IN THIS ISSUE…

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AL%20FALL%202016%20FINAL

The Newsletter of the

National Association of Addiction

Treatment Providers

Volume 1 | Issue 2 Fall 2016

IN THIS ISSUE…

Assessing Our Field’s

Trajectory

Advancing Our Work

Through Data Analysis

NAATP Parity Advocacy

in Washington, DC

Maximize Your NAATP

Membership

Surgeon General Issues

Landmark Addiction Report

NAATP National 2017

in Austin, Texas


Is the quarterly newsletter of the

National Association of Addiction

Treatment Providers (NAATP).

NAATP is a professional

membership society of addiction

service providers and supporters.

EDITOR

MARVIN VENTRELL

PUBLICATIONS CHAIR

RAYMOND TAMASI

Gosnold on Cape Cod

NAATP

1120 Lincoln Street

Suite 1303

Denver, CO 80203

naatp.org

info@naatp.org

888.574.1008

MISSION

To provide leadership, advocacy,

training, and member support services

to assure the availability and highest

quality of addiction treatment.

NAATP EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

CARL KESTER, Chair

Lakeside-Milam Recovery Centers

ART VANDIVIER, Vice Chair

La Hacienda Treatment Center

JOHN DRISCOLL, Treasurer

Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation

ROBERT FERGUSON, Secretary

Jaywalker Lodge

KERMIT DAHLEN, Past Chair

Jackson Recovery Centers

NAATP EXECUTIVE STAFF

MARVIN VENTRELL

Executive Director

KATIE STRAND

Director of Operations

TIFFANY RODE

Program Coordinator

MARK DUNN

Public Policy Director

JESSICA SWAN

Outcomes & Surveys Manager

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Executive Director’s Message

Assessing Our Trajectory 3

Board Chair Column

An Association Poised for Progress 8

Ethics Program Activity

Protecting Our Brands 10

Outcomes & Measurements

Advancing Our Field Through Data

Collection, Analysis, and Distribution 12

NAATP Public Policy Advocacy

Your Voice on the Hill: Parity Progress 14

Member Updates

Maximize Your NAATP

Membership Benefits 17

NATP News

The Surgeon General’s

Addiction Report 20

NAATP National 2017

The 39th Annual National

Addiction Leadership Conference 23

2


EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR’S COLUMN

So long as we trace the development from its outcome

backwards, the chain of events appears continuous and

we feel that we have gained an insight…

— Sigmund Freud

ASSESSING OUR

TRAJECTORY

The Freud quotation is a portion of a statement he made relative

BY MARVIN VENTRELL

NAATP Executive Director

to the study of human development in 1920. It describes the

difficulty of knowing where we find ourselves on a path of progress,

or whether we are even on a path of progress, before we know

the outcome from the other side. While observing a chain of

events, or moreover while participating in a chain of events,

it is a considerable challenge to appreciate the trajectory of

our progress.

3


ASSESSING OUR TRAJECTORY

The Freud statement is quoted in the seminal 1983

text, “The Natural History of Alcoholism” 1 , in which

researcher George Vaillant reports the outcomes

of the famous Harvard Cohort Study, one of the

most important studies of addiction, if not human

development, ever conducted. The value of the

study lies largely in its breadth and longevity. It is

a longitudinal study of adult development and life

satisfaction conducted through Harvard Medical

School over a period of more than 75 years. Parts

of the study continue to this day, and through it,

we can appreciate the trajectory of peoples’ health

because we have the perspective Freud referenced:

the passage of time and the opportunity to look

backward.

The study involved 268 healthy Harvard college

sophomores from the classes of 1939–1944 (not the

least of whom was President John F. Kennedy) and

it ran in tandem with a study that included a second

cohort of 456 disadvantaged inner-city youth who

grew up in Boston between 1940 and 1945. Data

were collected about mental and physical health,

career enjoyment, retirement experience, and

marital quality. The goal of the study was to identify

predictors of healthy aging, and what emerged

through the data collection was an entire subset of

subjects with alcoholism. From this subset, Vaillant

provided the most comprehensive findings to date

on alcoholism and recovery.

KEY FINDINGS FROM THE STUDY INCLUDE

• Alcoholism is a disorder of great destructive

power in peoples’ lives

• Alcoholism was the main cause of divorce for the

subjects

• Alcoholism strongly correlates with neurosis and

depression, which tended to follow alcohol abuse,

rather than to precede it

• Together with cigarette smoking, alcoholism was

the single greatest contributor to early morbidity

• Achieving long-term sobriety usually involves

a less harmful substitute dependency, new

relationships, sources of inspiration and hope,

and experiencing negative consequences of

drinking.

Beyond specific findings regarding alcoholism

causes and paths to recovery, the study made

fascinating connections about more general life

quality as it correlates to alcoholism.

The author’s main conclusion is that the quality

and warmth of relationships throughout life have

the greatest positive impact on life satisfaction,

happiness, and what is frequently seen as

success. While the study in no way discounts the

neurobiological component of alcoholism, in the

final analysis, the environment, the “psycho-socialspiritual”

pieces, proved to be enormous indicators

of addiction cause and recovery.

While the study in no way discounts the

neurobiological component of alcoholism,

in the final analysis, the environment,

the “psycho-social-spiritual” pieces, proved

to be enormous indicators of addiction

cause and recovery.

1 The Natural History of Alcoholism: Causes, Patterns, and Paths to Recovery,

By George E. Vaillant, Harvard University Press, ©1983.

4


ASSESSING OUR TRAJECTORY

Additionally, and critically important to our

understanding of the trajectory of our progress,

the study showed that correlating interventions

to successful outcomes is in fact time relevant

and not an absolute, once-and-for-all matter. As

an example, a shy and anxious child will indeed

struggle to thrive in adolescence, but the condition

becomes a less relevant predictor of welfare as

the child matures. By the time he is a mature adult,

the condition virtually disappears as a predictor

of health and happiness. A 15-year study would

not have revealed that information.

Our field is in now in a period of rapid

development. We are making considerable strides

in understanding the neurobiology of addiction,

and we are developing treatment practices around

that improved understanding. At NAATP, we

are engaged in a rigorous and comprehensive

treatment outcomes study, The OPP, which will

measure our efficacy under several integrated

treatment models from nine separate NAATP

Provider Member campuses.

Much of the growth and change is a response

to the emergency condition of opioid addiction

that seems to lend itself particularly well to

Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) in the form

of longer term medication protocols. Meanwhile,

alcohol addiction continues to be the most

prevalent destructive substance.

SO HOW ARE WE DOING?

WHAT IS OUR TRAJECTORY?

We know more about treating addiction than we

ever have. From the perspective of neuroscience

to psychology, and the social and spiritual

components of care, we have a wealth of

experience and evidence-based practice to offer

our patients. We recognize that recovery from

a chronic disease occurs on a lifelong continuum

of services and patient self-care, although we still

get stuck in episodic “calendar care” at times.

We recognize that recovery from a chronic

disease occurs on a lifelong continuum

of services and patient self-care, although

we still get stuck in episodic “calendar care”

at times.

We have lifesaving medications and medications

that can place a patient on a path to recovery,

although we may not know how to keep them on

the path or get them off the medications when they

are no longer indicated.

The stigma of addiction as a moral failing rather

than a disease is lessening considerably although

it still exists. It remains difficult to perceive a

brain disease with behavioral components as a

real disease. One of the great by-products of

neurobiological advances in addiction is that the

research gives us solid disease evidence.

One of the great by-products of

neurobiological advances in addiction is that

the research gives us solid disease evidence.

5


ASSESSING OUR TRAJECTORY

One of the outcomes of the opioid crisis within

middle class America is that it caused the

public, press, and policymakers to respond,

and the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery

Act (CARA) was passed by bipartisan support.

It is not adequately funded, yet.

The just-released report of the U.S. Surgeon

General is no small matter. Not only is it the firstever

report on addiction by a U.S. Surgeon General,

it also is significant evidence of progress toward

de-stigmatization, treatment of addiction as a

health care matter, and providing the best care for

the most people.

Service delivery remains highly problematic and

here our trajectory is quite unclear. Where 21

million people suffer from a disease and only 10%

receive the care they need, we are not doing our

job. It is certainly hopeful that 25 million people

identify as “in recovery” from addiction. 2

Where 21 million people suffer from a disease

and only 10% receive the care they need, we

are not doing our job. It is certainly hopeful

that 25 million people identify as “in recovery”

from addiction.

Which bring us to money. The inclusion of

addiction as an essential health care benefit in the

Affordable Care Act (ACA), and the connection

of the benefit to parity law through the Mental

Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act (MHPAEA),

create a tremendous potential for addiction care for

these millions who do not receive care. We know

that potential is far from realized but we have seen

progress, particularly through the recent White

House Parity Task Force Report 3 . It remains to be

seen to what extent this progress will continue.

Seventy-five years from now we will know just

how well we did in terms of developing treatment

responses during this critical period. In the

meantime, we must, as leaders in the field, assess

the wisdom of our trajectory and make good

decisions about treatment service delivery and

program best practices. In doing so, we would

do well to recall some of the lessons of history

provided by the Harvard Cohort Study.

First, we should function with a large measure of

humility. The Harvard Cohort data surprised some

very smart researchers with information they did

not know. Within each of our compartments along

the continuum of care and within our respective

disciplines, we frequently fail to recognize what we

do not know. Our perspective 4 can be narrow. What

we believe has worked well for many of our patients

has not always been well measured over time and

may not be a recovery fit for a new kind of patient.

It can also be very hard for a researcher who has

not seen human transformation from sick to well

though the application of psycho-social-spiritual

care to understand it and believe it.

Next, we should remember that environmental

factors, the social and spiritual components of

treatment, are key predictors of sobriety and

wellness and are not mere footnotes to medication.

This is true for all patients, including the young

opiate patient. Our development of improved

treatment modalities must continue to be

multidimensional.

2 Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol,

Drugs, and Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services,

November 2016. naatp.org/resources/news/surgeon-general-issueslandmark-addiction-report/nov-17-2016.

3 The Mental Health and Substance Use Parity Task Force Final

Report,October 2016. naatp.org/advocacy/public-policy/white-house-paritytask-force-releases-recommendations/oct-27-2016.

4 AA co-founder Bill Wilson frequently used the words humility and

perspective interchangeably in his writings compiled in “The Language

of the Heart.” The AA Grapevine, Inc. ©1992.

6


ASSESSING OUR TRAJECTORY

Last, let’s be mindful that success is best

measured along a continuum that values

early results, but continues to measure for

the long term. The outcomes are not always

the same. The quality of life in recovery

looks much different at the six-month mark

than it does at six or sixty years.

We must also play the long game in terms of

treatment center operational and business practices.

Progress brings new players to the field and not

all of them are well-informed, skilled, or wellintentioned.

Many NAATP members have been

with NAATP from our beginning in 1978 and were

delivering treatment long before that. They know

about opportunists coming to the profession

motivated by personal profit.

We have seen this before but it is particularly

prevalent now, ironically as a by-product of the

de-stigmatization and funding we have sought.

And, some of their methods work, or at least

seem to generate business and profit in the short

term. The temptation is to join them. While it is

hard to play the long game when it appears you

are losing the short game, we need to be directed

by our core values. •

LOOKING BACKWARD IN 2091,

WE WILL KNOW HOW WELL WE DID.

7


FROM THE NAATP BOARD CHAIR

NAATP:

AN ASSOCIATION

POISED FOR PROGRESS

BY CARL KESTER

Chair, NAATP Board of Directors

Daily news headlines reveal we live in an uncertain and often

unhealthy world. As healthcare providers, we face a rapidly changing

environment, one that seems to simultaneously embrace and reject

what we know about the disease we treat. The National Association

of Addiction Treatment Providers can represent the best of who

we are: effective caring professionals can come together with the

objective of improving the access to and the quality of addiction care.

The impetus of our membership society is mutual assistance to reach

the addict who still suffers. As the environment continues to change,

we operate with the belief that our ability to collaborate is our best

chance to succeed.

8


NAATP: AN ASSOCIATION POISED FOR PROGRESS

Addiction ravages individuals and families

regardless of gender, race, religion, or other

differences. To be successful in our work, we

must see past individual differences and seek

to understand where our opportunities for

improvement are. Our opportunity for the greatest

impact lies in working together on what we have

in common in the treatment of the addiction and

helping to build a foundation for recovery. To

continue to be viable and effective, we must build

through mutual support and education with a focus

on continuing to evolve. As we consistently seek

improvement and evaluate our actions, we must be

flexible and adjust our plans as indicated.

NAATP has special professional staff in place now.

Led by our Executive Director, Marvin Ventrell, our

team is more effective than I have seen in my ten

years on the Board of Directors. Our organization

now has the infrastructure and resources to

lead. Our Fall Board meeting was not spent

discussing operations, but on identifying the road

ahead. Board members were freed up to work in

committees focused on the most pressing topics

of the day. Our work groups focused on ethics,

training and education, member communications

and resources, and public policy. It was inspiring

to see this group working toward solutions that will

benefit all our members and those we serve.

Quite plainly, we have some of our field’s most

effective leaders working on our organization’s

growth, rather than discussing who will answer the

phone. We have the resources to direct towards

growth and increasing our role in the conversation

of change. We have the team in place to improve

support and communications with our members.

I am confident the reorganization is on the right

path, with a viable strategic plan. My belief only

grows when I think of the individuals involved.

We will continue to act, evaluate our actions, and

revise our plans. Armed with an understanding of

the disease and a principle-centered approach to

patient care and business, we will remain viable

and effective. In an uncertain world, we will see a

new challenge every day. In the changing world of

healthcare, we will constantly face new challenges.

What I am most excited about is that we have a

secret weapon: our people. Policy, procedure, and

organizational design are building blocks

for success.

Fortunately, we have even more to offer. You, the

members, are the essential piece for us to achieve

excellence. I am so happy that we have this

opportunity together. When I seek peace in this

world, I know that I have my recovery and my family,

and that I am a member of a special group of people

who have united to care for those in need. •

9


ETHICS AND PROFESSIONALISM

NAATP’S ETHICS PROGRAM ACTIVITY

BY ART VANDIVIER

Chair, NAATP Ethics Committee

Ethics is a top priority at NAATP. It needs to be. Now is a time

to stress professional, ethical, and values-based practice. NAATP

and its members must lead by example.

In the past year, NAATP republished its Ethics Code, clarified its

Values Statement, inserted our values positions into our Strategic

Plan, and implemented a Complaints Policy & Procedure, where

members and the public can register concerns about addiction

service providers’ conduct. We are pleased with our progress as we

work together to promote not just best practices but best valuesbased

practices. I encourage all NAATP members to become familiar

with these NAATP ethics and professionalism resources on the

NAATP website at:

naatp.org/resources/addiction-treatment-provider-ethics

More recently, the NAATP Board of Directors held its Fall Meeting in

Denver and convened a special comprehensive work group session

on addiction services’ ethics and professionalism. We conducted an

inventory of our current efforts and asked ourselves: What more do

our members need?

Treatment program “brand protection” rose to the top of our list.

How does a treatment center protect its brand from unauthorized

use and damage? Providing technical assistance on this issue is our

next project, and we will keep our members posted as we develop

recommendations.

We know that most providers, certainly most NAATP members,

are values-based, ethical agencies who place the welfare of their

patients and clients first. We also know that the few bad actors that

do not adhere to our standards hurt us all. While NAATP cannot

police our industry, nor fix the entire problem, we believe we have

an important role to play and one that will make a difference.

For that to happen, we need you, our members, to not only adhere

to our standards and indicate that you do so, we need you to report

matters of concern to us.

10


NAATP’S ETHICS PROGRAM ACTIVITY

We recently learned from several members that

their Google Maps locations were being captured

by an unauthorized call center and that the calls

were being referred to a different treatment center.

We investigated and learned that this is not an

isolated incident. We alerted our members through

our various Email and Social Media platforms with

the following information:

If your facility/agency has not claimed your business

listing on Google Maps, it is vulnerable to being

edited and having the contact telephone number

changed. We are urging all members to verify their

organization.

Key in the following link and enter the name

of your company:

google.com/maps

Then verify that all the information is correct.

Be sure to verify all your locations and telephone

numbers. One NAATP member agency had their

primary site correct but their outpatient facilities

were changed to a different phone number.

To claim your Google business profile listing,

key in this link:

support.google.com/business/answer/

2911778? hl=en&ref_topic=6001271

If your listing has indeed been edited or claimed

by somebody else, key in this link to correct it:

support.google.com/business/answer/

4566671?hl=en

In addition to the forgoing, NAATP will, where

appropriate, contact the offending agency

as well as report the matter to appropriate

authorities, as should all NAATP members.

Together as a professional society of the best

of addiction service providers, we will continue

to provide our essential health services to the

thousands of people who suffer from addiction

and advance our field in the process. •

11


OUTCOMES & MEASUREMENTS

ADVANCING OUR FIELD

THROUGH DATA COLLECTION,

ANALYSIS, AND DISTRIBUTION

BY JESSICA SWAN

NAATP Outcomes

and Surveys Manager

NAATP knows the value of data. We are committed to improving

treatment outcomes by showing our members and the public what

works and why we know that. Toward that end, we are currently

engaged in two important projects: The Outcomes Pilot Program

(OPP) and the 2016 Addiction Industry Salary Survey.

The NAATP Outcomes Pilot Program has been underway since

January, 2016. We have been collecting data now for a few months,

and we are pleased with the status of this important program. The

OPP is a research study designed to measure a sampling of our

clients as it concerns recovery from addiction through the measures

of abstinence, medication management, initial client services in

residential treatment, and ongoing client services beyond residential

treatment. We also measure quality of life improvement along

several fronts, including legal, social, medical, psychological, familial,

and financial gains over time. The study attempts to answer the

questions: does residential treatment improve the quality of life of

the patient over time and does residential treatment correlate to

reduced (or eliminated) use of substances for the patient over time?

We have enrolled over 500 participants in the study from our nine

participating treatment pilot sites across the US. Our goal is to collect

data on 1,000 participants, with enrollment ending December 31,

2016. Over 200 participants have discharged and more than 100

have completed the first follow up. We will follow these participants

throughout 2017 (one full year from date of enrollment), doing follow

up at five time points.

12


ADVANCING OUR FIELD THROUGH DATA COLLECTION, ANALYSIS, AND DISTRIBUTION

The National Association’s OPP will first refine the

methodology for outcomes evaluation, norm the

assessment tool, and then provide a toolkit to the

membership. Through widespread use, the toolkit

will lead to the creation of a large repository of

data on clients, services, and outcomes that will

support additional research. It will further norm

the tool, offer improved understanding of effective

practices, and promote the value of treatment

provider services to various stakeholder groups.

Completion of the pilot study will also lead to the

development of a significant research publication

and, as part of the bigger picture, will lead to

benchmarks and standards for addiction services

best practices.

NAATP MEMBERSHIP BENEFITS FROM

THE OPP WILL INCLUDE:

• A tool kit for completing outcomes studies at

your organization

• Data that provides standards for the addiction

treatment industry

• Potential participation in a larger longitudinal

study if approved by NAATP

• Creating a large repository of data for a largescale

study of our national target population,

which means broader and more in-depth insights

into what does and does not work

THE SALARY SURVEY

In 1986, The National Association was the first to

ever provide the treatment industry with a salary

survey. 2016 brings our membership the 10th

NAATP National Addiction Industry Salary Survey,

available to membership by the end of this year.

We recognize that the salary survey is an essential

tool to help members of our industry attract and

retain top talent. We expanded the salary survey

this year to include more healthcare and other

benefits questions, PTO information, broader and

more descriptive salary positions, and in-depth

demographics. We hope that this additional

information will be useful in helping benchmark

your organization with regard to services offered,

diversity of staff, benefits, and salaries.

Data for the 2016 salary survey was collected

online, via a survey hosted on NAATP’s website.

Data collection began on September 5, 2016

and ended on October 16, 2016. Respondents

completed the survey entirely online. Survey

responses were then exported for analysis, which is

currently underway. We look forward to seeing the

current condition of our industry through the use of

this important survey.

As we continue to grow the programs and

member benefits at The National Association, we

are excited to offer the members a value-added

benefit with the 2016 NAATP National Addiction

Industry Salary Survey and the Outcomes Pilot

Program (OPP). Stay tuned for the salary survey

report, available to membership by the end of

2016, and look for the first quarterly report from

our team on the OPP coming in January, 2017. •

NAATP Outcomes & Surveys Online

naatp.org/resources/treatmentoutcomes-surveys

13


NAATP PUBLIC POLICY ADVOCACY

YOUR VOICE ON THE HILL

NAATP MEMBERS

MUST CONTINUE TO

ADVANCE PARITY

PROGRESS

BY MARK DUNN

NAATP Public Policy Director

Washington, DC

One of the most significant achievements in the addiction treatment

field was the passage of the Mental Health Parity and Addiction

Equity Act (MHPAEA). That progress was enhanced when MHPAEA

was included in the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

Given the results of the election and debate surrounding the ACA,

it is important to emphasize that MHPAEA was passed with a

bipartisan majority, signed by President Bush and is the law of the

land separate from the ACA.

Even though the parity law passed in 2008, we waited far too long

for a final rule, which was necessary before the law could be

enforced. Parity was violated over and over because there was

no mechanism for enforcement. Thousands of patients suffered

needlessly as a result.

The Obama Administration recognized the inequity as NAATP and

many of our trade association and coalition partners gave voice to

the problem. We appreciate the leadership of Michael Botticelli,

Director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP).

Another leader in this effort has been former Congressman Patrick

Kennedy, who along with his father, was one of the original sponsors

of the legislation.

14


YOUR VOICE ON THE HILL

To address concerns over lack of enforcement,

President Obama created the White House Parity

Task Force. The Task Force held listening sessions

with many stakeholders and encouraged the field

to comment. The process provided an opportunity

to express not only frustration with the lack of

enforcement, but also recommend a path forward.

NAATP made specific recommendations on our

members’ behalf and with our membership input.

Our members’ responses were significant. Many

of you not only submitted comments, you supplied

specific examples of parity violations involving

your clients and patients. The real-life examples

were meaningful and substantive. Member

involvement has been greater on this issue than

we have ever witnessed.

And it made a difference.

The White House Parity Task Force recently

released its recommendations. NAATP was very

pleased with the results. Some of the positive steps

include:

• Providing meaningful information that is easily

accessible for consumers, so they understand

options and what Parity means for them.

• Providing additional training and financial

resources as well as best practices guidance to

the states. This will ensure that state regulators

have the financial and informational resources

necessary to do their job.

• Recommending greater transparency so that

consumers as well as regulators can determine

compliance with Parity law requirements. It has

been impossible in many cases to prove a Parity

violation occurred because obtaining information

with which to compare to medical/surgical

benefits has not been available.

• Creating greater oversight of insurance plans

as well as ongoing audits with the results being

made public. This means real enforcement with

state regulators as well as insurers being held

accountable. Also recommended is a

law change allowing for financial penalties for

repeat offenders.

15


YOUR VOICE ON THE HILL

When these recommendations are implemented,

we will have taken a huge step toward being

able to enforce the bipartisan law Congress

intended to help individuals in need of Substance

Use Disorder (SUD) and mental health treatment.

These recommendations are a monumental

achievement that could not have happened

without the support and involvement of so many

NAATP members. It will be critically important

that our members remain engaged with Congress

in the months to come.

It is our duty to work with our coalition partners

to ensure the Task Force recommendations are

applied to the various state and federal agencies.

We encourage the Obama Administration to move

forward as quickly as possible during the remaining

time it has in office.

We look forward to working with the newly

elected Congress and President-Elect Trump

on Parity and all SUD related issues. This is an

important time and it is critical that we persevere.

It is imperative for the United Sates that the

bipartisan goal of access to treatment for SUD

be realized. •

Stay connected to NAATP Public Policy Activity at:

naatp.org/advocacy

Access the White House Parity Implementation

Report:

hhs.gov/about/agencies/advisory-committees/

parity/index

16


NAATP MEMBER NEWS

MAXIMIZE YOUR

NAATP MEMBERSHIP

AT NAATP.ORG

BY KATIE STRAND

NAATP Director of Operations

The National Association launched a new, integrated website in 2016

to better serve our members. The website is the tool to get the most

benefit through resources and exposure for our members. Are you

maximizing the potential of your membership benefits and services

through the NAATP Website? You should!

MEMBERS ONLY NAVIGATION

NAATP Addiction Industry Directory

naatp.org/resources/addiction-industry-directory

All members in good standing are listed in the online NAATP

Addiction Industry Directory (AID). We continue to develop the AID

as the go-to addiction services provider directory for our members,

addiction professionals, and the public. For maximum visibility, we

ask you to include as much information as possible in your AID listing,

including your treatment center logo and contact information for

your Chief Executive, Admissions Department, and Marketing Staff.

All of this will assist in referrals and member to member connections.

As a member, you can update and control the information that is

visible on your AID listing. Additionally, accredited members receive

enhanced exposure in the AID, and if they include their logo in their

listing, the member image will scroll across the site home page, and

in turn, link to the AID listing.

17


MAXIMIZE YOUR NAATP MEMBERSHIP AT NAATP.ORG

MEMBER NEWS UPDATES

AND TRAINING POSTINGS

Does your treatment center have a news item

about the industry, a news release highlighting

your center, or an upcoming training to post to

the NAATP website? If so, use the Share News and

Updates or Post a Training Opportunity capability

on our website. Accredited NAATP Members

Rosecrance and Cumberland Heights recently

highlighted their 100th and 50th anniversary

celebrations respectively, both of which were

highlighted in our Members Making News section.

MEMBER TO MEMBER DISCUSSION BOARD

Stay tuned for an upcoming feature which will allow

open forum discussions between our members

on important industry topics. This member chat

area is expected to be live in early 2017, and in the

meantime, you can Request Technical Assistance

if you have a question.

JOB BOARD

NAATP offers a specialized job board specific to

the addiction treatment field. Job boards remain a

relevant place for companies to reach and engage

talent for their organizations. If you are looking to

maximize your treatment center job listing visibility

and build your candidate pool, take advantage of

our free Post Job Opportunities section, as it is

one of the best ways of getting job exposure. It is

now a complimentary member benefit.

ALL STAFF MEMBER LOG IN

naatp.org/user

Did you know that everyone in your organization

can access our member-only resources? One

designated person in your organization is the

primary member “admin” but any current

employee at your organization can gain log-in

access to our extensive member-only resources.

Offer your staff the opportunity to browse

our operational and clinical resources, access

industry salary surveys and the addictionLeader,

the newsletter of NAATP. Refer to past annual

conference materials as educational resources.

Help expand our addiction treatment research

by using the Share a Resource tool to submit

a resource. These resources must be academic

in nature as opposed to marketing pieces, but

we do welcome your treatment center name to

appear as recognition.

CONFERENCE SPONSORSHIP, EXHIBITS,

AND ATTENDEE ONLINE REGISTRATION

NAATP National 2017 will be our 39th Annual

Addiction Leadership Conference and the 39th

annual convening of our field’s leadership under

one roof. Our integrated online system now allows

for submission of abstracts, award nominations,

conference registration, exhibitor booth selection,

and opportunities for promoting your organization

through sponsorships. These options are available

first to our valued members.

We encourage you to take advantage of all your

member benefits. Take the time to log in to your

account today. NAATP staff is here to help you

understand the potential of your member services

and guide you through the process. •

naatp.org/training/national-addictionleadership-conference

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NAATP NEW MEMBERS

The National Association welcomes its newest members!

A New Start

West Palm Beach, FL

Alpha Healing Centers

Jersey City, NJ

Amethyst Recovery Center

Port St Lucie, FL

AMFM Mental Health

and Addiction

San Clemente, CA

Aquila Recovery Clinic

Washington, DC

Arahant Medical Centers

Denver, CO

Aspire Addiction

Recovery Center

Lubbock, TX

Banyan Treatment Center

Pompano Beach, FL

BHCFinancial

West Hollywood, CA

Bright Futures Treatment Center

Boynton Beach, FL

Brighton Recovery Center

South Ogden, UT

BrightView

Cincinnati, OH

Casa Capri Recovery

Costa Mesa, CA

Clere Consulting

St. Paul, MN

Cycles of Change

Recovery Services

Palmdale, CA

Delphi Behavioral Health Group

Ft Lauderdale, FL

Design For Change Recovery

Lancaster, CA

designRoom Creative

Cleveland, OH

Enlightened Solutions

Egg Harbor City, NJ

Families and Adolescents

in Recovery

Schaumburg, IL

First Step Detox

West Palm Beach, FL

Freedom Institute

New York, NY

Gateway Foundation

Chicago, IL

Gracious Care Recovery Solutions

Deerfield Beach, FL

Integrated Health Clinics

Milwaukie, OR

Las Vegas Recovery Center

Las Vegas, NV

Netjumps INTL

Temecula, CA

Oceanfront Recovery

Temecula, CA

Rally Point

West Palm Beach, FL

RECO

Delray Beach, FL

Recovering Champions

Teaticket, MA

Recovery Care Partner

Silver Spring, MD

Recovery is Happening

Rochester, MN

Red Rock Recovery Centers

Lakewood, CO

ReliaBill Solutions LLC

Delray Beach, FL

Stonegate Center

Azle, TX

The Foundry Treatment Center

Steamboat Springs, CO

The Hills Treatment Center

Los Angeles, CA

The Villa Treatment Center

Woodland Hills, CA

Westbridge

Manchester, NH

Research NAATP members by geography, accreditation,and services provided at

naatp.org/resources/addiction-industry-directory

19


NAATP NEWS

NAATP NEWS

The United States has a serious substance misuse problem.”

This clear and simple understatement begins the comprehensive

428-page landmark report, Facing Addiction in America:

The Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health.

SURGEON GENERAL

ISSUES LANDMARK REPORT ON ADDICTION

The U.S. Surgeon General released its report on November 17, 2016

advising that substance use disorder (SUD) is one of America’s most

pressing public health concerns. It reports that nearly 21 million

Americans — more than the number of people who have all cancers

combined — suffer from substance use disorders. “Alcohol and

drug addiction take an enormous toll on individuals, families, and

communities,” said U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Vivek Murthy. “Most

Americans know someone who has been touched by an alcohol or

a drug use disorder. Yet 90 percent of people with a substance use

disorder are not getting treatment. That has to change.” The report

marks the first time a U.S. Surgeon General has dedicated a report

to substance misuse and related disorders.

The report is divided into seven chapters that describe SUD in

the U.S. It documents a variety of scientific and evidence-based

policies and programs covering prevention, treatment, recovery

and services for justice-involved individuals. The report’s findings

and recommendations outline a public health approach that

“mainstreams” and integrates SUD into general healthcare. The

report also describes the significant economic impact of SUD.

It is the first ever report on addiction from the top U.S. federal

health official, and it assimilates much of the most significant

research and policy progress of the past several years. Because

the Surgeon General is expected to remain in his position into

the Trump Administration, the document has the potential to drive

the policy and progress, which has significant movement now.

20


NAATP NEWS

The report calls for an ambitious public health

approach to addiction that is evidence-based and

includes financing strategies for service delivery.

Key findings and statements in the report include:

• Addiction is a disease and not a moral failing.

• Substance misuse and substance use disorders

are estimated to cost $442 billion each year

and a comprehensive response is an economic

imperative.

• Recovery happens. 25 million people in the

United States are in recovery.

• Stakeholders should work collaboratively to

establish recovery outcomes and measures.

• Relapse rates for substance use disorders are

comparable to other chronic diseases.

• Barriers to marijuana research should be eased.

• The Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery

Act (CARA) requires adequate funding to have

adequate impact.

• Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT) is an

Evidence-Based Treatment component and more

research is needed on transition off of MAT. •

The full report is available at

addiction.surgeongeneral.gov

NAATP NATIONAL

LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE 2017

The 39th Annual National Addiction Leadership

Conference will take place at the Barton Creek

Resort and Spa, May 21-23, 2017. Join the field’s

executive level leadership, over 100 exhibitors,

and over 500 addiction professionals in this

39th annual convening. Leading field abstracts

are currently under review. Special leadership

roundtable discussions will be held to allow

thought leaders to create action steps to improve

responses to payer relations, ethics, marketing,

and development.

naatp.org/training/national-addictionleadership-conference

DISPLAY THE NAATP LOGO ON YOUR SITE

What goes around comes around — especially on

the internet. NAATP members are authorized to

display the special NAATP member logo on their

websites. Doing so demonstrates that you are part

of the foremost professional society of addiction

service providers and supporters, that you share

best practice and values-based services, and that

you adhere to the NAATP Code of Ethics.

Download the NAATP Member Logo at:

naatp.org/member-logo-and-guideline

21


NAATP NEWS

NAATP ANNUAL LEADERSHIP AWARDS

Time to submit nominations for the

2017 NAATP Leadership Awards

• Jasper G. Chen See, MD

Volunteer Leadership Award

• James W. West, MD Quality Improvement Award

• Michael Q. Ford Journalism Award

• Nelson J. Bradley Career Achievement Award

Submit your nomination at:

naatp.org/award-nomination

THE NAATP PAC

The NAATP Political Action Committee (PAC)

was formed in 2008 to support and help elect

candidates who understand and support

legislative and regulatory concerns that effect

treatment providers.

NOT A NAATP MEMBER YET?

NAATP is a nonprofit professional

membership society that supports addiction

treatment providers through leadership,

clinical and operational resources, and

systemic law and policy advocacy. Member

services include training and education,

industry surveys, networking and convening,

law and policy advocacy, visibility,

awards and recognition, resources, ethics

and professionalism, a job center, and

publications. Check your member listing

or become a NAATP member at

naatp.org/membership/become-member

For more information and to contribute

to the NAATP PAC, please visit

naatp.org/advocacy/naatp-pac

22


JOIN US

FOR THE 39TH ANNUAL

NATIONAL ADDICTION

LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE

2017 May

21 – 23, 2017

Omni Barton Creek

Resort and Spa

Austin, Texas

REGISTER TO ATTEND, SPONSOR, AND EXHIBIT AT:

naatp.org/training/national-addiction-leadership-conference

23


naatp.org

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