls

cross country teams advance

to sectional play, Page 53

Griffins cap their regular season by defeating Lockport 28-0, Page 54

The Lincoln-Way East varsity football team celebrates its entry into the playoffs Friday, Oct. 21, after defeating Lockport 28-0 in Frankfort. Julie McMann/22nd Century Media

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