Dazzle Fall Issue 2016

Ideaworks2

We’re excited to bring you our fall issue of Dazzle, the official magazine of Ideaworks Marketing! We sincerely hope you enjoy reading through this issue and find its contents both interesting and informative. Some articles which may be of particular interest to you include: • “Brand ID: The marketing technology you shouldn’t live without” (pg. 6) • “Challenging Goliath: How small brands can challenge industry giants” (pg. 12) • “Take two and call us in the morning,” which offers helpful marketing tips you can implement right away (pg. 24) • Plus, a friendly peek into what’s happening at our agency with “Life @ 197” (pg. 22) Please don’t hesitate to reach out to us with feedback or questions on anything you come across in this issue. We would also love to hear your thoughts on any topics you’d like to see covered in the future. Until next time, enjoy this issue of Dazzle. - Chelsey Tupper, editor-in-chief

fall 2016

THE O FFIC IAL M A G A ZINE O F IDEA W ORKS M ARKE T I N G

top

TEN

do’s & don’ts of

staying liked

on social media

p. 5

Has branding

become so

EXPANSIVE

it’s become

RESRICTIVE?

p. 9

CHALLENGING

GOLIATH

Brand ID:

the marketing

technology you

shouldn’t

live

without

p. 6

p. 12

B O O S T

your

marketing

metabolism

BY MORNING

p. 24


contents

EDITORIAL

Editor-in-Chief Chelsey Tupper

Design Director Donna Shrader

Art Director Patty Pugh

Deputy Art Director Allison Simenkiewicz

4 6 9

EDITOR’S LETTER

from Chelsey Tupper, director of

client & public relations

BRAND ID:

Marketing technology your

business needs

PEACOCKS, APPLES

& A SWOOSH

The happenings in the

world of design

IDEAWORKS TEAM

Owner & CEO Peter Steve

Owner Judy Steve

President Donna Hansbury

VP of Operations Patty Pugh

Chief Creative Officer Donna Shrader

Administrative Assistant Sue Cunningham

Graphic Designer Kelly Letukas

12 21 22

CHALLENGING

GOLIATH

Small businesses can

battle industry giants.

CHALLENGING

GOLIATH QUIZ:

Which type of brand are you?

LIFE @ 197

A behind-the-scenes

look at our team

23 24 27

TAKE 2

WE LOVE

IT IS WHAT IT IS

Marketing tips that can be

BLUE CHIP

A letter from our

combined to set you apart Sponsoring a no-kill animal

CEO Peter Steve from the rest refuge in Dallas, PA

Graphic Designer Rachael Baratta

Graphic Designer Allison Simenkiewicz

Marketing Communications Director McKenzie Kupchik

Director of Client & Public Relations Chelsey Tupper

IT Special Projects Tyler Steve

CONTACT US

Call Us 570-609-5650

Email Us info@ideaworks.marketing

Visit Us Online ideaworks.marketing

FOLLOW US

@IdeaworksAgency

facebook.com/IdeaworksMarketing

@ideaworksmarketing

Ideaworks Marketing

DAZZLE FALL 2016 3


FROM THE EDITOR

CHELSEY TUPPER, DIRECTOR OF CLIENT & PUBLIC RELATIONS

Don’t make them

unfriend you

The Top Ten Do’s and Don’ts of Staying “Liked” on Social Media.

KNOW YOUR

Do

Be active, not annoying

You know those “friends” who update you on every single moment of their

entire day, from a picture of their breakfast banana smoothie to their 7-mile

evening run tracker post? Don’t be them. Post engaging information

regularly, but not so often that your followers lose interest or that you get

buried in the newsfeed.

Don’t

Involve your personal views and opinions

Keep your political, religious and personal preferences close to your vest.

Unless you are running a campaign for public office or serving as the head

of PETA, these affiliations need to be kept separate from any and all of your

public business sites. If you publicize your affinities, you risk alienating

entire segments of your customer population.

REAP THE REWARD

look at the data!

Luckily, for you, analytics are available

for most social media sites. Make sure

you are posting during times when

your followers are active to capitalize

on the most exposure and engagement

possible. The difference between

posting at 8:15 and 8:45 a.m. can

equate to a hundred more views.

delete negative comments

View any negative comments that have been

made on your social media pages as an

opportunity to showcase your professionalism

and dedication to righting any potential

wrongs your company inadvertently made.

Though no one likes to handle situations like

this, it is important to show that you truly care

and immediately respond to any dissatisfaction

that is aired, no matter how trivial.

s one of the newbies

to the creative team at

Ideaworks Marketing,

I am thrilled to work

with such talented

individuals who, in

just a few short

months, have already made me

stronger at my craft. One key

aspect of my job as director of

client and public relations is to

promote Ideaworks throughout

my work with prospective and

current clients so the former will

become clients with us and the

latter will remain satisfied. While I’m

still learning more and more about

what makes Ideaworks who we are,

for the first time in my post-college

life, I can finally say I feel like I know

who I am professionally. As a result,

I’m reaping the reward of working

at a top-notch marketing agency.

See, even though I was working

in public relations and marketing

after graduating college, I always

questioned if that was the true

path I was supposed to follow. As a

result, I left the industry and quickly

Knowing

who you are

is similar to

a company

understanding

who it is

in terms of

its brand.

found myself without emotional

or professional satisfaction in my

job. I realized I needed to get back

in the game, so I set my sights on

returning. Now that I know who I

am as a professional, I don’t think

I’ve ever been more grateful for my

job and the company I work for.

Knowing who you are as a

person is similar to a company

understanding who it is in terms of

its brand. At Ideaworks, we specialize

in branding and brand identity.

One thing we wholeheartedly

believe is in order for a brand to

be successful, it needs to clearly

communicate who it is, what it

does and where it wants to go.

When a brand takes these steps, it’s

well on the road to success.

Because we believe so much in

the power of branding at Ideaworks,

we’ve dedicated this issue’s two

feature articles to topics that will

help you rethink and refine your

brand and brand identity. The first

feature, “Brand ID: The marketing

technology you shouldn’t live

without” (pg. 6), highlights our

Brand ID technology that maximizes

the true power of a brand

by ensuring a cohesive and

consistent use of its identity in the

marketplace. Did I mention it also

allows for easy personalization

and can work well for companies

of all sizes (doesn’t Brand ID

sound like a dream come true)?

Our second feature, “Challenging

Goliath: How small brands can

challenge industry giants” (pg. 12),

discusses the concept of challenger

brands and how taking a nontraditional

approach to positioning

your brand can uncover potential

growth opportunities.

Game of Thrones creator and

author, George R.R. Martin, said,

“Never forget what you are, for

surely the world will not. Make it

your strength. Then, it can never

be your weakness. Armor yourself

in it, and it will never be used to

hurt you.” Similarly, whether it’s

personally or as a brand, never

forget who or what you are and make

it your strength. If you do, you’ll reap

the reward.

Stay Consistent

If you have multiple social media

platforms dedicated to your

company, make sure your

personality, tone and information is

consistent throughout all sites. If

you started a particular platform

and let it go quiet, log in and delete

the account. A dead page portrays

dead business, which no one wants

potential customers to think!

Develop a personality

Your social media sites should portray

the true feeling and culture of your

business. If you are laid back and easy

going, your social media posts should

reflect your chill attitude. If your

company is a black tie, button up,

high-end machine, relay that image

with your words. Remaining true to

company form in all facets of business

is integral to maintaining the tone

and feel in your customers’ perception

and experience.

Be real

Use real images of your company, product, customers,

employees and services in action to generate a true connection

from your social media audience. No one feels an emotional

attachment to a stock image, so turn up the “likes” by posting real

photos of people and things in places that your customers will

recognize and relate to.

Ignore your

privacy settings

Make sure you are up-to-date

on the current status of your

privacy settings on all

accounts. You must also be

judicious of who you give the

administrative rights of your

social media page to. Make

sure all content is reviewed and

overseen to ensure the proper

tone and message is being

consistently delivered.

be needy

The words “please share” and

“please retweet” should never,

ever, under any circumstances,

appear on your social media

sites! You want to be perceived

as confident and successful,

never needy.

Mix up your 80 with your 20

Eighty percent of your posting information should be entertaining

or informative, while 20% should be related to selling your service

or product. A social media site is not a website and shouldn’t be

treated as one. Use this space to portray your personality and

deliver added value to your followers. By doing so, you’ll

successfully extend your marketing reach without even trying.

4 DAZZLE FALL 2016


THE MARKETING TECHNOLOGY YOU

SHOULDN’T LIVE WITHOUT

Minimize costs, maximize results,

preserve your brand identity

For marketers, one of the daily challenges often faced is protecting

your brand identity. Even if comprehensive guidelines are established,

once released to internal and external audiences, it’s difficult to ensure

that they are always maintained. Protecting your brand identity is not

only time consuming, but also costly in terms of resource and budget

expenditures. In any case, as marketers, our overarching goal is to build

lasting relationships with our target audiences and to do so through the

consistent application of our brand identity and messaging at all times.

You might be wondering if there is any way controlling your identity

can actually be achieved without spending excessive amounts

of time and money. Let us be the first to tell you the answer is YES!

We were determined to solve this issue facing many of our

clients, and marketers in general, because we’ve been in

similar situations and understand the accompanying frustrations.

Donna Hansbury, president of Ideaworks, first learned of this

technology platform at a creative conference and knew it would

be a game-changer for Ideaworks’ clients. “At Ideaworks, we’re

committed to forward thinking and fresh ideas, and Brand ID is

just that. We built upon the foundation of this already impressive

software to create the kind of marketing support suite we felt

our clients would value. Clients who currently use Brand ID

continually tell us how much they appreciate regaining full

control of their identity and messaging through this marketing

platform,” said Hansbury. She added, “Brand ID can conquer a

myriad of marketing challenges for small companies to large

organizations on projects ranging from simple business cards

to a 100-page customizable magazine.”

“Brand ID can

conquer a myriad

of marketing

challenges for small

companies to large

organizations on

projects ranging from

simple business

cards to a 100-page

customizable

magazine.”

THEREFORE, IT’S WITH MUCH EXCITEMENT THAT WE

ANNOUNCE OUR NEWEST OFFERING AT IDEAWORKS, BRAND ID!

Brand ID stands for Brand Intelligent Design, and its name explains its

purpose – a specialized marketing tool that ensures your brand identity

is consistently and accurately represented on all marketing assets so it

is never compromised. This technology application makes it simple for

site users to quickly access and create any corporate support collateral

within the brand parameters as set by executive management. As a result,

branding standards are controlled and brand integrity upheld – always.

6 DAZZLE FALL 2016


DESIGNED AND MANAGED AS A WEBSITE

PORTAL BY IDEAWORKS, BRAND ID

OFFERS A BROAD RANGE OF BENEFITS:

PROTECTS BRAND INTEGRITY

Brand ID fully protects your brand identity because access

and customization parameters are pre-set by marketing decision

makers. Users of the site are only able to select and customize

the design and messaging options approved by management.

As a result, you can rest assured that all marketing collateral and

support assets will consistently and correctly represent your

brand’s identity, 100% of the time.

PROVIDES SAVINGS

ON PRINT COSTS

Using Brand ID allows you to quickly create

and print marketing assets as needed, so

you no longer have to worry about having to

throw away a large quantity of collateral that

is out dated or out of touch with your

current target audience.

SAVES TIME

Tired of those “quick turnaround”

marketing requests for sales

collateral that can slice hours out

of your day? Because Brand ID is

user-intuitive, marketing materials

can be created by populating

a template with custom text

and/or a series of drop-down

menus. Users can easily tailor the

document to their own needs,

while the marketing department

stays on track with more

time-sensitive projects.

OFFERS

PERSONALIZATION

LOGIC

Brand ID features an

impressive logic capability that

allows for a vast amount of

personalization options. Create

imagery for direct mail pieces

personalized by the recipient’s

gender, location or interests.

With Brand ID, it’s easy to give

each direct mail campaign that

value-added personal touch

that often influences

purchasing decisions.

STREAMLINES COMMUNICATION

Any number of things can negatively impact

communication, including the use of outdated materials

and inconsistent messaging. Brand ID allows for all

marketing assets to be inventoried in one location for

easy access – keeping available support materials

current, brand compliant and easily accessible.

TO SEE BRAND ID IN ACTION, CALL US

TODAY FOR A FREE DEMONSTRATION.

BRAND ID HAS MADE A HUGE

DIFFERENCE FOR OUR CLIENTS, AND

WE KNOW IT WILL FOR YOU TOO.

PROVIDES FLEXIBILITY FOR CUSTOMIZATION

Even though marketing decision makers set the design and content parameters

for each marketing asset, site users do have the option to customize according to

individual need and/or aesthetic preferences. For example, a direct mail brochure

that needs to be customized by company location, target audience or offer specifics.

You can even change the photos being used to be fit the needs of the audience or

geographic location.

Has

branding

become so

expansive

it’s become

restrictive?

DONALD PARTYKA

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Americas Quarterly

DAZZLE FALL 2016 9


+ =

IN HER INTERVIEW with Hilman Curtis,

famous designer Paula Scher talks about

drawing the Citibank logo during the

initial client meeting on a napkin and

walking out. She quickly sees the formal

constraints of merging the Citibank type

with the logo for Travelers, known for it’s

red umbrella icon. “They had to merge

Travelers and Citi - and Traveler’s had an

umbrella and Citibank is a word - and the

lowercase ‘thing’ of a ‘t’ is an umbrella

and you stick an arc on the top and you

got it,” Scher said.

Take a straw poll of most Citibank patrons

at your local branch to see if they know

what the arc in the Citibank logo means.

Most, if not all, will be clueless. However,

they look for the same memorable red

arc in the logo when trying to find an

ATM to make a withdrawl. Is it a problem

that the meaning of the arc is lost?

Probably not. Many memorable logos

evolve beyond their original intended

symbolism, and the recognizability of the

logo itself takes over. For instance, do most

people know that NBC’s peacock logo

exists because they were the first network

with color programming? Or the strange

TimeWarner glyph represents an eye and

an ear symbolizing the merger of the

print magazines from Time, Inc. with the

movie and music of Warner Brothers? Do

you still see the “hidden” forward arrow

in the counterspace in the “Ex” in FedEx?

Or realize that the smiley arrow in the

Amazon logo - which point from the

“a” to the “z” in Amazon - signifies

they sell everything from a to z?

Some symbolism in these identities is

more subtle and requires an awareness

of brand history. Understanding that the

Travelers icon was an umbrella makes the

Citibank logo make sense. However, using

more universal, literal symbols also works.

My former teacher, the late Malcolm Grear,

was a master of symbolism in logo design.

His meanings were never abstract and

rarely obscured. One of his most notable

triumphs of symbol and form is his logo

for the Presbyterian Church. Overall, it’s a

cross. But, upon closer inspection, it also

contains a pulpit, a book, a chalice, a fish,

a dove and fire. Nothing vague there.

For better or worse, logos today often

veer from more literal and illustrative

solutions like Grear’s. Part of this is

practicality. Branding today has become

so expansive it is restrictive. Any logo

has to be usable as a social media icon, a

banner on a profile page, and even teenytiny

as a favicon to show up in the tab of

a browser. No wonder most clients want

a lower case sans-serif letter on a blue

background. They’ve seen it before and

they know it works.

Agencies spend a lot of time with clients

justifying their design decisions based on

meaning. This makes sense and shows

respect. A good designer will always use

the content and history of the company

as a starting point. But, the final result can’t

sacrifice simplicity for symbolism. The

true test of a good logo is not just it’s first

impression, but how it builds memory and

meaning over time. This is hard to quantify

and can be frustrating. Think of the Apple

logo. If a new company were launching

today called Apple Computers, and existed

fresh without years of innovative product

design and advertising, I

don’t think the simple

apple icon

would have

much punch

on it’s own.

In fact, it took

many years

for Apple to

use the apple icon without typesetting the

word “Apple” next to it - in effect, to use its

identity without explaining it. Same for Nike

and its swoosh. Symbolic meaning can be lost

over time. But it is the consistent use of logos in

branding that makes the mark memorable by

its own merits. Peacocks, apples, and hook-like

“swoosh” symbols do not clearly tell us what

they represent. Especially decades after their

creation. How they are used over time makes

them memorable and reinforces their brand.

Sometimes an umbrella is just an umbrella.

The complete interview with Paula Scher can

be viewed at hillmancurtis.com/artistseries/paula-scher/

Donald Partyka tweets about

typography news and history,

as well as design and education.

Follow him @donaldpartyka.

Visit his website donaldpartyka.com

All registered and unregistered trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

DAZZLE FALL 2016 11


COVER FEATURE

CHALLENGING

GOLIATH

How small brands can challenge industry giants

THINK ABOUT THOSE

BRANDS YOU SEE, HEAR,

AND READ ABOUT

ALL THE TIME LIKE UBER,

DYSON, DOLLAR SHAVE

CLUB AND AIRBNB.

WHY DO YOU THINK THESE

BRANDS ARE PLASTERED

ALL OVER THE PLACE?

W

henever anyone starts a business or is trying to grow a business, it’s always the same

dream – visions of your logo and company name everywhere, not being able to keep your

shelves stocked, not having enough manpower to keep up with demand, phones ringing

off the hook, social feeds full of conversations between engaged consumers, and too many

media requests and mentions to count. However, rarely does this happen. Why? Because

most times, business owners do not stop to give their company’s brand serious thought.

You might have a great product or service to offer, but if you don’t position your brand

correctly, your business won’t achieve true success.

12 DAZZLE FALL 2016

BY: CHELSEY TUPPER


Think about those brands you see, hear, and read about all

the time, such as Uber, Dyson, Dollar Shave Club and Airbnb.

Why do you think these brands are plastered all over the

place? Yes, their success has placed them in the forefront,

but it’s how they achieved that great success that’s the real

story. The reason these brands are booming is because

each one has challenged their respective market leaders,

resulting in a revolution in that market. As such, each one of

these brands can be referred to as a “challenger brand.” More

specifically, a challenger brand is a company or product

brand that is not the category leader in a particular industry.

Challenger brands play from a position behind the dominant

player or leader in an industry. The process of achieving

challenger brand status does not happen overnight. The

aforementioned brands were and continue to be committed

to their marketing strategies and did not shy away from putting

a lot of time and effort into devising their marketing plans,

brand identity and positioning. They carefully researched their

respective industries and the key players. As a result, they didn’t

jump in blindly; they knew their competition and how vital it

was to have a solid marketing execution to attract customers.

A CHALLENGER BRAND IS A COMPANY OR

PRODUCT BRAND THAT IS NOT THE CATEGORY

LEADER IN A PARTICULAR INDUSTRY.

Take a look at Airbnb for example. For those who aren’t familiar,

Airbnb is an online rental service that enables people to list, find

and rent vacation homes. It is a marketplace for vacation rentals

that charges a fee for connecting users with people who have

property to rent. Founded just eight years ago, Airbnb already

has over 1,500,000 listings in 34,000 cities and 191 countries.

How does this great success happen when there are thousands

of hotels and motels? It happened because Airbnb differentiated

its service from the leading brand or in this instance, a category

of brands in its industry, which are hotels. Instead of always

needing to stay in a hotel with people all around or having to

reserve several rooms next to each other if traveling with friends

or family, Airbnb provides accommodations that are much more

private than the typical hotel and allows groups of travelers

to stay together instead of being sectioned off in separate

rooms. Additionally, travelers can actually get an idea of what

it’s like to live in the town or city being visited. Thus, Airbnb

provides a greater cultural experience than staying in a hotel.

DAZZLE FALL 2016 15


Differentiation is just one key characteristic of challenger

brands. In sticking with the Airbnb example, not only does

Airbnb differentiate itself from the average hotel, it also

creates market segmentation. Early on, Airbnb identified

those consumers who are under-valued or under-served

by leading hotels, such as individuals who cannot afford

grand hotels and/or hotels in close proximity to areas of

interest for the duration of a vacation, along with those

traveling in groups. With Airbnb, not only are there more

desirable budget-friendly options, but groups can enjoy

the luxury of renting a house verse being divided in a hotel.

ALONG WITH

DIFFERENTIATION

AND SEGMENTATION,

CHALLENGER BRANDS

ALSO POSSESS

THE FOLLOWING

QUALITIES:

OUT-THINK, RATHER THAN

OUT-SPEND, THE COMPETITION

COMMITTED TO BEING THE BEST

AT WHAT THEY DO

EMBRACE PRODUCTIVE DISRUPTION

AND UNCONVENTIONAL APPROACHES

USE THE COMPETITION’S SIZE

AGAINST THEMSELVES

PROVOKE NEW CONVERSATION

When you think about Airbnb, isn’t it easy to see how

each of these qualities is representative of the company?

16 DAZZLE FALL 2016


CONSTANT EVOLUTION

Technological advancements. Product or service is always evolving

& does not stay the same for an extended period of time.

Examples: Google Fiber

and Shinola

5

TYPES

OF CHALLENGER

BRANDS

COMPLUSIVE SERVITUDE

Over delivers. Superior promises and services.

Examples: The Ritz-Carlton

and FedEx

FOSTER REJECTION

Creates a “cult-like” following. Focuses only on a very specific

niche audience. Hyper focuses on their target.

Examples: Mini Cooper

and ModCloth

LIGHTNING ROD

Creates attraction. Does the unexpected and adds shock value.

Examples: Dollar Shave Club

and Lady Gaga

WHO ARE YOU?

HERETICAL

Game changer. Takes ideas from other industries

and improves upon them.

Examples: IKEA and Silvercar

18 DAZZLE FALL 2016


Going back to our Airbnb example, which type of challenger

brand would you say it is? If you guessed heretical, good

job. This type of challenger brand best describes Airbnb

because it is a total game changer in the travel/hospitality

industry. Airbnb took ideas from this industry and

improved them in order to create a much better consumer

experience in many different ways. Which category do

you think your brand falls into? Is it the same category you

would like your brand to be in? If you think your brand can

fit into more than one category, be careful. Think about

the granular, fundamental purpose of your company or

service. To be a challenger brand, you must have a clear

vision and focus of what it is you want to do or provide.

ARE YOU A

CHALLENGER BRAND?

Take this fun quiz to find out if you are and what type.

Are you a category leader in your industry?

You’re not a

challenger

brand :(

YES

START

NO

Do you have a unique

product or service

that you offer?

NO

Do you typically have

a very specific type

of customer?

YES

NO

Do you make sure your

customers are happy

no matter the cost?

YES

The concept of challenger brands can get you thinking

differently about your company. Every business owner

wants the same kind of success Airbnb has seen in

just eight years, but to do so, it’s imperative to take

a step back and invest in your marketing/branding

effort. It might take a lot of time and energy, but the

investment will be worthwhile when the dreams you

had back when starting your business become reality.

NO

Is the product/service

an improvement on a

previous product?

YES

YES

MANY

Are you always

changing your

product to fit your

customers needs?

Does your company

tend to do things a

bit out of the norm to

gain attention?

NO

YES

Is the customer

always right?

OF COURSE!

NO

NOT ALWAYS

Do you think your brand already falls into one of

these five categories or do you think your brand has

the potential to become one of these challenger

brands? Connect with us. At Ideaworks, it’s our

passion to think of ideas that will make your brand,

product, or service stand out and resonate with

your target market regardless if it’s challenger brand

material or not. Who knows, after a conversation with

us, you might start to see your brand in a new light.

Do you think that your

product/service can

completely change the

way people do things?

MAYBE

YES!

NO

NO

YES

Are customers

extremely loyal to

your brand?

YES

NO

Does your company

try to make viral videos

and have outrageous

marketing?

YES

NO

We think you

need to dig a

little deeper.

We can help

with that!

See page 19 for discriptions of your type of challenger brand.

DAZZLE FALL 2016 21


Rachael also loves photography!

IT IS WHAT IT IS

PETER STEVE, OWNER & CEO

McKenzie Kupchik is new to

the Ideaworks team, joining

as the director of marketing

communications in April. Her past

career experience includes working

in marketing for Children’s Miracle

Network at Geisinger Janet Weis

Children’s Hospital, as well as Sodexo

Campus Services. McKenzie lives in

Roaring Brook, PA with her husband

Bryan, daughters Viola and Nellie,

three cats, and her dog Caesar. Baby

Isabelle is expected to join their

circus in Roaring Brook sometime

in late December.

THE BEST

Chelsey Tupper, director of

client and public relations,

turned the big 3-0 in July! She

traveled to Portland, Maine

to visit her sister Catherine,

so they could celebrate the

big day together. Then, when

Chelsey returned home, she

was surprised with a party

thrown by her husband Brian,

parents and in-laws.

A Steve family tradition

continued earlier this year

when Peter’s sons Peter III (L)

and Tyler proudly attended

the 116th U.S. Open golf

tournament held at Oakmont

Country Club in Oakmont, PA.

Years earlier in 1983, Peter Sr.

and his brother, Tom, attended

the same tournament at the

very same course!

One of our graphic designers, Kelly

Letukas, and her family visited

LegoLand in Boston, MA this year!

Her husband, Jimmy, and son, Porter,

found the wild Lego giraffe!

We are excited to welcome

Rachael Baratta to the

Ideaworks Marketing team!

Rachael came onboard with

us as a graphic designer. She

graduated from Kutztown

University in 2012 with a

Bachelor of Fine Arts in

communication design,

advertising and graphic

design. While in college and

over the course of her career,

Rachael has been the recipient

of several art and design

awards and honors. She is an

incredibly talented designer

and illustrator who we are

happy to have on our team.

Allison Simenkiewicz, one

of our graphic designers,

attended LUMA Arts Festival

in Binghamton, New York. This

featured 3D videos projected

onto buildings in the city.

In October, Donna Hansbury,

Ideaworks president, and her family

traveled to Solano Beach, CA to visit

her niece, Lyndsay, and her fiancé,

Wyatt, who welcomed their first-born

in September, a little girl named

Harper. While visiting, Donna’s mom,

sister, niece and the baby gathered

for a special four generations photo!

Ideaworks chief creative officer, Donna

Shrader, and her son David recently

spent a week in Disney. They stayed at

Jambo House, Disney’s Animal Kingdom

Lodge. Favorite rides? Tower of Terror,

Expedition Everest and Space Mountain.

YOU NEVER ENTERED

m sorry, but we’re just

not a good fit.” As an

agency principal, the

thought of uttering

these words to a

prospective client

makes me cringe,

knowing how challenging it is to

grow a business in today’s economy.

But my experience has proven that

there are instances where the pain

of not entering a client relationship

far outweighs enduring an even

greater pain that awaits either party

in the not-too-distant future.

So what merits walking away

from a client/agency relationship?

Obviously, this depends on the

situation but from my experience,

it boils down to three factors: ego,

respect and value. It’s important to

note that all three factors can apply

to either side of the relationship.

Let’s take a deeper look.

1. EGO: The client/agency

relationship must be a true

partnership with both parties

working together to achieve

success. If either party’s ego

overwhelms the other, it’s a sure

sign of future problems. Anyone

who insists their copy, creative, or

ideas are better simply because they

are in charge or because they’re

paying the bill, will never be a good

fit for an agency. Conversely, any

agency that is so defensive of their

work that they can’t appreciate a

better idea or constructive feedback

coming from their client, will never

truly benefit the organization that

hired them.

2. RESPECT: Anyone who

isn’t willing to make a financial

commitment to work with an agency

based upon the agency’s proposal

for the work requested, isn’t ready

to enter a productive client/agency

relationship. It is incumbent upon

an agency to demonstrate their

value in a proposal and to explain

how they will meet the needs of

the client. A client must respect the

expertise of the agency enough to

pay them for their services, while

an agency must deliver services as

promised and produce results. If

either is not present, it’s time to

walk away.

3. VALUE: Like respect, value

must be a two-way street in any client/

agency relationship. It is imperative

that agencies understand the

real value of what they provide

The client/agency relationship must be

a true partnership with both parties

working together to achieve success.

and continually look for ways to

maximize the value they bring

to their clients. Clients, too, must

understand the value of partnering

with an agency versus offering

projects for hire to the lowest

bidder. If at any time, from either

perspective, price becomes the

driver, then the real value of the

partnership will never be realized.

Thankfully, most client/agency

relationships consist of true

professionals who enjoy working

with each other on a regular basis.

In these relationships, the clients

recognize the agency as a partner,

focused on helping them achieve

success. They understand and

respect the expertise the agency

offers, and value the services

provided to help them reach

their goals.

The agency in these relationships

understands the role it plays

in helping the client attain its

desired outcomes. It realizes the

investment the client has made

in the relationship and assumes

the responsibility to deliver real

solutions and measurable results.

But for those unfortunate times

when one or maybe even all three

of the above-mentioned factors

surface, I urge you, client or agency

alike, to walk away in the best

interest of all involved. It just might

be the best business relationship

you never entered.

DAZZLE FALL 2016 23


Peter Steve, Jr.

Owner & CEO

Wyoming, PA 18644

This kennel kindly adopted by:

Signs donated and printed by

peters@ideaworks.marketing

570.609.5650

www.ideaworks.marketing

197 Wyoming Avenue

Take two of

these tips to

boost your

marketing

metabolism.

MCKENZIE KUPCHIK

DIRECTOR OF

MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS

Ideaworks Marketing

Put yourself out there on as many

platforms as you can, but make sure

you are using the right space. Some

businesses aren’t fit for

Instagram or Snapchat,

where others can

significantly improve

customer connection

through those platforms.

Take a good look at

which social media outlets

your business falls into and

immerse yourself in them. If

you’re not the most

social-savvy person,

find someone who

is and hand the task

to them.

Check out our hints

and tips on page 5 where

we give you the top

do’s and don’ts of

social media.

People, especially customers, want

nothing more than to get a return on

their investment. Reward both the

loyal and the potential customer by

developing a referral program that

benefits each type of patron, and you’re

sure to have a winning combination. Just

make sure everyone on staff is educated

about the program so that you don’t

have a fumble at kickoff!

If you have a great company you work

with regularly, tell people about them!

Publicizing solid working partnerships

within an industry is an excellent way to

further your reach and exposure. As they

say, two heads are always better than

one, and in this case, two customer

bases are definitely better than one.

Get free marketing exposure and instant

credibility by applying for local and

on-line business specific

awards. You’ll never win

if you don’t throw your

hat in the ring, so get

out there and line your

shelves with some shiny

trophies recognizing your

business excellence.

Get rid of the stock business cards and

make an impact with something fresh

and exciting. Make sure your business

card reflects the image and culture

of your business - down to colors,

texture and shape. This may be the first

impression they get of your business, so

make it accurate, engaging and worth

holding on to.

There is no better way to get free press

than by writing it yourself. Submit an

article discussing your new product or

service or delve into the reasons your

technique or customer experience is

superior, and submit it to a trade or local

magazine for publication. News and

media outlets are always looking for

interesting leads, so give them what they

want and reap the benefits of free PR!

Imagine 20 kids huddling together,

cheering “Gooooo *insert your company

name here*!” It might not be the first

thing you think of when it comes to your

marketing plan, but it is a fun way to

support your community, while getting

great exposure. Plus, those t-shirts stick

around for years and get recycled as

hand-me-downs, so your investment is

extended well beyond the season.

Sharing your industry knowledge at

seminars or local workshops can pull

double duty. First, you are giving added

exposure to your business, and second,

you are proving that you are rife with

information and experience, which will

help to bring your company to mind

when the attendees are seeking services.

Do-gooding always

does a business good.

Select a charity you

believe in, and support

it financially through

donations and

sponsorships or

by providing your

business’ services

at no cost.

Rave’s

974 Lockvi le Rd, Da las, PA 18612

570.333.5265 • bcfanimalrefuge.org

There may be nothing more useful

Thank You

On behalf of a l of us

at Blue Chip Farm Animal Refuge,

we extend our sincere thanks and

gratitude for your generosity in

Adopting-A-Kennel to help

offset the expense of the care

and upkeep of our furry friends

until they become part of

their forever family.

THANKS AGAIN!

than a good, honest, client testimonial.

Develop and maintain an ongoing library

of testimonials about your company and

use them anywhere you can. Post the

good word on your website, social media

pages, in print, and on online reviews,

and let them speak for themselves.

Just remember to ask their permission

first before using any sample work on

endorsements!

24 DAZZLE FALL 2016


BUZZW RDS

CHELSEY TUPPER DIRECTOR OF CLIENT & PUBLIC RELATIONS


I wanted to check in with you, so

we can start moving the needle

on the task at hand and not wait

until next week to circle back,

because I’d really like to

leverage the motivation the

team has for the creation of

this piece of evergreen content.”

If you’re like us, that statement

probably makes your blood boil

and drives you bonkers thanks

to all those annoying buzzwords.

It’s so commonplace anymore for

professionals to severely overuse

these words and phrases. As such,

we thought it would be fun to

compile our favorites into an

infographic, and make each other

promise we’ll never use these

around the office again.

Goals that don’t

require much

effort to achieve

Two

marketing

strategies

combined

to achieve

a greater

impact

Diagnosing the

root of an issue

One’s availability

and workload

Of or denoting a situation

in which each party benefits

in some way

We Love

Blue Chip

Ideaworks has selected Blue Chip Animal Farm

Refuge as our charity of choice because, well,

we love Blue Chip Farms! This animal refuge,

located in Dallas, PA, is more than just a no-kill

shelter. It is a team of dedicated volunteers who

work selflessly to keep the safety and security

of countless at-risk animals intact, purely out of

the goodness of their hearts. We are more than

proud to support the marketing efforts of Blue

Chip, because like our friends, we believe every

animal deserves a second chance for love and

companionship in a ‘fur-ever’ home.

Modifying

thinking /

creativity

process

to be

original and

different

A project or

effort making a

noticeable impact

A deadline enforced

by previously

scheduled tasks

Focus

solely

on the

project at

hand and

work until

its done

Stop by Blue Chip today or

check out its website at

www.bcfanimalrefuge.org;

Blue Chip is always thankful for

an extra helping hand!

26 DAZZLE FALL 2016

All components

of a specific

project being

ready for the

next steps

Illustration done by Rachael Baratta

bcfanimalrefuge.org


Brand ID (Brand Intelligent Design) is easy-to-use software that

allows you to customize marketing materials and resources without

compromising your company’s identity. Colors, logos and fonts remain

consistent, keeping your brand standards in check across your entire

organization. This “one-stop shop” houses an online library of templatebased

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menus, to postcards, letters, and emails, Brand ID can help your company

cut costs, save time and maximize results!

Call Ideaworks Marketing today for a FREE demonstration,

570-609-5650 or email info@ideaworks.marketing.

CUSTOMIZE

MATERIALS

SAVE TIME

AND MONEY

PROTECT

YOUR BRAND

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