Insights

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1 l Digital Salary & Industry Insights

Digital

Salary &

Industry

Insights

7th Edition

propellondon.com

0207 432 6340

enquiries@propellondon.com


Digital Salary & Industry Insights l 3

Contents

Preface 5

Methodology 6

Demographics 7

Overview 8

Open Blend Method 9

Leaving Intentions 14

Factors that drive job change 17

How professionals find a role 18

Bonus receipt & company benefits 20

C-Level Insights 23

Contractors/Freelancers 25

Salary overview 26

Gender pay gap 26

Marketing 28

Demographics and highlights 29

Open Blend summary 30

Salaries 32

Advertising Operations/Trafficking 32

Affiliate Marketing 32

Campaign Management 33

Content Management / Editorial 33

Digital Advertising 34

Email Marketing / eCRM 34

Marketing - Online / Direct 35

Marketing - Brand Strategy 35

Paid Search 36

Paid Social 36

Product Management 37

SEO/SEM 37

Social Media 38

Commercial 39

Demographics and highlights 40

Open Blend summary 41

Salaries 43

Account Management 43

Agency Sales 43

Business Development 44

Channel Sales 44

Customer Services 45

Enterprise Software Sales 45

Partnerships 46

Pre-Sales 46

Publisher Development 47

Technical 48

Demographics and highlights 49

Open Blend summary 50

Salaries 52

Architecture 52

Back-end Development 52

Big Data 53

Business Analysis 53

Front-end Development 54

IT Operations 54

Mobile Development 55

Programme Management 55

Project Management 56

Testing & Quality Assurance 56

Creative 57

Demographics and highlights 58

Open Blend summary 59

Salaries 61

Artwork 61

Copywriting 61

Creative Strategy 62

Design 63

Production Management 63

Project Management 63

UX / UI 64

Business Operations 65

Demographics and highlights 66

Open Blend summary 67

Salaries 69

Administration 69

Finance 69

Human Resources 70

IT Salaries 70


4 l Digital Salary & Industry Insights

“ We listened to last year’s

respondents and developed our

research to provide insight that’s

more comprehensive than ever.”

Welcome

The seventh edition of our ‘Digital Salary & Industry Insights’ report sees us deepen

our understanding of the individuals driving the global digital economy through

collaboration with Open Blend Method. We listened to last year’s respondents and

developed our research to provide insight that’s more comprehensive than ever and

which employers can utilise to improve staff satisfaction and retention.

As in previous years, our research combines the results from an online survey (over 1,300

respondents) with anonymised data taken from our own internal records. In doing so,

we’re able to present a broad insight into both the salaries and the working lives of the

professionals driving the global digital economy.

How does your salary compare to your peers? Which factors drive job change? Which

factors impact most on staff retention?

These questions and more we can now answer thanks to our extensive research.

So, whether you are looking to hire, get hired or just have an interest in the results, we

hope our report proves useful to you.

Melina Jacovou

CEO & Founder

Propel London


Digital Salary & Industry Insights l 5

Preface

Propel’s seventh annual ‘Digital Salary & Industry Insights’ report combines our own

internal salary data with over 1,300 respondents to a survey we conducted from December

2015 to February 2016.

The survey element has been included in the research for our previous two salary surveys,

with questions designed to provide insight into work life blend and role perceptions within

the global digital economy.

The report is split into five main sections. The first breaks down the overall results from

our survey across the entire sample, showing differences across seniority, length of tenure,

gender, business type and skill set. The remaining four sections analyse our sample based

on their wider skill set.

We split out our respondents into five main skill sets: Marketing, Commercial, Technical,

Creative and Business Operations. Within these skill sets, data is broken down further by

seniority, which we split into the following brackets:

• Junior / Non Management

• Mid-level / Middle Management

• Senior / Senior Management / Head of

• Senior Executive / CxO / Managing Director / Board Level

The following pages provide a brief overview of the methodology adopted to compile

the report, and a summary of the demographic splits for the sample.

This report has been produced by Propel in partnership with The Drum and Open

Blend Method.

Any queries regarding the contents of this report, as well as any media queries,

can be directed to our marketing department on 0207 432 6340 or by emailing us

at survey@propellondon.com.


6 l Digital Salary & Industry Insights

Methodology

The data for this report is drawn from two primary sources; an online survey carried out

in early 2016, and internal salary records taken from placed candidates and client briefs

throughout 2015/16.

Online survey

We gathered the data through a pre-tested and then revised questionnaire. The

responses were collected online via SurveyMonkey, then analysed through Microsoft Office

Excel and PowerBI.

We received 1,353 responses to the survey, 43 of which were invalidated due to being either

incomplete, irrelevant or due to respondent error.

The final survey data set therefore consists of 1,310 responses from individuals working

across the global digital economy.

The questionnaire structure took into consideration a number of factors regarding

respondent behaviour, namely:

• Direct influences - demographic variables (e.g. age, gender, seniority, job title and salary)

• Behavioural influences - career level, years in industry, skill set

• Deduced influences – work life blend, attitudes, career patterns

This year, we measured the deduced influences of our respondents more explicitly

through incorporating the Open Blend Method into our analysis. A full summary of the

methodology applied to derive the Open Blend Method results can be found on page 9.

Internal data

We took a total of 1,850 anonymised salary records from our own database. This allowed

us to supplement the salary data provided by survey respondents with robust data drawn

from placed candidates and client briefs.

Final data total

In total we have 3,160 individual data records to form the basis of our analysis.


Digital Salary & Industry Insights l 7

Demographics

Demographics overview: Gender

Demographics overview: Age

55-64, 2%

65+, 1%

45-54, 8%

18-24, 9%

Female 37%

Male 63%

35-44, 28%

25-34, 52%

Demographics overview: Seniority

Demographics overview: Type of business

Senior 35%

C-level 8%

Junior 18%

Tech Vendor 15%

Agency

Side 38%

Consultancy

5%

Mid-level 39%

In-house/

client-side 42%

Demographics overview: Skill set

Technical

21%

Business

Operations 10%

Commercial

15%

Demographics overview: Time in role

>5 years 7%

4-5 years 5%

3-4 years 8%

Less than

1 year 38%

Marketing

37%

Creative 17%

2-3 years

16%

1-2 years 26%

The demographics are consistent with our 2015 report, with some minor variations. Most

notably, there are fewer females represented in the sample at 37% compared to 40% in 2015.

70% of the sample are based in Greater London, with the remainder based across the various

UK regions and overseas. The most represented region in the UK is the South East which

accounts for 8%. A further 8% of the sample are based outside the UK.

As expected, those working in media and technology formed the majority of our sample, with

over 20 other business sectors also represented, including retail, finance, and government

services. This highlights the growing requirement for digital talent across the UK economy.


8 l Digital Salary & Industry Insights

Section 1:

Overview

Before delving into the five skill sets and

specialisms, we have analysed the

sample as a whole within the overview

section.

This section acts to provide perspective

to the rest of the report and provide a

general summary of employee

perceptions and average salaries across

the global digital economy.


Digital Salary & Industry Insights l 9

Introduction

In our 2015 report, 95% of respondents told us that work life balance was ‘very important’ to

them. So, we listened and this year have developed our report through collaboration with

Open Blend Method - an online tool that facilitates coaching in sessions between a manager

and their talent.

At the heart of these sessions is the methodology of work life blend – the replacement for

work life balance.

The term ‘work life balance’ implies a precarious balancing act. It’s a notion that suggests

our work and our life are in opposition to each other.

The concept of work life blend acknowledges the reality that productivity at work is

impacted by life and life is impacted by work. Our life commitments are not separate, they

come together, influence each other and blend.

The Open Blend methodology is underpinned by the belief that well-being drives performance

and that if you are happy, not stressed, confident and secure in your role you have

the best chance of reaching your potential.

Well-being

Respondents were first asked to score the

following well-being questions based on

how they felt generally in life - questions

were scored 0-10 with 0 low and 10 high.

• How stressed are you?

• How happy are you?

• How confident are you?

• How skilled do you feel to progress

in your career?

STRESS

HAPPINESS

CONFIDENCE

SKILLED TO

PROGRESS

WELL-BEING AVERAGES ACROSS THE SAMPLE

5.7

0.0 1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 6.0 7.0 8.0 9.0 10.0

6.7

7.1

7.4

Averages for the well-being metrics across our sample can be viewed in the accompanying

chart. It is encouraging that stress scores are lowest for the group out of the recorded

metrics, and that confidence, both generally and in terms of confidence in skills, display the

highest scores.

There are few gender differences across the sample, however men appear to be slightly

more confident than women on average (7.3 to 6.6 confidence score).


10 l Digital Salary & Industry Insights

Similarly, there are no stark differences in averages based on age, but both the 18-24 (Gen

Z) and 45-54 (Younger Boomers) groups observe scores lower than the average across most

well-being measures.

We were also interested in the respondents whose happiness score fell in both the bottom

and top 20% of the sample. We highlight these two groups in the next section and look at

how their work life blend scores impact upon their happiness scores.

Unique work life blend

To create a unique work life blend we asked each survey respondent to: “Imagine that

everything is running smoothly in your life, you are highly effective at work and home,

you are happy and feel on top of everything in your life, what is contributing to this? “

They were then taken through a 3 stage process:

1. Each respondent was given a menu of 27 contributing factors known as elements.

clear career

goals

flexible

culture

fulfilment

at work

making a

difference at

work

manageable

workload

mindset

well-being

my children my parter organised

at work

recognition

relationships

at work

supportive

network

time with

family and

friends

childcare

support

effective IT

effective

team

effective use

of hours

fun

health and

exercise

money my time organised

at home

progressing

at work

quality time

with kids

sense of

belonging at

work

supportive

family

supportive

leader

They were asked to choose 8 contributing elements, which we used to form their unique

work life blend.

2. Once identified, the respondent scored each of these 8 elements on a scale of 0-10 to reflect

their current level of fulfilment in this area. This created their current work life blend.

3. Each element was then scored again based on where it needs to be in order for the

respondent to be highly effective and satisfied, thus creating their target work life blend.

Finally, the respondent’s current and target score were each calculated as percentages.


Digital Salary & Industry Insights l 11

Results

85%

target blend

22% gap

63%

average

current blend

It is this 22% gap which is

important for businesses to

understand as the higher the gap,

the greater the disparity between

the individual’s current level of

fulfilment and their target level.

Interestingly, the 22% gap is

consistent across the male and

female respondents.

Understanding why elements go unfulfilled holds the key to retaining talent, something we

highlight later on.

Displayed below are the average fulfilment scores for respondents in both the top 20% and

bottom 20% for happiness score (page 8) across the 8 most popular elements identified by

the respondents.

As mentioned, this is to highlight how an individual’s work life blend impacts upon their

happiness.

Current Blend Score

Most popular element choice top 20% happiness Bottom 20% happiness

1. Money 73% 45%

2. Fulfilment at work 77% 51%

3. Fun 78% 47%

4. My partner 93% 64%

5. Time with friends and family 83% 67%

6. Health and exercise 76% 63%

7. Progression at work 78% 62%

8. Making a difference at work 82% 53%


12 l Digital Salary & Industry Insights

To highlight the link between work life blend and well-being further, respondents experiencing

a blend fulfilment of 80% and above are in the top 20% for happiness score. In

contrast, people experiencing blend fulfilment of under 60% are in the bottom 20% for

happiness score.

We also found that respondents in the top 20% for happiness are less likely to consider a job

change and the respondents with the highest stress scores are the most likely to consider a

job change.

Across the sample, there is an interesting finding when we compare the most fulfilled

elements to the least fulfilled.

Most fulfilled elements

Least fulfilled elements

My partner

Progression at work

My children

Recognition

Supporting my family

Clear career goals

Quality time with my children

My time

Time with friends and family

Fulfilment at work

As shown, the most fulfilled elements are all home related with the least fulfilled all work

related. This provides an opportunity for businesses as the findings indicate the 22% gap

in blend fulfilment sits within the work environment, areas managers and businesses can

have a direct impact on.

35 – 44 year olds have the most fulfilled work life blends and are the happiest age group,

whereas those in the 45-54 bracket are least happy, and also feel least skilled and least

confident.

Across all age groups people that feel more skilled to progress are less likely to consider a job

change.


Digital Salary & Industry Insights l 13

General themes by age group

18 - 24

GEN Z

25 - 34

MILLENNIALS

Largest gap in

current –

target blend:

23%

Most

stressed

out of the

age groups

Important to

this age group:

fun

Important to

this age group:

time with

family and friends

Need their employers

to support them with:

progressing

at work

clear career

goals

Need their employers

to support them with:

fun

time with

family and friends

clear career

goals

fulfilment

at work

recognition

34 - 44

GEN Y/X

The happiest

group with the

most fulfilled

blend.

Important to

this age group:

Need their employers

to support them with:

45 - 55

55+

Lowest group in

terms of happiness,

confidence and

skills to progress in

their role.

Least stressed

but least fulfilled

blend out of all

the age groups.

my parter

Need their employers

to support them with:

recognition

clear career

goals

Important to

this age group:

progressing

at work

making a

difference at work

fulfilment

at work

Need their employers

to support them with:

health and

exercise

flexible

culture

fulfilment

at work

We have broken the results down further across each section within the report, and

includes further information on work life blend by skill set and age group.

Recommendations

Our Open Blend research emphasises the findings from our 2015 report, that the

factors responsible for poor retention are both targetable and addressable. The same

factors highlighted in our Open Blend research are also explicitly identified as contributory

factors throughout our survey. It shows that the companies that focus on

progression, clear career paths, and recognition of individual achievement will succeed

in retaining motivated staff.


14 l Digital Salary & Industry Insights

Leaving intentions

To understand the factors that drive professionals to change roles, we asked our respondents

whether they were considering a job change in 2016, why they left their previous

position and what would make them leave their current position.

Are you considering a job change in 2016?

No 37%

Yes 63%

Last year, 52% of individuals were considering a job change, a figure which has increased in

this year’s sample to 63%. This is a substantial difference, and also represents an increase

from our 2014 sample, in which 57% of the group were considering a job change.

Male vs female

Within the sample, male respondents (64%) are more likely than their female counterparts

(61%) were to consider a move in 2016. This is consistent with previous reports which found

leaving intentions to be higher amongst men.

Business type

Those working for a consultancy were the most likely to consider a change, with 72% seeking

a move. The lowest leaving intentions were displayed by agency employees (56%) with

those working client-side (62%) and for technology vendors (60%) being slightly higher.

Seniority / length of tenure

Interestingly, only 47% of C-level respondents are likely to consider changing role in 2016 -

a decrease on last year’s 49%. In comparison, junior (65%), mid-level (66%) and senior (62%)

professionals are all more likely to consider leaving their role this year.


Digital Salary & Industry Insights l 15

Job change vs Seniority

70%

60%

50%

40%

30%

20%

10%

35%

65%

34%

66%

NO YES NO YES NO YES NO YES

Junior Mid-level Senior C-level

38%

62%

53%

47%

As with last year, length of tenure also continues to act as a clear influence, with intentions

increasing consistently as the number of years of service increases. Leaving intentions

peak at 79% for those at the 4-5 year mark, and only once an individual has been with their

company for over 5 years do we begin to see a decrease.

Job change vs Tenure

90%

80%

70%

60%

58%

69%

72%

76%

79%

64%

50%

40%

30%

20%

42%

31%

28%

24%

21%

36%

10%

NO YES

< 1 year

NO YES

1 - 2 years

NO YES

2 - 3 years

NO YES

3 -4 years

NO YES

4 - 5 years

NO YES

> 5 years

Those that have been with their company for less than a year are the only example where

those intending to stay represent the majority with only 42% considering a change.


16 l Digital Salary & Industry Insights

Bonus receipt / remuneration

As in previous years, professionals who receive bonuses are typically less likely to be considering

a job change, although there is little difference. 58% of those that receive a bonus are

still considering a potential move this year, in comparison to 61% of those that do not.

Similarly, 74% of those that believe they are underpaid intend to leave their role this year,

whereas only 47% of those who state they are fairly paid are actively considering a move.

Of those that received a pay increase, 56% are considering a change in role. However, for

those that have received a pay cut, or simply have received no increase over the past 12

months, this rises to approximately 65% for both groups.

Job change vs Annual salary change

70%

60%

50%

40%

30%

20%

10%

35%

65%

44%

56%

35%

65%

NO YES NO YES NO YES

Decreased Increased No change

Interestingly, it seems that among our sample, it’s almost as damaging for businesses to not

increase salary as it is to decrease it. Of the sample who received no change in salary over

the past 12 months, 65% are considering a job change, the same percentage as those whose

salary decreased.

Recommendations

• Given the influence that these pay perceptions seem to hold over leaving intentions,

there’s a clear message for employers that more needs to be done to communicate

why pay levels are fair and equitable to employees, and to increase pay where appropriate.

The fact that money was highlighted as the most critical element in our

open blend research further emphasises the influence of pay as a key factor in aiding

retention.

• Length of service continues to be a major impact on leaving intentions as it was in

2015. Employers need to do more to engage staff after their first year in post, particularly

in processes like pay reviews as remuneration perceptions continue to impact

leaving intentions dramatically.


Digital Salary & Industry Insights l 17

Factors that drive change

We were also interested in exploring the main reasons respondents choose to leave their

organisations.

Across the sample, the most significant factors were generally consistent across our

skill set groups, in order these are. In order these are:

1. Lack of career opportunities / progression (26%)

2. New work challenge (19%)

3. People / culture / working environment (17%)

Uncompetitive pay is also a key factor, rating highly for 15% of our respondents.

The older the individual gets, the more the focus shifts from career progression to new

work challenges, suggesting that individuals are perhaps seeking more substantial career

shifts as they grow older.

Culture and working environment also becomes increasingly significant with age, rising

from 11% in 18-24 year olds, to 27% in the 55-64 bracket. Additionally, as with our 2015 report,

redundancy increases as a contributory factor to changing roles as individuals progress

through their career.

Salary is also more important for younger professionals, with an average of 16% choosing

this as the key influence across the 18-24 and 25-34 brackets combined, compared to approximately

11% between the 35-44, 45-54 and 55-64 age ranges combined.

We also asked our respondents what their main reasons would be, if they decided to leave

their current position for another role.

In order, the most commonly selected reasons for changing roles were:

• Improved career opportunities / progression (65%)

• Increased financial remuneration / compensation package (60%)

• New work challenge (43%)

While improved career opportunities / progression and a new work challenge remain

important factors, interestingly increased financial remuneration was the second most

commonly cited factor, again reaffirming the findings from Open Blend Method.


18 l Digital Salary & Industry Insights

How professionals find a role

We also investigated the platforms and channels they used to source this new position.

Across our entire sample recruitment consultancies (47%) and LinkedIn (46%) are the most

popular methods for finding roles. Direct applications (40%), personal networks (40%), and

job boards (38%) were all also seen as viable options.

Non-business social platforms such as Twitter and Facebook are used by around 10% of the

sample, a decrease on last year (16%).

Whilst there are similarities regarding the tools digital professionals utilise to find roles,

there are also interesting differences across the different skill sets.

Creatives continue to be the most prevalent users of non-business focused social platforms,

whereas marketers favour the likes of LinkedIn and other business social networks to

search for jobs.

Job search preferences by sector

Recruitment consultancy

Other social media

e.g. Twitter / Facebook

Job boards

Personal network

60%

50%

40%

30%

43%

44%

40%

52%

27%

39%

Direct application

47%

38% 41% Marketing

36%

49%

Business social networking

e.g. Linkedin / Xing

51%

42%

48%

51%

47%

41%

37% 36%

13%

Creative

45% 42%

44%

37% 40% 10%

39% 42% 11%

20%

10%

5%

Business Operations

Commercial

Technical

Commercial professionals make the greatest use of their personal networks, whilst technical

professionals, perhaps given the make-up of the tech sample which featured a number

of contractors, rely on recruitment consultancies to find their next role.


Digital Salary & Industry Insights l 19

How roles were found

60%

50%

40%

30%

51%

48% 50% 51%

44% 45% 44% 43%

41%

37%

37% 35%

28%

38% 39%

31%

49% 51%

33%

C-LEVEL

SENIOR

MID-LEVEL

20%

10%

16%

12% 10% 10%

5%

JUNIOR

Job Boards

Recruitment

consultancy

Personal

network

Direct

application

Business social

networking

e.g. Linkedin/Xing

Other social

media e.g.Twitter

/Facebook

Seniority

There are also some key differences in job search preferences as professionals climb the

career ladder.

The results indicate that junior professionals are generally the most active in their job

search highlighted in their use of job boards, recruitment consultancies, direct applications

and business social networks.

Contrastingly, the most senior level professionals tend to utilise the personal networks (51%)

they’ve built up throughout their career. Use of job boards and direct application are also

less prevalent at this level.

At mid and senior level, professionals are starting to grow and tap into their online

networks as well as working with recruiters in the search for their next role.

Recommendations

• Recruitment consultancies remain the most popular search option for candidates,

with LinkedIn and business networking tools an extremely close second. It is

beneficial for job seekers to tap into these resources and engage with recruiters as

well as having an active presence online.

• Equally, it’s important for companies to understand where to find their target talent

and utilise specialist recruitment agencies, engaging job adverts and a strong online

presence to attract potential candidates into their business.


20 l Digital Salary & Industry Insights

Bonus receipt & company benefits

Bonus receipt amongst our respondents is something we’ve been interested in over past

few surveys. In particular we’re interested in how it differs across business type and whether

it impacts upon an individual’s willingness to leave their role and their pay perceptions.

55% of our respondents receive some form of bonus, a finding which is consistent with our

2015 report (55%). This also represents an increase on our 2014 sample (50%).

However, less than half of the female sample receive a bonus (47%), down 4% in comparison

to 2015, and in contrast, 58% of male respondents receive a bonus, an increase of 2%.

Commercial professionals are the most likely to receive a bonus as you might expect given

the target driven nature of their roles whilst creative professionals are the least likely.

Bonus receipt by skillset

80%

70%

60%

50%

40%

30%

20%

10%

46%

54%

NO YES

Business

Operations

75%

58%

52%

54%

48%

46%

42%

25%

NO YES NO YES NO YES NO YES

Commercial Creative Marketing Technical

Bonus by seniority / age

Bonus receipt across the sample increases steadily as seniority level increases with 68%

of senior executives receiving a bonus in comparison to 37% of junior professionals.

Interestingly, this represents a 3% drop in bonus receipt among juniors compared to 2015.

Linked to these findings, bonus receipt is lowest amongst 18-24 year olds (36%) and highest

amongst 35-44 year olds (62%).


Digital Salary & Industry Insights l 21

Bonus receipt by seniority

70%

60%

50%

40%

30%

20%

10%

68%

63%

60%

54%

46%

40%

37%

32%

YES NO YES NO YES NO YES NO

Junior Mid-level Senior C-level

Across our sample bonuses are most common in consultancies (70%) and tech vendors

(73%). This drops to 54% for those in client-side teams and 44% for those working in

agencies.

Bonuses do appear to have a slight impact in reducing leaving intentions as 58% of those

receiving a bonus are still considering a job change in 2016.

Interestingly however, those that receive a bonus are far more likely to believe they are

fairly paid (41%) in comparison to those that do not (60%).

Benefits

The benefits most commonly received across the sample are pensions, medical insurance,

discounted memberships and flexible working practices.

Benefit receipt across the sample

100%

90%

80%

70%

60%

50%

89%

64%

81%

69%

64%

80%

64%

70%

88%

51% 49%

40%

30%

20%

10%

11%

36%

19%

31%

36%

20%

36%

30%

12%

YES

NO

YES

NO

YES

NO

YES

NO

YES

NO

YES

NO

YES

NO

YES

NO

YES

NO

YES

NO

Career breaks /

Sabbaticals

Discounted

memberships

Share Option

Scheme

Life

Insurance

Flexible

working

Flexible

benefits

Pension

Travel

allowance

Childcare

Medical

Insurance


22 l Digital Salary & Industry Insights

Certain benefits are also more likely to be available to those in more senior positions within

an organisation. For example, C-level executives are far more likely to receive share options

(35% compared to just 10% of juniors).

Percentage of respondents receiving Share Options

100%

90%

80%

70%

60%

50%

40%

30%

20%

10%

90%

83%

77%

65%

35%

23%

17%

10%

YES NO YES NO YES NO YES NO

Junior Mid-level Senior C-level

Flexible working also appears to be more available as seniority level increases, with 43% of

senior executives able to work flexibly, compared to only 27% of juniors within our sample.

Percentage of respondents receiving Flexible Working

100%

90%

80%

70%

60%

50%

40%

30%

20%

10%

73%

62%

61%

57%

43%

38%

39%

27%

YES NO YES NO YES NO YES NO

Junior Mid-level Senior C-level


Digital Salary & Industry Insights l 23

C-Level insights

We asked those in senior executives and C-level positions additional questions, in order to

gain further insight into trends amongst the most senior employees.

Differences in gender representation are evident at this level, with males accounting for

77% of the group compared to 63% across the entire sample. As expected, the C-level group

is older on average, with 57% of C-Level executives based in the 35-44 age bracket.

Demographics overview: Gender

Female 23%

Demographics overview: Age

55-64, 3% 65+, 2%

45-54, 21%

25-34, 17%

Male 77%

35-44, 57%

Just under 80% hold an undergraduate degree and less than half hold a postgraduate

degree. The most common was an MBA, representing 30% of those with postgraduate

qualifications.

The value of a university education is under increasing scrutiny, however for our C-level

respondents, both undergraduate and postgraduate degrees seem to have a clear impact

on earnings. Those with an undergraduate degree earn an average of £10K more than their

peers without a university education. The highest earners are those with an MBA, with an

average salary of almost £120K.

Average Salary by Undergraduate Degree

£120,000

£100,000

£80,000

£60,000

£40,000

£20,000

£88,583

£102,772

No Degree

With a Degree


24 l Digital Salary & Industry Insights

Working hours

C-Level respondents are typically contracted more hours per week than those in junior,

mid-level and senior positions. For example, 11% of senior executives are contracted 48+

hours per week compared to 3% of junior, mid-level and senior respondents combined.

The results also found that 36% of the most senior professionals work 10+ hours over their

contracted hours and only 16% of them work less than 2 hours more than they’re contracted.

In comparison, 20% of the junior, mid-level and senior respondents combined don’t work

additional hours, and 40% work less than 2 hours above their contracted hours.

Remuneration

For the vast majority of our executives (70%), performance related pay accounts for 0-30%

of their overall remuneration package and for 18% of senior executives, performance influences

60% or more of their overall remuneration package.

Current role

As previously stated, personal networks are the most popular avenue for finding their next

role, with 50% of the respondents having obtained their current role this way.

Following this, the two most popular methods were through a specialist headhunting firm

(17%) and through internal promotion (16%).

Exemplifying the difficulty in attracting C-level candidates, over a quarter (27%) stated that

they expect to be in their current post for six years or more.

Additionally, many are attached to their current roles with significant notice periods.

Slightly under 40% expected to provide notice of between three to six months, and 16%

expected to provide notice of six months or more before departing.

Keeping in mind the restrictive notice periods, and the fact that the vast majority of C-level

individuals gain roles through their personal network, firms should look to either focus

on hiring talented individuals from within to the executive level, or consider employing a

specialist headhunting firm in order to attract the best candidates externally.


Digital Salary & Industry Insights l 25

Contractors / Freelancers

We asked freelance and contract staff a series of additional questions regarding their roles,

and their working preferences and habits.

59% of respondents were freelance in their last role, with a third (32%) stating they were in

full time employment in their previous post.

Compared with 2015’s findings, contracts lasting less than 3 months were not as common

amongst our sample. Freelancers appear to favour longer projects of 3-6 months (38%) and

6+ months (40%).

Usual Contract Length - Freelance Staff

>6 months, 40%

4 weeks, 23%


26 l Digital Salary & Industry Insights

Salary overview

Encouragingly, the overall average salaries across the skill sets covered appear to be greater

in comparison with last year.

Overall Agency Client-side Tech Vendors Consultancy

Junior £27,542 £24,243 £28,607 £32,900 £29,871

Mid-level £41,514 £37,172 £41,826 £50,009 £49,303

Senior £68,256 £57,436 £70,793 £84,915 £69,434

C-level £108,418 £109,060 £103,235 £123,769 £89,286

In contrast to 2015, agency staff represent the lowest paid group across the majority of

seniority levels and have seen their average salaries decrease across junior, mid-level

and senior positions.

What is clear is that the healthy salaries across the different skill sets and business types

are representative of the flourishing digital economy.

Gender pay gap

Average of current salary in £ per annum

£120,000

£100,000

£98,862

£99,703

£80,000

£60,000

£40,000

£20,000

£26,326

£37,932

£64,427

£29,474

£44,670

£71,282

Junior

Mid-level Senior

Female

C-Level

Junior

Mid-level Senior

Male

C-Level


Digital Salary & Industry Insights l 27

The pay gap across the sample sits relative to that observed in ONS statistics, at

approximately 18%.

As with our 2015 report, there are still some clear differences in pay across genders.

The gender pay gap becomes much more significant at mid and senior levels, with over

£6,000 separating average pay at these levels. Some positives can be seen at the C-level

bracket, where the gap is much narrower and almost at parity.

Gender pay differences continue to make headlines, with the UK government currently

drafting legislation that, if passed, would force companies above 250 employees to disclose

the gender pay gap amongst their workforce.

Regardless of the threat of legislation, firms need to do more to identify where gender pay

differences exist in their organisations and rectify the underlying reasons. Our research

suggests that these interventions should be targeted primarily at middle and senior management

level.


28 l Digital Salary & Industry Insights

Section 2:

Marketing

The role of the modern marketer continues

to develop and diversify with marketers now

expected to reach consumers seamlessly

across multiple channels and touchpoints.

Salaries across the group remain below the

overall averages, however compared to 2015,

salaries do increase for three of the four

seniority levels which is encouraging.

Findings from our Open Blend research

suggest that progression and fulfilment at

work are key areas of concern across many

of the age brackets.


Digital Salary & Industry Insights l 29

Demographics and highlights

Demographics overview: Gender

Are you considering a

job change in 2016?

Female 48%

N0 39%

Male 52%

Yes 61%

Demographics overview: Seniority

Do you receive a bonus?

C-Level, 7%

Junior, 22%

N0 52%

Senior, 28%

Mid-level, 43%

Yes 48%

Demographics overview: Age

Average working hours

55-64, 1% 65+, 1%

45-54, 4%

18-24, 14%

35-44, 20%

48 4%


30 l Digital Salary & Industry Insights

Open Blend summary: Marketing

Blend scores

85%

target blend

Most important elements

progression

at work

24% gap fulfilment

at work

61%

current

fun

blend

Well-being

65%

happiness

69%

confidence

57%

stress

Biggest gaps in fulfilment by age

Generation Z

(18-24)

Millennial

(25-34)

Generation Y

(35-44)

Baby boomers

(45-55)

17%

fulfilment

at work

18%

progression

at work

17%

progression

at work

12%

clear career

goals

12%

progression

at work

23%

making a

difference

at work

18%

effective

team


Digital Salary & Industry Insights l 31

Average Salaries by Seniority

£120,000

£100,000

£108,203

£80,000

£60,000

£63,723

£40,000

£20,000

£26,504

£39,007

Junior

Mid-level

Senior

C-Level

As observed in our report last year, marketing salaries fall below the overall averages across

all seniority levels.

In comparison to the marketing salaries reported in 2015, we see an increase in the average

salary across junior, senior and C-level, with a slight decrease at mid-level.

Contract rates

Average day rate over past 12 months

Seniority

Specialism Junior Mid-level Senior C-level Average

Campaign Management £450 £450

Content Management / Editorial £180 £295 £500 £222

Digital Advertising £200 £260 £285 £258

Email Marketing / eCRM £180 £408 £351

Marketing - Online / Direct £158 £400 £218

Marketing / Brand Strategy £245 £538 £391

Paid Search £218 £218

Product Management £325 £500 £383

SEO / SEM £200 £325 £263

Social Media £133 £288 £300 £213

Average £192 £272 £405 £266

Contract rates for marketing professionals are slightly below the report average, but certain

specialisms are clearly in higher demand. Those that sit in the senior levels of content

management, brand strategy and product management are particularly well compensated.

The following pages provide an overview of the salary averages for the specific specialisms

within the marketing skill set, broken down by seniority level.


32 l Digital Salary & Industry Insights

Advertising Operations / Trafficking

With the continuing rise of programmatic advertising (and the subsequent shift in budgets

towards programmatic platforms), Ad Ops / trafficking professionals find themselves in

increasing demand. Mid and senior level professionals sit below the average marketing

salaries, but wide salary bandings suggest that there is plenty of room for skilled specialists

to command impressive rates.

ADVERTISING OPERATIONS / TRAFFICKING SALARIES

SENIOR

£55,797

MID-LEVEL

£37,463

JUNIOR

£26,217

£0k £10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k £140k £150k

Affiliate Marketing

Affiliate marketing remains a crucial part of the digital ecosystem, especially for publishers

and those keen to monetise their content. Salaries for affiliate professionals are slightly

below average but in the more senior bracket, average salaries are consistently higher than

in our 2015 report.

AFFILIATE MARKETING SALARIES

SENIOR

£55,000

MID-LEVEL

£36,885

JUNIOR

£26,917

£0k £10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k £140k £150k


Digital Salary & Industry Insights l 33

Campaign Management

This broad strategic role often requires campaign managers to balance the needs of

multiple stakeholders across an organisation, while still satisfying the wider KPIs linked

to the campaign. Salaries tend to be below the marketing averages, with broad bandings at

higher seniority levels allowing plenty of room for negotiation.

CAMPAIGN MANAGEMENT SALARIES

SENIOR

£48,850

MID-LEVEL

£36,821

JUNIOR

£27,614

£0k £10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k £140k £150k

Content Management / Editorial

Content creation and distribution has become a cornerstone of an organisation’s marketing

strategy as search engines continue to tailor SEO algorithms to prioritise original material.

Although below the average at junior and mid-level, skilled professionals that advance to

senior positions can expect to earn significantly above the average marketing wage.

CONTENT MANAGEMENT SALARIES

SENIOR

£69,143

MID-LEVEL

£34,822

JUNIOR

£25,217

£0k £10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k £140k £150k


34 l Digital Salary & Industry Insights

Digital Advertising

Across all seniority levels, digital advertising salaries are on a par or higher than the overall

marketing averages. When it comes to C-level professionals, the broad range of roles leads

to significant variation in salaries, but those at the top end can achieve almost £80K more

than the C-level average.

DIGITAL ADVERTISING SALARIES

C-LEVEL

£103,571

SENIOR

£66,381

MID-LEVEL

£41,296

JUNIOR

£26,250

£0k

£15k £30k £45k £60k £75k £90k £105k £120k £135k £150k £165k £180k £195k £210k

Email Marketing / eCRM

As with our 2015 report, salaries at junior and mid-level are competitive, but become more

restrictive for senior professionals, somewhat below the senior average for marketers. This

suggests that organisations need to consider more attractive benefit packages to prevent

talented eCRM professionals from being tempted into other marketing disciplines.

EMAIL MARKETING / E-CRM SALARIES

SENIOR

£52,063

MID-LEVEL

£38,688

JUNIOR

£27,419

£0k £10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k £140k £150k


Digital Salary & Industry Insights l 35

Marketing - Online / Direct

Dominated by those with more generalist marketing skills, the group observes both

extreme highs and lows in terms of reported salaries. On balance, the professionals in

this group achieve slightly higher wages across the seniority brackets than the marketing

average.

MARKETING - ONLINE / DIRECT SALARIES

C-LEVEL

£110,925

SENIOR

£66,236

MID-LEVEL

£40,926

JUNIOR

£27,376

£0k

£15k £30k £45k £60k £75k £90k £105k £120k £135k £150k £165k £180k £195k £205k

Marketing - Brand Strategy

Branding and identity continue to be the key differentiator for companies, and this is

reflected in the similar or above average salaries for brand strategy professionals at both

senior and C-level brackets, receiving some of the highest salaries observed across our

sample.

BRAND STRATEGY SALARIES

C-LEVEL

£108,182

SENIOR

£67,175

MID-LEVEL

£36,745

JUNIOR

£23,734

£0k

£15k £30k £45k £60k £75k £90k £105k £120k £135k £150k £165k £180k £195k £205k


36 l Digital Salary & Industry Insights

Paid Search

Across the sample, paid search displays relatively competitive junior salaries followed by

less restrictive senior pay. With search continuing to grow, it is expected that salaries in the

senior levels will increase as organisations compete for more experienced talent.

PAID SEARCH SALARIES

SENIOR

£57,294

MID-LEVEL

£38,619

JUNIOR

£26,640

£0k £10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k £140k £150k

Paid Social

At junior level, salary bandings extremely tight, a trend which was also observed in our

2015 report. However, mid-level and senior positions now show much wider bandings than

in 2015, suggesting more diverse supply and competition for positions. Although this has

caused slightly lower average salaries overall, maximum earning potential has increased

significantly.

PAID SOCIAL SALARIES

SENIOR

£56,800

MID-LEVEL

£36,250

JUNIOR

£21,000

£0k £10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k £140k £150k


Digital Salary & Industry Insights l 37

Product Management

Product management remains one of the most profitable marketing specialisms, a trend

also observed in our 2015 report. Product managers earn above the average across all seniority

levels, with the gap widening as seniority increases.

PRODUCT MANAGEMENT SALARIES

SENIOR

£80,176

MID-LEVEL

£49,208

JUNIOR

£28,250

£ k £10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k £140k £150k

SEO / SEM

In line with our 2015 report, SEO/SEM professionals continue to earn salaries that are

broadly consistent with the average marketing salary, except at senior level where salaries

are lower. However, broad salary bands at senior level indicate a high level of opportunity

for career advancement for ambitious junior and mid-level executives.

SEO / SEM SALARIES

SENIOR

£55,850

MID-LEVEL

£39,422

JUNIOR

£27,038

£0k £10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k £140k £150k


38 l Digital Salary & Industry Insights

Social Media

Social media salaries remain slightly below the average marketing salaries at all levels,

suggesting that businesses are still to be convinced that social influences the bottom line

enough to increase remuneration, particularly across junior and mid-level roles. Salaries at

senior level however, show broader bandings, suggesting a demand for those able to lead

social strategy at an organisational level.

SOCIAL MEDIA SALARIES

SENIOR

£56,420

MID-LEVEL

£35,583

JUNIOR

£25,379

£0k £10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k £140k £150k


Section 3:

Commercial

The leading edge of a business, those in

the commercial section of our report are

responsible for seeking out potential clients

and fostering the relationships that allow

a company to grow.

Salaries have increased across the spectrum

in comparison to our 2015 survey, while

research from our Open Blend section

suggests that employers have to do more to

ensure commercial staff are fulfilled, and clear

on their future prospects for progression.


40 l Digital Salary & Industry Insights

Demographics and highlights

Demographics overview: Gender

Are you considering a

job change in 2016?

Female 33%

N0 44%

Male 67%

Yes 56%

Demographics overview: Seniority

Do you receive a bonus?

C-level, 18%

Junior, 14%

N0 25%

Senior, 40%

Mid-level, 28%

Yes 75%

Demographics overview: Age

Average working hours

55-64, 2% 65+, 1%

45-54, 8%

18-24, 6%

35-44, 35%

48+ 7%


Digital Salary & Industry Insights l 41

Open Blend summary: Commercial

Blend scores

87%

target blend

Most important elements

fulfilment

at work

23% gap my partner

64%

current

blend

health

and exercise

Well-being

66%

happiness

74%

confidence

60%

stress

Biggest gaps in fulfilment by age

Generation Z

(18-24)

Millennial

(25-34)

Generation Y

(35-44)

Baby boomers

(45-55)

17.5%

effective

team

13%

progression

at work

13%

fulfilment

at work

19%

clear career

goals

24%

mindset

well-being

12%

clear career

goals

11%

progression

at work


42 l Digital Salary & Industry Insights

Average Salaries by Seniority

£120,000

£113,083

£100,000

£80,000

£71,423

£60,000

£40,000

£20,000

£27,126

£41,116

Junior

Mid-level

Senior

C-Level

With the exception of mid-level professionals, salaries across the commercial skill set

were higher than in our 2015 report.

However, unlike last year where salaries were above the overall average across each

seniority level, junior and mid-level salaries fall below the overall averages.

Contract rates

Average day rate over past 12 months

Seniority

Specialism Junior Mid-level Senior C-level Average

Account Management £200 £275 £230

Business Development £253 £280 £650 £390

Partnerships £400 £400

Average £200 £262 £340 £650 £324

As a specialism focused on relationships, freelancers in the commercial skill set tend to be

focused in a small subset of the overall discipline. Rates for this group tend to be tightly

distributed, with little separation between the junior and senior levels.

The following pages provide an overview of the salary averages for the specific specialisms

within the commercial skill set, broken down by seniority level.


Digital Salary & Industry Insights l 43

Account Management

Despite being the cornerstone of most organisations, and the first point of contact with

clients, salaries for account management professionals are slightly below the commercial

average overall. However, broad bandings allow room for negotiation, and those that advance

to C-level in this specialism can expect their compensation to rise above that usually

observed at this level.

ACCOUNT MANAGEMENT SALARIES

C-LEVEL

£116,750

SENIOR

£60,683

MID-LEVEL

£40,567

JUNIOR

£26,140

£0k

£10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k £140k

Agency Sales

Remuneration within agency sales is above the commercial average, with this difference

becoming particularly pronounced as professionals enter the senior and C-level brackets.

Despite the high averages, variation across the salary bandings is high, with senior compensation

ranging from £50K at the low end to almost £160K at the top of the spectrum.

AGENCY SALES SALARIES

C-LEVEL

£121,250

SENIOR

£94,527

MID-LEVEL

£45,038

JUNIOR

£28,750

£0k

£20k £40k £60k £80k £100k £120k £140k £160k £180k £200k £220k £240k £260k £280k


44 l Digital Salary & Industry Insights

Business Development

In a similar vein to agency sales, the broad range of roles across business development see

significant variation within each seniority bracket. At C-level in particular, professionals

have substantial space for negotiation, with top range salaries amongst the highest recorded

across our survey.

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT SALARIES

C-LEVEL

£108,231

SENIOR

£73,770

MID-LEVEL

£40,703

JUNIOR

£29,882

£0k

£20k £40k £60k £80k £100k £120k £140k £160k £180k £200k £220k £240k £260k £280k

Channel Sales

Although salaries for channel sales professionals are below the overall commercial average,

particularly at junior level, bandings become much broader as seniority increases.

Remuneration remains lower at the top end compared to other commercial roles

suggesting some migration into more strategically focused positions as professionals gain

experience.

CHANNEL SALES SALARIES

SENIOR

£62,250

MID-LEVEL

£38,100

JUNIOR

£25,000

£0k

£10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k £140k


Digital Salary & Industry Insights l 45

Customer Services

Customer services professionals sit below the average commercial salaries across the

seniority levels, particularly at junior and mid-level, where remuneration is restrictive even

at the top end. Despite some at senior level earning above the average commercial rate,

our research suggests professionals may seek lateral movement into other related roles to

improve their remuneration prospects.

CUSTOMER SERVICES SALARIES

SENIOR

£65,250

MID-LEVEL

£31,750

JUNIOR

£24,667

£0k

£10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k £140k

Enterprise Software Sales

Selling software to large enterprises requires a mix of technical and administrative skills, in

combination with the business sense and personality to secure the final sale. Despite the

long sales cycle, the potential for reward is significantly higher than many commercial roles,

with salaries above the commercial average at all seniority levels.

ENTERPRISE SOFTWARE SALARIES

C-LEVEL

£118,333

SENIOR

£85,714

MID-LEVEL

£60,000

JUNIOR

£35,000

£0k

£10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k £140k


46 l Digital Salary & Industry Insights

Partnerships

Representing the lucrative revenues derived from large scale sponsorship agreements and

partnerships, professionals in this specialism see relatively tight salary bandings at junior

and mid-level. However, salaries across all seniority levels sit above the commercial average,

and earning potential for those that advance remains competitive with the broad spectrum

of commercial roles analysed in our report.

PARTNERSHIP SALARIES

SENIOR

£72,409

MID-LEVEL

£42,000

JUNIOR

£33,867

£0k £10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k £140k £150k

Pre-Sales

As in our 2015 report, salaries for pre-sales professionals remain relatively tight across the

seniority levels, with much less room for negotiation than in many other commercial roles.

Despite the tight salary bands, those that hold mid-level and senior positions are highly

valued, with average salaries significantly beyond the commercial norm.

PRE-SALES SALARIES

SENIOR

£90,000

MID-LEVEL

£62,000

JUNIOR

£23,333

£0k £10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k £140k £150k


Digital Salary & Industry Insights l 47

Publisher Development

Junior and mid-level salaries sit below the overall commercial average, however wider

salary brackets allow for the potential to exceed the norm by some margin. At senior level,

professionals can expect their compensation to rise significantly, although top end salaries

are somewhat more restrictive than the other positions analysed.E

PUBLISHER DEVELOPMENT SALARIES

SENIOR

£79,583

MID-LEVEL

£37,300

JUNIOR

£23,333

£0k £10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k £140k £150k


Section 4:

Technical

Those in our technical specialisms are

responsible for maintaining the extensive

infrastructure and virtual assets that act

as storefronts in today’s digital economy.

Developers and technical specialists arguably

hold as much influence over the customer

experience as marketers, with polished

online interactions a growing driver of

brand preference.

Salaries for this group are above the overall

industry averages observed across our

sample. However, findings from our Open

Blend research suggest that progression at

work remains a key concern across many

of the age brackets.


Digital Salary & Industry Insights l 49

Demographics and highlights

Demographics overview: Gender

Are you considering a

job change in 2016?

Female 16%

N0 36%

Male 84%

Yes 64%

Demographics overview: Seniority

Do you receive a bonus?

C-Level, 7%

Junior, 22%

No 46%

Yes 54%

Senior, 28%

Mid-level, 43%

Demographics overview: Age

Average working hours

55-64, 2% 65+, 1%

45-54, 11%

18-24, 5%

42-47 7%


50 l Digital Salary & Industry Insights

Open Blend summary: Technical

Blend scores

83%

target blend

Most important elements

fulfilment

at work

21% gap time with

my partner

62%

current

blend

family and

friends

Well-being

68%

happiness

71%

confidence

53%

stress

Biggest gaps in fulfilment by age

Generation Z

(18-24)

Millennial

(25-34)

Generation Y

(35-44)

Baby boomers

(45-55)

14%

progression

at work

13%

progression

at work

13%

progression

at work

21%

fulfilment

at work

14%

recognition


Digital Salary & Industry Insights l 51

Average Salaries by Seniority

£120,000

£100,000

£80,000

£60,000

£40,000

£20,000

£31,995

£48,604

£68,874

Junior

Mid-level

Senior

Contrasting significantly with last year’s report, technical salaries are above the overall

averages at junior, mid and senior level, a trend more in line with our 2014 report.

Despite the lack of salary data for senior executives, our report would suggest that for those who

do make it to the most senior management level, the remuneration is extremely favourable.

Contract rates

Average day rate over past 12 months

Seniority

Specialism Junior Mid-level Senior C-level Average

Architecture £300 £451 £434

Back-end Development £300 £400 £496 £438

Business Analysis £200 £275 £481 £400

Front-end Development £224 £324 £403 £310

IT Operations £197 £350 £442 £333

Mobile Development £250 £313 £416 £393

Programme Management £250 £450 £383

Project Management £225 £315 £385 £323

SEO / SEM £300 £300

Testing / QA £225 £315 £400 £306

Average £224 £324 £422 £336

Technical contractors and freelancers are commonplace within many organisations, with

a large number of tech professionals preferring this often lucrative option over taking a

salaried role. Rates often start high indicating there are opportunities to make good money

even at junior level. The high demand for technical talent is reflected in the fact that rates

for this group are significantly above the average at both junior and mid-levels.

The following pages provide an overview of the salary averages for the specific specialisms

within technical skill sets, broken down by seniority level.


52 l Digital Salary & Industry Insights

Architecture

Those in software architecture typically tend to be more senior in scope, with those analysed

concentrated in the mid-level and senior brackets. Although mid-level positions are

slightly below the average, salary ranges are wide in scope, and those in senior positions can

expect to earn significantly above the average for technical roles.

ARCHITECTURE SALARIES

SENIOR

£92,115

MID-LEVEL

£46,111

£0k £10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k £140k £150k

Back-end Development

Those in back-end development roles see their salaries slightly below the technical average

at mid and senior level. However, wide ranges across all levels show that skilled professionals

are still in high demand with organisations willing to pay well for the right candidate.

BACK-END SALARIES

SENIOR

£63,937

MID-LEVEL

£46,265

JUNIOR

£35,100

£0k £10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k £140k £150k


Digital Salary & Industry Insights l 53

Big Data

As businesses focus their strategies towards data, those capable of managing and deriving

insight will see rising competition for their skillsets. This is already reflected in the above

average salaries for big data professionals across all seniority levels with salaries representing

an increase in comparison to 2015.

BIG DATA SALARIES

SENIOR

£72,650

MID-LEVEL

£53,754

JUNIOR

£32,292

£0k £10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k £140k £150k

Business Analysis

Similar to roles centred on big data, the increased focus on driving performance and

revenue gains through insight has also had a commensurate impact on those in the

business analytics space. Salaries here outstrip the technical average at both the junior

and mid-level brackets.

BUSINESS ANALYSIS SALARIES

SENIOR

£66,231

MID-LEVEL

£55,094

JUNIOR

£38,125

£0k

£10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k £140k £150k


54 l Digital Salary & Industry Insights

Front-end Development

Front-end development traditionally acts as an entry point in the technical space, which

leads to significant variation in salary bandings and slightly depressed averages. However,

across all seniority levels, top end salaries can be exceptional, suggesting that competition

and demand for talented front-end developers is still driving the market forward.

FRONT-END SALARIES

SENIOR

£59,640

MID-LEVEL

£45,523

JUNIOR

£30,960

£0k £10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k £140k £150k

IT Operations

Those in IT Operations are responsible for the general technical maintenance of an organisation’s

assets, and compensation for these roles stretches beyond the technical average in

junior and mid-level positions. Salaries at senior level move toward parity with the average

wage for technical professionals at this level.

IT OPERATIONS SALARIES

SENIOR

£62,276

MID-LEVEL

£50,104

JUNIOR

£33,093

£0k £10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k £140k £150k


Digital Salary & Industry Insights l 55

Mobile Development

As mobile continues as a key consumer touchpoint, those in its development have seen

their skills come into considerable demand. Due to this, salaries for mobile development

positions are above the group average for junior and mid-level roles and are just shy of

average at senior level.

MOBILE DEVELOPMENT SALARIES

SENIOR

£68,346

MID-LEVEL

£51,333

JUNIOR

£35,857

£0k £10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k £140k £150k

Programme Management

As a role which is generally perceived as more senior by organisations, programme managers

can expect to receive particularly competitive salaries in relation to their peers in the

technical sample. This is illustrated by the fact that mid-level programme managers can

receive salaries above the technical average, even at the lowest end of the spectrum.

PROGRAMME SALARIES

SENIOR

£92,300

MID-LEVEL

£61,951

£0k £10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k £140k £150k


56 l Digital Salary & Industry Insights

Project Management

Although junior project managers can expect to receive salaries below that of the technical

average, room for negotiation increases significantly as professionals rise through the

ranks. Salary variation is particularly high for this group at mid and senior levels, but compensation

for the project managers at the top end rivals that of the most skilled developers.

PROJECT MANAGEMENT SALARIES

SENIOR

£66,308

MID-LEVEL

£51,100

JUNIOR

£26,625

£0k £10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k £140k £150k

Testing & Quality Assurance

Similar to front-end development, the testing and QA function is often seen as an entry

point into many technical departments and technically focused organisations. Perhaps for

this reason, salaries sit below the average for the technical skill set as a group, but competition

at the top end still leads to enviable remuneration offers for the most accomplished QA

professionals.

TESTING & QA SALARIES

SENIOR

£55,300

MID-LEVEL

£42,861

JUNIOR

£27,100

£0k £10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k £140k £150k


Section 5:

Creative

Creativity remains one of the strongest differentiators

that any business can offer, with many of the world’s most

notable companies driven by design and ingenuity. Those

in our creative section are responsible for creating the spark

that brings an idea to life.

The majority of those in our creative group have seen

their salaries increase since 2015. Our Open Blend research

suggests that younger creatives in particular (those in

generation Z and millennials) feel that clearer career goals

are a necessity.


58 l Digital Salary & Industry Insights

Demographics and highlights

Demographics overview: Gender

Are you considering a

job change in 2016?

Female 35%

N0 29%

Male 65%

Yes 71%

Demographics overview: Seniority

Do you receive a bonus?

C-Suite, 4%

Junior, 19%

N0 58%

Senior, 45%

Mid-level, 32%

Yes 42%

Demographics overview: Age

Average working hours

55-64, 1% 65+, 1%

45-54, 10%

18-24, 9%

48+ 7%


Digital Salary & Industry Insights l 59

Open Blend summary: Creative

Blend scores

85%

target blend

Most important elements

fun

26% gap health and

59%

current

blend

time with

family and

friends

exercise

Well-being

64%

happiness

68%

confidence

54%

stress

Biggest gaps in fulfilment by age

Generation Z

(18-24)

Millennial

(25-34)

Generation Y

(35-44)

Baby boomers

(45-55)

16%

clear

career goals

17%

progression

at work

13%

flexible

working

culture

16%

recognition

17%

clear career

goals

16%

health and

exercise

16%

sense of

belonging


60 l Digital Salary & Industry Insights

Average Salaries by Seniority

£120,000

£100,000

£80,000

£60,000

£60,067

£84,667

£40,000

£20,000

£28,236

£38,677

Junior

Mid-level

Senior

C-Level

Across junior, mid and senior levels, salaries are higher than in 2015. However, they are still

lower than the 2016 overall average salaries for three of the four seniority levels.

Only at junior level do creative professionals find their average salary higher than the

sample overall.

Contract rates

Average day rate over past 12 months

Seniority

Specialism Junior Mid-level Senior C-level Average

Copywriting £188 £271 £360 £266

Creative Strategy £275 £308 £295

Design £193 £264 £341 £266

Production Management £200 £200

Project Management £255 £333 £366 £331

UX / UI £244 £341 £438 £390

Average £208 £311 £403 £334

Due to the project orientated nature of creative work, there will always be a need for

skilled contractors within this space and often they are crucial to delivering projects on

time. Across many of the specialisms, rates are down at each seniority level, however this

decrease is only marginal. Salary averages for creative professionals are in line with those

found across the wider survey group.

The following pages provide an overview of the salary averages for the specific specialisms

within the creative skill set, broken down by seniority level.


Digital Salary & Industry Insights l 61

Artwork

Salaries for artworkers are widely consistent with creative averages, and generally, remuneration

for artworkers is higher than those observed in our 2015 research. However at junior

level, salaries remain below the creative average.Copywriting

ARTWORK SALARIES

SENIOR

£60,000

MID-LEVEL

£46,250

JUNIOR

£24,333

£0k

£10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k £140k £150k

Copywriting

Salaries for copywriters reflect the fact that many in the specialism migrate into more

broadly focused strategic roles, such as creative strategists or more general marketing

positions, as they gain more experience. As an artefact of the specialism’s heritage as an

entry point into creative roles, salaries are slightly below the creative average.

COPYWRITING SALARIES

MID-LEVEL

£34,267

JUNIOR

£25,000

£0k £10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k £140k £150k


62 l Digital Salary & Industry Insights

Creative Strategy

Traditionally a more senior role within organisations, those responsible for creative strategy

command some of the highest salaries observed across the creative skill set sample.

However, salaries are distributed widely across the seniority brackets, suggesting that the

perception of the value of creativity varies significantly across organisations.

CREATIVE STRATEGY SALARIES

C-LEVEL

£84,667

SENIOR

£62,313

MID-LEVEL

£38,417

JUNIOR

£27,000

£0k

£10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k £140k

Design

Salaries for designers remain slightly below the creative average on the whole. However,

particularly at senior levels, designers with broader strategic goals (such as brand

experience heads), can attain impressive remuneration packages that are higher than the

majority of those observed across the creative sample.

DESIGN SALARIES

SENIOR

£54,659

MID-LEVEL

£36,726

JUNIOR

£27,609

£0k

£20k £40k £60k £80k £100k £120k £140k £160k £180k £200k £220k £240k £260k £280k


Digital Salary & Industry Insights l 63

Production Management

Reflecting the trend for production management roles to be focused in senior levels of

creative departments, junior salaries are concentrated in a narrow range. Mid-level salaries

in particular outstrip the average for the creative skill set, and the most well paid production

managers at senior level can expect to achieve around £10K more than the average for

creatives.

PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT SALARIES

SENIOR

£58,714

MID-LEVEL

£45,500

JUNIOR

£27,892

£0k

£10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k £140k

Project Management

Creative project managers show a similar salary profile to their counterparts in the technical

space. Salaries at both junior and mid-level positions are on a par with the average creative

wage, and although senior compensation is slightly below the average, vast variations

in salary ranges see some senior project managers earning up to £100K.

PROJECT MANAGEMENT SALARIES

SENIOR

£58,591

MID-LEVEL

£39,182

JUNIOR

£28,685

£0k

£10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k £140k


64 l Digital Salary & Industry Insights

UX / UI

With a more technically focused skillset backed up by the growing awareness of strong UX

as a competitive advantage, UX and UI professionals receive salaries that are higher than

the creative average by some margin, particularly at junior level. Broad salary bandings also

suggest significantly potential for lateral movement within the specialism.

UX/UI SALARIES

SENIOR

£66,717

MID-LEVEL

£41,136

JUNIOR

£37,429

£0k

£10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k £140k


Section 6:

Business

Operations

The business operations professionals in our sample are the

engines of their organisations. Responsible for core functions

such as finance and human resources, they often sit in the

background of their business. Few professions are more

essential for firms to function effectively however, with our

Open Blend research alone emphasising the importance of

HR policy on employee retention.

Salaries sit close to the overall averages, rising slightly above

at junior level. Fulfilment at work and progression were

recognised as key concerns for business operations

professionals, which shifts to a focus on a more positive

and flexible working culture for older employees.


66 l Digital Salary & Industry Insights

Demographics and highlights

Demographics overview: Gender

Are you considering a

job change in 2016?

Female 52%

N0 33%

Male 48%

Yes 67%

Demographics overview: Seniority

Do you receive a bonus?

C-level, 14%

Junior, 14%

No 46%

Senior, 34%

Mid-level, 38%

Yes 54%

Demographics overview: Age

Average working hours

45-54, 13%

55-64, 7%

65+, 1%

18-24, 5%

48+ 3%

42-47 6%


Digital Salary & Industry Insights l 67

Open Blend summary: Business Operations

Blend scores

85%

target blend

Most important elements

fulfilment

at work

24% gap fun

61%

current

my partner

blend

Well-being

67%

happiness

71%

confidence

59%

stress

Biggest gaps in fulfilment by age

Generation Z

(18-24)

Millennial

(25-34)

Generation Y

(35-44)

Baby boomers

(45-55)

23%

fulfilment

at work

16%

clear career

goals

14%

fun

14%

flexible

working

culture

26%

progression

at work

16%

fulfilment

at work

14%

recognition


68 l Digital Salary & Industry Insights

Average Salaries by Seniority

£120,000

£100,000

£102,111

£80,000

£60,000

£66,087

£40,000

£20,000

£29,000

£39,701

Junior

Mid-level

Senior

C-Level

New to our report this year, business operations professionals see their average salaries fall

below the overall averages at mid, senior and C-level, perhaps given the breadth of roles and

responsibilities within this group.

Only at junior level do business operations professionals find their average salary higher

than the sample overall.

Contract rates

Average day rate over past 12 months

Seniority

Specialism Junior Mid-level Senior C-level Average

Administration £107 £185 £450 £190

Finance £100 £100

HR £700 £700

IT £300 £517 £750 £494

Legal £350 £600 £475

Average £105 £265 £555 £750 £402

A skill set with typically fewer contract staff than those we’ve covered, business operations

professionals on a daily rate see the broadest banding throughout seniority levels. This

again, is most likely due to the breadth of roles covered within this sample.

The following pages provide an overview of the salary averages for the specific specialisms

within the business operations skill set, broken down by seniority level.


Digital Salary & Industry Insights l 69

Administration

Administration encompasses a broad range of professions, from those responsible for

fulfilling key organisational support functions to chief operating officers. The variation in

roles leads to the lower seniority levels observing salaries which are somewhat below the

business operations average whereas senior and C-level positions sit above the average.

Linked to this, salaries are broadly distributed across the brackets, reflecting the wide

variety of positions.

ADMINISTRATION SALARIES

C-LEVEL

£109,922

SENIOR

£71,000

MID-LEVEL

£36,433

JUNIOR

£26,667

£0k

£20k £40k £60k £80k £100k £120k £140k £160k £180k £200k £220k £240k £260k £280k

Finance

As with administration, the finance specialism encompasses a wide-ranging mix of

positions, from accounts administrators to chief financial officers. Salaries for finance

professionals are largely at parity with the average for the business operations skillset,

but C-level finance professionals can expect to receive significantly above the average,

rising to £200K per year at the highest levels.

FINANCE SALARIES

C-LEVEL

£112,500

SENIOR

£64,800

MID-LEVEL

£37,167

£0k

£20k £40k £60k £80k £100k £120k £140k £160k £180k £200k £220k £240k £260k £280k


70 l Digital Salary & Industry Insights

Human Resources

HR and recruitment salaries are consistent with the averages observed across the business

operations skill set as a group. Junior and mid-level salaries are somewhat above the

average however expected salary ranges across both brackets are fairly restrictive. At senior

and C-level, remuneration varies much more widely, with almost £70K separating the

highest and lowest paid HR directors.

HR SALARIES

C-LEVEL

£99,143

SENIOR

£60,250

MID-LEVEL

£40,844

JUNIOR

£32,200

£0k

£10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k £140k

IT Salaries

With the exception of C-level professionals, those in IT can expect to receive salaries that

are equivalent with others in the support functions analysed across business operations.

At C-level, IT specialists can still expect to receive competitive compensation, but the salary

range is significantly more measured at the top end than with other C-level professionals

across the skillset.

IT SALARIES

C-LEVEL

£81,000

SENIOR

£67,455

MID-LEVEL

£41,984

JUNIOR

£28,500

£0k

£10k £20k £30k £40k £50k £60k £70k £80k £90k £100k £110k £120k £130k £140k


Thank you

Our Digital Salary & Industry Insights report is an annual undertaking produced for the

individuals who drive the global digital economy. We’ll be back in 2017 with our eighth

edition, but in the meantime you can get in touch with any questions or queries on

0207 432 6340 or by emailing survey@propellondon.com.

Propel London: Recruiters for the global digital economy

Propel are the UK’s largest independent provider of permanent and contract recruitment

services to the global digital economy, specialising in commercial, marketing, technical and

creative talent.

The Drum is a global media platform and Europe’s largest marketing website.

Every day we share industry news from around the globe, and every fortnight, we showcase

‘world-changing’ marketing in our magazine.

Beyond our reporting remit, our ecosystem includes 23 awards, 7 live events, a peer-to-peer

learning club, content marketing division, and video production and distribution service.

To find out more visit www.thedrum.com.

Open Blend Method is an online tool that simply enables effective communication between

a leader and their individual team members.

Our software facilitates high impact coaching sessions that focus on an individual’s wellbeing

and performance. At the heart of the software is our ‘Blend Tool’. Work life balance is

outdate and Blend is its replacement.

Blend is our simple yet revolutionary methodology that highlights the reality that perfomance

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