HH_112316

22ndcenturymedia

The Homer Horizon 112316

Homer Glen’s Award-Winning Hometown Newspaper homerhorizon.com • November 23, 2016 • Vol. 11 No. 43 • $1

A

®

Publication

,LLC

Welcoming a

new leader

Homer Township Fire

Protection District picks

chief, Page 6

Holiday

commerce

Chamber puts on annual

party, installs directors

at Ruffled Feathers Golf

Club, Page 7

Just in time

Publisher 22nd Century

Media’s 2016 Holiday

Guide arrives, featuring a

look at area happenings,

Inside

Holiday Sip & Shop presents festive atmosphere for ladies to purchase gifts, mingle, Page 3

Homer Glen residents (left to right) Tami O’Brien, Pat Naylor and Karen Hill-Davis chat Friday, Nov. 18, at the inaugural Holiday Sip & Shop fundraiser

at John Olson American Legion Post 18 in Lockport. Laurie Fanelli/22nd Century Media

8550 W 159 th St.

Orland Park, IL

708.403.1300

www.zeiglernissanoforlandpark.com

Chance to win a FREE car

from Zeigler Auto Group!

*See dealer for details

8500 W 159th St.

Orland Park, IL

708.403.4700

www.infinitioforlandpark.com


2 | November 23, 2016 | The Homer Horizon calendar

homerhorizon.com

In this week’s

Horizon

Sound Off.....................13

Pastor Column...............16

Faith Briefs....................16

The Dish........................18

Puzzles..........................22

Classifieds................ 24-34

Sports...................... 35-40

The Homer

Horizon

ph: 708.326.9170 fx: 708.326.9179

Editor

Thomas Czaja, x12

tom@homerhorizon.com

Assistant Editor

Erin Redmond, x15

e.redmond@22ndcenturymedia.com

Sales director

Sherry Ranieri, x21

s.ranieri@22ndcenturymedia.com

real estate sales

Tricia Weber, x47

t.weber@22ndcenturymedia.com

business directory Sales

Kellie Tschopp, x23

k.tschopp@22ndcenturymedia.com

Recruitment Advertising

Jess Nemec, x46

j.nemec@22ndcenturymedia.com

Legal Notices

Jeff Schouten, x51

j.schouten@22ndcenturymedia.com

PUBLISHER

Joe Coughlin, 847.272.4565, x16

j.coughlin@22ndcenturymedia.com

Managing Editor

Bill Jones, x20

bill@opprairie.com

SALES MANAGER

Andrew Nicks

a.nicks@22ndcenturymedia.com

EDITORIAL DESIGN DIRECTOR

Nancy Burgan, x30

n.burgan@22ndcenturymedia.com

22 nd Century Media

11516 West 183rd Street

Unit SW Office Condo #3

Orland Park, IL 60467

www.HomerHorizon.com

Chemical- free printing on 30% recycled paper

circulation inquiries

circulation@22ndcenturymedia.com

The Homer Horizon (USPS #25577) is published

weekly by 22nd Century Media, LLC,

328 E Lincoln Hwy New Lenox, IL 60451.

Periodical postage paid at New Lenox, IL

and additional mailing offices.

POSTMASTER: Send changes to:

The Homer Horizon, 328 E Lincoln Hwy

New Lenox, IL 60451

Published by

www.22ndcenturymedia.com

Erin Redmond

e.redmond@22ndcenturymedia.com

Friday

Coffee, Donuts and a Movie

10:30 a.m. Nov. 25, Homer

Township Public Library,

14320 W. 151st St., Homer

Glen. Indulge on coffee

and donuts while watching

a film. No registration necessary.

For more information,

contact Adult Services

at askalibrarian@homerli

brary.org or call (708) 301-

7908.

Monday

Reindeer Sign Craft

8:30 a.m. Nov. 28, Homer

Township Public Library,

14320 W. 151st St., Homer

Glen. Create some holiday

cheer when you craft

a reindeer sign. For more

information, contact Youth

Services at children@

homerlibrary.org or call

(708) 301-7908.

Parks and Recreation

Committee Meeting

6:30 p.m. Nov. 28, Homer

Glen Village Hall, 14240

W. 151st St., Homer Glen.

Monthly meeting in Community

Room.

Tuesday

Pizza and a Movie

6 p.m. Nov. 29, Homer

Township Public Library,

14320 W. 151st St., Homer

Glen. Watch the 2016 version

of “Ghostbusters” on

the big screen and eat pizza

and breadsticks. The movie

is rated PG-13 and is 134

minutes long. For teens in

grades 6-12. For more information,

contact Heather Colby

at heather@homerlibrary.

org or call (708) 301-7908.

Wednesday

Homer CCSD 33C Finance

and Operations Meeting

4-5 p.m. Nov. 30, Homer

Community Consolidated

School District 33C, 15733

Bell Road, Homer Glen.

Upcoming

Informational Coffee at

Lemont Montessori

9:30 a.m. Thursday, Dec.

1, Montessori School of

Lemont, 16427 W. 135th St.,

Lemont. Prospective parents

can learn about the Montessori

philosophy of education

and talk with current parents,

faculty and students. Parents

will tour the school and see

lessons in action. RSVP by

Nov. 25 to info@lemont

montessori.com. For more

information, visit www.lem

ontmontessori.com.

Reading with Rover

5 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 1,

Homer Township Public Library,

14320 W. 151st St.,

Homer Glen. Izzy, a friendly

dog, will be at the library

to share stories. Children

read stories to Izzy, and she

listens. Children who may

be hesitant to read aloud

are typically less stressed

when reading to a dog who

never judges. Register for

a 15-minute session. Limit

four per day. For more information,

contact Youth

Services at children@

homerlibrary.org or call

(708) 301-7908.

5th Grade Chorus Holiday

Concert

7 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 1,

Hadley Middle School gymnasium,

15731 Bell Road,

Homer Glen.

Basic Yoga

9 a.m. Friday, Dec. 2,

Homer Township Public Library,

14320 W. 151st St.,

Homer Glen. Marti Anne

will lead this class designed

especially for first time yoga

students. The class consists

of learning a series of gentle

poses, postures and positions

while calming the body

and mind. The program will

take place at 9 a.m. before

the library opens at 10 a.m.

Attendees are encouraged

to bring a yoga mat. However,

one can be provided

during the class if needed.

Registration is required.

For more information, call

(708) 301-7908.

Village of Homer Glen Tree

Lighting

6:30 p.m. Friday, Dec.

2, Heritage Park, 14240 W.

151st St., Homer Glen. Enjoy

the sounds of the season

while the Providence

Catholic Singing Celtics

sing Christmas carols while

meeting Santa. The first 100

children will receive a special

goody bag from Fannie

May Fine Chocolates. Hot

chocolate and cookies will

be provided. For more information

contact the Village

Hall at (708) 301-0632 or

visit www.homerglenil.org.

Pictures with Santa

8 a.m.-3 p.m., Saturday

Dec. 3, Animal Clinic, 1328

N. Cedar Road, New Lenox.

Bring your pets to have their

pictures taken with Santa.

Proceeds will benefit the

animals at the TLC Animal

Shelter in Homer Glen.

Breakfast With Santa

9 a.m.-noon, Sunday Dec.

4, Homer Jr. High cafeteria,

15711 S. Bell Road, Homer

Glen. Sponsored by Our

Mother of Good Counsel.

Breakfast will include eggs,

sausage, pancakes, fruit,

a sweet table, juice, milk,

hot chocolate and coffee.

Tickets cost $6 for adults

if bought in advance, $7 at

the door. Children ages 4-12

and seniors are $5. Children

ages 3 and under eat free.

Tickets can be purchased

at the church office, 16043

S. Bell Road, Homer Glen.

For more information, call

(708) 301-6246.

Choir Madrigal Dinner

7 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 4,

Lockport Township High

School East Campus, 1333

E. 7th St., Lockport. The

auditioned group of singers

and actors host a Renaissance-themed

dinner with

entertainment. For more

information, contact Chad

Goetz at cgoetz@lths.org or

call (815) 588-8534.

Bi-Chamber Annual Holiday

Luncheon

11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., Tuesday,

Dec. 6, TBD. The

chambers of both Homer

Glen and Lockport will host

their annual Holiday Luncheon.

More details coming

soon. For more information,

contact the chamber at office@homerchamber.com

or

call (708) 301-8111.

Mollie’s War: The Letters of

a WWII WAC in Europe

7 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 6,

Homer Township Public Library,

14320 W. 151st St.,

Homer Glen. Cyndee Schaffer,

coauthor of “Mollie’s

War,” presents her book on

her mother’s experience in

the Women’s Army Corps

during WWII. The program

offers a glimpse into the life

of a WAC during WWII. For

more information, call (708)

301-7908.

Holiday Business After

Hours

5-8 p.m., Thursday, Dec.

8, State Farm Insurance,

Michelle Kerfin, 14051 S.

Bell Road, Homer Glen. The

event will feature festive

drinks and food and offers

attendees the opportunity

to network with other area

businesses. For more information,

contact the chamber

at office@homerchamber.

com or call (708) 301-8111.

6th Grade Chorus Holiday

Concert

7 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 8,

Hadley Middle School gymnasium,

15731 Bell Road,

Homer Glen.

Homer Jr. High Chorus/

Show Choir Holiday Concert

6:30 p.m. prelude music;

7 p.m. concert Monday, Dec.

12, Hadley Middle School

gymnasium, 15731 Bell

Road, Homer Glen.

Christmas Party

Dec. 13, DiNolfo’s Banquets,

14447 W. 159th St.,

Homer Glen. Homer Township

will once again host its

Christmas party for seniors

at DiNolfo’s. The cost is $25

for those who have paid their

senior fees, and it is $35 for

those who have not. For

more information, call (708)

301-0522.

Ongoing

Holiday Guessing Jar

Nov. 14-27, Homer Township

Public Library, 14320

W. 151st St., Homer Glen.

Guess the number of items

in the jar. The closest guesser

will take home the holiday

pup. One entry per child. For

more information, contact

Youth Services at children@

homerlibrary.org or call

(708) 301-7908.

Food for Fines

Nov. 19-30, Homer

Township Public Library,

14320 W. 151st St., Homer

Glen. Pay off library fines

with food instead of cash.

Bring in one can of food,

and the library will waive

$1 of library fines (up to

$20). For questions, call

(708) 301-7908.

Have an item for calendar?

Deadline is noon Thursdays

one week prior to publication.

To submit an item to the calendar,

contact Assistant Editor

Erin Redmond at e.redmond@

22ndcenturymedia.com or call

(708) 326-9170 ext. 15.


homerhorizon.com news

the Homer Horizon | November 23, 2016 | 3

Holiday Sip & Shop features mix of vendors

Homer Glen Junior

Woman’s Club to

give proceeds to two

nonprofits in area

Ryan Esguerra

Freelance Reporter

The arrival of the holiday

season means it is time to

start the long process of holiday

shopping.

This year, the Homer Glen

Junior Woman’s Club wanted

to give ladies from around

the area a fun event to start

their holiday shopping lists

and did so by hosting the inaugural

Holiday Sip & Shop

fundraiser Friday, Nov. 18, at

John Olson American Legion

Post 18 in Lockport.

“One of the things that we

were trying to do was give

ladies a night to get their

shopping done in an environment

that they could enjoy

themselves,” said Jodi Martiniak,

co-chair of fundraising

for Homer Glen Junior

Woman’s Club. “Being that it

is so close to the holiday season,

now is a perfect time for

women to come out and have

a ladies’ night.”

Attendees of the event had

the opportunity to shop from

27 vendors sporting a variety

of different products that

included clothing, jewelry,

baked goods, skin care products,

kitchen and handmade

items. Also at the event for

shoppers were appetizers,

a cash bar, a raffle featuring

items from local businesses,

a ladies’ self-defense booth

and a host of door prizes.

Proceeds of the event went

to nonprofits Gigi’s Playhouse

and CASA of Will

County.

“We sought out vendors

from a variety of different areas,”

Martiniak said. “We selected

a lot of them based on

Kathy Langford (left) and Beverly Wurst, both of Lockport,

fix themselves cups of cocoa during a quick break from

shopping at the event.

category. We wanted to give

people a lot to choose from.

“We do a lot of fundraising

work for national and local

charities, and we thought

[Gigi’s and CASA] would be

a good fit for us.”

Marie Gesiakowski, of

Frankfort, has been selling

note cards, framed professional

photos and hand

crafted serving dishes for two

years. Gesiakowski said that

she attends roughly 10 to 12

events similar to the Holiday

Sip & Shop each year but

was particularly impressed

with this event.

“I can say that this one is

very well-attended,” Gesiakowski

said. “I have been to

events where there are not

many people, so this is nice.”

Gesiakowski added that

the event’s atmosphere was

part of what made it so enjoyable.

“The room is decorated

beautifully,” she said. “I like

it a lot; everyone is nice and

friendly. I am having a great

time just being here.”

Kathy Mustafa, of Homer

Glen, typically attends larger

shopping events in downtown

Chicago when she

starts to shop for the holiday

season. Mustafa said that despite

the event’s smaller size,

the community that forms as

a result is what appeals to her

the most.

“Events like these bring

people together,” Mustafa

said. “These are people in

your community. You are going

to see these people in your

town, and it is really nice to

have something that gives us

a chance to connect.”

Despite her group residing

in Homer Glen, Martiniak

said that she enjoys coming

to Lockport and sharing the

holiday spirit with her neighbors.

“We are from Homer Glen,

but Lockport is a neighboring

community that we appreciate,”

Martiniak said. “We

really wanted to share this

atmosphere with them.”

Martiniak added that it is

the goal of the Homer Glen

Junior Woman’s Club to return

next year for the same

event, one she said that will

hopefully be bigger than the

one this year.

“Any event that you try

to do, you hope that you

can repeat it the following

year,” Martiniak said. “We

are fortunate in that a lot of

the events we have tried to

put on have been successful

enough to do again. We hope

this event is no different.”

Cousins Taryn White (left) and Natalie Rigoni sell handmade crochet items from their

business, Hooked on Sugar, which was named in honor of their grandmother, Friday, Nov.

18, at the first annual Holiday Sip & Shop fundraiser for ladies at John Olson American

Legion Post 18 in Lockport. Photos by Laurie Fanelli/22nd Century Media

22ND CENTURY MEDIA PRESENTS

SAVE THE DATE

FREE ADMISSION! FREE PARKING!

This event will be the answer to getting the New Year’s

resolution off to a solid start by offering health screenings,

fitness tips, healthy eating ideas and more to start off the

New Year with a New You.

The event will feature vendor booths as well as interactive

activities for all ages to promote health and fitness.

For more information, call (708) 326-9170 ext. 16

or visit www.22ndcenturymedia.com/events


4 | November 23, 2016 | The Homer Horizon news

homerhorizon.com

Homer D33C Board of Education

Levy for 2016 property taxes unanimously approved

Jessie Molloy

Freelance Reporter

The Board of Education

of Homer Community Consolidated

School District

33C held its monthly meeting

Nov. 17 and unanimously

approved the levy for 2016

property taxes.

The levy was tentatively

presented at the last board

meeting for consideration

by board members and residents.

A total of $41,785,000

is being requested in the

levy, an increase of about

2.75 percent over last year,

when the final tax extension

ended up amounting to

$40,668,069.74.

“We had considered a scenario

where we raised by

over 4 percent,” said Interim

Superintendent for Business

Christi Tyler, who presented

the levy. “But we decided

not to ask for that much. This

number represents a consumer

price index, which is

about 0.7 percent, new construction

in and a little extra

in case the new construction

valuations end up being

higher than predicted.”

According to Tyler, the

preliminary new construction

valuations from Will County

have had a major increase

this year.

“It went up significantly,”

Tyler said. “Last year,

it was valued at $9-pointsomething

million, and this

year it’s up to $13.8 million,

which is about a 51 percent

increase.”

Tyler said that following

the initial presentation of the

levy last month, the board did

not receive any comments or

complaints from taxpayers

about the levy, leading to the

short discussion before the

board’s approval.

Strategic Plan aims to ensure

consistency across schools

The board also heard a

presentation by Superintendent

Kara Coglianese and the

District Leadership Team on

the latest developments in the

implementation of the district’s

Strategic Plan.

The DLT is a representative

group of teachers from across

all the district’s schools

which aims to work with the

administration to improve

communications between the

buildings and make sure new

plans are being implemented

evenly throughout the district.

According to the presentation,

the district currently

has 21 initiatives — ranging

from state mandates to

curriculum plans to school

improvements — tentatively

slated for the next three years

based on a survey of priorities

completed by certified

district staff members.

The biggest initiative currently

underway is the alignment

of the district’s science

curriculum. This year, grades

five through eight are piloting

a new program — which

will be assessed during next

school year — while grades

one through four pilot the

corresponding elementary

curriculum.

The elementary grades’ pilot

will be assessed, according

to the plan, during the

2018-2019 school year.

Homer Glen school districts exceed state testing averages

Kirsten Onsgard

Contributing Editor

Academic progress improved

at a higher rate in

Homer Glen school districts

than the state average in

2016, standardized test results

show.

Statewide results show a 1

percent increase in students

performing at or above grade

level, while elementary and

high school districts in Homer

Glen and Will County all

improved scores by at least 3

percent year-to-year.

The figures stem from the

results of the second year of

the Partnership for Assessment

of Readiness for College

and Careers exam. The

results from the 2016 exam

were released Oct. 31 by the

Illinois State Board of Education

in the annual Illinois

State Report Card.

The springtime test was in

its second year in 2016 and

gauges readiness in English/

Language Arts and mathematics

and was administered

to grades three through eight

and high schoolers.

State averages show about

one-third of Illinois students

across grade levels and subjects

meeting or exceeding

expectations, which is the

threshold used to determine

whether or not a student

is ready for the next grade

level. That figure is lowest at

the high school level — with

only 28 percent of students

deemed ready — and buckles

further in minority and lowincome

students. The state

will drop the high school

PARCC exam and replace the

ACT with the SAT in 2017.

Composite results from

Lockport Township High

School D205, Will County

School District 92 and Homer

Community Consolidated

School District 33C all exceeded

state averages.

Lockport Township High

School D205

LTHS students showed

a modest uptick in meeting

grade readiness standards

and maintained the number

of students considered ready

for college in 2016.

But limited PARCC data

and a shift away from the

exam means the standardized

test has done little to shape

curriculum, according to Assistant

Superintendent Brett

Gould.

“Looking at the PARCC,

we’re a little disappointed

we only gave it two years,”

Gould said. “There is not

enough data to give us longitudinal

information to make

changes.”

The lack of long-range

standardized test data means

the district is relying more on

in-house assessments — such

as classroom tests and semester

exams — to tweak teaching,

he said.

Forty-four percent of high

school students were considered

on track for the next

grade level, up 2 percent from

2015 figures. Math scores

were especially strong, with

47 percent of students reaching

standards.

Statewide, high school results

slumped compared to

lower grades, with just 28

percent of students meeting

or exceeding subject-level

expectations.

At the high school level,

students are assessed by

course, rather than grade level,

meaning students of different

grades could be given

the same exam. Gould said

this makes it difficult to compare

to other schools, given

discrepancies in curriculum.

The district’s 2015-2016 Illinois

Report Card shows that

59 percent of students who

took the ACT were considered

college ready last year,

with an average composite

score of 21.8 at the school.

The state will switch to the

SAT in the spring, which will

be administered to LTHS juniors

April 25.

Gould said that students

are preparing for the SAT

switch with personalized

preparation based on PSAT

results from Khan Academy.

The district is also incorporating

SAT-like questions and

thinking into the classroom,

he said.

“We’re not teaching to the

test, but we’re teaching to

the same kind of concepts,”

Gould said.

The district’s report card

also shows that its graduation

rate dipped slightly from

2015 to 2016, as expected

from enrollment numbers released

earlier this fall. Senior

enrollment is up by 60 students

this year, in part due to

students who did not graduate

in the 2015-2016 academic

year and will continue for a

fifth year.

About nine out of 10 LTHS

students graduated within

four years, down 3 percent.

Homer 33C

Homer 33C saw an average

3 percent uptick in students

considered ready for

the next grade level in 2016.

Half of students in the K-8

district met or exceeded expectations,

about 15 percent

higher than the state average.

That figure was highest

at the K-4 Schilling School,

where 56 percent of students

were considered performing

at grade level under PARCC

standards. Only third- and

fourth-graders were tested at

Schilling.

While results were largely

consistent with those in 2015,

Assistant Superintendent for

Instruction Kathleen Robinson

said that with additional

data, the district will be able

to drill down into subjects to

assess where students are performing

well and underperforming.

The district recently

implemented a new Common

Core math curriculum and is

in the midst of phasing in a

new English/Language Arts

curriculum.

“We are still addressing

and adapting our curriculum

maps and our pacing because

the standards are so new to

us,” she said. “As we see areas

we might need to adapt, I

think we will see that in our

assessment.”

Will County D92

Will County D92 showed

the highest number of students

considered grade ready

among Homer Glen and

Lockport districts.

Fifty-two percent of students’

composite scores met

or exceeded expectations,

and all three schools required

to administered the test —

Oak Prairie Junior High,

Ludwig School and Reed

School — had more than half

of its students ready for the

next grade level.

Scores among low-income

students dipped significantly

in comparison, consistent with

statewide trends. Twenty-nine

percent of the district’s approximately

280 low-income

students were considered

grade ready, the district’s lowest-performing

demographic.

Still, the achievement gap —

the difference between lowincome

and non low-income

students — was 3 percent

smaller at Will County D92

than statewide.


homerhorizon.com homer glen

the Homer Horizon | November 23, 2016 | 5

"months free"

No need for

When everything you need

one affordable fee!

is included for

Voted

Best

of Chicago's Southland

Senior Living Community

at Tinley Court Retirement Community

One of a kind premier senior living community offering you relaxing,

maintenance free living along with the following amenities:

• 3 chef prepared meals served daily

• Full daily activity program,

entertainment & trips

• Weekly housekeeping

• All utilities included

• Library, chapel, coffee shop and

beauty/barber shop on premises

• Private Formal Dining Room available

• Home health care services available

on premises

• Walking distance to Tinley

shops & restaurants

• Veterans Financial Assistance Available

Call for questions or to schedule a private tour!

16301 S Brementowne Rd.

Tinley Park, IL

708.532.7800

www.tinleycourt.com

Member of Tinley Park Chamber of Commerce Since 1994

Seating is limited! Call Today!








Migraines

Chronic Headaches

Weight Gain/Belly Fat

Irritability

Low Libido

Fatigue

Anxiety/Depression

Insomnia/ Poor Sleep

Sweating/Hot flashes

Digestive Problems

Migraines

Memory Loss

Infertility

Brain Fog

“Symptoms of a hormonal imbalance or chronic undiagnosed condition

range from migraines and chronic headaches to memory loss, brain fog insomnia

or fatigue and anxiety and depression. If you have been suffering

from any of these symptoms and have not gotten the answers or results from

medications, I cordially invite you to learn about breakthrough

protocols and testing to discover the underlying

causes to most of these debilitating symptoms. Also,

and most importantly, what can be done, once and for

all, to return you to health and vitality!” ~ Dr. Ed Beyer,

D.C.


6 | November 23, 2016 | The Homer Horizon news

homerhorizon.com

Vietnam veteran gives personal

insight while at DAR meeting

Submitted by Daughters of

the American Revolution

The Daughters of the

American Revolution are

known for their service to

veterans of the U.S. military.

Last month, the newest

Illinois chapter, Founders

Crossing, presented a story

about military service during

the Vietnam War from the

perspective of a veteran and

his wife.

Wes Davis, retired Chief

Warrant Officer, U.S. Navy,

was on the aircraft carrier

CALL TODAY FOR

A FREE ESTIMATE

815.838.4763

doxleyconstruction.com

Now Accepting Credit Cards!

Located in Lockport

FAMILY OWNED

SINCE 1984

• Remodeling

• Room Additions

• Kitchens & Cabinets

• Bathrooms

• Basement Remodels

• All Concrete Work

FULLY BONDED AND INSURED

Dental Specialists of Homer Glen

Oral Surgery

• Extractions

• Wisdom Teeth

• Implant Placement

• Bone Grafting

• Ridge Augmentation

• Frenectomy

• Biopsy

Endodontics

• Root Canal

• Root Canal Retreatment

• Apicoectomy

• Vitality Testing

Diagonistic Imaging

• CBCT Scan

• Panoramic

• Cephalometric

15927 South Bell Rd.

Homer Glen, IL 60491

(Behind Bonfire)

815-306-0262

dentalspecialistsofhomerglen.com

PPO Insurance Accepted

*Independant Contractor

USS Franklin D. Roosevelt

during the Vietnam War.

His young wife, Linda, and

daughter, Tina, were left

behind for a nearly a year.

Using letters they had saved

from that long separation,

Wes and Linda shared with

the crowd the everyday stories

of his service in all of its

dimensions.

Linda told the broader

story of challenges faced by

the families of our military,

giving the text of their letters

a broader, practical meaning.

The program audience,

Dr. Cristina Olarov*

(Endodontist)

Orthodontics

• Traditional Braces

• Ceramic Brackets

• FREE Consultation

• Early Childhood

Development Appliances

Dr. Roberts Baima*

(Periodontist)

Periodontics

• Scaling (Deep Cleaning)

• Crown Lengthening

• Periodontal Maintenance

• Implant Maintenance

• Smile Enhancement

(Gummy Smile)

• Tissue Grafting

Dr. Debra Alavi*

(Orthodontist)

Dr. Olarov speaks Romanian, French and Spanish

many of whom had their

own memories of the Vietnam

War era, were visibly

moved by the program and

contributed their own stories

of spouses and family serving

in that conflict.

Through a Veterans Administration

effort at commemoration,

the DAR are

paying attention to those

who served in the Vietnam

War 50 years ago. The

Founders Crossing Chapter

of the DAR has recently

joined the ranks of official

Commemorative Partners, as

have other chapters and the

national DAR organization.

The structured standards of

the Commemorative Partner

program makes certain that

Americans who served are

acknowledged.

For more information

about the chapter or membership

in the Daughters

of the American Revolution,

call Christina Bannon

at (773) 208-1156 or Susan

Snow at (708) 751-5154.

Dr. Debra Alavi

(Orthodontist)

Up to 30% OFF UCF

PPO & All Kids Accepted

No insurance discount

HTFPD tabs Locacius to be fire chief effective Jan. 1

Battalion chief has

lived and worked in

Homer for 16 years

Thomas Czaja, Editor

The Homer

Township Fire

Protection

District has its

new leader.

Battalion

Chief Christopher

Locacius

Locacius

was selected Nov. 7 by the

HTFPD Board of Trustees

to take the reins of fire chief,

which will be made effective

Jan. 1, according to a press

release from the district.

Locacius will fill the spot

formerly held by Robert Tutko,

who turned in his letter

of resignation that was made

effective in October. According

to the press release,

Locacius began his fire service

career in 1992 and has

been a full-time member of

the Homer Township Protection

District for 16 years.

“I was really excited about

What you don’t

Use you lose!

Use your

insurance benefits

before they are gone!

$75

IN Office

WHITENING!

Expires 12/15/16

• Do you need a Denture?

• Do you have Hot or Cold Pain?

• Do you have missing teeth?

• Do you need your wisdom teeth out?

• Do you have implants?

• Do you have a broken tooth or teeth?

the opportunity to be the first

full-time chief that came

from within the organization,”

Locacius said. “In the

past, we’ve gone outside for

the fire chief position. I’ve

been excited to be here the

last 16 years and now given

the opportunity.”

During his time with the

HTFPD, Locacius said he

gradually worked up the

ranks from fireman to lieutenant

to captain to battalion

chief to fire chief. Points of

emphasis going forward will

be providing good service,

being fiscally responsible

and working on educational

efforts with residents.

“We are going to be more

involved in public education,”

Locacius said. “...

We’re working with various

organizations to bring public

safety messages. One thing

we are going to start right

away is getting back out in

the community.”

In a corresponding move,

Deputy Fire Marshal Dave

Bricker — who has been

serving as acting chief since

late September — will become

the division chief of

fire prevention at the start of

the new year, the press release

said.

Bricker is confident in the

job Locacius will do.

“I’ve known [Locacius]

for years; I met him years

ago. ... We didn’t reconnect

until I got here a little over

a year ago, and I’m very

impressed with what I’ve

seen.”

Bricker echoed Locacius’

sentiments on wanting to

implement a variety of community

programs, adding

different individuals will

oversee certain areas like senior

activities, a car seat program,

school talks and other

public initiatives.

“We’ll sit down and go

through different ideas to

make sure we are out in the

public,” he said.

As for his own new role

as division chief of fire prevention,

Bricker said many

of his responsibilities will

stay the same, and that he is

“looking forward to many

more years in a great organization.”

Locacius and his wife,

Beata, have been residents

of Homer Glen for the last

16 years and have three

daughters — Lauren, 14,

and twins, Victoria and

Elizabeth, 11. He earned a

masters degree in business

administration with an emphasis

in public administration

in 2010, and in 2015 he

obtained his Chief Fire Officer

certification, the highest

certification offered by the

Illinois State Fire Marshal,

the release added.

Meanwhile, the release

said Bricker, of Lockport,

earned a bachelors degree

in fire service management.

He has a wife, Sue, and two

daughters, Kaity and Rachel.

He has also been active in

community organizations

for the past 12 years.

In addition to the new roles

for Locacius and Bricker, a

replacement battalion chief,

captain and lieutenant will

also become effective at the

start of the new year.

A formal swearing-in ceremony

is set to take place

Jan. 10. Along with the promotions,

the fire protection

district officials will swear

in five firefighters who have

successfully completed their

one-year probationary period,

the HTFPD said.

“Throughout my career, I

have been mentored by other

firefighters,” Locacius said.

“...A big part of who I am is

giving back, whether training

or doing drills.

“It’s not just about spending

the day in the office doing

paperwork. I like to be

hands-on and go out and do

drills with the [personnel],

pass on my knowledge as it

was passed to me. I’m very

thankful for the opportunity

for me and my family.”


homerhorizon.com news

the Homer Horizon | November 23, 2016 | 7

Chamber focuses on getting

feedback, serving residents

Installation of 2017

Board of Directors

takes place during

annual holiday party

Thomas Czaja, Editor

The Homer Glen Area

Chamber of Commerce is

all about feedback and appealing

to residents going

into 2017.

The chamber held the

2016 version of its Annual

Holiday Party and Installation

of Directors Thursday,

Nov. 17, at Ruffled Feathers

Golf Club in Lemont.

At the event held a week

prior to Thanksgiving, the

2017 board members were

introduced and took the

oath of office. Those included

Chairman Larry Killmer,

Vice Chairman Renee Saban,

Treasurer Denise Edwards,

Secretary MJ Gasik

and Directors Damian Sichak,

Mitch Hart, Lynn Mc-

Gary, Sue Gram, Barbara

Tishuk, Jodi Adelman, Amber

Morrison, Jack Lebert

and Deb Poczatko.

A number of raffle and

silent auction items were

on-hand, in addition to a

multi-course dinner, as

guests used the evening as

a chance to further network

with other members and

residents.

According to Homer Glen

Area Chamber of Commerce

Executive Director

Jane Bushong, the attendance

and number of donated

raffle and silent auction

items held steady from last

year and may have been a

bit higher.

“This is a great event,

because it’s really an introduction

of our next board,”

Bushong said. “…We’ve already

started working with

them, and we’ve got almost

everybody assigned as committee

chairs already.”

Bushong added that the

chamber has begun studying

what other successful

U.S. chamber of commerce

are doing in the hopes of

emulating ideas.

While the Homer chamber

may not be as big as others,

Bushong is confident it

can nonetheless effectively

offer a host of benefits comparable

to the larger ones

studied.

“[The new board] is just

really enthusiastic and determined

to make a difference,”

Bushong said.

To that end, a greater

emphasis will be placed on

reaching out to businesses

in the community and asking

what they each need.

The chamber no longer

wants to make that judgment

for businesses, Bushong

said.

An example of that point

was the piece of paper requesting

membership feedback

at every place setting

at the installation dinner. A

majority of the page was

blank and asked members

for suggestions, ideas and

comments to “meet your

business needs and challenges.”

Killmer, who took over as

chairman at the installation

dinner in 2015, cited making

the chamber more efficient

in the past 12 months

will likewise increase their

efficiency in the year ahead.

“We’ve done a lot in the

past year,” Killmer said.

“We’ve got a lawyer on

board. We’ve redone our

bylaws. We are redoing our

fee structure. We have a

CPA onboard now to do our

finances.

“…We are trying to do

more activities.”

The leaders of the chamber

are determined to get

more residents involved

with events, according to

Killmer. He said many,

including senior citizens

“looking for something to

do,” want to participate.

“This year, we are going

to try to reach out to [residents]

and try and invite

them to some of our events

and expose them to our businesses,”

Killmer said. “…

They don’t [always] know

that there is a yoga shop

over here or a donut shop

over there or a fitness center

over there, so we have to try

and promote that.”

Bushong agreed with

Killmer, noting that residents

have always been

welcome to chamber functions

but sometimes may

think the group is only or

primarily for local business

owners.

The executive director

couples resident involvement

and feedback as shortterm

goals, while a longterm

goal is also underway.

“I’m going to make sure

this chamber does become

accredited by the U.S.

Chamber of Commerce,”

Bushong said. “That may

take us two or three years.

There is a lot of detail to it.”

Taking that step means

ensuring all rules and guidelines

are followed, along

with having proper audits,

financials and a close attention

to detail, Bushong said.

If attendees’ upbeat conversation

as they made the

rounds at the holiday party

was any indication, feedback

was positive for the

evening.

“[The installation dinner]

promotes the chamber, and

the better our businesses

The 2017 Homer Glen Area Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors stands with chamber

Executive Director Jane Bushong (second from left) at the Annual Holiday Party and

Installation of Directors Thursday, Nov. 17, at Ruffled Feathers Golf Club in Lemont. Laurie

Fanelli/22nd Century Media

in Homer [are doing], the

more our taxes are going to

stay low,” said recently reelected

Will County Board

Member Steve Balich, who

was on the chamber’s board

of directors prior to the

2017 group. “…I believe in

promoting businesses.”

As does Bushong, who

said another goal in the

coming months will be to

better cater to individual

business’ needs, noting bigger

companies like Richards

Building Supply and Big R

may seek the chamber’s

help more so for advocacy

or legislative issues, whereas

smaller, home-based

businesses likely are more

concerned with publicity

and getting their name out.

No matter the want or

need, from businesses to

residents, Bushong said

both she and the new board

will continue to sort through

the feedback to build a better

future.

“We have a wide scale,

and that’s why we need the

feedback,” Bushong said.

“We need to see who needs

what and how we can best

do that with a wide, broad,

diverse membership group.”

For more information on

the chamber, visit www.

homerchamber.com.

Journey to

A Live Nativity

PERFORMANCES HELD AT

CHRIST LUTHERAN CHURCH

(Covered Outdoor Pavilion)

14700 S. 94th Ave., Orland Park, IL

(708) 349-0431

www.christlutheranorland.com

CHRIST LUTHERAN PRESENTS

Bethlehem

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 9 TH

6PM & 7:30PM

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 10 TH

6PM

FEATURING

LIVE ANIMALS & DICKENS CAROLERS

Refreshments will be served in our hall.

No Reservations Required!

This is a FREE & Non-Profit Event.

celebrate & experience the true reason for the season!

Thanksgiving is a me

family, iends and graude.

I am GRATEFUL to you my past, present and

future clients; for your laughter, friendship & trust.

CallJennifer

Christopher

815.693.8016

www.jenjchristopher.com

CSC, GRI, SRES


8 | November 23, 2016 | The Homer Horizon homer glen

homerhorizon.com

SILVER CROSS SENIOR ADVANTAGE

HEALTH FAIR

Tuesday, November 29, 2016

7-11 a.m.

Silver Cross Hospital

Conference Center

1890 Silver Cross Blvd., New Lenox

Complimentary Valet Parking

FREE SCREENINGS

Blood Pressure • Colon Cancer Screening Kits

Diabetes (non-fasting Blood Sugar) • Fall & Balance • Pulse Oximetry

SPEAKER

Medicare Made Clear at 8 a.m. & 9:30 a.m.

presented by Maggie DelReal, Senior Vice President, United Healthcare

Talk with representatives from many health plans, including

Blue Cross Blue Shield, Humana and United Healthcare.

A sales person will be present with information and applications.

FLU SHOTS

Provided by Walgreens

your insurance will be billed

SILVER CROSS SERVICES

Ask the Geriatrician—Farooq Hussain, M.D. • Diabetes Center

Childerguild Gift Shop • Emergency/Urgent Care • Encore (Resale) Shop

Home Health Care • Center for Women’s Health

Lifeline Medical Alert Program • Midwest Institute for Robotic Surgery

Outpatient Testing • Sleep Disorders Center • Stroke Prevention & Care

The Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago at Silver Cross

University of Chicago Medicine Comprehensive Cancer Center

at Silver Cross

SNACKS & DOOR PRIZE DRAWING

complimentary coffee and light refreshments

Advanced registration is not required. Questions? Call (815) 300-1096

Visit silvercross.org for more information.


homerhorizon.com COMMUNITY

the Homer Horizon | November 23, 2016 | 9

Announcements

Turning 5!

Happy 5th birthday

to our wonderful

Lottie. You bring

laughter and love to

our lives everyday.

Happy birthday,

bluebird!

Love,

Mom, Dad and

Lexie

Make a FREE announcement

in The

Homer Horizon. We

will publish birth,

birthday, military,

engagement, wedding

and anniversary

announcements free

of charge. Announcements

are due the

Thursday before publication.

To make an

announcement, email

tom@homerhorizon.

com.


10 | November 23, 2016 | The Homer Horizon NEWS

homerhorizon.com

LTHS teacher wins award for being top drafting educator in Illinois

Erin Redmond, Assistant Editor

Jeff Brown was in the midst of

celebrating his students’ success at

the Illinois State Technology Day

when he received some shocking

news.

Without even knowing he was

nominated, the Lockport Township

High School teacher was told he

had won the Illinois Drafting Educators

Association R. Tim Phillip

Award for 2016 for being one of the

best Illinois drafting educators.

“It was pretty exciting, and obviously

it was a bit of a surprise,”

Brown said. “It was a lot of good

news at once.”

Each fall, one teacher from

around the state is chosen to receive

the IDEA’s award. Brown was nominated

by a former student teacher,

Ryan Altenburg, and formally received

his award at the end of last

month at the IDEA Fall Conference

in Bloomington.

“I owe where I’m at right now

with my career [to Brown],” said

Altenburg, who student taught under

Brown in the fall of 2013. “He’s

been a great role model to me; he’s

someone who I aspire to build my

program after.”

Altenburg, who now teaches at

Bolingbrook High School, said he

adopted many of Brown’s practices

and principles into his own classroom.

He has even admittedly “stolen”

some of the projects the LTHS

teacher has his students complete,

which has led to some of his own

students landing jobs in the field.

But some of the most important

lessons Altenburg said he learned

had little to do with drafting. He

said Brown understands not all of

his students will want to enter the

field, and that is OK as long as leave

armed with real-world skills such as

teamwork and constant professional

development.

“He helped me understand that it

really is just about helping the kids

discover what they’re good at and

where they want to take it,” Altenburg

said. “He said, ‘If some of you

leave here not wanting to be an architect,

that’s OK, because at least

you’re figuring it out now.’”

It is a lesson that Brown had to

learn for himself, too. From an early

age, the College and Careers Applications

teacher had a passion for

drafting and dreamed of becoming

an architect. But once he got to college

and realized it would take almost

a decade before he could be a

working architect, he discovered a

better suited career.

“To me, that was just too long to

get started,” said Brown, who has

been teaching for 27 years, 21 of

those at LTHS. “I also worked in the

Boy Scouts teaching merit badges. I

coached soccer, and I just thought,

‘Hey, I could teach architecture. I

got the best of both worlds.’”

Even though he has been teaching

for almost three decades, Brown is

just as passionate as when he started.

Students typically come into his

class knowing little about drafting,

architecture and engineering, and

he said he loves the opportunity to

watch their transformations.

“I’ve had students who it’s their

first year in drafting, and by the end

of the year in April, they’re state

champions, second place, third

place in state — it’s just incredible,”

Brown said. “When you continue to

see that kind of growth in a student,

that’s amazing. That makes it worth

it.”

Like Altenburg, several of

Brown’s former students have followed

his lead and pursued careers

in drafting education or architecture.

In fact, he saw a former Lockport

student working on a remodeling

project at LTHS and said it was

“neat” to see him back on campus in

that capacity.

While retirement is creeping

closer for Brown, he has no plans of

putting away his drafting tools just

yet. Winning his award has left him

humbled and excited to continue his

career in the classroom.

“I can’t retire yet,” Brown said

with a laugh. “I’m going to keep

going at it, absolutely, as long as I

keep enjoying it. I have the health

right now, the interest, the drive. As

long as that’s there, I’ll keep going.”

Illinois Drafting Educators

Association President Steve

Skorup (left) gives Lockport

Township High School teacher

Jeff Brown the R. Tim Phillip

Award for 2016 for being one

of the best Illinois drafting

educators. Photo submitted

Ready for a new, more modern

approach to real estate?

CALL ME TODAY to find out how I utilize the latest

cutting edge technologies to get homes SOLD FAST.

Dan Kenney | 708.629.6452

DanKenneyHomes.com

Curious to know what your home is worth? Visit my home pricing website – homerglen.smarthomeprice.com

Want to search for homes on the go?

Download my mobile app to your smartphone or tablet.

Simply text kw2glm4lc to 87778 or use my QR Code

You can also find me on

+


homerhorizon.com homer glen

the Homer Horizon | November 23, 2016 | 11


12 | November 23, 2016 | The Homer Horizon news

homerhorizon.com

FROM THE NEW LENOX PATRIOT

New Lenox students send

love through letters to the

troops

Every letter was unique —

clad with colorful pictures,

hand-drawn flags and handwritten

notes.

Throughout November,

hundreds of students in New

Lenox School District 122

thanked veterans for their

service and wished those

serving a happy Thanksgiving

and a merry Christmas.

A handful of those students

from kindergarten through

fifth grade had the opportunity

to meet Doug Bobrowski,

also known as “Dougie

Stylz” from US99, and share

the letters they wrote to veterans.

The letters were “colored

with love,“ said Lori Motsch,

principal at Spencer Trail

Kindergarten Center.

“It’s a great way for 5-yearolds

to feel connected,” she

said.

Students from Spencer

Trail, Spencer Pointe and

Spencer Crossing met with

Bobrowski to read their letters

aloud. He recorded their

voices, and they were aired

Nov. 16-18 on radio station

US99.

Bobrowski said the impact

of the event really struck him

when he met a 26-year veteran

who received some of

the letters from schools in the

Chicago area and later had

the opportunity to meet some

of the students who had written

the letters.

“[The students] are really

making a difference, and we

really appreciate it,” he said.

Bobrowski’s goal each

year is to collect 10,000 letters

for the troops.

“Pointe alone has written

over 600 letters,” said Kim

Gray, principal at Spencer

Pointe Primary School. “We

asked our parents to write

letters too, so we had a good

amount of parents write letters

and send them in to

school.”

Reporting by Amanda Stoll,

Assistant Editor. For more, visit

NewLenoxPatriot.com.

FROM THE LOCKPORT LEGEND

Lockport art shop a dream

come true for owner

Leanne Wargowsky and

her family went out for dinner

in downtown Lockport

one night in September, and

parked on State Street outside

a vacant storefront with “for

rent” signs in the window.

The Joliet woman had been

looking for a space where she

could fulfill her lifelong ambition

of opening her own art

shop, but little did she know

that less than two months

later her dream would become

a reality. Wargowsky’s

13-year-old daughter, Katie,

texted the phone number

on the “for rent” sign to her

mom’s sister, Laura Trento,

and the wheels were set in

motion.

“I called the number,”

said Trento, of New Lenox.

“I said, ‘I’ve got nothing

to lose,’ and that’s where it

started. I called, talked to the

owners, and I called Leanne

back and said, ‘this might

work.’”

Wargowsky and Trento

opened Creative Wings Art

Shoppe earlier this month,

and held a ribbon-cutting ceremony

Nov. 12 to formally

announce their presence at

1011 S. State St. Wargowsky

has wanted to own an art

shop for as long as she can

remember, and recalled that

as a child she watched oil

painter William Alexander

on PBS.

“I would sit with my crayons

and try to do what he did

with oils on the screen,” she

said. “So my love of art has

been a lifelong passion. I’ve

worked in health care to pay

the bills, and always had this

dream not quite knowing if

we could make it, but here

we are.”

Reporting by Jason Maholy,

Freelance Reporter. For more,

visit LockportLegend.com.

FROM THE TINLEY JUNCTION

Tinley Park Village officials

honor local youth football

team

It’s not a story you hear

often: football players going

12-0 to win the Super Bowl.

What’s more unheard of is

that this might be a pattern

for the Tinley Park Bulldogs

junior varsity white squad,

who secured the 2016 River

Valley Youth Football championship

title for the second

year in a row.

On Nov. 6, the Orland Park

Pioneers lost to the Bulldogs

in the final game of the season.

Tinley Park officials

honored the team for its accomplishments

at the Nov.

15 Village Board meeting at

Village Hall.

Trustee Brian Younker, a

former coach for the Bulldogs,

recognized the team’s

success and ushered all 32

boys and their coaches into

the room. The boys, whose

ages range from 11 to 13

years old, entered the room

with their heads held high.

Reporting by Brittany Kapa,

Assistant Editor. For more, visit

TinleyJunction.com.

FROM THE FRANKFORT STATION

Frankfort craft show connects

buyers and creators

Jenny Narel started making

homemade foods and

treats for her dogs after four

of her beloved pooches died

from diseases she believes

were caused by preservatives

and other additives used in

commercial dog foods.

The Frankfort resident

didn’t think at the time that

baking doggy treats in her

kitchen would be a business

venture, but someone

asked her a few years back

if she knows anyone who

sells all-natural, homemade

dog treats. Today, business

is booming for K-9 Cookie

Factory, which Narel runs out

of her home.

Narel was one of nearly 60

vendors Nov. 12 at the Frankfort

Park District’s 23rd annual

Holiday Craft & Vendor

Show at Founders Community

Center. Exhibitors sold

a variety of items — many

of them made by their own

hands, including soaps, blankets,

preserves and wooden

toys.

Reporting by Jason Maholy,

Freelance Reporter. For more,

visit FrankfortStation.com.

FROM THE ORLAND PARK PRAIRIE

Two men identified, Orland

man arrested in Nov. 12

firearm discharge

Police have identified two

men involved in a Saturday,

Nov. 12 incident in which

gunshots were fired in the

parking lot of the 17300

block of Oak Park Avenue,

according to a press release

issued Monday, Nov. 14, by

the Tinley Park Police Department.

The release stated Tinley

Park police responded to a

disturbance at 2:37 a.m. Nov.

12 in the parking lot of 17300

block of Oak Park Avenue.

The two men reportedly had

fled the scene in a vehicle.

No one was injured by the

gunshots, police said.

The police later identified

those men as Ramsey T.

Shelby, 22, of Orland Park,

and Ahmad R. Ismail, 22, of

Tinley Park.

Shelby was charged with

two felonies: unlawful possession

of a weapon by a felon

and aggravated discharge

of a firearm, according to

the release. Shelby was later

transported to Cook County

Jail.

Cook County Judge Peter

Felice has issued a warrant

for Ismail, who is not in

custody and is wanted for a

charge of aggravated fleeing

and eluding.

The bond on the warrant

reportedly is $50,000.

Reporting by F. Amanda

Tugade, Contributing Editor.

For more, visit OPPrairie.com.

Police Reports

Garage doors, driveway, exterior walls of home reportedly defaced with red spray paint

Red spray paint was reportedly

used Nov. 1 on

the 14000 block of S. Rado

Drive W. in order to cause

damage to two white garage

doors of a residence. Exterior

brick walls and the driveway

were also spray painted,

according to police.

Nov. 7

•Jade M. Baker, 21, of 13618

Overland Trail in Orland

Park, was cited for reportedly

failing to signal and driving

while having a revoked

license at W. 143rd Street

and S. Greystone Drive.

Nov. 6

•Three windows were reportedly

shot out of a vehicle

by a BB gun at 2nd Avenue

and S. Hebbard Street.

Nov. 5

•Joseph Alvarado, 46, of

407 S. Hamilton Street in

Lockport, was charged with

disorderly conduct and resisting

a peace officer at

the Speedway at 12502 W.

143rd Street.

Nov. 3

•Doug Fricker, 52, of 20050

Keystone Avenue in Matteson,

was cited for allegedly

having expired registration,

operating an uninsured motor

vehicle and driving while

his license was suspended at

W. 159th Street and S. Crystal

Creek Drive.

Nov. 2

•Two people — who police

described as a white woman

and Hispanic man — were

reportedly observed stealing

15 various bottles of alcohol

and leaving the Meijer at

14169 S. Bell Road.

Nov. 1

•The rear window of a vehicle

was reportedly broken

out with a large landscaping

rock on the 14000 block

of S. Innisbrook Lane. The

rock was also used to scratch

the front windshield, police

said.

Editor’s note: The Homer

Horizon’s police reports come

from the Will County Sheriff’s

Department’s online news bulletin

service. Anyone listed in

these reports is considered to

be innocent of all charges until

proven guilty in a court of law.


homerhorizon.com sound off

the Homer Horizon | November 23, 2016 | 13

Social snapshot

Top stories

From HomerHorizon.com from Friday, Nov. 18

1. Residents learn to swing dance at local event

2. Team 22: Girls Volleyball

3. Butler School honors 84 veterans at assembly

4. Enbridge Energy presents $3,000 grant to

create Homer Township rain garden

5. Frankfort’s Butter Up! Popcorn connects with

customers

Become a Horizon Plus member: homerhorizon.com/plus

“Monthly Board of Directors meeting

today.”

Homer Glen Area Chamber of Commerce

from Nov. 15.

Like The Homer Horizon: facebook.com/homerhorizon

“Coach Dillard kicking off our Monday

Speaker presentations with “What

Makes an UNCOMMON person?” @

c32dillard @lthsathletics”

@LockportHoops from Nov. 14.

Follow The Homer Horizon: @homerhorizon

From the Assistant Editor

Give more than thanks

Erin Redmond

e.redmond@22ndcenturymedia.com

When I think about

Thanksgiving, I

think about the

delicious spread on the table

and football games on TV.

There is so much planning,

cooking and cleaning

— among other things —

involved, and it’s easy to

lose sight of what the day is

really about: giving thanks.

And this year, I have a lot to

be thankful for.

Having recently moved

back to the area, this is the

first time in five years that

I am able to sit down and

enjoy the holiday with my

family. I’ll get to dress the

turkey with my mother,

chase my nieces and nephews

around the house, and

there’s a high probability

that I’ll burn the crescent

rolls. I am extremely talented

in the latter.

I can’t express in words

how thankful I am to be

home to do all this, especially

when there are so

many — for one reason or

another — who don’t have

the opportunity to.

There are many who

struggle to put food on the

table on a daily basis, let

alone during the holidays.

Those in need may be closer

to home than we think; they

could even be our friends

and neighbors.

While many of us feel

helpless, there are several

ways to help lighten the

load.

This holiday season, a

plethora of local organizations

are accepting donations

for the less fortunate. While

I couldn’t possibly list them

all, I have included a few below

that we should all think

about contributing to.

The holidays can be especially

hard on children of

low-income families. Every

child dreams of getting

presents from Santa, and

the Homer Township Fire

Protection District is making

those dreams come true.

They are accepting new,

unwrapped toys for their annual

Toys for Tots donations

at Station 1, 16050 S. Cedar

Road, Homer Glen. For

more information, call (815)

838-5006.

The Lockport/Homer

FISH Food Pantry, 604

E. 9th St., Lockport, is a

completely volunteer-based

organization that helps

feed more than 300 hungry

families in our area. It is

always in need of both

monetary and nonperishable

donations from canned

fruits and vegetables to dish

soap. FISH also partners

Are you reaching 90,000 subscribers?

NO

Contact Sherry Ranieri!

with several churches in

Homer Glen and Lockport

through its Circle of Love

program, which provides

diapers and other products

to those in need. For more

information on the local

FISH pantry, visit www.

lockportfoodpantry.org.

St. Dennis Church, 1214

S. Hamilton St., Lockport,

is running two programs

over the holiday to benefit

local families. The first

is its Christmas Adopt-a-

Family Program in which

an individual or a group can

“adopt” a family to provide

with gifts for Christmas.

The church has also partnered

with The Giving Tree,

3016 S. State St., Lockport,

which provides low-income

clients with basic necessities.

St. Dennis is helping

collect, sort, clean and pack

these donations and is seeking

volunteers to help. For

more information, call (815)

383-2592, ext. 113.

This holiday season, take

some time to consider your

neighbors who may need

some help. It doesn’t take

much to brighten someone’s

day — if we each give a

little, it can add up to a lot.

Sherry Ranieri

Sound Off Policy

Editorials and columns are the

opinions of the author. Pieces

from 22nd Century Media are

the thoughts of the company

as a whole. The Homer Horizon

encourages readers to write

letters to Sound Off. All letters

must be signed, and names and

hometowns will be published.

We also ask that writers include

their address and phone number

for verification, not publication.

Letters should be limited to

400 words. The Homer Horizon

reserves the right to edit letters.

Letters become property of The

Homer Horizon. Letters that

are published do not reflect

the thoughts and views of The

Homer Horizon. Letters can be

mailed to: The Homer Horizon,

11516 West 183rd Street, Unit

SW Office Condo #3, Orland

Park, Illinois, 60467. Fax letters

to (708) 326-9179 or e-mail to

tom@homerhorizon.com.

www.homerhorizon.com.

Calling all

PET BOUTIQUES

WALKERS

GROOMERS

BOARDERS

& MORE!

DOES YOUR BUSINESS

PAMPER PETS?

Advertise Today!

Contact the

Classified Department

708-326-9170

22ndcenturymedia.com

YES

You’re one of our

valued clients!

Sales Director for The Homer Horizon & The Lockport Legend

s.ranieri@22ndcenturymedia.com • 708.326.9170 ext.21


14 | November 23, 2016 | The Homer Horizon homer glen

homerhorizon.com

WWW.ZEIGLERNISSANOFORLANDPARK.COM

If you purchase a new Nissan or Infiniti during our Black Friday sales

event and it snows 7" or more on Christmas Day your car is FREE!!!

*See dealer for details

8550 W 159 th St.

Orland Park, IL

708.403.1300

8500 W 159th St.

Orland Park, IL

708.403.4700

WWW.INFINITIOFORLANDPARK.COM


the homer horizon | November 23, 2016 | homerhorizon.com

Muy Bien

Buenas Nachos in Frankfort a labor of

love started by Mexico native, Page 18

Plentiful harvest

Seniors given free fruits, vegetables

during special day, Page 19

WGN comedy duo performs at fundraiser benefiting

Homer Glen’s TLC Animal Shelter, Page 17

Sue Navotny, of Palatine, laughs with other attendees Nov. 12 during Comedy for Critters, which was hosted at Harry E. Anderson VFW Post 9545 in New Lenox.

Inset: WGN Morning News sports anchor Pat Tomasulo performs his comedy routine for more than 250 people at the event. Photos by adam Jomant/22nd Century Media


16 | November 23, 2016 | The Homer Horizon faith

homerhorizon.com

Pastor Column

The perception and acceptance of reality

THE REV. THOMAS LOYA

Annunciation Byzantine

Catholic Church

The outcome of our

recent presidential

election and the

dynamics that underlie the

outcome can actually help

us understand the tension

that often exists between

the Church and the modern

world when it comes to

some of the moral hot-button

issues of our time.

This past presidential

election was not a choice

between two candidates

or two political parties. In

truth, it was about a clash

that has been going on in

modern Western civilization

between reality and

ideology.

The outcome of the election

was actually a statement

about the preference

for reality over ideology.

The word “ideology” is

of Greek origin, and the

first two letters also form

the beginning of words like

“idiosyncratic” or even

“idiot.” The “id” in these

words means “self” or the

“I.” An “idiot” actually

meant someone who thinks

within their own personal

world. In our modern times

— and in the social-political

and sometimes even religious

realm — “ideology”

means to look at and pursue

life as we ideally want it

to be rather than how it really

is, how things actually

work — “reality.”

The acceptance of

reality is twofold: it

means accepting the way

things actually work,

how God designed them

to be. Secondly, it means

accepting the fact that the

beautiful natural order

of creation designed by

God has at the same time

become corrupted by

mankind’s sin. There is a

reality to how economics

actually works, how the

environment actually

works, how government

and jurisprudence actually

works, how human beings

are actually made and how

they actually work, etc.

We may not like gravity

at times. We may even find

it unfair and discriminatory,

because gravity does not

allow people who want to

jump off a cliff, wave their

arms and fly like a bird, do

so without harm. But just because

gravity does not act as

we want it to does not mean

we can change gravity to be

what we want it to be. It is

we who have to accept and

defer to the nature of gravity.

The reason behind all

that the Church and the

Bible say about the moral

hot-button issues of our day

grows out of a perception

and acceptance of reality,

of the way things were

designed by God and how

they work. The Church

and the Bible are not about

“manmade rules” that restrict

our freedom and fun.

Rather, the Church and the

Bible have a vision, a vision

of reality. The Church

and the Bible simply say

to us that if we perceive

and follow that reality, we

will have a great healthcare

system, a great economy,

great foreign policy, great

marriages and even greater

peace on Earth.

The opinions of this column

are that of the writer. They do

not necessarily reflect those of

The Homer Horizon.

In Memoriam

Robert Lucas

Robert Lucas, 91, formerly of

Homer Glen, died Nov. 11. He

is survived by his son, Steven

(Jane) Lucas and daughter Cheryl (Richard)

Mauzer; his grandchildren, Andreya (Jason)

Post, Christine (Vinnie) Singh and Sarah Lucas;

his great-grandchildren, Chloe, Calvin and

Fiona Post, Surya and Raveena Singh; and his

nieces and nephews, Kenneth (Paulette) Schultz,

Patricia (Mark Fallon) Schultz and Elizabeth

(Jeoffrey) Robinson and William (Christine)

Mecklenburg. He was a Navy WWII veteran of

Clarendon Hills and was born on July 28, 1925

in North City, Illinois. Services were held Nov.

17 at Notre Dame Church.

FAITH BRIEFS

St. Bernard Parish

(13030 W. 143rd St., Homer Glen)

Holy Hour for Life, Marriage and Family

7 p.m. Friday, Dec. 2. A special showing

of “Sign a Little Louder,” a film suitable

for teens and older. There will also be fellowship

after the program.

Herbert J. “Herb” Price

Herbert J. Price, 64, formerly of Homer Glen

and Oak Lawn, died Nov. 14. He is survived

by his sister, Deborah Kemper; his niece, Carly

(Daniel) Bos; and his great-nephew, Nolan

Bos. He was a numismatist and avid collector

of European artifacts and historical antiques.

He adored animals and had a passion for science

fiction. Services were held Nov. 17 at the

Goodale Memorial Chapel. A graveside service

will be held in Sugar Hill, New Hampshire at a

later date.

Have someone’s life you’d like to honor? Email

e.redmond@22ndcenturymedia.com with information

about a loved one who was a part of the Homer

Glen community.

Cookies with Santa

5:30-6:30 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 3.

Join Santa for cookies and treats after

Mass, sponsored by St. Bernard’s Men’s

Club.

Weekday Worship

9:30 a.m. weekdays. Communion Service

on Thursdays.

Weekend Worship

4:30 p.m. Saturdays. 8:30 a.m., 10 a.m.,

and 11:30 a.m. every Sunday.

Community Choir Practice

7:30-9 p.m. Thursdays. Parish members

ages 16 and older may join the choir. The

choir needs vocalists and instrumentalists.

For more information, join the weekly rehearsal

or contact the music director, Dennis

Sobczak, after mass on Sundays.

Christian Life Church

(15609 W. 159th St., Homer Glen)

Live Nativity

6-8 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 3 and Sunday

Dec. 4. Experience the sites and sounds

of the miraculous night when Jesus Christ

came into this world to save us all. There

will be live animals for the children to pet,

as well as a chance to see Mary, Joseph,

shepherds, wise men and baby Jesus.

Assumption Greek Orthodox Church

(15625 S. Bell Road, Lockport)

Parish Council Elections

Sunday, Dec. 7. The parish will host its

council elections to fill 15 positions. Nominations

close Nov. 30. Visit www.assump

tiongreekorthodox.org for more information.

Sunday Services

8:15 a.m. Orthros; 9:30 a.m. Divine Liturgy;

10 a.m. Sunday School. For more information,

call (708) 645-0652.

Cross of Glory Lutheran Church

(14719 W. 163rd St., Homer Glen)

Santa Visit

10 a.m.-1 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 3. Santa

will visit the church to talk to children

and take a picture. Attendees can also eat

sweets, do a craft and play a game.

Worship Service

9:30 a.m. Sundays. Parishioners may use

the nursery for their children up to age 3

during services. There is a Kids Klub for

children in grades 4-5 during the service.

Christ Community Church

(13400 Bell Road, Lemont)

Sunday Worship

9:30 a.m. Sundays. Worship is casual.

Our Mother of Good Counsel Parish

(16043 S. Bell Road, Homer Glen)

Christmas Choir

Rehearsals for the Christmas Choir begin

in November. If you would like to sing

at Christmas Eve Mass, contact Don Luksetich

as soon as possible. The church is in

need of all voice ranges for both men and

women in high school or older.

Annunciation Byzantine Catholic Church

(14610 S. Will Cook Road, Homer Glen)

Christmas on the Prairie

2-6 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 3.

New Life Community Church - Homer Glen

(14832 W. 163rd St., Homer Glen)

Weekly Worship Services

5:30 p.m. Saturdays

For more information, call (815) 838-

1416

Have something for Faith Briefs? Contact

Assistant Editor Erin Redmond at

e.redmond@22ndcenturymedia.com or call

(708) 326-9170 ext. 15. Information is due by

noon Thursday one week prior to publication.


homerhorizon.com life & arts

the Homer Horizon | November 23, 2016 | 17

Comedy for Critters returns with WGN Morning News duo

Chicago television

personalities elicit

laughs, funds for TLC

Animal Shelter

Jason Maholy

Freelance Reporter

A benefit for a Homer Glen

animal shelter drew a full

house for a night of comedy

and raised more than $3,700

that will go toward caring for

homeless dogs and cats.

The Comedy for Critters

fundraiser for TLC Animal

Shelter was held Nov. 12, at

the Harry E. Anderson VFW

Post 9545 in New Lenox.

The event attracted 250 people

for a night of food and

drinks with friends and was

highlighted by stand-up performances

from WGN Morning

News comedy duo Pat

Tomasulo and Mike Toomey.

Fundraiser organizer Tracy

Lesmeister called the benefit

an “almost-annual Comedy

for the Critters show,” a reference

to the event being held

nearly every year for the past

six years but on an irregular

schedule. The last Comedy

for Critters was held in April

2015.

“We don’t like to oversaturate

with the comedians, so

every year, year-and-a-half

we find the time to get us all

together,” she said.

Lesmeister said the show

always draws a packed

house, in large part because

of the appearances by Tomasulo

and Toomey.

“They are hysterical; everybody

loves them,” she

said. “They’re two of the nicest

guys you will ever meet,

too. We almost always sell

out completely. The hard part

is we almost never have any

[room] for walk-ins, so we’re

beginning to get a reputation

of not being able to accommodate

them.”

The comedians entertained

the audience, keeping

attendees laughing and

engaged with routines consisting

largely of observational

comedy most people

can relate to in some way.

Part of Toomey’s bit was

about the dog he adopted

from TLC. Toomey and

Lesmeister’s shared love of

animals helped bring them

together for the first Comedy

for Critters some five

years ago.

“He was kind enough and

gracious enough to work out

an arrangement and come and

do the shows, and they have

been phenomenally supportive

since we’ve been doing

them,” she said of the comedy

team. “And I couldn’t ask for

better people; they are truly

amazing human beings.”

Lesmeister also praised

TLC for the work the shelter

and its staff does to care

for animals, many of which

would be otherwise euthanized,

she said. Money raised

by the event goes toward shelter

upkeep, animals health

care, fuel and maintenance for

TLC vehicles, among other

expenses, she added.

“They put it to good use,”

she said. “They adopt out

so many dogs that would

otherwise be put down — I

mean, sometimes these dogs

are saved within minutes [of

being euthanized]. Beautiful

puppies and dogs that are a

couple years old that make

wonderful pets for people.

It’s so important what they’re

doing. It’s phenomenal, and

they are such angels of God

for doing what they do.”

Lesmeister’s soft spot for

animals came from her father,

who would often bring home

other people’s unwanted pets.

“People would bring him

animals they said they had

to get rid of; they’d tell him

it was a pure breed, and he’d

come home with a mutt,” she

said.

Lesmeister credits her

adopted pooches with giving

her a new perspective

on life.

“I adopted dogs from

TLC eight years ago, and

they pretty much saved

my life,” she said. “It was

one of those ‘who saved

who’ kind of things. I had a

couple of tough years, and

they gave me a reason to

keep getting up and staying

positive.”

RIGHT: WGN Morning

News sports anchor Pat

Tomasulo performs Nov. 12,

during Comedy for Critters,

a fundraiser benefiting

TLC Animal Shelter in

Homer Glen, at the Harry

E. Anderson VFW Post

9545 in New Lenox. Jason

Maholy/22nd Century Media

FUNERAL SERVICES DIRECTORY

Kim O’Neil Golob

Kelli Hartseil Mores

Kelly Furlong Foresman, Secretary

Colonial Chapel

Family Owned Funeral Home

edward damstra, owner

Private On-Site

Crematory Orland Park

colonialchapel.com

ADVERTISE

YOUR

FUNERAL

SERVICES.

Contact Jessica Nemec

@708.326.9170 ex.46

www.22ndcenturymedia.com


18 | November 23, 2016 | The Homer Horizon dining out

homerhorizon.com

The Dish

Buenas Nachos offers authentic fare inspired by family roots

Frankfort restaurant

relies on word-ofmouth,

regulars to

grow over the years

Thomas Czaja, Editor

The light yellow and

green walls hint of a different

past.

Though the inside of Buenas

Nachos now is filled

with the sights and smells of

a variety of authentic Mexican

cuisine, the Frankfort

eatery used to be a flower

shop.

Keeping the bright paint

in the interior is a daily reminder

of how far the business

has blossomed since

first opening in the spot in

1991, according to Buenas

Nachos manager Andres

Torres, son of the restaurant’s

owner, Elvia.

“We literally had patio furniture

in here,” Andres said

of the humble beginnings of

the family-owned business.

“We started without much,

but it began to catch on.”

Elvia, originally from central

Mexico, first had a different

restaurant in Chicago

but decided to move to their

Frankfort spot to put her

family in a better, up-andcoming

neighborhood, according

to her son.

Converting the space to

house tacos and tamales instead

of the likes of roses

Paul & Associates

Real Estate

Serving Homeowners, Banks, Builders, Investors.

31 Years providing the Most Money, Quickest Sale,

Fewest Problems with Reasonable Flat Rate Fees.

708.301.4140 • epaulhs@att.net • www.appraisalpaulh.com

E. Paul Hildebranski Owner, Managing Broker, CREA

The milanesa dinner ($8.99) is a breaded rib-eye steak

that is handmade and fried. It features the flattened meat

accompanied by rice, beans, a salad and French fries.

and daisies may not have

been an easy task, but neither

was slowly building an

established clientele — a

feat made all the more impressive

when coupled with

the fact Buenas Nachos has

never advertised.

“We are 100 percent wordof-mouth,”

Andres said. “So

we really have to thank all

the people that have tried it

and have recommended us,

because that’s actually how

we thrive.

“Even to this day, we

don’t have any kind of marketing

things.”

Instead, the restaurant relies

on namesake items like

the Buenas Nachos tacos

($2.40 each, $9 for a dinner)

to do the talking. The

tacos come with a choice of

steak, pork, ground beef and

chicken and are made with

grilled pepper, onion, tomato,

cheese and avocado, on

either a corn of flour tortilla.

The menu item again

serves as a nod to a harder

past, back when the Torres’

family fridge was sometimes

nearly empty and Elvia made

tacos for the family with a

random mix of ingredients

on hand.

That improvised meal was

the same as the Buenas Nachos

tacos ordered regularly

by many today.

“We decided to make [the

tacos] just how she made

them [that day],” Andres

said.

To ensure the best quality

dishes, there are no “imitation”

ingredients, and plenty

of prep work is done.

Every morning, before

opening, two hours are spent

hand-cutting tomato, cilantro

and onion.

“A lot of people don’t go

through that work, because

they end up just purchasing

it themselves or buying it

The tacos al pastor ($1.85 for single, $7.50 for dinner) are a traditional dish made with pork

soaked in a marinade of fresh oranges, limes and more, finely cut and served with onion

and cilantro on a corn shell. Photos by Thomas Czaja/22nd Century Media

in bags or in bulk,” Andres

said. “Stuff like that, we actually

go ahead and put in

labor hours. The chicken is

hand-chopped. Everything is

natural.”

To accommodate demand,

pots that “go up to your

waist” hold large batches of

food, according to Andres.

Sauces are made in house.

Elvia even has traveled back

to Mexico in the past to ensure

the culinary standards

are right, while always remembering

the lessons in the

kitchen her mother gave her

as a young girl.

For those looking for

a dinner served with rice

and beans, the carne asada

($13.50) is a skirt steak that

is lightly salted with grilled

onions and comes with a

stack of corn or flour tortillas,

fresh guacamole, lettuce,

tomato and a side of

French fries.

“A lot of individuals who

have come like our food because

it is not very heavy,”

Andres said. “It’s friendly

for consumption purposes.

It doesn’t have a lot of preservatives

or nitrates or anything.”

A staple of the family-run

restaurant — which Andres

calls a “dying breed” — is

that at least one member of

his extended family always

is present to ensure the operation

is running smoothly.

Whether guests choose

tostadas, burritos, gorditas

or tortas, the focus is on

providing quick, satisfying

lunches or dinners.

“Anything here is good,”

Andres said. “I mean, you

really could almost blind

shoot the menu. Everything

is so fresh and delicious. It’s

really what you have a taste

for that day.”

Another recommendation

by the manager is to order

the enchiladas ($8.25), made

with a choice of chicken,

cheese, pork and beef, with

an option of steak for 75

cents extra.

Buenas Nachos

21016 S. LaGrange

Road in Frankfort

Hours

• 10 a.m.-9:45 p.m.

Monday-Saturday

• Closed Sunday

For more information ...

Web: www.

buenasnachos.com

Phone: (815) 469-8353

The customer has a choice

of four different sauces for

their enchiladas, picking

among red, green, mole or

ranchera — each offering a

distinct flavor.

With Elvia ready to retire,

according to Andres, the future

growth and course of

Buenas Nachos is not set in

stone, but there is one certainty

— the family tradition

and authentic dishes will

continue.

“We are here to stay,” Andres

said. “We’re not going

anywhere anytime soon.”


homerhorizon.com LIFE & ARTS

the Homer Horizon | November 23, 2016 | 19

Gleaner Life supports seniors with Harvest Day

Submitted by the Homer

Township Oak Arbor of

Gleaner Life Insurance

Society

Seniors were recently provided

with free fruits and

vegetables by the Homer

Township Oak Arbor of

Gleaner Life Insurance Society.

During the Senior Harvest

Day, seniors received produce,

met Arbor members,

socialized, received a free flu

and pneumonia vaccine and

met Mrs. Illinois International

2016 Nicole Zwiercan.

The society also provided

insulated Gleaner zipper totes

and recipe cards for items

that were given away. More

than 100 people attended.

Once a fraternal society

for farmers, the Gleaner Life

Insurance Society offers

volunteer opportunities for

its members through establishing

Arbors. The Homer

Township Oak Arbor of

Gleaner Life Insurance Society

was established in 2013

and has served the Homer

A Homer Township senior (left) greets Mrs. Illinois

International 2016 Nicole Zwiercan at the Senior Harvest

Day. Photo submitted

Glen community through

events that support the community.

Its next event will collect

items that teens will pack at

the Homer Township Public

Library for distribution to

Meals on Wheels senior recipients

in December. Those

interested in donating items

can bring 40 items to Sheree

Kozel-La Ha, the library’s

executive director, or call

(708) 301-1078.

Monthly Gleaner meetings

are held at 8 a.m. on the third

Wednesday of each month at

Purple Onion Restaurant. For

more information, call Ethel

at (708) 301-0426.

Combining fellowship with spaghetti

Our Mother of Good Counsel parishioners dine together

Attention Builders:

Advertise with

22nd Century Media

Reach 92,000+ Southwest Suburban homes.

®

Contact

Lora Healy

708.326.9170 ext. 31

l.healy@22ndcenturymedia.com

NOTICE OF PROPOSED PROPERTY TAX INCREASE FOR

THE HOMER TOWNSHIP FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT

I. A public hearing to approve a proposed property tax levy increase

for the HOMER TOWNSHIP FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT for

2016 will be held on December 5, 2016 at 6:30 p.m. at the Homer

Township Fire Station #1, located at 16050 S. Cedar, Lockport, Illinois.

Any person desiring to appear at the public hearing and present testimony

to the taxing district may contact President Paul Anderson c/o

Homer Township Fire Protection District Station #1, 16050 S. Cedar,

Lockport, Illinois, telephone

(815) 838-5006.

II. The corporate and special purpose property taxes extended or

abated for 2015 were $6,035,977.03.

The proposed corporate and special purpose property taxes to be levied

for 2016 are $6,756,000.00. This represents an 11.93% increase

over the previous year.

III. The property taxes extended for debt service and public building

commission leases for 2015 were $-0-.

The estimated property taxes to be levied for debt service and public

building commission leases for 2016 are $-0-. This represents a 0%

increase from the previous year.

IV. The total property taxes extended or abated for 2015 were

$6,035,977.03.

Colette (left) and Richard Wallyn prepare to eat their spaghetti dinners together last month

at Our Mother of Good Counsel Parish. The Knights of Columbus fundraiser included

spaghetti, Italian salad, bread and beverages. Laurie Fanelli/22nd Century Media

The estimated total property taxes to be levied for 2016 are

$6,756,000.00. This represents an 11.93% increase over the previous

year.


20 | November 23, 2016 | The Homer Horizon homer glen

homerhorizon.com homerhorizon.com homer glen

the Homer Horizon | November 23, 2016 | 21


22 | November 23, 2016 | The Homer Horizon PUZZLES

homerhorizon.com

crosstown CROSSWORD & Sudoku

The crosstowns: Frankfort, Homer Glen, Lockport, Mokena, New Lenox, Orland Park, Tinley Park

Crossword by Myles Mellor and Cindy LaFleur

Across

1. Part of a nuclear arsenal,

for short

5. Pondered

10. Get one in a Jiffy?

14. Colorful dress

15. Kind of lyric poem

16. Privy to

17. Mary Robinson, for

example

19. Attractive cave

20. Stiff hairs

21. 1960s hot spot

22. Game table fabric

23. Faux ___ (mistake)

25. Impostor

26. It’s the site of the

Frankfort Trail 5K

run/walk

32. Junk ____

33. Cries from the bush

34. Coin type

37. A deadly sin

38. Partakes of

39. The most prosecuted

40. Christened

41. Posted

44. Itty-bitty bit

45. Stalin’s rule, e.g.

47. Object of a tuneup

50. Elton John, e.g.

51. Copy machine

52. Signifying word

55. Pinched, as a voice

59. Many years old

60. School that won the

IHSA Class 4A basketball

state championship

for the third year

62. Algonquian speaking

Indian

63. Not frivolous

64. Stake

65. Rug rats

66. Pastoral scene

poems

67. Shorebird with a

curved beak

Down

1. Mythical fertility

goddess

2. Attention to detail

3. Sir Lawrence Olivier,

for one

4. Use the wrong way,

as case law

5. Cat cry

6. Versed in

7. Body

8. Red-skinned cheese

9. Secluded room

10. Bonding molecule

11. Disconnect

12. Hard stuff

13. Breeze in

18. Recover

22. Bent

24. USAF unit

25. Wade opponent

26. Prediction

27. Road division

28. Plunge into water

29. Like a perfect game

30. Eater of eucalyptus

leaves

31. Make new

34. Cry of contempt

35. Walking hairball

36. Right now!

39. ____ Gears, Cream

album

41. Hussy

42. Serve perfectly

43. Old computer operating

system

45. Devices that restrict

electrical flow

46. Coating

47. Take forcibly

48. United ___ College

Fund

49. Pay respects

52. Moved forward

53. Religious

54. Demonic

56. High-hat

57. SA palm

58. Contact, e.g.

60. Pressure meas.

61. Checks for under

21s

HOMER GLEN

Mullets Sports Bar and

Restaurant

(14903 S. Bell Road,

Homer Glen; (708) 645-

7000)

■7 ■ p.m. Wednesdays:

Trivia

LOCKPORT

The Outpost Pub & Grill

(14929 Archer Ave.,

Lockport; (815) 836-

8893)

■8 ■ p.m. Tuesdays and

Thursdays: Live DJ and

Karaoke

Strike N Spare II

(811 Northern Drive,

Lockport; (708) 301-1477)

■9:30 ■ p.m.-12:30 a.m.

Mondays: Quartermania

■Fridays: ■ Live bands

ORLAND PARK

The Brass Tap

(14225 95th Ave. Suite

400, Orland Park; (708)

226-1827)

■8 ■ p.m. Tuesdays: Trivia.

Prizes awarded

■9 ■ p.m. Fridays and Saturdays:

Live music

TINLEY PARK

Bailey’s Bar & Grill

(17731 Oak Park Ave.,

Tinley Park; (708) 429-

7955)

■7 ■ p.m. Tuesdays: Trivia

■10 ■ p.m. Fridays: DJ

Dance Party

■9:30 ■ p.m. Saturdays:

Live Music

FRANKFORT

Pete Mitchell’s Bar & Grill

(21000 Frankfort Square

Road, Frankfort; (815)

464-8100)

■6-8 ■ p.m. Wednesdays:

Free N’ Fun Bar Game.

Free to play.

MOKENA

The Alley Grill and Tap

House

(18700 S. Old LaGrange

Road, Mokena; (708)

478-3610)

■9 ■ p.m. Tuesdays: Karaoke

NEW LENOX

Little Joe’s Restaurant

(1300 N. Cedar Road,

New Lenox; (815) 463-

1099)

■5-8 ■ p.m. Tuesdays:

Piano Styles by Joe

To place an event

in The Scene, email

b.kapa@22ndcenturymedia.

com.

answers

How to play Sudoku

Each sudoku puzzle consists of a 9x9 grid that

has been subdivided into nine smaller grids of 3x3

squares. To solve the puzzle, each row, column and

box must contain each of the numbers 1 to 9.

LEVEL: Medium

Sudoku by Myles Mellor and Susan Flanagan


homerhorizon.com Real estate

the Homer Horizon | November 23, 2016 | 23

The Homer Horizon’s

The current owner has

meticulously carved out

a quarter-mile walking

path through this scenic

outdoor oasis. Standing

on the street, one would

not know that this secret

garden was there for

private enjoyment.

What: Four bedrooms,

three baths, 4,000

square feet, built in 1989,

property extends over six

acres

Where: 13627 S. Kickapoo

Trail, Homer Glen

Amenities: A home with

an enormous backyard.

Several rooms in this home

have been completely

updated, including all

three full baths, the

sleek family room and

the modern kitchen with

granite and stainless

throughout. Generously

sized bedrooms include

a spacious master with

sitting area and large

fourth bedroom with bonus

area for a nursery, office

or playroom. The main

attraction of this home is

directly outside the back

door, where one will find

a large, wraparound deck

with outdoor kitchen,

custom Gunite pool and

spa, large spacious yard

of the

WEEK

and an additional six

acres of open space to be

deeded to the new owner.

Listing Price: $444,000

Listing Agent: For more

information, contact Dan

Kenney, Keller Williams

Preferred Realty, at (708)

629-6452.

Want to know how to become

Home of the Week? Contact Tricia

at (708) 326-9170 ext. 47.

Buying

or

Selling

Mike McCatty

and associates

708.945.2121

mccattyrealestate.com

Over a Half Billion

in sales since 1999

Named as one of the top brokers in the country

Homer Glen $429,000

There’s plenty of room in this 4800 SF home

nestled on a 1+ acre lot in Meadowcrest. 4

bedrooms. 3 baths. Finished basement. Sun room.

#1 Worldwide

Tinley Park $216,000

Single family living with none of the outside

maintenance. Bright 2 bedroom, 2 bath, end-unit

ranch townhome. 2 car garage. Full basement.

Oct. 24

*14309 Mallard Drive,

Homer Glen, 604919260

Anthony J. Verhagen

to Michal M. Lepionka,

Venessa Lepionka,

$237,500

Oct. 25

*12928 W. 159th St. 2A,

Homer Glen, 60491-6634

Marquette Bank Trustee

to Eric Reed, $115,000

*13556 S. Janas

Parkway, Homer Glen,

604919498 Todd M.

Rose to Kamil Andrzej

Bacztnski, Monika

Baczynski, $380,000

*15622 Trailside Drive,

Homer Glen, 604917917

Bufka Trust to Michael F.

Rodriguez, $270,000

Oct. 26

*13020 Bramble Court,

Homer Glen, 604919028

Glatzhofer Trust to

Thor Batchelor, Aimee

Batchelor, $209,000

*14318 Mallard Drive,

Homer Glen, 604919259

Peter John Coneset to

Scott Bello, Jennifer Bello,

$265,000

*14846 Glen Crest Lane,

Homer Glen, 604918742

James W. Arp to Kenneth

F. Henke, Jr., Tami L.

Henke, $325,000

*14850 W. 147th St.,

Homer Glen, 604917549

Kucera Trust to Frank

P. Kucera, Kelly Kucera,

$265,000

The Going Rate is provided by

Record Information Services,

Inc. For more information,

visit www.public-record.com

or call (630) 557-1000.

Frankfort $399,000

One level living with related living potential.

Unique brick ranch. 4 bedrooms. Bonus room. Sun

room. Almost 1 acre wooded lot.

Orland Park $259,000

Rarely available ranch home. Set on a 1.7 lushly

landscaped wooded acre. Peaceful views yet just

minutes from all Orland Park has to offer.

Orland Park $339,000

Spectacular recently renovated ranch home. Open

floor plan. Beautiful finishes. 3 bedrooms. 2 bath.

Partial basement. Peaceful yard.

Orland Park $359,000

Here’s your 2016 investment property! Vintage

home on a private & secluded wooded 5 acre

parcel. Endless possibilities.


24 | November 23, 2016 | The Homer Horizon Classifieds

homerhorizon.com

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Sell It 708.326.9170 | Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It | DEADLINE - Friday at 3pm

Automotive

$52 4 lines/

7 papers

1003 Help Wanted

Real Estate

$50 7 7 papers

lines/

Help Wanted

$13 4 lines/

per line 7 papers

Merchandise

$30 7 4 papers

lines/

Bookkeeper, P/T, flex. days/hours

This part-time bookkeeping position requires advanced

knowledge of Quick Books, MS Excel and MS

Office. Qualified candidates will pay parish/school bills,

administrate payroll, assist in the completion of school/

parish financial reports and coordinate the functions also

of the parish office, including recording of weekly

contributions, prepare bank deposits and reconcile all bank

accounts monthly. Must possess a knowledge of

bookkeeping and generally accepted accounting

principles both standard and nonprofit. Must possess a

keen attention to details and a commitment to high quality

work. Ability to prioritize, multi-task and problem solve.

Ability to maintain strict confidentiality and communicate

in a professional manner. Knowledge of Google forms

integration. Familiarity with Catholic teachings. Excellent

written communication, including spelling and grammar.

Comfortable with importing, exporting, and manipulating

data. Elevates potential issues and offers solutions to

problems. There are school and parish duties combined

into this part-time opportunity to work with a flexible,

dedicated staff in a caring Catholic environment. St.

Michael Orland Park-email resume to

resume@saintmike.com. No phone calls please.

Immediate, Full/part-time

openings in Data Entry.

Typing 40 wpm. Paid

holidays & other benefits

avail. No exp. necessary.

Will train. 708.460.9677

FT/PT Cashier. Flex hrs.

Will-Cook Ace Hardware

12121 W. 159th St.

Homer Glen, IL 60491

708.301.7130

Help

Wanted

Frankfort, IL CPA Firm is

looking for a F/T Office

Administrator.

40 hrs/week with OT

available during tax

season. Competitive pay

with benefits. (Located just

off of I-80 and Harlem

Ave) Fax Resume To:

708.534.1017

2016 Southwest Choice

Award winner Pet Patrol

is looking for dog walkers

& pet sitters in Orland &

Tinley Park. For more info

& to apply:

www.pet-patrol.net

Start a new career in

time for the holidays!

AMERICAN SCHOOL

BUS NOW HIRING.

CALL NOW:

708.349.1866

Mokena School District 159

P/T Bus Driver. 4.25 hrs/day.

$14.34/hour. Please contact

Joe Sierra for details.

708.342.4900

1023 Caregiver

Caregiver Services

Provided by

Margaret’s Agency Inc.

State Licensed & Bonded

since 1998. Providing

quality care for elderly.

Live-in/ Come & go.

708.403.8707

Affordable Caregiver

Professional, private duty

caregiver: live-in or come

& go with a car. Insured

with excellent references.

Low prices.

708.692.2580

IamaReliable, Independent

Caregiver w/Medical Education

&Experience Available

for Elderly Care 630-673-3666

1037 Prayer /

Novena

Oh most Beautiful Flower of

Mt Carmel, Fruitful vine,

splendor of heaven, blessed

mother of the Son of God,

Immaculate Virgin, Assist me

in this my neccessity, oh star of

the sea help me and show me

herein you are my mother. Oh

holy Mary, Mother of God,

Queen of Heaven and Earth, I

humbly beeseach you from the

bottom of my heart to succor

me in my necessity (make

request) there are none that can

withstand your power, oh Mary

conceived without sin, pray for

us who have recourse to thee

(3x). Holy Mary I place this

cause in your hands (3x). Say

this prayer for three

consecutive days, you must

publish it and it will be granted

to you. Thank you For

Granting my request.

-MMT-

Oh, Holy StJude, Apostle &

Martyr, great in virtue and rich

in miracle, near kinsman of Jesus

Christ, faithful intercessor

of all who invoke your special

patronage in time ofneed. To

you Ihave recourse from the

depth of my heart and humbly

beg to whom God has given

such great power to come to

my assistance. Help me in my

present and urgent petition, In

return, I promise tomake your

name known and cause you to

be invoked. Say three Our Fathers,

three Hail Marys and

glories for nine consecutive

days. Publications must be

promised. St. Jude pray for us

all who invoke your aid.

Amen. This Novena has never

been known tofail, Ihave had

requests granted. D.B.

Automotive

1061 Autos Wanted

1061 Autos

Wanted

WANTED!

WE NEED

CARS, TRUCKS

& VANS

Running Or Not

Top Dollar Paid !!!

Free Pick-Up

Locally Located

708 205 8241

1074 Auto for

Sale

2003 Ford Mustang

125k mi. Good Condition

Runs well. $2,500

708-557-2598

2005 Nissan Ultima 2.5SL,

200k mi, very clean, runs great.

$3,000/or best offer. Call

847.366.1077

Rental

1225 Apartments

for Rent

Oak Forest Terrace

15815 Terrace, Oak Forest

Spacious 1 & 2 Bdrms.

Serene setting & Beautiful

Grounds. Tennis, Pool,

Walking Trails. Near metra.

708-687-1818

oakterrapts@att.net


homerhorizon.com Classifieds

the Homer Horizon | November 23, 2016 | 25

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Sell It 708.326.9170

Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It

Automotive

Help Wanted

Real Estate

Merchandise

per line

DEADLINE -

$52

$13

$50

$30

4 lines/

4 lines/

7 lines/

4 lines/

Friday at 3pm

7 papers

7 papers

7 papers

7 papers

LOCAL REALTOR

DIRECTORY

REAL ESTATE ATTORNEYS

CLOSINGS ANDALL REAL ESTATE NEEDS

THOUSANDSOFTRANSACTIONSCLOSED

•RECOGNIZEDASAN

INDUSTRY LEADER FOR

OUREXPERIENCE AND

PROFESSIONALISM

•FEATURED INCHICAGO

REALTOR MAGAZINE

•SELECTED BYCHICAGO

AGENTMAGAZINE ASA

"WHO'S WHO" IN

CHICAGO REALESTATE

SELLING: $200 Flat Fee*

BUYING: $500 Flat Fee*

*Must mention Ad

OFFICESINORLANDPARK & CHICAGO

WWW.DUFFINDORELAW.COM• 312.566.0911

708.966.0692

Attorneys At Law

www.duffindorelaw.com

DUFFIN &DORE

Consistent Listing and Sales Leader

YEAR AFTER YEAR

30+ Years of Experience

Internet Marketing Expert • Fulltime Professional

14851 Founders Crossing

Homer Glen, IL 60491

Pete Ciaccio

Specializing in Homer Glen, Lockport,

Orland Park and Lemont

Residential & Commercial Real Estate

708.710.0936

www.PeteCiaccio.com

parkview2000@comcast.net

Commission Rates

3 % !

as

Low

as

Ask me How

Kim Wirtz, Associate

Broker

(708) 516-3050

www.KimWirtz.com

Residential, Commercial and Short Sales Specialist

AWARD WINNING

AGENT

Guaranteed The LOWEST Selling Fees!

2 %

3.5 % Total

To

Selling Fees

708 •460 • 8101





Sell It!

With a Classified Ad

See the Classified Section for more info, or call


26 | November 23, 2016 | The Homer Horizon Classifieds

homerhorizon.com

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Sell It 708.326.9170 | Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It | DEADLINE - Friday at 3pm

1225 Apartments

for Rent

FRANKFORT

Maple Apartments

1BR-$830/month

2BR deluxe- $960/month

Plus security deposit

NO PETS, 815-469-1899

Automotive

$52 4 lines/

7 papers

Real Estate

$50 7 7 papers

lines/

Help Wanted

$13 4 lines/

per line 7 papers

Merchandise

$30 7 4 papers

lines/

1325 Duplex For

Rent

Frankfort Duplex

2BR, 1 bath duplex with

parking space in Frankfort.

Includes washer, dryer, stove,

and fridge. Rent $1,100

month. Security deposit

$1,500/ month.

National Advantage Real

Estate 815-485-0304

2007 Black Dirt/Top Soil

Sawyer

Dirt

Pulverized Black Dirt

Rough Black Dirt

Driveway Gravel Available

Bobcat Services Available

For Delivery Pricing Call:

815-485-2490

www.sawyerdirt.com

...to place your

Classified Ad!

708.326.9170

2011 Brick/Chimney Experts

2025 Concrete Work

2032 Decking

2060 Drywall

2003 Appliance Repair

QUALITY

APPLIANCE

REPAIR, Inc.

• Air Conditioning • Furnaces

Refrigeration • Dishwashers

Stoves & Ovens • Microwaves

Garbage Disposals

Washers&Dryers

Family Owned &Operatedsince 1986

Someone you can TRUST

All work GUARANTEED

BEST price in town!

708-712-1392

Business Directory

Advertise your

RENTAL PROPERTY

in the newspaper

people turn to first

CALL US TODAY: 708.326.9170

www.22ndcenturymedia.com

2006 Basement Waterproofing

Sturdy

Deck & Fence

Repair, Rebuild or

Replace

Make It Safe - Make it Sturdy

708 479 9035

2070 Electrical

EXPERIENCED

ELECTRICIAN

R E A S O N A B L E

D E P E N D A B L E

SMALL JOBS

CALL ANYTIME

(708) 478-8269

Drywall

*Hanging *Taping

*New Homes

*Additions

*Remodeling

Call Greg At:

(815)485-3782

2075 Fencing

2080 Firewood

2017 Cleaning Services

FANTASTIK POLISH

CLEANING SERVICE

If you’re tired of housework

Please call us!

(708)599-5016

5th Cleaning is

FREE! Valid only one time

Free Estimates

& Bonded

Calling all


homerhorizon.com Classifieds

the Homer Horizon | November 23, 2016 | 27

2080 Firewood

2100 Garage Doors/Openers

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Automotive

$52 4 lines/

7 papers

Help Wanted

$13 4 lines/

per line 7 papers

Sell It 708.326.9170 | Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It | DEADLINE - Friday at 3pm

Real Estate

$50 7 7 papers

lines/

Merchandise

$30 7 4 papers

lines/

2130 Heating/Cooling

2120 Handyman

GroundsKeeper

Landscape Services!

Get Your Firewood

Early This Year

FREE Local Delivery

Contact us at

708.301.7441

or

Visit our website

www.groundskpr.com

HANDYMAN SERVICE —WHATEVER YOU NEED

"OVER 30 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE"

Windows, Doors, Decks Kitchen & Bathroom Remodeling, Plumbing Interior and

Exterior Painting Wall Paper Removal Professional Work At Competitive Prices

CALL MIKE AT 708-790-3416

CARRARAREPAIRSERVICE

2090 Flooring

Advertise your

RENTAL PROPERTY

in the newspaper

people turn to first

CALL US TODAY: 708.326.9170

www.22ndcenturymedia.com

BEECHY’S

Handyman Service

Custom Painting

Drywall & Plaster Repair

Carpentry Work

Trim & General

Tile & Laminated Flooring

Light Plumbing & Electrical

Remodeling, Kitchen & Bath

Install StormWindows/Doors

Clean Gutters

Wash Siding & Windows

Call Vern for Free Estimate!

708 714 7549

815 838 4347

Kitchen, Baths, Basements

Quartz Countertops

Electrical & Plumbing

Carpentry, Trim & Finish

Tile/Wood & Laminate Floors

Handyman Services

www.custombuilthomeimp.com

JEROME

DRIVE CAR BUYERS

TO YOUR DOOR WITH

A CLASSIFIED AUTO AD

708.326.9170


28 | November 23, 2016 | The Homer Horizon Classifieds

homerhorizon.com

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

2130 Heating/Cooling

Sell It 708.326.9170

Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It

DEADLINE -

Friday at 3pm

Automotive

Real Estate

$52

4 lines/

7 papers Help Wanted

$50

7 lines/

7 papers Merchandise

2132 Home Improvement

$13

per line

4 lines/

7 papers

$30

4 lines/

7 papers

2132 Home Improvement

Don’t just

list your

real estate

property...

Sell It!

With a Classified Ad

See the Classified Section for more info,

or call 708.326.9170

22ndCenturyMedia.com

2135 Insulation

2150 Paint & Decorating

MARTY’S

PAINTING

Interior / Exterior

Fast, Neat Painting

Drywall

Wallpaper Removal

Staining

Free Estimates

20% Off with this ad

708-606-3926

DRIVE CAR BUYERS

TO YOUR DOOR WITH

A CLASSIFIED AUTO AD

708.326.9170


homerhorizon.com Classifieds

the Homer Horizon | November 23, 2016 | 29

2150 Paint & Decorating

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Sell It 708.326.9170

Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It

DEADLINE -

Friday at 3pm

Automotive

Real Estate

$52

4 lines/

7 papers Help Wanted

$50

7 lines/

7 papers Merchandise

$13

per line

4 lines/

7 papers

$30

4 lines/

7 papers

2170 Plumbing

2200 Roofing

2170 Plumbing

Save 10% with this ad

10% of All Rodding Will Go To The American Cancer Society

for Breast Cancer Research

2180 Remodeling

Family Owned & Operated • Over 40 Years

Licensed - Bonded - Insured

Call 24 hr. Service | Free Estimates

We will rod any main line

with clean out in lawn area

for

Lic# SL2599

(708)-846-2252 | (815) 329-4019

(708) 942-1943

$

75 .00

• Rodding

• Water Jetting

• Kitchen Sink

royalflushplumbingandsewerinc.com

inside slightly higher

DISCOUNT to SENIOR CITIZENS & VETERANS

with this ad

• Bathroom Sink

• Laundry Tubs

• Shower Drains

You need your pipes repaired or

installed, we have all the newest

equipment,Underground TV

Cameras, Radio, Hydro Jetting.

• Floor Drains

• Repair Work

• New Line Installs

Written guarantee on all work | Written estimate for insurance work

KASCH PLUMBING Inc.

• Waterheaters

•SumpPumps

• Faucets

Lisense #055-043148

Complete Plumbing Service

• WaterLeaks

• RPZ Testing

• Ejector Pumps

•Disposals

• Toilets

815.603.6085

2200 Roofing

Don’t just

list your

real estate

property...

Sell It!

With a Classified Ad

See the Classified Section for more info,

or call 708.326.9170

22ndCenturyMedia.com


30 | November 23, 2016 | The Homer Horizon Classifieds

homerhorizon.com

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Sell It 708.326.9170

Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It

DEADLINE -

Friday at 3pm

Automotive

$52

4 lines/

7 papers

Help Wanted

per line $13

4 lines/

7 papers

Real Estate

$50

7 lines/

7 papers

Merchandise

$30

4 lines/

7 papers

2200 Roofing

2255 Tree Service

2276 Tuckpointing/Masonry

2294 Window Cleaning

P.K.WINDOW

CLEANING CO.

Window Cleaning

Gutter Cleaning

Power Washing

Office Cleaning

call and get $40.00 off

708 974-8044

w w w . p k w i n d o w c l e a n i n g . c

o m

Advertise your

RENTAL PROPERTY

in the newspaper

people turn to first

CALL US TODAY: 708.326.9170

www.22ndcenturymedia.com


homerhorizon.com Classifieds

the Homer Horizon | November 23, 2016 | 31

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Sell It 708.326.9170 | Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It | DEADLINE - Friday at 3pm

Automotive

$52 4 lines/

7 papers

Real Estate

$50 7 7 papers

lines/

2390 Computer Services/Repair

2489 Merchandise

Wanted

Metal Wanted

Scrap Metal, Garden

Tractors,

Snowmobiles,

Appliances, Etc.

ANYTHING METAL!

Call 815-210-8819

Free pickup!

Help Wanted

$13 4 lines/

per line 7 papers

Merchandise

$30 7 4 papers

lines/

Professional

Directory

2416 Pet Services

Calling all













Merchandise

Directory

2490

Misc.

Merchandise

Canon Toners

Color Image MF8350C/

8380C, Cartridge 118

Magenta, Black, Cyan,

Yellow, 2 Each.

Best Offer 708.326.9170

2701 Property for

Sale

SHERIFF'S SALE OF REAL ES-

TATE at 15528 Red Cedar Trail,

Homer Glen, IL 60491 (Residential).

Onthe 8th day of December,

2016 to be held at 12:00 noon, at

the Will County Courthouse Annex,

57 N. Ottawa Street, Room

201, Joliet, IL 60432, under Case

Title: Federal Home Loan Mortgage

Corporation Plaintiff V.Lois

M. Maida; et. al. Defendant.

Case No. 16CH 0838 in the Circuit

Court of the Twelfth Judicial

Circuit, Will County, Illinois.

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%)

at the time of sale and the balance

within twenty-four (24) hours;

plus, for residential real estate, a

statutory judicial sale fee calculated

at the rate of $1 for each

$1,000 or fraction thereof of the

amount paid bythe purchaser to

the person conducting the sale, not

to exceed $300, for deposit into the

Abandoned Residential Property

Municipality Relief Fund. Nojudicial

sale fee shall be paid by the

mortgagee acquiring the residential

real estate pursuant to its credit bid

at the sale or by any mortgagee,

judgment creditor, or other lienor

acquiring the residential real estate

whose rights inand to the residential

real estate arose prior to the

sale. All payments shall be made in

cash or certified funds payable to

the Sheriff of Will County.

In the event the property is acon-

dominium, in accordance with 735

ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and

(H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and

765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are

hereby notified that the purchaser

of the unit, other than amortgagee,

shall pay the assessments and legal

fees required by subdivisions

(g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9and

the assessments required by subsection

(g-1) of Section 18.5 of the

Illinois Condominium Property

Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03

(J) ifthere is asurplus following

application of the proceeds of sale,

then the plaintiff shall send written

notice pursuant to 735 ILCS

5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the

proceeding advising them of the

amount ofthe surplus and that the

surplus will beheld until aparty

obtains acourt order for its distribution

or, in the absence of an order,

until the surplus is forfeited to

the State.

For Information Please Contact:

Codilis & Associates, P.C.

15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite

100

Burr Ridge, Illinois 60527

P: 630-794-5300

F: 630-794-9090

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR

DEBT COLLECTION PRAC-

TICES ACT YOU ARE AD-

VISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM

IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT

COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO

COLLECT ADEBT AND ANY

INFORMATION OBTAINED

WILL BE USED FOR THAT

PURPOSE.

2703 Legal

Notices

PURSUANT TO THE FAIR

DEBT COLLECTION PRAC-

TICES ACT YOU ARE AD-

VISED THAT THIS LAW FIRM

IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT

COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO

COLLECT ADEBT AND ANY

INFORMATION OBTAINED

WILL BE USED FOR THAT

PURPOSE.

STATE OF ILLINOIS )

) SS.

COUNTY OF WILL )

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF

THE TWELFTH JUDICIAL CIR-

CUIT

WILL COUNTY, ILLINOIS

Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation

Plaintiff,

vs.

Lois M. Maida; et. al.

Defendant.

No. 16 CH 0838

NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE

Public notice ishereby given that

pursuant to ajudgment entered in

the above cause on the 20th day of

July, 2016, MIKE KELLEY, Sheriff

of Will County, Illinois, will on

Thursday, the 8th day of December,

2016 ,commencing at 12:00

o'clock noon, at the Will County

Courthouse Annex, 57 N. Ottawa

Street, Room 201, Joliet, IL 60432,

sell at public auction to the highest

and best bidder orbidders the following-described

real estate:

LOT 155 IN TWIN LAKES #3,

BEING ASUBDIVISION IN THE

SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF

SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 36

NORTH, RANGE 11, EAST OF

THE THIRD PRINCIPAL ME-

RIDIAN, ACCORDING TOTHE

PLAT THEREOF RECORDED

OCTOBER 27, 1987, AS DOCU-

MENT NO. R87-59358 AND

CERTIFICATE OF CORREC-

TION RECORDED NOVEMBER

16, 1987, AS DOCUMENT NO.

R87-63129, IN WILL COUNTY,

ILLINOIS.

Commonly known as:

15528 Red Cedar Trail, Homer

Glen, IL 60491

Description of Improvements:

Residential

P.I.N.:

16-05-13-408-025-0000

Terms of Sale: ten percent (10%)

at the time of sale and the balance

within twenty-four (24) hours;

plus, for residential real estate, a

statutory judicial sale fee calculated

at the rate of $1 for each

$1,000 or fraction thereof of the

amount paid bythe purchaser to

the person conducting the sale, not

to exceed $300, for deposit into the

Abandoned Residential Property

Municipality Relief Fund. Nojudicial

sale fee shall be paid by the

mortgagee acquiring the residential

real estate pursuant to its credit bid

at the sale or by any mortgagee,

judgment creditor, or other lienor

acquiring the residential real estate

whose rights inand to the residential

real estate arose prior to the

sale. All payments shall be made in

cash or certified funds payable to

the Sheriff of Will County.

In the event the property is acon-

2703 Legal

Notices

dominium, in accordance with 735

ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) and

(H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), and

765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), you are

hereby notified that the purchaser

of the unit, other than amortgagee,

shall pay the assessments and legal

fees required by subdivisions

(g)(1) and (g)(4) of Section 9and

the assessments required bysubsection

(g-1) of Section 18.5 of the

Illinois Condominium Property

Act.

Pursuant to Local Court Rule 11.03

(J) ifthere is asurplus following

application of the proceeds of sale,

then the plaintiff shall send written

notice pursuant to 735 ILCS

5/15-1512(d) to all parties to the

proceeding advising them of the

amount ofthe surplus and that the

surplus will beheld until aparty

obtains a court order for its distribution

or, in the absence of an order,

until the surplus is forfeited to

the State.

FOR INFORMATION PLEASE

CONTACT:

Codilis & Associates, P.C.

15W030 N. Frontage Road Suite

100

Burr Ridge, Illinois 60527

P: 630-794-5300

F: 630-794-9090

Plaintiff's Attorney

MIKE KELLEY

Sheriff of Will County

2900 Merchandise

Under $100

2 loose pillow back upholstered

drexel heritage chairs in

taupe. Excellent condition.

20x27x31 $100. Call

708.614.0266

2new Shimano Spirek spinning

reels in box for sale $40

each. or both for $70. Mokena

location, call 630.865.6366 after

3 PM.

5 drawer dresser, one white,

one dark brown. Like new $50.

Wooden rocker $45.

708.479.7537

Beautiful vintage wicker

roll/bread basket uniquely

made with metal fruit decor

$20. 708.466.9907

Brand new spare tire and jack

assembly shole bolt pattern. 15

inch. For Hyundai Elantra

$100 or best offer. Call

708.404.9722

Brand new, never used deluxe

poker game table top. Great

Christmas gift. Perfect condition

$60. 815.469.5820

Dark blue platform rocker.

Good condition $25/offer.

708.705.7111

Futon: wooden arms, built-in

magazine racks, great shape,

cover &throw pillows. Clean

$50. 708.602.4689

2900 Merchandise

Under $100

Handcrafted wood dollhouse,

six rooms very sturdy w/ furniture

$55. 22 Liberty Falls collectible

houses $2 ea or $40 all.

815.462.9527

Hillary presidents cards, Michael

Jordan cards. Chris

708.203.5667

IKEA malm (3) dressers & full

headbaord. Bottom drawers

need sl. repair $25 each obo

708.567.7690

Maytag quiet series 200 bisque

built-in dishwasher &GE over

the range bisque microwave for

sale $100 for both excellent

condition. Call Tom

815.462.3884

Men’s American made Redwing

soft toe shoes $55 each,

sz 8.5D. Wood ladder, 6ft $12.

708.798.9755

Mokena. Small dog/cat carrier.

Black soft orhard blue plastic

carrier. $15 each. Frontline

plus for cats, 3pack $25. Call

708.479.7020, leave message.

New 2 foot talking Santa, animated,

with light $45. New

animated 18” Santa with little

girl with 2.6” lighted lamp post

$45. 708.532.1699

Old antique desk, excellent

condition $80. 708.921.8505

Old antique desk, excellent

condition $80. 708.921.8505

Pair of stiffel antique brass table

lamps. Excellent condition

$95 for both. New Lenox

815.462.3561

Rare CJ vintage gasoline 5gallon

can &spout by Jayes Can

Company $25. 708.466.9907

Sharp LCD 480 I enhanced

television $6o. Glass/wood

coffee table $40. Call

815.735.4509

Vintage solid steel wizard electric

variable speed saber saw

$30. 708.466.9907

...to place your

Classified Ad!

708.326.9170


32 | November 23, 2016 | The Homer Horizon Classifieds

homerhorizon.com

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Sell It 708.326.9170

Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It

DEADLINE -

Friday at 3pm

Automotive

$52

4 lines/

7 papers

Help Wanted

per line $13

4 lines/

7 papers

Real Estate

$50

7 lines/

7 papers

Merchandise

$30

4 lines/

7 papers

2703 Legal Notices

2703 Legal Notices

ANNUAL STATEMENT OF AFFAIRS SUMMARY FOR FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 2016

Copies of the detailed Annual Statement ofAffairs for the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 2016 will be available for public inspection inthe school

district/joint agreement administrative office by December 1, 2016. Individuals wanting to review this Annual Statement of Affairs should contact:

Homer CCSD 33C 15733 Bell Road 708-226-7600 8 am to 4 pm

School District/Joint Agreement Name Address Telephone Office Hours

Also by January 15, 2017 the detailed Annual Statement of Affairs for the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 2016, will be posted on the Illinois State Board

of Education's website@ www.isbe.net.

SUMMARY: The following is the Annual Statement of Affairs Summary that is required to be published by the school district/joint agreement for the

past fiscal year.

Statement of Operations as of June 30, 2016

Educational Operations & Debt Transportation Municipal Capital Working Tort Fire

Maintenance Services Retirement/ Projects Cash Prevention

Social Security

& Safety

Local Sources 1000 33,070504 5,347,353 1,953 764,432 2,110,970 273,733 19,306 124,504 0

Flow-Through Receipts

/Revenues from One

District to Another

District 2000 0 0 0 0

State Sources 3000 1,790,570 1,193,603 0 2,088,012 280,721 0 0 0 0

Federal Sources 4000 1,201,362 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Total Direct Receipts

/Revenues 36,062,436 6,540,956 1,953 2,852,444 2,391,691 273,733 19,306 124,504 0

Total Direct

Disbursements

/Expenditures 36,237,410 4,623,427 3,830,992 3,227,647 1,914,720 1,049,024 234,575 0

Other Sources

/Uses of Funds (2,400,000) (2,387,523) 3,787,523 375,500 0 1,000 0 0 0

Beginning Fund

Balances - July 1, 2015 10,507,220 2,100,975 77,903 967,842 622,516 847,881 7,038,500 301,890 0

Other Changes in

Fund Balances 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Ending Fund Balances

June 30, 2016 7,932,246 1,630,981 36,387 968,139 1,099,487 1,072,590 7,057,806 191,819 0

SALARY RANGE REPORT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2015-2016

6/30/2016 CERTIFIED SALARIES

$25,000 AND UNDER

ANDERSON, JEFFREY C;; DALEY, STEPHANIE THERESE; DWYER, BARBARA A; DZIELSKA, EMILIA; FALESE, MARIA KRISTINE;

HABERKORN, EMILY MARGARET; HESEK, MARIANNE E; HILLER, DONNA M; HOFFERICA, KATHLEEN A; HOINACKI, SUZANNE T;

JOHNSTON, GERALDINE N; KHALIL, NIHAD;; LIBBY, NANCY ;;MARTINO, KATHLEEN A; MCFALL, JOHN JOSEPH;; NIEMI, DENISE

C; ORELOVE, ABEL S;; SMITH, ERIN KATHLEEN; SMYDER, CONNIE R; VOREL, PAULA C

$25,001 - $39,999

BEVERING, KATI ROXANNE; BINDER, BROOKE REGINE; BOUCHE, JAMIE EILEEN; CRAWFORD, JACLYN ELLEN; DAY, JULIANNE

ELIZABETH; DEFILIPPIS, KALEEN FRANCIS; FITZGERALD, BRENDA IRENE;FITZGERALD, MEGHAN M; HIRSCH, ALEXIS EMILY;

HULL, MATTHEW MICHAEL; MAZIUR, JENNA ANN; MITCHELL, JENNIFER JEAN; MUIR, MATTHEW R; NELSON, ASHLEY RACHEL;

NIEMEYER, JACQUELINE NICOLE; O'NEILL, MOLLY EILEEN; PAVLOVICH, MAXINE DAWN; RYAN, KRISTIN LOUISE; SCHORSCH,

LAUREN E; SCUDERI, DAWN M; STASIK, DOROTA; SUGGS, GINA M; TEWS, BRITTANY KIM; YANOWSKY, CORTNY KRISTINE

$40,000 - $59,999

AIROLA, KATHRYN A; BAILEY, MEGAN COLLEEN; BARD, KRISTEN M; BARNES, BRIAN J; BARNES, KATE ELIZABE; BAZANT, MAL-

LORY K; BICKELMAN, CYNTHIA A; BOYCE, NICHOLE LYNN; BRACE, KENTON S; BRAINERD, AMIE M;BRICKER, SUSANN M;

BROWN, KATHLEEN D; BROWNING, MEGAN EILEEN; BUCKLEY, ELLEN M; BUERGER, MORGAN L; CALLAN, JAIME L; CANNON,

LEIGHANN; CARLSON, CHRISTOPHER M; CLARIDA, CARI A; CLARKE-SIGEL, JACQUELINE MARIE; COLLINS, LAURA CHRISTINE;

COLLINS, SARAH ELIZABETH; CONNOLLY, ALLISON MARIE; CREEK, ELIZABETH MARY; DAVIS, LISA M; DEUSER, AUGUST ROB-

ERT; DEVENNEY, SARA LYNN; DICKSEN, CAROL A; DOLE, ANDREW M; DONAHUE, JENNIFER E; DRAGISIC, JENNIFER L;

DUCHARME, AMANDA J; DYAL, JARID T; ESTES, LISA M;EVANS, DANIELLE; FARTHING, KATHLEEN E; FAZIO, NICOLE M;FINK,

SUSAN E; FISKE, ERIN L; FLENTGE, SARAH A; GAGE, JACOB R; GALLAGHER, SHARON M; GARRISON, EILEEN R; GEIBEL, MELISSA

MARIE; GENTILE, SHANNON C; GERAGHTY, ALESA BETH; GESIAKOWSKI, JENNIFER MARIE; GIANTOMASSO, JANINA R; GILBERT,

DANIEL C; GORECKI, KATHLEEN ANN; GRANT, GWEN I; GUSKA, KRISTIN MGYRION, KIMBERLY A; HAGLUND, LISA MICHELLE;

HANSEN, KATHERINE A; HEINTZ, MEGAN M; HETFLEISCH, KIMBERLY A; HILDEN, KIMBERLY M; HUFFMAN, JOEL D; HUGHES, NA-

TALIE S; HUNTLEY, MEGAN M; JABER, SAWSAN; JOHNSON, BRITTANY E; JOHNSON, KRISTEN M; JONAITIS, JEFFREY A; KAMIN-

SKA, JADWIGA; KARR, KRISTIN M;KEASLER, WILLIAM NATHAN; KLIMSON, CANDICE D;KLOSAK, KELLY M; KOCANDA, LORA C;

KONSOER, BRITTANY R; KRZEBIOT, TRICIA M; LANE, MICHELE M ;LARA, ANGELICA; LARSON, MANDA R; LITTEL, ERIN J; LOVE,

CHRISTINE ANN; LOWMAN, AMY E; LOZANO, VERONICA K; MADISON, KIMBERLY A; MALONEY, ELYSE M; MARRONE, CARRIE L;

MARTELLO, HEATHER KRISTIN; MARZANO, AMY ROSE; MATRICIANO, LORIE L; MATT, TIMOTHY; MAUTZ, BONNIE L;

MCENERY, KATIE L; MCINERNEY, GINA C; MCLENIGHAN, SYLVIA M;MEZYDLO, ELIZABETH A; MITCHELL, KELLY A;MITCHELL,

MICHAEL WAYNE; MOORE, SHANNON; MOORE, STEPHANIE F; MULDER, MARY ANNE; MURPHY, CHRISTINE A;NEIL, ALISHA M;

OHOTZKE, TASHA N; OLMSTEAD, VALERIE ANN; ONDREJA, MEGAN F; PANGRAZIO, WENDY L; PARNITZKE, COLLEEN;PASSAR-

ELLI, JESSICA A; PEARSON, STEPHANIE S; PEKALA, BETH A; PEKOL, SEAN M; POREMBA, MICHAEL J; POTERACKI, KATHRYN J; PU-

LAK, REBECCA A; REINICHE, JULIANNE E; RISUM, CAROLINE G; SCHLUETER, AMY K; SCHMECKPEPER, STACEY ELIZABETH;

SCHROEDER, SHANNON O'NEAL; SCHULTZ, JANE E; SCHURY, MARY T; SCHWAB, RENEE NICOLE; SCHWEERS, JESSICA L; SIME-

ONE, COLLEEN M; SMITH, AMY KATHERINE; SMITH, MARGARET A; STEEPLETON, AMY MARIE; TENGSTRAND, ERIC J; THEISSING,

JENNIFER N; VAN ALST, MEGHAN LYNN; VANHEEST, JENNIFER V;WALL, LAUREN E; WALSH, LAURA MARIE; WIERENGA,

STEPHANIE M; WILKINS, SCOTT A; WOODS, JENNIFER TER; WORLEY, REBECCA T; YBORRA, JESSICA A; ZEIMETZ, KENNETH ED-

WARD; ZENAWICK, JASON ROBERT; ZURALES, CAROLE

$60,000 - $89,999

ACKLAND, PHILIP B; ANDREWS, PATTI J; ARUNDEL, JEANINE MARIE; BAAR, JANE E; BERNAR, JULIE M; BHATTACHARYYA, AN-

DREA L; BLACKBURN, JANET L;BLASKEY, DIANE L; BORDENARO, JODI L; BRUIN, WENDY L; BRUMFIELD, JERILYN A; BUMBER,

ROSALINE A; BURKE, JANICE L; BURNS, JAMIE L; BUTTON, JOEL L; CERNAK IV, FRANK J; CLAYTON, CATHERINE J; COOPMAN,

KATHLEEN M; CORCORAN, ANNMARIE; CRAFTON, CRAIG M; DETLOFF, LARA C; DOMKE, MAUREEN D; DOORNBOS, MEAGAN K;

DUL, ERIN E; DURBIN, ANDREA M; EBEL, TAMMIE R; FARMER, VALERIE D; FEELEY, GLORIA A; FENCL, JOHN; FERGUSON, MARY

ELLEN; FLAVIN BAECHER, BRIDGET G;FLEMING, DEBORAH L; GRAY, LAURA MARIE; GRILL, JONATHAN J; GRITZMAN, DONNA L;

HALL, KIMBERLY S; HAYES, ANNE P; HESEK, JENNIFER T; HOAK, CARMEL MARY; JAGER, CYNTHIA L; JAGUST, SUSAN F; JER-

MOLOWICZ, CARRIE A; JOHNSON, MARY ANN; JOHNSON, MELODY L; JOKUBAUSKAS, VANDA B; JUNG, ANNETTE L; KAUFMAN,

KATHLEEN M KAY, KIRSTIN M; KOSIAK, JENNIFER A;KRAYNAK, KAREN; KRENGIEL, PATTY L; KUELTZO, ADAM KUHNY, DEBO-

RAH G; MCGOWAN, KATHLEEN A; MCNABB, KAREN L; MICHALIK, KENDRA C; MICKELSON, GAIL LYNETTE; MONAHAN, AMANDA

L; MURPHY, DONNA T; MURPHY, JENNIFER MURR, DEBORAH C; MUSIAL, KAREN A; NAGLE, MARIE T; NICE, LAURA M;NICHELE,

TERRA M; NOVAK, TRACY A; ODOM, HOLLY R; OESS, TIMOTHY L; ONESTO, MELISSA J; PARUS, SANDRA M;PELLIZZARI, TERRI L;

PETSCHOW, JANE ANN; PIKUS, ALISON R; PIPER, STEPHANIE J; POLITANO, LINDA M; PULLARA, DIANE C; REBOLLAR, MARY

BETH; RUPSIS, CELESTE MARIE; RUSH, DAVID C; RUSSELL, BETH NICOLE; SALVATORI, LINDA M; SCHROEDER, DENISE M;

SCHULZ, EILEEN G; SCHULTZ, MICHELLE Y; SIERROS, PENNY; SKUBE, JASON T; STARK, TIFFANI L; STORCK, NICHOLE C;STRA-

HANOSKI, SHELLY A; TELLOR, CARRIE L; TELLOR, TEDDY A; THOMAS, LYNN M; THOMPSON, JASON E; THOMPSON, KRISTIN R;

TOLAND, KAREN LYNN; VANDER HEIDE, STACEY L; WEATHERS, JEFF M; WHITMIRE, CHANTAL E;ZIEGLER, CAROL M; ZURALES,

GREGORY ZUREK, KELLY

$90,000 - $9,999,999

BRUNZELLE, JUDITH A; CHRISTIE, ANN M; COGLIANESE GUSTAFSON, KARA ANN; DEFILIPPIS, KAREN A; FOJTIK, JANE A; GASA,

CANDIS M; GRIVAS, NANCY K; JONELIS, DORENE K; KUBINSKI, LEANNE K; KUZEL, CATHERINE E; LITTMANN, KIMBERLY M;

MCGINNIS, LINDA S; MILLER, MARY C; MITCHELL, TROY A; O'HARA, COLLEEN E; O'HARE, JUDITH C; PAVLICH, WILLIAM D;

POPEK, CHERYL A; PORTWOOD, MICHAEL S;REINICHE, JOHN; RIMSNIDER, SHAWNAE M; ROBINSON, KATHLEEN M; ROUNSAV-

ILLE, ROBERT; RYAN, PATRICE M; RYAN, VICKIE T; SCHROEDER, KRISTEN; SHANNON, ERIN; SKENTZOS, NORA C; SZOPINSKI JR,

MICHAEL

Non-Certified

$25,000 AND UNDER

ALVARADO, DEBORAH LEE; AMIN, IBRAHIM; ANDERSON, KATHERINE B; BARSZ, GAIL M; BENAITIS, KRISTIE L; BERGMARK,

DAVID BRUCE; BOBAK, JEANETTE MARY; BOWLING, THERESA ANN; BRAZZALE, JEREMY THOMAS; BRICKER, KAITLYN NICOLE;

BROWNLEY, THOMAS C; BUMBA-GARZA, KATHLEEN M; BURKE, DEBORAH L; BZDYK, YOLANDA; CAREY, DONNA L; CARPENTER,

NICOLA J;CARROLL JR, DAVID J;CHORD, SYLVIA J;CIARLETTE, ROBYN L;COPEN, ROGER A; COPHER, PAMELA T; CORCORAN,

SAMANTHA FRANCES; CRAPIA, JOSETTE A; CROWLEY, PAMELA SUE; Cruz, Jonathan Scott; CURRY, LINDA C; DECAIRE, JO ANNE;

DEMAURO, TAMMY E; DENARDO, JACOB MICHAEL; DOLAN, DEBRA L; DOMKE, DOUGLAS C; DONOFRIO, IRENE M;DYBAS, KARIN

L; EATON, ANTOINETTE T; ERICKSON, SYLVIA M; ERNST, NICHOLAS E; ERNST, PATRICIA A; FICEK, MARK E; FLYNN, ROBERT

PATRICK; FOJTIK, CHRISTOPHER LEE; FOODY, MARYBETH; FOSTER, JEAN M;FRANCIS, THERESE A; FRANZEN, DARLENE A;FU-

DALA, DONALD R; FULLER, CHRISTINA L;GALLAGHER, JACQUELINE LEE; GEORGIOU, LAURA J;GIERTUGA, KRISTA LIANE;

GIROUX, JOAN E; GIROUX, KEVIN JAMES; GIROUX, WILLIAM JOSEPH; GORCZAK, HELENA; HANSEN, CHERYL L; HARMATYS, MI-

CHELLE M; HARRIS, VICTORIA LYNN; HARRIS, VICTORIA RENA; HAUCK, SHERIE L;HEARNE, BRIDIE M; HENIFF, JOHN BUCKI;

HOFFMAN, MARY LYNN; HOLLAND, ANGELA BARBARA; HOLLE, JENNIFER ; HOULIHAN, EILEEN P; HOULIHAN, JACK WILLIAM;

HUBER, ALEXANDER CHARLES;J ASSEN, CHRISTINE; HUECKSTAEDT, JULIE M; JOHNSON, DAWN C; JOHNSON, LISA; JUDAY,

LISA KATHLEEN; KAPUSTA, STELLA A; KNIGHT, JAMES WAYNE; KOCOLOWSKI, DEBORAH JEAN; KOLACKI, EILEEN ;KOSIARA,

LAWRENCE A; KOSMOWSKI, CHRISTINE M; KOZIARSKI, SUSAN; KOZUBOWSKI, CRAIG THOMAS; KRENTKOWSKI, HEATHER

DAWN; KRUPA, BONNIE L; KRYL, JOAN J; KULA, SUSAN; KULAK, GENEVIEVE A;LA DUKE, CYNTHIA L; LAUCIELLO, DEBRA J;

LAVELLE, ERIN KRISTINE; LENNOX, MARY A; LEONARD, TERESE A;Andrew Joseph; LEWIS, DONNA M; LIPPOLD, KAREN L; LOCK-

WOOD, CHRISTOPH; LOPEZ, MARISA; LORANGER, MARY E; MALLO, GREGORY A; MASEN, MARCUM-CRUZ, CATHYANN; SCOTT A;

MAZUR, CHRISTINE S;MCCARTHY, ANGELA G; MCELROY, TERESA LYNN; MCMAHON, SHARON M;MICETIC, ANNE MARIE;

MILES, GENNENE L; MILLER, SHERRY L;MITCHEFF, TARI LEE; MOROZ, LAURIE D; MUDROCH, JEANNETTE; MURPHY, KATHRYN

ANN; NASSAR, SUZANNE M; NEGRETE, KATHLEEN M; NEYLON, CHERYL A; NIEMANN, GRETCHEN CATHERINE; NORVILLE,

KAREN L; NOVOTNEY-STARKEY, LAURIE LYNN; O'CALLAGHAN, CATHERINE MARIE; O'DWYER, MARY F;OLDENDORF, MARY

KAY; ONEIL, LISA DIANNE; ORLOWSKI, MARIA M; OSINSKI, GRACE; OSTERKORN, BARBARA A; OTREMBIAK, EDWARD STANLEY;

PAHL, ANNETTE MARIE; PANFIL, MONICA L; PARCHEM, DEBRA L; PARTHUN, KERRI LYNN; PAUKSTIS, SUSAN M; PAYNE, SHARON

L; PEDIGO, MARK W;PERSONS, CHRISTINE L;PLOGER, MARIAN C; POIA, TERRENCE W; POPADOWSKI, KAY A; POTEMPA, PAMELA

ANN; RASPOPOVICH, DONNA THERESA; REED, MARYELLEN W; REGO, THOMAS JOHN; REMIJAS, MARY H; RINGBAUER, MARGA-

RET R; RIORDAN, PATRICIA MARIE; RISUM, MICHAEL A; ROBINSON, JACQUELYNN JANE; ROGOWSKI, KASIE F; RUCKMAN, JAKE

THOMAS; RUZELLA, PHYLLIS G; RYAN, COLLETTE M; RYAN, KELLY MARIE; SARTORI, KATHLEEN A; SCHOENBECK, CANDACE A;

SERPE, SAMANTHA ELIZABETH; SERPICO, LOUISE A; SICHAK, ERIN L; SISTO, KATHERINE; SIDES, JANET L;SIGEL, CHRISTOPHER

FITZGERALD; SIMS, KEVIN; SMIETANSKI, VICTORIA ELIZABETH; SREDIN, PAIGE LEIGH; STACHLER, JOSEPH T; STAI, DYLAN JO-

SEPH; Stanford, Mark A; STANFORD, MATTHEW DANIEL; STAPLETON, VIVIENNE STEVENS, SUSAN; SUERTH, JESSICA ANN; SULICH,

TERESA ANN; SULLIVAN, MARY P; SUMNLER, KATHRYN AGNE; SZAFRAN, TRACY L;TARGOSZ, JOSEPH M; TARWATER, DONNA

M; TAVEGGIA, DEBRA M;TRAINOR-MALEC, JUDITH TUCKER, JANE C; TYRRELL, LOIS B; VANBEVEREN, CINDY M; WALLACE,

BRENDAN C; WALLACE, SEAN JAMES; WEBER, PATRICIA A; WENTZ, LISA K; WESTRA, DOREEN; WHEELER, HELEN; WINISTORFER,

JULIEANNF; WROBEL, GENNA; YAEGER, KEITH E; YOUNG, JUDY

$25,001 - $39,999

ANDRULIS, JULIE M; ANTANAITIS, ANNE; BARKER, PENNY L; BARTON, THERESE J;BERNAT, BOGUSLAWA; BICISTE, LAURA A;

BUMBA, PATRICIA A; CARBERRY, ROBIN A; CARLSON, CARRIE ;COBBETT, BENJAMIN; COSTA, CAROLE J; CREEDON, LORAINE M;

CZARNIK, MALGORZATA B; DAGGETT, DORIS GAIL; DELGADO, FRANK J; DUDA, ZOFIA; FERRIN, CHERYL A; GALVIN, DEIRDRE

GAZTAMBIDE, BIANET; GUTKA, DENNIS E; HALL, HOLLY; HILLER, SUSAN M; HINE, BEVERLY; HOINACKI, KIMBERLY A; HOIN-

ACKI, SAMUEL MATTHEW; HULL, EVA; KADOW, TINA A; KAGIANAS, MARIA N; KANE, ANNETTE K; KEPPNER, DONNA C;

KONIEWICZ, CATHERINE S; KORN, ALAN W; KORNAS, JANINA E; KOWALSKI, GREGORY A; KOZUBOWSKI, JANINE M; LARSON,

CHRISTI S; LEFKO, JOSEPH J; LOGSDON, BARBARA A; LOZANO, KAREN L; LUKASIK, DANIEL; LUKAS, MICHAEL STEVEN; MADO-

NIA, CHARLENE R; MAKA, HELEN; MALACINA, CYNTHIA M; MARCINIAK, LINDA S; MARTIN, PATRICIA A; MASON, DEBRA M;

MATTHIESEN, PATRICIA L;MCMASTER, KRISTINE M;MILLER, DEBRA A; MILLER, DIANA D; MORANDI, KATARINA; MUEL-

LERSCHOEN, JULIE C; MUELLERSCHOEN, WENDY S; MUSSAY, CARI A; MUSSELMAN, JOSEPHINE F; NICKEL, APRIL S; NICOSIA,

GLENNA F; PACKO, BETH A; PAVLICEK, FLORENCE C; PEARSON, SHARON L; PEDIGO, TOD WILLIAM; PIASECKI, CATHERINE R;

PILZ, AUDREY A; PIWOWAR, PAMELA; PLEBANEK, BONNIE L; PRIMOZIC, DEBRA R;PRATT, MARYANN; RACHAN, SHARON A;

ROBINSON, TINA M; ROE, EILEEN T; ROTH-DEAN, ALICE M; SCHWAB, KAREN I; SIMKO, JAMES J; SLONE, LYNDA R; SMITH, TIMO-

THY; STEVENS, KIMBERLY A; STEWART, JUDITH K; THOMPSON, MARSHA A; WATERMAN, PAMELA JOY; WEINRICK, MARIA;

WESSLING, VIRGINIA L; WOJOWSKI, DIANE M; WOLAK, JILL M; YAEGER, DENISE M; ZACK, KENNETH W; ZINK, KELLY

$40,000 - $59,999

BAIKIE, RAYMOND G; BARTLAGA, DONNA J; BIALON, CAROL J; BROM, DEBORAH LYNNE; BROWN, WALTER G; CAPADONA,

CAROL L;CARPENTER, JAMES E;CERDA, MARIO E; CILUFFO, CYNTHIA A; DENTON, CINDY A;DREWS, MICHAEL J; DUDA, VICTO-

RIA C;EMMEL, DONALD W;FIEDOR, JANE A; FLOUNDERS, PATRICIA L; FRICILONE, BARBARA A; HAEHNLEIN, MICHAEL A;

HAEHNLEIN, MICHAEL J; HORAZY-GAWEL, DOLORES; KACZMAREK, LINDA A; KOCANDA, TERESA M; KOCANDA, WILLIAM; KU-

LAK, PATRICIA JEAN; LAHEY, NANCY G; MURRAY, SABRINA R; NOVOTNY, RUSTY A;O'CONNOR, WILLIAM P; PECENIAK, MARY B;

POWERS, GLORIA; RICHARDSON, KAREN M; SAJDAK, MARYTHERESE R; SUTTON, JEANNE

$60,000 - $999,999

BAUD, BRIAN M; BRAUTIGAM, CHARLA R;COLBURN, JAMES S;CONRAD, JULIE K; ERNST, AUDREY; ESPOSITO, FRANK V; LAN-

GERT, LORRI A; NYE, JILL A;ORWAT, BEVERLY E; PATRICK, CYNTHIA M; SCHMIDT, RUSSELL C; SCHOPPE, CRAIG R; SIEFERT, AR-

LENE A; STUDHOLME, ANTOINETTE MARIE; TRELLA, DAVID H; WYSONG, GLEN

PAYMENTS OVER $2,500, EXCLUDING WAGES AND SALARIES

Homer Junior High PTO 2515; Scholastic, Inc. 2518.36; Stericycle, Inc. 2579.3; Fox Valley Fire & Safety Company 2581.4; Sarna, Rosalie 2637.65;

Advanced Fitness Designs, LLC 2655; Varitronics, LLC 2665.36; Van Cott and Associates, Ltd. 2677.5; Cintas Corporation #344 2682.84; Slager, Jim

2686.98; MARIE ICOZZIE 2721.42; Speed Bumps and Humps Company 2747.86; Simplex Grinnell 2759; Nasco 2766.28; MARY ELORANGER

2788.28; Staples Business Advantage 2791.61; New Lenox School Dist #22 2815; School Nurse Supply Inc. 2829.7; Safety-Kleen Systems, Inc.

2835.45; Panera Bread Catering 2874.5; Demco, Inc. 2988.55; Button, Joel 3000; JACQUELINE MARIE CLARKE-SIGEL 3000; Sertoma Speech and

Hearing Center 3037.5; Global Equipment Company 3109.42; Calloway House, Inc. 3181.07; DOROTA STASIK 3200; INSPEC 3200; Central Parts

Warehouse 3227.31; Acco Brands USA, LLC 3269.34; AMY ROSE MARZANO 3301.56; Falls Mechanical Insulation, Inc. 3320.46; Zimco, Inc.

3349.5; Elkins Joanne 3385.6; Teacher Direct 3389.77; Northern Illinois University 3400; Kelmscott Communications 3431.94; BROOKE REGINE

BINDER 3500; JACQUELINE NICOLE NIEMEYER 3500; Mary Biniewicz 3537.5; Lexia Learning Systems 3600; Linden Oaks Tutoring Services

3601.9; Digital Paper Solutions Inc. 3667; Brainpop, LLC 3710; Apple, Inc. 3740; BEPublishing 3775.22; CSC Learning 3850; Rifton Equipment

3866.25; Hapara Inc. 3960; Bureau Education &Research 3985; Gopher 3990.59; Ed Tech Team Inc. 4000; Kelly Hansen 4000; Will County Regional

Office of Educ 4035; Wunderlich Doors, Inc. 4058.2; SHARON L PAYNE 4071.48; Battery Service Corporation 4077.4; Homer Industries 4188.8;

Corvus Industries, Ltd. 4262; B&JTowing &Auto Repair, Inc. 4307.5; Schuch, Linda 4311.71; Chicago Backflow, Inc. 4323; Robert Crown Center

4450; Intergrity Fitness 4479.16; Ackland, Phillip 4500; AMY KSCHLUETER 4500; GINA M SUGGS 4500; JnR Safety Inc. 4503; ELIZABETH

MARY CREEK 4532.63; Raptor 4600; Parent Petroleum Inc. 4640; JEFF M WEATHERS 4655; JEFFREY C ANDERSON 4665.75; LAUREN E

SCHORSCH 4672.41; Standard Industrial & Auto Equipmen 4700.3; Lock and Key, LLC 4755; Telesolutions Consultants, LLC 4800; Williams Scotsman,

Inc. 4979.03; Cross Points Sales, Inc. 5040; Let's Talk 5040; Benefit Resource, Inc. 5041.5; Premier Agendas Inc. 5106.5; H-O-H- Water Technology

5245.26; CAROL LO'LEARY 5252.64; Richard ALesniak 5285; Decker, Inc. 5301.91; JUDY J YOUNG 5340.38; Helsel -Jepperson Electrical,

Inc. 5349.17; Speech Plus, P.C. 5374.25; Tria Architecture, Inc. 5375.8; William EYoung School 5495.22; O'Brien, Cynthia 5538.72; Wentworth Tire

5584.7; William V. MacGill &Company 5635.64; Handwriting Without Tears 5639.7; Transfinder 5700; Kristin Graham 5851.44; Don Johnston Inc.

5852; Bormet Company 5930; Synrevoice Technologies, Inc. 6004.35; Filewave Inc. 6048; Rush Truck Centers 6060.85; City of Lockport 6060.96;

Will County School District #92 6163.45; ABeep, LLC 6197.22; Commercial Electronic System 6350.52; Forcast 5Analytics Inc. 6500; Stephan L

Bild 6500; SureFire Auto Parts 6608.5; Trane US, Inc. 6826.34; Solution Tree 6900; R&GConsultants 7008.86; Neel, Darlene 7093.18; Scantron/Harland

Technology Service 7251.01; Plainfield CCSD #202 7260.17; IXL Subscriptions 7575; Lockport Twp HSDist #205 7924.66; Neuco Inc. 7983.4;

Body Builders Auro Body, Inc. 8031.5; DP Systems LLC 8141.8; Newsela 8300; Martino, Kathleen 8873.85; Southern Will County Co-op for Spec

8902; Discovery Education 8940; Thyssenkrupp Elevator Corporation 9117.88; Lakeshore Learning Materials 9134.72; Max interactive, Inc. 9200;

Waste Management 9623.76; Dupage Roe 9640.83; Healy, Bender &Associates, Inc. 9641.5; Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishin 9703.92; ISCORP

10068; Conserv FS 10234.28; Sports Huddle 10518.25; Jostens 10587.61; Menards 10669.25; Kid Sounds, LLC 10860; Really Good Stuff, Inc.

11888.83; Fleetsoft LLC 11910.22; Onhand Schools, Inc. 11970; IASB 12157.31; Scholastic, Inc. 12465.73; P&MNational Sales 12511.37; Easter

Seals Metro Chicago 12604.17; Airwatch, LLC. 12627; Hadley Activity Fund 13370; Success By Design, Inc. 13587.77; Will County Health Dept

13722; Sebert Landscaping 13860; Lazel 13945.5; Loyola Univ. Medical Center 14099; Homer District 33-C Support Staff C 14250.38; Mobile Air,

Inc. 14740; Consortium for Educational Change 14745; Frontlilne Technologies Inc. 15038.6; TSI Commercial Floor Covering 15349; Specialty Floors,

Inc. 15825; ITR Systmes 15965.4; Meurer &Sons Plumbing Heat 16400.75; HPProducts 16409.13; Santillana USA Publishing Company, 16667.17;

Shl i 16 362 i hA i i d1 182 8 i l i 1806 h l Ad i C 18800 CO G 1886


homerhorizon.com Classifieds

the Homer Horizon | November 23, 2016 | 33

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Sell It 708.326.9170

Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It

DEADLINE -

Friday at 3pm

Automotive

$52

4 lines/

7 papers

Help Wanted

per line $13

4 lines/

7 papers

Real Estate

$50

7 lines/

7 papers

Merchandise

$30

4 lines/

7 papers

2703 Legal Notices

y g g p y

Scholastic, Inc. 16773.62; Homer Jr. High Activity Fund 17182.87; Timm Electric, Inc. 18065; HR Technology Advisors, LLC 18800; COTG 18865;

Carolina Biological Supply Company 19294.56; Polar Electro Inc. 19400; Whitt Law 20670.87; NCS Pearson Inc. 20854.5; Public Consulting Group

21129.6; Sight &Sound Innovations, Inc. 21813.5; Pike Systems, Inc. 21940.84; Active Internet Technologies, LLC 22000.01; Call One 23769.36;

Sonitrol Chicagoland West 24661; Project Leadership Associates 25833.87; Mulchy Pauritsch Salvador &Co Ltd 26000; Amplified IT 28612; Currie

Motors 30079.81; Solutions In Speech, P.C. 30239.25; School Specialty 32628.2; Martin Whalen Office Solutions, Inc 34040.31; Tremco/Weatherproofing

Technologies 34382.06; H&R Johnson Bros. Inc. 34705; Comcast 35109.66; Skyward, Inc. 35262; NWEA 35937.5; Frank Cooney Company

37453.5; Follett School Solutions, Inc. 39872.69; Trinity Services, Inc. 39905.2; Office Depot 41961.65; United Healthcare Insurance Company

45501.3; Harris School Solutions 51060.22; Midland Paper Company 51947; Robbins Schwartz Attorney At Law 53909.57; CDW Government, Inc.

61739.27; McGrath Office Equipment, Inc. 62435.52; PCS Industries 63250.11; Illinois American Water 71192.68; Anchor Mechanical, Inc. 73393.21;

Quest Management Services, Inc. 74068.13; IL Department of Employment Securit 75079.03; Proven Business Systems 75618.92; Teacher's Retirement

System 80342.74; Soaring Eagle Academy 84844.01; Southwest Cook County Cooperative 89885.11; Lockport Area Spec'l Ed Coop 97904.06;

McGraw Hill School Education Holdin 104454.01; The Hartford Group Benefits Divisio 110227.22; Al Warren Oil Company, Inc. 139227.66; Mesirow

Insurance Services Inc. 140827; Matthew Paving Inc. 146450; ComEd 181910.32; Dell U.S.A., L.P. 188750; Sentinel Technologies, Inc. 192554.4; The

Omni Group 193623; IL Counties Risk Mgmt Trust 199830; Elim Christian Services 219595.47; Chicago Heights Construction Compan 317164.98;

Preferred Meals System, Inc. 403951.82; Delta Dental of Illinois -ASC 446935.86; Lincoln-Way Area Special Education 517328.78; BMO Financial

Group 600197.38; Performance Services, Inc. 616661; Vanguard Energy Services, LLC 634706.46; Midwest Transit Equipment, Inc. 750761.44; Bank

of New York Mellon 3828069.38; Health Care Service Corporation 9171143.08

Want to

See Your

Business

in the

Classifieds?

Call

708-326-9170

for a FREE Sample

Ad and Quote!

BUY IT!

SELL IT!

FIND IT!

- IN THE -

CLASSIFIEDS

708.326.9170


34 | November 23, 2016 | The Homer Horizon homer glen

homerhorizon.com

Once a week is weak.

You don’t have to wait until the paper

arrives for your news.

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted · Garage Sales · Automotive

Real Estate · Rentals · Merchandise

Sell It 708.326.9170 | Fax It 708.326.9179

Charge It | DEADLINE - Friday at 3pm

Automotive

Real Estate

$52

4 lines/

7 papers Help Wanted

$50

7 lines/

7 papers Merchandise

FREE FREE FREE

$13

per line

4 lines/

7 papers

$30

4 lines/

7 papers

CLASSIFIED MERCHANDISE ADS!!!

In this tough economy, we'll give you a free

merchandise adtotaling $100 or less.

· Write your FREE ad in 30 words or less.

· One free ad per week.

· Same ad may not be submitted more than 3 times.

· The total selling price of your ad must not exceed $100.

· Ads will be published on a space available basis.

· Free Ads are Not Guaranteed to Run!

GUARANTEE Your Merchandise Ad To Run!

Ad Copy Here (please print):

$30 for 7 Papers

Free Merchandise Ad - All Seven Papers

Merchandise Pre-Paid Ad

$30! 4 lines! 7 papers!

Join today to get all the news from your newspaper

as it happens—online anytime, anywhere.

Visit HomerHorizon.com/Plus

to become a member.

Name:

Address

City/State/Zip

Phone

Payment Method(paid ads only) Check enclosed Money Order Credit Card

Credit Card Orders Only

Credit Card #

Signature

®

Exp Date

Circle One:

Please cut this form out and mail or fax it back to us at:

22nd Century Media

11516 W. 183rd St, Suite #3 Unit SW

Orland Park, IL 60467

Brought to you by THE HOMER HORIZON

FAX: 708.326.9179


homerhorizon.com SPORTS

the Homer Horizon | November 23, 2016 | 35

Wrestling

Lockport envisions state title

with talented, veteran group

Randy Whalen

Freelance Reporter

When Lockport Township

senior Abdullah Assaf

wakes up in the morning, he

is greeted by a message.

“I wake up everyday to a

poster that says ‘state champion,’”

Assaf said. “We’re

going for it all this year.

We’re working for the state

title.”

The Porters squad that is

working toward a state title

is the wrestling team. With

nearly everyone back from

last season’s Class 3A thirdplace

team which went 24-5,

it is an achievable goal.

“Every year, we are trying

to win a state title,” Lockport

coach Josh Oster said. “But

knowing what we have coming

back, this is the year that

we’ve been looking forward

to for quite awhile. We only

lost one person from last year

[Oster’s younger brother,

Shayne, who placed second

at 145 pounds and is now

wrestling at Northwestern

University], so we have 20-

plus guys that have varsity

wins back.

“The work ethic is there,

the talent is there. We’re just

looking for everything to fall

into place. We’re in that position.

We have to do everything

we can to prepare for

it.”

A key component to the

season will be to stay healthy.

There were situations with

that last season, but the Porters

regrouped the take third

in the state. That was their

second straight team trophy,

as they placed fourth in Class

3A in the 2014-2015 season.

There is already a health

setback, however. That is

Assaf, who suffered a partial

tear in the ligament of his

right thumb on the opening

day of practice Nov. 7. But

Assaf, who placed third at

113 pounds in 2015 and fifth

at 120 last season, does not

expect to miss much time in

his quest to also win an individual

title this season.

“I’ll only miss a few

meets,” said Assaf, who will

wrestle at 126 or 132 this

season. “I should be back by

Dec. 1. I’d rather get healthy

for the rest of the season.

We’re ready to make a deep

run this season.”

Trevell Timmons was one

of the Porters who battled

injuries last season. He fractured

his left elbow and

missed about half the season.

He came back to make it to

state in the individual tournament.

But there he suffered a

dislocated left shoulder in the

semifinals at 152 pounds and

placed sixth. The year before,

he finished fifth at the same

weight.

“It’s the same thing as last

year; we just have to make

sure we’re not injured,” said

Timmons, who is expected to

wrestle at 160 pounds as a senior

this season. “But I don’t

get nervous anymore. I just

wrestle.

“This should be the best

team we’ve had, and we want

to go for the title. We just

have to keep our minds focused,

and we could have it.”

In all, the Porters return 20

of 21 from their dual team

state roster. Assaf and Timmons

were the two individual

state placers, but the group

had five state Class 3A state

qualifiers and also five individuals

that placed in Akron

or Fargo National Tournaments

this past summer.

The other top individuals

that will be looked to this

season are sophomore Matt

Ramos (106), sophomore

Anthony Molton (113/120),

senior Brandon Ramos (126),

who is a three-time state qualifier,

sophomore Baylor Fernandes

(145), a state qualifier

last season, and sophomore

heavyweight Ronald Tucker,

who had a 47-7 record and

was a also a state qualifier

last season.

A senior who did not qualify

for state last season is

Brendan Ramsey, who will

be at 132 pounds this season.

He hopes to be one of the senior

leaders on the team this

campaign.

“I’ve got lofty goals

for myself and the team,”

Ramsey said. “We want to

win it all as a team, and I want

to make it to state as an individual.

We just have to keep

going, work hard and give it

our all. We’re just looking to

do damage and show that our

team is good.”

Brandon transferred to

Lockport from St. Laurence

before last season. He qualified

for state his first two

years at St. Laurence and also

last season for the Porters,

and he came to Lockport for

the opportunity to win a title.

“I’m here to win a state

championship,” he said. “I’m

hungry for more this year. We

need to be more of a unit, one

brotherhood for each other.

We just want to work everyday

to get better. We want to

go out with a bang.”

The Porters held their annual

Maroon and White

Night Nov. 16. They hoped

to open with a bang when the

dual meet schedule opened

on Tuesday, Nov. 22, with a

home meet against Yorkville.

The next day was scheduled

to bring a trip to West Aurora

for another 5:30 p.m. dual

meet.

Athlete of the Week

10 Questions

with Oliwia Wolek

Oliwia Wolek is a sophomore

at Lockport Township and a

member of the Porters girls

swimming team.

How did you start

swimming?

I started because of my

brother [eight years ago]. I

was always jealous that my

brother swam, so I followed

in his footsteps.

How does it feel making

it to the state meet

your first season at

LTHS and in America

since moving from

Poland?

I am very happy that it

happened. I wasn’t that confident

coming into the season,

but I am very excited.

What has been the

highlight of your season

so far?

My first meet here at

Lockport, because it was the

first time I swam the 200IM

[individual medley] here in

America. In Poland, they

have a long-course pool instead

of yards; it was very

different.

This Week In...

Lockport Township

High School Varsity

Athletics

Boys basketball

■Nov. ■ 23 at WJOL

Tournament at University of

St. Francis, 8:15 p.m.

■Nov. ■ 25 at WJOL

Tournament, University of St.

Francis, 7:45 p.m.

Was it a big adjustment

moving to America? Do

you miss anything about

Poland?

Yeah, it was a little bit of

an adjustment. No, I don’t

miss anything really.

Do you have any premeet

rituals?

I loosen up my muscles

and listen to music.

Have you learned

anything new from your

teammates?

[I have learned] English,

for sure. I learned to improved

my relay starts from

coach, [Grant] Ferkaluk.

What are some goals

you hope to achieve as

a swimmer?

I hope to get a scholarship

from swimming.

Do you play any other

sports?

I ride horses as a hobby.

I did it as a sport in Poland,

but now it’s more of a hobby,

as I don’t have the resources

to do it.

■Nov. ■ 26 at WJOL

Tournament, University of St.

Francis, TBD

Boys bowling

■Nov. ■ 25 at Cougar Invite,

Town and Country Lanes,

9 a.m.

■Nov. ■ 29 host Stagg at Strike

& Spare, 4:30 p.m.

Erin Redmond/

22nd Century Media

If you could meet any

celebrity who would it

be and why?

Michael Phelps because

he’s a swimmer, and he’s really

good.

What is your favorite

“American” food that

you have eaten so far?

[I like] Chinese food; orange

chicken.

This interview was conducted

through a Polish interpreter,

Matt Zalesko. Interview by Assistant

Editor Erin Redmond

Girls bowling

■Nov. ■ 26 at Rock Island Quad

■Nov. ■ 29 host Joliet West at

Strike & Spare, 4:30 p.m.

Boys wrestling

■Nov. ■ 23 at West Aurora,

5:30 p.m.

■Nov. ■ 26 at Minooka Quad,

9 a.m.


36 1 | | November 23, 23, 2016 | | The fraNkforT Homer Horizon sTaTioN sports

SPORTS

frankfortstation.com

homerhorizon.com

22nd Century Media chose the best football student-athletes based on coach

recommendations and player statistics in its seven-town southwest suburban coverage

area to place them on one super team — Team 22. The team is made up of studentathletes

from Lincoln-Way Central, LW East, LW West, Providence Catholic, Andrew,

Lockport Township, Tinley Park and Sandburg high schools. This is its offensive squad.

Compiled by 22nd Century Media staff

quarterback

running back

running back

wide receiver

Jake Arthur, senior, LW East

126-of-189 for 1,719 yards,

74 long, 18 touchdowns,

5 interceptions. A big-time

passer, Arthur also had 26

carries for 76 yards this

season, leading the Griffins

deep into the playoffs.

Tavares Moore, junior,

Lockport

1,284 rushing on 220

carries, 13 catches for 174

yards, 11 touchdowns total.

All-SWSC. A good blocker as

well as a runner, his best

game came against Lincoln-

Way Central when he rushed

for 175 yards on 33 carries.

Nigel Muhammad, senior,

LW East

878 yards on 147 carries,

65 long, 20 touchdowns.

All-SWSC. Muhammad

played a big part in the

passing/rushing combo

that made the Griffins’

offense difficult to slow all

season.

Matt Pollack, junior, LW

Central

968 yards on 52 catches,

10 touchdowns. All-SWSC.

With 56 rushes for 512

yards and 4 touchdowns

added to his receiving,

Pollack had more than

1,500 all-purpose yards as

the team MVP.

wide receiver

wide receiver

Offensive line

Offensive line

Jeremy Nelson, senior, LW

East

879 yards on 55 catches, 74

long, 10 touchdowns. Nelson

was one of two standout

targets for quarterback Jake

Arthur, racking up yards and

finding his way into the end

zone for the Griffins.

Nick Zelenika, senior, LW

East

685 yards on 64 catches,

42 long, 6 touchdowns.

All-SWSC. Zelenika was

the other big-time receiver

for the Griffins, helping

to keep the attention of

defenders split all season.

Nate Henry, senior, LW

West

All-SWSC. Henry proved

to be a big part of a line

that allowed the Warriors’

offense to work this

season.

Sam Diehl, senior, LW

East

All-SWSC. Diehl’s play was

key to the Griffins having a

big offensive attack, and

he played at an All-State

level all season.

Offensive line

BurNs PhoTograPhy

Offensive line

Offensive line

kicker

First team

Eric Hypke, senior, LW

Central

All-SWSC. An anchor for

the line at right tackle,

Hypke made way for

the team’s 2,500 yards

rushing.

George Kringas, senior,

Lockport

A two-year starter, he

was tenacious and

hard-working, despite

being undersized. He

contributed to the Porters’

ability to run the ball well.

All-SWSC.

Chris Toth, senior,

Sandburg

All-SWSC. The Eagles’

tackle only allowed 1 sack

and had 12 pancakes.

At 6-foot-7, 305 pounds,

he was a nightmare for

defensive linemen.

Ben Davis, senior, Lockport

17-of-19 extra points, 6-of-7

field goals. 1,138 yards

passing for 12 touchdowns.

All-SWSC. Hell of an arm;

hell of a leg. The Porters’

quarterback also punted

and kicked, excelling all

around.

second team

QB: Ryan Zientara, junior, Tinley

1,546 passing yards, 876 rushing yards,

15 touchdowns.

RB: Mitch Hosman, senior, LW Central

600 yards rushing, 8 touchdowns. All-

SWSC.

RB: Nico Muto, senior, LW Central

Missed half the games this season and still

made an impact.

WR: Jamare Parker, senior, Sandburg

867 yards on 55 catches, 7 touchdowns.

All-SWSC.

WR: Patrick Cooper, senior, Lockport

483 yards on 36 catches, 4 touchdowns.

All-SWSC.

WR: Nico Planeta, junior, Providence

340 yards on 21 catches for, 3

touchdowns.

OL: Mario Rodrigues, senior, LW Central

A major part of the Knights’ offense.

OL: Dan Heilbron, senior, Andrew

All-SWSC. One of the T-Bolts’ biggest

standouts.

OL: Jake Taylor, senior, LW East

As if the Griffins needed more great

linemen.

OL: Jake Buhe, junior, LW East

Another solid blocker on an impressive

line.

K: Eduardo Favela, junior, Providence

20-of-22 extra points, 3-of-5 field goals.

Honorable mentions

QB: Hunter Campbell, senior, LW Central;

Collin Friedsam, senior, Sandburg; Jared

Drake, senior, Providence; Max Shafer,

senior, LW East.

RB: Brendan Morrissey, junior, LW East;

Richie Warfield, senior, Providence; Austin

Hoffman, junior, Lockport.

WR: Dakota Kotowski, junior, Providence.

K: Karl Kosary Jr., senior, Andrew.


homerhorizon.com 2 | November 23, 2016 | The fraNkforT sTaTioN sports

SPORTS

the Homer Horizon | November frankfortstation.com

23, 2016 | 37

22nd Century Media chose the best football student-athletes based on coach

recommendations and player statistics in its seven-town southwest suburban coverage

area to place them on one super team — Team 22. The team features student-athletes

from Lincoln-Way Central, LW East, LW West, Providence Catholic, Andrew, Lockport

Township, Tinley Park and Sandburg high schools. This is the defensive squad.

Defensive Linemen

Devin O’Rourke, junior,

LW East

95 tackles (52 solo, 43

assists), 19 tackles for a

loss, 9 sacks, 1 safety, 1

fumble recovery. All-SWSC.

The defensive end played

at an All-State level all

season long.

Kyle Julius, senior, LW East

43 tackles (27 solo, 16

assists), 9 tackles for a

loss, 5 sacks, 1 forced

fumble. All-SWSC. Always a

presence on a Friday night,

Julius was the type to rally

the troops.

Compiled by 22nd Century Media staff

Linebackers

BurNs PhoTograPhy

Peyton Nigro, junior, LW

Central

56 tackles, 7 interceptions,

1 return touchdown.

All-SWSC. A leader and

playmaker, also a defensive

back, he impressed all

season enough to make

every writer’s list.

Colin Dominski, junior,

Sandburg

74 tackles, 6 tackles for a

loss, 3 sacks, 1 defensive

touchdown. All-SWSC. The

powerhouse tackler also

made his presence known in

the backfield when blitzing

offenses.

Defensive backs

First team

Sean Reyna, senior, LW

Central

300-plus return yards, 200

yards offense rushing/

receiving, 25 tackles, 1

interception at corner. All-

SWSC. Also a running back

and returner, he excelled on

both sides of the ball, despite

limited touches on offense.

Sean Maloney, senior, LW

East

65 tackles (42 solo, 23

assists), 2 interceptions, 1

tackle for a loss, 1 forced

fumble, 1 fumble recovery.

All-SWSC. Maloney was key

to taking the ball away from

opponents this season.

second team

DL: Mike Murphy, senior, Sandburg

31 tackles, 7 sacks, 3 tackles for loss, 2

caused fumbles, 2 recovered fumbles.

All-SWSC.

DL: Kevin Marmo, senior, Providence

18 tackles, 5 sacks, 5 hurries, 2 passes

deflected, 1 forced fumble.

DL: Alex Bowler, senior, Providence

19 tackles, 1 interception.

DL: Trevor Schmidt, senior, LW West

All-SWSC.

LB: Nick Degregorio, junior, LW Central

94 tackles, 6 tackles for a loss, 5 sacks.

All-SWSC.

LB: Billy Bailey, senior, Tinley

87 tackles, 7 tackles for a loss, 2 blocked

kicks, 1 interception. All-SWSC.

LB: Kevin O’Boyle, senior, Providence

79 tackles, 2 sacks, 1 fumble recovery.

All-CCL.

LB: Chris Kaminski, senior, Providence

43 tackles, 3 sacks, 2 hurries.

Josh Baker, senior,

Lockport

10 tackles for loss, 7

QB hurries, 5.5 sacks, 3

caused fumbles, 2 fumble

recoveries. A two-year

starter for the Porters,

this defensive end gave

quarterbacks headaches.

Blake Evans, senior, LW

West

60 total (15 solo, 45

assists), 7 sacks. All-SWSC.

The inside linebacker was

a crucial member of the

Warriors’ defensive unit this

season, making big tackles

on both sides of the line.

Jamie Marines, junior,

Sandburg

64 tackles, 1 forced fumble,

1 recovered fumble, 1

interception, 1 blocked

punt. All-SWSC. Safety

Jamie Marines put up big

tackle numbers alongside

takeaways at important

times for the Eagles.

DB: Gaosh Williams, senior, Providence

23 tackles, 6 passes knocked down, 1

forced fumble, 1 fumble recovery. 1 kickoff

return for TD. All-CCL.

DB: Colton Pedersen, senior, LW East

2 interceptions, 1 returned for a

touchdown.

DB: Ricky Kwak, junior, Sandburg

38 tackles, 4 interceptions, 1 returned for

a touchdown.

BurNs PhoTograPhy

Mike Cepolski, senior, LW

Central

55 tackles, 10 tackles

for a loss, 7 sacks,

3 interceptions, 1

touchdown. All-SWSC.

The Knights’ captain

specializes in pushing

offenses back but also had

several picks.

Trey Telez, senior, LW West

54 total (25 solo, 29

assists), 7 sacks, 2

touchdowns. All-SWSC.

Also a defensive end, this

outside linebacker found his

way into the end zone twice

this season. He kept many

others out of it.

Honorable mentions

DL: Ameer Aqel, sophomore, Andrew.

LB: Danny Allen, senior, LW West; Brett

Stegmueller, senior, LW East; Michael

Mata, senior, Lockport; Jake Price, junior,

LW West; Patrick Brucki, senior, Sandburg.

DB: Brian Gebert, senior, Andrew; Eric

Jungheim, senior, Lockport.


38 | November 23, 2016 | The Homer Horizon SPORTS

homerhorizon.com

Merk medals as Porters show mettle at state meet

Max Lapthorne, Contributing

Editor

Lockport freshman phenom

Lindsey Merk added

the first of what figures to be

many medals to her trophy

case this past weekend.

Merk finished third overall

in the 100-meter butterfly

Saturday, Nov. 19, at the

IHSA State Swimming and

Diving Finals in Evanston.

Her time of 55.56 in the finals

bested her preliminary

time, but it fell just short of

her seed time of 55.52.

Ending on the podium in

her first high school season

was a success for Merk.

“I just wanted to make

Top 6,” she said. “I just

wanted to come into this and

do what I do — come out

and do my best and do what

I had to do.”

Merk finished with the

best qualifying time in the

state in the 100 fly, so there

were high expectations for

her coming into the state finals,

despite her age.

“There was a lot of pressure

coming it and doing

what I had to do,” Merk

said. “The atmosphere was

crazy and [was] not something

I had experienced before.”

Even before she stepped

Lockport Jr. Porters

best in the state

Submitted by Lockport Jr.

RePorters

Oliwia Wolek takes part in the 200 individual medley, in

which she finished 36th overall for the Porters.

foot on campus at LTHS,

people around the program

knew she would accomplish

great things; it was just a

matter of her putting in the

work and executing when

the time came.

“I know last year a lot of

people were telling me I was

going to do well in state, but

my goal was to make Top 6,

and I ended up Top 3, so I’m

happy with how everything

went,” Merk said.

Merk also competed in the

100-yard backstroke where

she narrowly missed out on

qualifying for the finals by

finishing in 15th place with

The Lockport Jr. Porters Jr.

Pee Wee football team took

first place in the Chicagoland

Pop Warner state finals Nov. 5

at St. Francis High School in

Wheaton.

The Jr. Pee Wee football

players beat the Oswego

Bears in a hard-fought

game in double overtime

with a score of 7-6 and were

crowned state champions in

their division. The football

team advanced to play in the

regional finals held Saturday,

Nov. 19, in Michigan City,

Indiana.

Lockport’s Lindsey Merk competes in the 100-yard backstroke Friday, Nov. 18, at the IHSA

State Swimming and Diving Finals in Evanston. Photos by Carlos Alvarez/22nd Century

Media

a time of 1:38.17. But the

100 fly is the event Merk has

been focused on for a long

time.

“I’ve been pretty much a

flyer my entire life, and it’s

something I want to do, so

I went for it and wanted to

make it happen,” she said.

In the 200 freestyle relay,

seniors Brittney O’Neill,

Makayla Kraus, Lauren Estes

and sophomore Emily

Johnson finished 21 out of a

possible 36 with an overall

time of 1:38.17, three-tenths

of a second faster than their

seed time.

“That was three of our seniors,

this was that their last

meet, so getting them to go

faster was fantastic,” Lockport

coach Grant Ferkaluk

said.

The Porters’ 200 medley

relay team of O’Neill,

Oliwia Wolek, Merk and

Lauren Estes teamed up to

finish in 25th place with a

time of 1:49.67, which was

just off their seed time of

1:48.75. While the 400 free

relay team of Merk, Wolek,

Johnson and Estes finished

in 3:35.99, almost the same

as their seed time, which

earned them 22nd place.

Johnson and Wolek also

competed in individual

events, with Johnson taking

31st in the 200-yard

freestyle with a time of

1:56.97, and Wolek finishing

36th overall in the 200

individual medley with a

time of 2:11.37. Wolek also

competed alongside Merk in

the 100 fly, putting up a time

of 58.16 in the prelims, good

for 29th place.

Additional reporting by

Micheal Wojtychiw, Contributing

Editor, and Brittany Kapa,

Assistant Editor.

LEFT: The

Lockport

Jr. Porters

Pee Wee

football team

celebrates

Nov. 5 after its

victory in the

Chicagoland

Pop Warner

state finals

at St. Francis

High School

in Wheaton.

Photo

submitted


homerhorizon.com SPORTS

the Homer Horizon | November 23, 2016 | 39

fastbreak

1st and 3

Julie McMann/

22nd Century Media

Lockport girls

basketball

succumbs to defeat

in first game

1. Hitting the hardwood

The LTHS girls

basketball team

started its campaign

with a 65-46 loss to

Lincoln-Way West

Nov. 15 in New Lenox.

The Warriors had a

12-0 fourth-quarter

run in the win.

2. Missing a key youth

The Porters played

their first game

without heralded

freshman Treasure

Thompson, who is

listed at 6-foot-3.

3. Leading ladies

Junior Taylor Hopkins

took charge for

Lockport with 12

points, while senior

Elena Wolfe scored

11 points. Junior

Destiny Davis tallied 9

points in the opener.

Girls Basketball

Lincoln-Way West cruises past Porters on opening night

LTHS struggles on

court without top

freshman in lineup

Frank Gogola

Freelance Reporter

Taylor Gugliuzza helped

Lincoln-Way West blow out

Lockport before blowing out

the candles.

The freshman guard celebrated

her 15th birthday

with an all-around performance

in the Warriors’ season-opening

65-46 win over

the Porters Nov. 15 in New

Lenox. She was one of three

Warriors who scored in double

figures as West overcame

the loss of four-year starter

Emily Atsinger to an injury.

Gugliuzza set the bar high

with 12 points, eight steals,

six assists and two blocks in

her first high school game.

She said she was nervous in

the opening minutes playing

against upperclassmen. Add

to that, Atsinger left with an

injury with 26.4 seconds left

in the first quarter and West

up 22-17.

“That was devastating

because she’s big part of

this team,” Gugliuzza said.

“I feel like in the beginning

we were shocked and scared

because she’s our leader, and

she was down. Eventually,

we adjusted to it and picked

ourselves up.”

Gugliuzza was part of a

10-0 run in the second quarter

without Atsinger. In one

series, she stole the ball, ran

Lockport’s Hailey Ledbetter (left) fights for a loose ball with Lincoln-Way West’s Taylor

Gugliuzza Nov. 15 during the loss to the Warriors in New Lenox.

Julie McMann/22nd Century Media

the court and assisted on a

basket. Later in the quarter,

she stole the ball, led a

fast break and faked a pass,

which turned around the defender,

before laying in the

ball.

Lockport played without

touted freshman Treasure

Thompson, who is listed at

6-foot-3. Kelly said she sat

out because of “a program

reason” but expects her to

play “hopefully very soon.”

After the game, Kucharski

went over to the West bench

and consoled Atsinger, who

did not return to the game after

her injury. White was not

sure yet of the severity of her

ankle injury.

West coach Ryan White

said the coaching staff knew

what it was getting in the girl

who played in a recreational

league from kindergarten to

second grade and with the

Lincoln-Way Explosion,

a travel team, from thirdthrough-eighth

grade.

Gugliuzza is the lone

new starter for West, which

went 20-7 and lost in a 3A

regional final last season.

The Warriors return Atsinger

(15.6 points per game), senior

Courtney O’Donnell

(15.6 ppg, 7.4 rebounds per

game), senior guard Stephanie

Athanasoulis (8.5 ppg,

team-high 55 3-pointers)

and sophomore Tara Hastings

(7.4 ppg).

“We told the girls this is a

smart, skilled, quality basketball

team,” said Lockport

coach Dan Kelly.

O’Donnell dominated

down low, as she scored

21 points and 12 rebounds,

scoring six as part of a 12-0

fourth-quarter run to go up 60-

41. Hastings totaled 14 points,

and Athanasoulis added six

points and five rebounds.

Atsinger scored eight before

injuring her right ankle

when she landed from a

pull-up shot in the lane after

stealing the ball.

Junior Taylor Hopkins

paced Lockport with 12

points. Senior Elena Wolfe

and junior Destiny Davis

added 11 and 9 points. Senior

Laurel Kucharski, who

led last year’s team with

11.1 points and 6.4 rebounds

per game, was limited to two

points and seven rebounds.

In a postgame huddle, the

team sang “Happy Birthday”

to Gugliuzza. She brought

cupcakes for the team and

got a present of candy, Nike

clothes and socks from fellow

freshman Sydney Swanberg,

who played travel ball

with Gugliuzza.

In addition to Gugliuzza

and Swanberg, West’s roster

features eight others who

did not start last year, are

new to varsity or transferred

from Lincoln-Way Central:

senior Elayna Cheney and

juniors Katie Honan, Sara

Swanberg, Raquel Chavez,

Hannah Barry, Abby Steele,

Alanna Ledvina and Shannon

Bencsik.

Sydney Swanberg and

Honan were the first two

off the bench after the injury.

White learned about his

team as the bench got more

minutes than expected, but

he sees need for improvement

with four starters at

5-foot-7 or shorter.

“With as small as we are,

we have to figure out ways

to generate more shots because

we’re probably going

to get outrebounded,” White

said. “If we can turn that

over through turnovers and

3-point shooting, hopefully

that’s an equalizer.

“... If nothing else, they

should be fun to watch going

up and down [the court on

the fast break].”

LISTEN UP

“I wake up everyday to a poster that says ‘state

champion.’ We’re going for it all this year. We’re

working for the state title.”

Abdullah Assaf — Lockport Township senior wrestler, on the lofty expectations

his team has for the season

Tune In

Wrestling

Meeting the mats — 5:30 p.m. Wednesday,

Nov. 23, at West Aurora

• The Porters hit the road for their second

dual meet of the season, looking to get off

to a fast start.

Index

35 - Athlete of the Week

35 - This Week In

FASTBREAK is compiled by Editor Thomas Czaja, tom@

homerhorizon.com.


homer glen’s Hometown Newspaper | www.homerhorizon.com | November 23, 2016

Starting hoops Lockport girls

basketball team drops season opener to

Warriors in New Lenox, Page 39

Grappling for a

championship LTHS wrestling squad has

big goals following recent successes, Page 35

Lockport girls swimming partakes in state meet in Evanston, Page 38

Lockport’s Lindsey Merk makes her way through the 100-meter butterfly Friday, Nov. 18, at the IHSA State Swimming and Diving Finals in Evanston. She would finish third overall

in the event. Carlos Alvarez/22nd Century Media

BENEFITTING FAMILIES BATTLING CANCER

HEADLINING:

SUPPORTING ACTS: MIKE & JOE, INFINITY, SEAN & CHARLIE, AND JOEY DIGS & THE DENTIST

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2 ND

115 BOURBON STREET

MERRIONETTE PARK, IL

WWW.WEISHFEST.COM

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines