Issue 32 / April 2013

bidolito

April 2013 issue of Bido Lito! Featuring MIND MOUNTAIN, CLANG BOOM STEAM, LUDOVICO EINAUDI, WE CAME OUT LIKE TIGERS, JON MORTER and much more.

FREE

Issue 32

April 2013

Mind Mountain by Keith Ainsworth

Mind Mountain

Clang Boom Steam

Ludovico Einaudi

We Came Out

Like Tigers

Jon Morter


Thursday 4th APRIL

Johnny’s Acoustic Caravan Club

THE FURNACE / 8pm – 11pm / Free


Saturday 6th APRIL

RockAbilly Extravaganza

CAMP / 2pm til late


Wednesday 10th APRIL

PLAY

CAMP and FURNACE / 8pm / Free


Thursday 11th APRIL

Lights Out

THE LOBBY / 8pm / Free


Wednesday 17th APRIL

PLAY

CAMP / 8pm / Free


Thursday 18th APRIL

Rockaoke

CAMP / 8pm til 12am / Free


Wednesday 24th APRIL

LOBBY CLOSED FOR PRIVATE FUNCTION


Thursday 25th APRIL

Mellowtone

THE LOBBY / 8pm


Tuesday 30th APRIL

After Darkness Light presents:

Post Tenebras Lux

GALLERY / 8pm

Thursday 4th APRIL

Liverpool Psych Fest presents:

HOOKWORMS & Baltic Fleet


Friday 12th APRIL

Behind the Wall of Sleep presents:

WHITE HILLS, Plank & Mugstar


Monday 15th APRIL

Deep Hedonia IN ASSOCIATION with drawing paper:

NHK’KOYXEN, Bantam Lions & Isocore


Wednesday 24th APRIL

Liverpool Psych Fest presents:

K-X-P & Gigantes


Friday 26th APRIL

Blade Factory presents:

COWTOWN and other earth


SATURDAY 27th APRIL

Rehab presents:

Phil Weeks, David Glass & INFINITE Soul


Blade Factory is a live music, club and arts space situated

within Camp & Furnace, if you would like to come and visit

or make any booking enquiries please contact

AndrewEllis1986@gmail.com

DJs / Chefs / Mixologists

Music / Street-food / Cocktails

FOOD SLAM

FRIDAYS

Underground supper-party

Devour / Drink / Dance


20.00hrs – 02.00hrs

In The Furnace,

every Friday – starting 12th April

Free entry

www.campandfurnace.com


Bido Lito! April 2013 3

Editorial

Festival season is starting to slowly creep up on us. This month’s Bido Lito! includes reviews from

two of the year’s early pacesetters, Threshold Festival and Liverpool International Jazz Festival. New

to the calendar, Liverpool International Jazz Festival proved a really welcome addition, providing a

focus on a section of our music community that for years has been criminally overlooked (an issue

brought into focus by the positive reaction to last month’s feature on The Weave).

We’ve also enjoyed another broad, diverse and enthusiastic outing from Threshold Festival.

Surely one of the most energetic events of the year, the festival does a vital job in bringing

together and celebrating the emerging scene. Early announcements have also emerged from (to

mention but a few) Africa Oyé (pictured), Liverpool International Festival Of Psychedelia and X&Y

Festival - which seems set to build on a very impressive debut in 2012. The inaugural Radstock is

also imminent and we find ourselves only a matter a weeks away from

this year’s Liverpool Sound City - look out for next month’s issue which

will feature an extensive Sound City preview.

Leading on from this, and emerging just after we published last

month’s edition of Bido Lito!, the announcement was made that

Mathew Street Festival was to be scrapped and replaced by a new

Liverpool International Music Festival. Ever an emotive issue, Mathew

Street was loved and loathed in equal measure - for a host of diverse

reasons - with many in the local music scene angered by its emphasis

on tribute artists and Beatles nostalgia. I’ve said many times in the past

that Mathew Street festival - much like the Mathew Street Beatles industry for which it provided

an annual focal point - was principally a tourism event, not a music festival. We’re incredibly

lucky in this city to have a blossoming tourism industry bringing in investment. If we didn’t,

the economic picture would be even bleaker than the smog in which we find ourselves. The

local music community berating Mathew Street Festival for not including new emerging artists

always seemed slightly misguided, a waste of energy, to me.

But, with the new announcement, Liverpool City Council have certainly put their head on

the block. According to the announcement, the new festival will have “activities catering for

a diverse range of tastes”, and the previously under-resourced and, some could say, tokenistic

fringe will “return for 2013 adding a cutting edge element as the city celebrates its original

grassroots musicians in venues which support live music all year round.”

The news that Yaw Owusu, a local dedicated professional who knows this city’s music

intimately, has been appointed musical curator is a step in the right direction. The challenge has

been set, and I know Yaw understands that the only way to achieve a festival that everyone will

get behind is to have an event that represents and celebrates the amazing musical culture our

city has oozing from its every backstreet - as well as catering for the Beatles crowd.

Our friends up the road in Manchester recently announced the programme for 2013’s

Manchester International Festival. Last year, Björk opened proceedings with a musical lightning

generator and four harp-playing pendulums in a performance that also included a 24-piece allfemale

Icelandic choir and a voice-over from Sir David Attenborough. This year, Mogwai will play

a live soundtrack to Douglas Gordon’s iconic Zidane: A 21st Century Portrait. The XX will also be

playing an 18-date residency in a 60-capacity, specially created space.

I trust that the Liverpool International Music Festival will show no less ambition as it looks to

shine a global light on our city.

Craig G Pennington / @BidoLito

Editor

Features

6

8

MIND MOUNTAIN

CLANG BOOM STEAM

10

GLAM!

12

JON MORTER

14 LUDOVICO EINAUDI

16

WE CAME OUT LIKE TIGERS

18

GIT AWARD 2013

Regulars

4 NEWS

20

PREVIEWS/SHORTS

22

REVIEWS

Bido Lito!

Issue Thirty Two / April 2013

bidolito.co.uk

4th Floor, Mello Mello

40-42 Slater St

Liverpool L1 4BX

Editor

Craig G Pennington - info@bidolito.co.uk

Assistant Editor

Christopher Torpey - reviews@bidolito.co.uk

Assistant Reviews Editor

Naters Philip - live@bidolito.co.uk

Online Editor

Natalie Williams - online@bidolito.co.uk

Designer

Luke Avery - info@luke-avery.com

Proofreading

Debra Williams - debra@wordsanddeeds.co.uk

Interns

Amy Minshull, Jack Graysmark, Petrica Mogos

Words

Craig G Pennington, Christopher Torpey, Naters P., Petricã

Mogos, Mick Chrysalid, Sam Archie Aston, Bill Ryder-Jones,

Jennifer Perkin, Richard Lewis, Joshua Nevett, Nic Lowrey,

Amy Minshull, Joseph Viney, Steven Aston, Laurie Cheeseman,

Flossie Easthope, Joshua Potts, Rob Dewis, Clarry M, Jack

Graysmark, Sarah Harman

Photography, Illustration and Layout

Luke Avery, Keith Ainsworth, Gered Mankowitz, Alex Wynne, Robin

Clewley, Gareth Arrowsmith, Sam Archie Aston, Adam Banister, Klaus

Pichler, John Johnson, Matt Thomas, Lasse Flede, Michael Sheerin,

Joe Wills, Adam Edwards, Matthew Thomas, Alex Nicholson, Nata

Moraru, Michelle Roberts, Gaz Jones, Jack Thompson

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views expressed in Bido Lito! are those of the respective

contributors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the

magazine, its staff or the publishers. All rights reserved.


News

City Of Sound

By now you’ve probably worked out your ‘to see’ list for May’s Sound City music feast, but there are several more additional

toppings to sprinkle on. Storming up from London and knocking people off chart spots in the process, BASTILLE (pictured) are

sure to be a must see at the festival, as are TEMPLES and SUN GLITTERS. If you’re looking to hear the best of the local flavour

you’re in luck with the additions of LOVED ONES, BY THE SEA, NADINE CARINA and BROKEN MEN. With still more acts to be

confirmed, keep up to date at liverpoolsoundcity.co.uk

City Of Light

If you are interested in exploring some of Liverpool’s finest landmarks, while simultaneously getting a glimpse of the local

creative scene, LIGHT NIGHT could be just the thing for you. This annual cultural night bestows astonishing light projections across

some of Liverpool city-centre’s most iconic buildings, as well as hosting live music, interactive street theatre and workshops. With

most of their events being free, Light Night again promises a unique visual experience. Be in the city on 17th May for a different,

imaginative approach towards the arts. lightnightliverpool.co.uk

The Social Is For Socialising

The Bido Lito! Social Club is back. This is the perfect opportunity for any budding writers, illustrators, photographers,

filmmakers and creative types who want to get involved with the magazine to meet the Bido Lito! team. To give things some

extra spice we’ve partnered up with new promoters Yeah! Skinny Boy to bring a FREE gig to the social, which will be at a

different Liverpool venue each month. The next instalment is on 25th April at The Caledonia, featuring DEATH MASKS, MIND

MOUNTAIN and EVRIPIDIS AND HIS TRAGEDIES.

X & Y’s Axis Of Awesome

As 2012 proved to be a great success in introducing X & Y FESTIVAL to the Liverpool festival scene, the announcement of this year’s

event marks a welcome return for the event, with some great artists already confirmed. Featuring the tropical heavy pop of DOG

IS DEAD and the funky, jangly indie from Brooklyn’s FRIENDS, the already intriguing line-up explores the limitlessness of lo-fi, lush

sounds in a highly anticipated new wave fiesta. With more to supplement the menu, which unwinds over the weekend of 6th – 7th

July, X & Y will be shifting between the O2 Academy and St Luke’s Bombed Out Church. facebook.com/XYFestival

Record Store Day 2.0

Want the chance to have some of your music released on hot wax? ITCHY PIG RECORDS can help. In the run-up to International

Record Store Day (20th April), the people from Itchy Pig will be leaving 20 USB sticks in key places around Liverpool, containing

stems from one of their releases (SIR VINYL INSTINCT’s Fruit Fly). Interested parties are invited to remix the track and submit their

entries by 31st May, with the winning mixes committed to a 12” record which will be released on 1st July. A tantalising selection of

clues to the locations of the USB sticks will soon be published online at bidolito.co.uk

Bido Lito! Dansette

Our pick of this month’s wax wonders…

AceMo

Leis

UNSIGNED

Highly abstract and experimental at

times, Leis is an esoteric lullaby that

swarms with strange textures and glitch

hop vibes. Basing his melodies on woozy

soundscapes, the wonky, futuristic New

York-based producer ACEMO’s breezy and

introspective melodies represent a great

discovery if you’re into the likes of Teebs,

Shlohmo or Mount Kimbie. Ace.

Vision Fortune

Mas Fiestas Con El Grupo

Vision Fortune

GRINGO RECORDS/FAUX DISCX

Masters of drone and repetition, VISION

FORTUNE know how to construct a narrative

from seemingly alien sounds, and their

debut long player takes this idea beyond

the normal realms. Taking inspiration from

John Kay’s Parable Of The Ox, Mas Fiestas

Con El Grupo Vision Fortune is laced with

tension and clashing imagery. If you’re

looking for common ground between

Mazes and Cold Pumas, look no further.

SeaWitches

Space Gun

UNSIGNED

COMPETITION!

Red Bull Studios Returns

We have teamed up with the guys at Red Bull Studios, who will be back in Liverpool for this year’s Sound City, and are giving

one lucky band the chance to record an exclusive track at the world-renowned Parr Street Studios. Not only that, they will do so

under the guidance of BILL RYDER-JONES who will be in the producer’s chair. The selected group will then go on to play the Red

Bull Studios Closing Party Stage at Sound City alongside Delphic, Egyptian Hip Hop, Murkage and many more. To apply, tweet a link

to your music and why your band should be the lucky one picked, tagging #RedBullStudiosLSC

On 15th May, MILES KANE will take to the stage at the Zanzibar for a very special exclusive show

as part of this year’s JD ROOTS. Jack Daniel’s has long been a favourite for rock icons. And like

Jack Daniel himself, those musicians achieved success by working hard and staying true to their

independent spirit. They learnt their craft by playing intimate gigs in their local small venues, places

worth celebrating so that new legends can be born.

For your chance to win a pair of tickets to this one-off show answer the following question -

In which venue is Miles Kane playing the JD Roots homecoming gig?

To enter, email your answer to competition@bidolito.co.uk

by 21st April 2013. 18+ only. For terms and

conditions go to bidolito.co.uk/content/jd-terms-conditions

The debut EP by SEAWITCHES, following

a lengthy apprenticeship on the city’s gig

circuit, distils the female-fronted art rock

band’s sound into a brace of spiky new

wave stunners. Shooting for the stars

on the epic title track and juxtaposing

Talking Heads and Fela Kuti on Another

Clown Fight, the four tracks’ brittle energy

serves notice of greater things to come.

This is serious dark matter.

The Growlers

Hung At Heart

FATCAT

RECORDS

THE GROWLERS scrub up their trademark

sunshine fuzz on their third record Hung

At Heart. The fifteen songs here shuffle

effortlessly from weird country to surf

rock to woozy psychedelia, all shot

through with an unflinchingly simple

garage approach. One Million Lovers is

Hung At Heart’s perfect distillation: the

Allah-Las in Harris Tweed.

Gig Guide and Ticket Shop live at www.bidolito.co.uk


Sun 24th Mar • £12.50 adv



Thurs 28th Mar • £16.50 adv


Fri 29th Mar • £6 adv


Sat 30th Mar • £25 adv

1pm - 11pm












Thurs 4th Apr •


Fri 5th Apr • £6 adv



Fri 12th Apr • £10 adv



Sat 13th Apr • £15 adv

10pm - 3am • over 18s only





Sat 13th Apr • £6 adv



Sun 14th Apr • £7 adv

6.45pm



Mon 15th Apr • £7 adv




Tues 16th Apr • £22.50 adv


Weds 17th Apr • £18 adv


Weds 17th Apr • £10 adv

6.30pm




Sat 20th Apr • £6 adv



Tues 23rd Apr • £9 adv


Wed 24th Apr • £11 adv


Fri 26th Apr • £12 adv



Sat 27th Apr • £17.50 adv


Sat 27th Apr • £6 adv




Sun 28th Apr • £16.50 adv


Sat 4th May • £15 adv

6pm




Sat 4th May • £15 adv


Tues 7th May • £7 adv


Weds 8th May


Fri 10th May • £6 adv





Sat 11th May •


Sun 12th May • £12 adv


Fri 17th May • £6 adv




Sat 25th May • £17.50 adv




Weds 29th May • £15 adv

£30 VIP inc. meet & greet


Thurs 30th May • £10 adv


Fri 31st May • £6 adv


Sat 1st Jun • £3 adv

6.30pm






Sat 8th Jun • £10.50 adv



Mon 1st Jul • £12 adv




Sat 6th Jul • £10 adv

2pm - 11pm







Mon 23rd Sep • £8.50 adv


Thurs 10th Oct • £16 adv


Sun 13th Oct • £16 adv



Sat 19th Oct • £10 adv




Thurs 31st Oct • £12 adv


Mon 4th Nov • £14 adv


Sat 16th Nov • £18.50 adv



Fri 29th Nov • £11 adv


Mon 2nd Dec • £12 adv


Fri 10th Jan 2014 • £13 adv


Fri 14th Jun • £20 adv


Tues 18th Jun • £35 adv


Tues 18th Jun • £15 adv






Sat 27th Apr • £17.50 adv

Sun 12th May • £12 adv

Sat 25th May • £17.50 adv

Tues 18th Jun • £35 adv


6

Bido Lito! April 2013

Words: Mick Chrysalid / witchfinderrecords.com

Photography: Keith Ainsworth / arkimages.co.uk

Gig Guide and Ticket Shop live at www.bidolito.co.uk


Bido Lito! April 2013 7

Hard work combined with sheer enjoyment is a great place

to start for any musical endeavour and it is self evidently in

abundance when I meet Joe Hirons (Guitar/Keys), Marc Glaysher

(Bass) and David Smyth (Drums), the trio of sonic contortionists

who make up MIND MOUNTAIN. These are three like-minded

individuals who have left no stone unturned, poring over jam

after jam to emerge with a true representation of where they are,

what they do and where they are going.

“A lot of the stuff does come from jams. We’ve never played

the same set twice,” says Marc. It is this innovation through

improvisation, with a focus on excitation, that aids them in their

ability to mix it up when playing live. David recalls, “Me and Mark

met at Roadburn festival in Holland and saw Earthless. I’d never

seen anything like it. A three-piece instrumental band that played

seat of your pants stuff for 45 minutes. It blew me away.”

Mind Mountain’s prime focus has been to pump as much

energy and thought into playing with each other, discovering each

other’s strengths and omitting the superfluous, the stuff that gets

in the way. Aided by a little four-track with built-in microphones

they recorded their jams with the purpose of revisiting, editing

and then redrafting. Reaching the level of understanding and

synchronicity that Mind Mountain have has its own reward and

this benefit is taken with them on stage. It has been greeted

with the thumbs up from 4.30am festival crowds at Liverpool’s

very own inaugural Psych Fest, through to their recent Blade

Factory appearance supporting Mazes. Psychedelia and heavy

rock are without doubt basic ingredients (elements of Hawkind

and Sabbath are evident) but they have bounced off on their own

tangent to cook up something that exists solely between the

three of them. Monolithic genres are rendered pretty meaningless

when talking about Mind Mountain. Marc explains, “It was all

practice and more practice and then from there grew a band.

Everything else comes after that.”

This is not a band whose first album cover, T-shirt and press

release have already been readily imagined. They didn’t just

theorise an amalgamation of influences that would set them up

for their first two years. They seem to be influenced by each other

as much as by anyone else. David states, “I remember being blown

away by Marc and Joe and it raised my own game. We’re aiming

for something a bit special.” Music is paramount, with everything

else having to wait. Even the idea of one of them singing has had

to be placed on the back burner in pursuit of the music, though it

appears that they may not remain an instrumental band forever,

with Joe looking to add vocals at some point. Again, however,

they are keen for any vocal inclusion to not be extraneous or

wasteful. With most music still being dominated by a centre

stage vocal, they are all too aware that the singer can become a

burdensome focal point. It is something they want to do but you

get the message that the music will come first, that any vocal

inclusion would be worked on until it was well honed, and only

then would it see the light of day. Mind Mountain would rather

have good riffs than bad lyrics. This point is hammered home

when Joe states, “The reluctance comes in having confidence in

what you’re singing and not just the act of singing itself.”

So, what next for Mind Mountain? Joe states, “We are looking

to record in May with a producer who knows what we’re after.

It will most likely be three tracks. With the recent shows it was

good to gauge a reaction to what we were doing.” It is this keen

interest in audience feedback that has led them to the view that

playing live is a testing ground for what works. This is a band who

have deliberated and come to the conclusion that riffs and hooks

is where they are being directed and impress upon the listener

that in a three-piece they are well aware that they can’t be lazy.

The reason they haven’t put anything out in physical form yet?

It is down to this search towards a full, exhilarating sound and a

drive towards becoming a dynamic three-piece that can captivate

and inspire. It is in their live gigging, Mind Mountain’s selfeducation,

that will set the precedent for when the band enter

the studio. Add this to the pure enjoyment derived from making

music and their debut starts to become a truly hot prospect. David

states, “We’re not going through the motions, this is a real outlet

for us. I couldn’t just drop this. Like quite a few people I know, it

would all get a bit depressing without music.”

Mind Mountain play the Bido Lito! Social Club @ The Caledonia

on 25th April and are live in session on this month’s Bido Lito!

Podcast at bidolito.co.uk.

Gig Guide and Ticket Shop live at www.bidolito.co.uk

mindmountain.bandcamp.com


8

Bido Lito! April 2013

Clang Boom Steam

Words: Richard Lewis

Words: Richard Lewis

Photography: Robin Clewley / @robinscamera

Announcing their arrival with the superb angularity of debut

cut Worms and the death-rattle sermon of accompanying double

A-side Clan late last year, blues/punk quartet CLANG BOOM STEAM

are one of the most promising prospects to emerge from the

Mersey Delta for 2013.

Aside from flagging up one of the band’s primary influences,

their moniker - taken from a Tom Waits track – also extends to the

group’s sound. “When the name popped up we were making a lot

of noise with the music we were doing in practice and it seemed

onomatopoeic as well,” Garvan Cosgrove (Singer/Guitarist)

explains, sipping coffee in a bustling MelloMello.

The Northern Ireland via Merseyside four-piece were founded by

Garvan and guitarist Charlie Mullan, veterans of several Liverpool

groups, and are completed by bassist Conor Simpson and drummer

Giulio Vaccaro. “Me and Charlie have been playing music for years;

we’ve been in Liverpool for ten years; we’ve gone through a couple

of different bands trying to work out what we were doing. We

played up and down the country,” Garvan explains.

Whereas Garvan and Charlie’s previous groups had boasted folky,

acoustic arrangements, Clang Boom Steam are a more hard-hitting

affair, in thrall to the power and volume of electric guitar, bass

and drums. Soaking up the raw energy of Californian psychobilly

renegades The Gun Club (in particular their groundbreaking 1981

debut Fire of Love) along with an infatuation with Nick Cave and

the aforementioned Waits, the pair set out on a new path.

“We were playing a lot of acoustics and mandolins; it was

almost a kind of punk Irish Pogues-y band on one level,” Garvan

says of the pair’s earlier work. “I went back to my roots. I started

when I was younger listening to Nirvana, so I was just getting fed

up within the confines of an acoustic folk thing. It’s like that film

you saw when you were five: it comes back round and every bit of

it you know inside out ‘cos it’s sort of ingrained.”

In tandem with Garvan’s switch from hollow to solid-bodied

guitars and something edgier and more immediate, the move

opened up a completely new musical avenue for the songwriter.

“I’d never been in a four-piece rock band of any sort,” he explains.

“In other things I’ve done there’s been a lot of chords and melodies

going around, but with this band I didn’t really wanna do that. I

wanted to create something that was built on bass and drums.”

While CBS operate in a two-guitars-bass-drums set-up, the

band aimed for a specific sound, partially drawn from the

saturated guitar tones of QOTSA. “One of the things was going

heavier; we didn’t want to put any kind of classic rock sound

through our amplifiers,” Garvan emphasises. “We wanted to

make it dark and dirty, gritty rather than smooth. We wanted to

bring a visceral element to it.”

Once established, the fledgling group went through a

baptism of fire, having to book a recording studio at the earliest

opportunity. Precipitated by an amicable split with four-string

axeman Malcolm Lunan due to his long-standing commitments

in Eugene McGuiness’s band, the recording of CBS’s debut LP had

to be undertaken as fast as humanly possible. “We kind of threw

the band together to begin with and managed to get a load of

songs down,” Garvan says. “To be honest, it was out of necessity

more than anything we got the album recorded, as Malcolm was

leaving. It wasn’t supposed to be an album; it was supposed to be

a snapshot of where we were before we lost our bass player.”

Pencilled in for a May release and wrapped in a cover by

Alan Moore-approved artist Michael Lacey, the disc was almost

unbelievably nailed in a single day’s work at Whitewood Studios.

“We didn’t have any money, we did it live in the studio,” Garvan

says of the session. “We just set up and recorded all the tracks. I

think the most we played a track was four or five times. We only

overdubbed the vocals afterwards; everything else was played as

it was in the studio.”

Set to feature Worms and Clan alongside the crystalline guitar

lines of Digging Up the Dead and the staccato bursts of Good

Ship, the album’s highpoint is reached on the stunning Fort St.

Gabriel. The pinnacle of their songwriting achievements thus far,

the five-minute opus reads like a modern day blues, summoning

up the image of a mirage-like desert outpost, a veritable mininovella

set to music. Like mid-sixties Dylan or Nebraska-era

Springsteen, the track demands the listener’s close attention as

the winding narrative unfolds. Amazingly, considering the song’s

skilfully constructed stanzas and tumbling rhyming schemes, the

entire lyric was written in a single sitting.

“There’s only about five, six verses in there,” Garvan explains.

“Charlie had the chorus to it and he couldn’t do anything with

the rest of it, so I took the verse and wrote it in half an hour. The

words came out pretty much as is. Sometimes it’s good to write

songs fast, a certain feeling comes with it.”

Aside from the influence of acclaimed musical wordsmiths

Nick Cave and Tom Waits, Garvan draws inspiration from literary

sources including Anglo-American poet W.H. Auden and gothic

horror icon Edgar Allan Poe. “I like to mash it all together, take

all the things that I’m buzzing off,” the singer enthuses. “I really

like stories and imagery. You get so much more from a big verse.

I write stuff constantly, anything I hear or think of I’ll write down.

I’ve got a notepad full of stuff I keep an eye on I can use.”

With the LP in the can and out-of-town gigs being lined up

around its release, the band are relaxed about the response the

album receives. “You kick it out of the aeroplane door, let [it] drop

to ground and hope the parachute opens on the way down,”

Garvan says of the disc’s upcoming release, laughing. The band

needn’t worry about the album’s ripcord working, however, as

after only a cursory listen it’s manifestly clear Clang Boom Steam

are guaranteed the happiest of landings.

soundcloud.com/clangboommusic


Know when to unplug. Please drink Jack Daniel’s responsibly.

Competition closes 1st May 2013. Over 18’s only. Full terms and conditions at jackdaniels.com

Copyright © 2013 JACK DANIEL’S. All rights reserved. JACK DANIEL’s and OLD NO. 7 are registered trademarks


GLAM!

Bido Lito! April 2013 11

Nic Lowrey

GLAM!Words: GLAM!Photography: GLAM!© Gered Mankowitz

© Bowstir Ltd. 2013/Mankowitz.com

Behind The Lens with Gered Mankowitz

“I would

say that my first portrait of

Suzi Quatro is my favourite photograph from my work

At the eye of the

Glam storm, friends with some of

the biggest, most influential names in modern pop history,

capturing the movement as it unfurled, shone, and then burned in the

thrown Molotov of punk rock’s rise, Mankowitz explains that it is only

now that we can dissect Glam and curate its paraphernalia. Back then,

spanning the Glam period. The classic one, with the leather, zip partly

it was just life.

undone. It’s a really powerful image of her that young women - and men -

“It’s very different when you look back at something,” he asserts.

of the time were really impressed by. I think it’s a ground-breaking portrait;

“Curators and academics start analysing it and putting that time in some

it’s very glamorous, yet very hard and very rock and roll.”

context, relating something Bowie does in 1970 to something that

Gered Mankowitz, one of England’s finest pop photographers -

happened to him in ‘64. When you look in that way, you get a completely

responsible for much of the famous photography of Hendrix, The Rolling

different view of what it was like. When you were there, it was just your life.

Stones and Kate Bush - is talking about his favourite image from the

We were influenced by the fashion, the social environment - including all

Glam era of the early 70s. The portrait of Quatro he thinks of so fondly

of the turbulent politics of the early 70s: the three-day week, the strikes...

(shown opposite) features in the new Tate Liverpool exhibition, Glam!

all of that is just a part of your daily life. You’re not inspired by a movement

The Performance of Style. The exhibition brings together, in a curatorial

or an art form; you’re inspired by what you see around you every day, what

fashion, many of the elements associated with Glam - pop, fashion, make-

other people are doing - it’s like you’re on a roller coaster and you don’t

up, photography, video and cultural ephemera.

think about it.”

The exhibition also asserts - with the definite assistance of academic

Perhaps it is only coincidental, then, that all of the trademarks of

and cultural hindsight - that Glam was subversive, socio-culturally radical

Glam rock dress-ups - the make-up, the space-pomp, the platform shoes

and significantly influential on the decades that followed the 70s, and on

- stimulate mixed feelings in Mankowitz: on the one hand, providing

the art movements that followed Glam. It also attempts to draw together

excellent opportunities for artists like himself to experiment with style and

less considered artefacts of the time - paintings by David Hockney,

technique, at least a little; on the other, full of silly, grotesque costumes.

experimental film by Warhol and Jarman - and consider their underlying

“There was definitely a staged look bands were looking for: often

similarities with the value-questioning, image-making glorious excess and

they would emerge from the dressing room in ridiculous outfits and don

vulgarity of Glam.

ridiculous wedged shoes. It was funny, grotesque, theatrical and good fun

Whilst from behind the lens Mankowitz saw not so much a Glam riot

all at the same time, for me. I did some of what I thought was my really

but a more calculated image manipulation, he agrees that some of the

good work in the 70s.”

marketing of pop in the 70s involved a daring, radical visual redefinition.

However, Mankowitz has not maintained any misty-eyed attachment

He considers the Quatro image as one of those moments - one where

to the 70s to cause him to shoot in a certain way, or otherwise inject

gender definitions are forever rent asunder, drowned in a sea of leather,

a nostalgic overtone to his work. In fact, whilst some artists may be

assertiveness and the first small spark of riot grrrl culture.

subconsciously choosing him as some kind of totem to Glam success,

“Suzi was an innovator and a ground breaker. As a woman in rock and

his methods and approaches change with every subject. For instance, if

roll she played a very important role. There weren’t a lot of women in Glam

Patrick Wolf’s LP cover shoot for The Magic Position with Mankowitz can be

rock - she was really important.”

accused of a certain over-the-topness, the slight air of a Glam invasion 30

Mankowitz photographed a number of Glam’s trademark names -

years too late, it’s at the behest of Wolf himself, not through Mankowitz’s

including Slade, The Sweet and Gary Glitter, but - to his regret - he never

own desires or yearning for the past.

photographed Bowie or Bolan.

“With Patrick, what really struck me was that he was an extraordinarily

“I knew Bowie, a bit, personally, but I never photographed him. I do

talented singer-songwriter. I already knew from the first time we met that

regret that a little. I was supposed to photograph Marc Bolan but he was

if we could find a comfortable place to work together we would get a

so mad, so completely bonkers, we could never get it to happen.”

great session. He was visually a treat; he’s very interested in clothing so

Interestingly, whilst the cracked actors we see in Ziggy Stardust and

I let him take care of the wardrobe altogether. What I didn’t do is think

Bolan, the mad genius of Eno, the now almost ubiquitous influence of

overly much about whether Wolf reminded me of the past or anyone in

Warhol, give the early 70s a gloss of danger, debauchery, day-glo and

my past. I saw him as being a unique and extraordinarily creative person.

derangement, Mankowitz’s Glam rockers were a very different bunch:

Because of that, I shot him in really quite a fashion-y way.”

savvy, professional and hard-working. Pub rockers with a glitter tube and a

Understanding what the artist is trying to project has always

knack for writing catchy, stompy pop.

been Mankowitz’s sweet key to longevity and success. “I think what

“By the early 1970s there was a real professionalism in music; nearly I’m interested in as a photographer - what I always was interested

all of the bands I worked with were incredibly professional and very good

in - was less about who the artists were and more about what they

at what they did. Slade were a very good band: great live and a fantastic

wanted to be. I try to capture and project the image that they want

bunch of guys. I loved working with Slade; I think I photographed every

or have adopted.” As a long line of artists from Slade and Quatro to

album cover they ever had as well as going on the road with them. Gary

Suede and Wolf will attest.

Glitter was also very good at what he did - he was a fantastic showman

and made what I consider to be really important pop records. Compared

Glam! The Performance of Style is on now at Tate Liverpool

to Bowie and Bolan? Well they had a far, far more complex appeal.”

mankowitz.com

Gig Guide and Ticket Shop live at www.bidolito.co.uk


12

Bido Lito! April 2013

Words: Joshua Nevett / @joshuanevett

Illustration: Gareth Arrowsmith / @garetharra

The golden chalice of the Christmas number one: a

quintessentially British phenomenon engrained into the marrow

of our culture - where tactless novelty acts and charity supergroups

congregate for a weird and wonderful midnight mass of

festive mediocrity.

Many moons have waxed and waned since Nicky Valentine

crooned of an Alphabet Christmas - the song that’s widely

recognised as the first Christmas themed number one - just

four years after the charts were established by NME

in 1952. But it was only when Slade wished

everyone a merry Christmas to reach

number one in 1973 that the concept

of the ‘head-to-head battle’ for the

Christmas number one spot attained

any gravitas at all. Slade famously

pipped glam-rockers Wizzard’s single

I Wish It Could Be Christmas Every Day

to the top spot, forever immortalising this

peculiar tradition in the crumpled cavities

of Noddy Holder’s smug expression.

Then, forged from the fires of Mount

Doom, came the behemoth of the X Factor. In

2005, unknown X Factor contestant Shayne

Ward claimed the converted Christmas number

one spot with his debut single, That’s My Goal,

which became the third-fastest-selling single of

all time. Alarm bells started ringing. The lowcultured,

shallow romanticism of the whole

escapade inevitably gripped the nation, firmly

digging its rusty hooks into the Christmas

charts while popularising the ‘flavour of the

week’ throwaway mentality. After four successive years of

repetition, it seemed that no-one could rise up against the

domineering totalitarian regime of Simon Cowell’s corporate

steam-train. Thankfully, a beacon of hope emerged, and one noble

rebel aspired to form a fellowship to cast the X Factor back into

the fiery chasm from whence it came.

“I just snapped; I just thought, ‘is there no-one out there who

can challenge this, are there no other record companies, are

there no other bands that just think, c’mon, this is a bit shit, let’s

have a go ourselves?’,” exclaims social media guru JON MORTER,

as he describes a mixture of anguish and distain that had driven

him to the end of his tether. Galvanised by the sterile nature of

the charts, Jon sought to derail the current occupants by using a

modern form of guerrilla warfare across the cyberscape of social

networks. Jon used his knowledge of social media to manipulate

the rules of Facebook, finding groups with an already established

fan-base and assigning himself as the admin for each group in

order to use them as a conduit. This gave him the authority and

scope to reach people sympathetic to his cause, which allowed

him to create a viral epidemic that could sweep across the social

network and consciously persuade users to actively participate

in his campaigns. Pretty clever, hey? After failing to make any real

impact in 2008 with his first attempt to usurp his arch nemesis

Gig Guide and Ticket Shop live at www.bidolito.co.uk

(the X Factor) by garnering support

for Rick Astley’s single Never Gonna

Give You Up (otherwise

known as the ‘Ultimate Rickroll’

campaign), Jon graciously admitted defeat in battle, but the war,

however, was far from over.

“With the song Killing In The Name, I just thought it would

work, it’s the antithesis of anything the X Factor would put out -

and even kids could get behind it, because it’s got lots of swear

words at the end.” Surely this punter’s taking the piss? More piein-the-sky

pseudo pranks, right? Wrong. Before you could say

Mr Blobby, Jon was back in 2009 with a new social

media campaign under the name of

‘Rage Against the Machine

for Christmas

number one’.

The

message

was indubitable:

“fuck you; I

won’t do what

you tell me”

- and the

aim was true,

rupturing a nerve

with the usually selfassured

Simon Cowell, who subsequently waded in to deem

the campaign “stupid” and “cynical”. It takes a lot to get music’s

most dastardly mogul rattled, but once he’d acknowledged the

campaign’s existence, Jon was rubbing his hands together in

triumph. “For us, his reaction was a godsend; we were thinking

‘great, he’s absolutely rattled, we’ve got him here’. As soon as

he acknowledged it, there were droves of people who suddenly

registered it and jumped on the bandwagon.”

Jon’s grassroots crusade against the monopolisation of the

charts soon expanded beyond the stratosphere, and before long

the surrealism of the situation hit home hard. The campaign had

escalated from one man and his wife (Tracy), a computer and an

internet connection, to a dedicated legion of fans in a Facebook

group that was reportedly 1.6 million members strong. “It instantly

became a big snowball. If I’d started with one member, i.e. me,

that would have been tricky. I didn’t break any rules at all, I just

bent them; what I always say is ‘bend the rules until just before

they snap’ - and that’s with everything I do. If you can get away

with it, do it,” he states defiantly.

The damage was done, and the initiative was successful in

thwarting the X Factor’s Joe McElderry in attaining the Christmas

top-spot, thus liberating the charts from Simon Cowell’s reign

of tyranny. More than half a million people downloaded Rage

Against the Machine’s famous anti-establishment and expletive

laden track Killing In The Name in what will be remembered as

a seminal viral protest in defiance of the increasing influence

of manufactured pop music.

This victory elevated Jon’s status from ambitious activist

to virtuoso social media kingpin and, as a result, his services

were required for an attempt to repeat history. In 2012,

a who’s who of musicians and celebrities launched a

campaign titled The Justice Collective to support various

charities associated with the Hillsborough disaster. A

cover of the Hollies’ ballad, He Aint Heavy, He’s My

Brother was released to commemorate the victims -

and you don’t have to be Simon Cowell to figure out

who was asked to mastermind their social media campaign. As a

football fan with a vested interest in the campaign, Jon was more

than happy to impart his astute set of skills. “The Hillsborough

disaster is something that’s stuck with me for many years. MP

Steve Rotherham got in contact and I assumed the role of the

social media side of things,” recalls Jon with pride. He continues:

“What was great about the Justice guys is that they just let me

do it. They said ‘you go and do whatever you need to do’; I

said ‘OK, leave it to me, I’ll get this to number one’.” True to

his word, The Justice Collective took the top spot, beating

the painstakingly emotive James Arthur to further release

the X Factor’s vice-like grip whilst also raising a bundle of

cash for charity.

The question is, what’s his secret and how did he

gatecrash the music industry so easily? Jon concedes

that there isn’t a ‘magic formula’ to a successful social

media campaign, and uses Hans Christian Andersen’s

short tale The Emperor’s New Clothes as an analogy

to convey that the impact of social media is not as

transparent as it seems. As a life-long music fan who could

never play an instrument, Jon reveals his tongue-in-cheek motto

to unlocking the treasure trove of social media, “You’ve got to

fake it to make it - look at me now, I’ve now got two number

one singles on my CV.” He chuckles, revelling in his accolades,

for he who laughs last, laughs longest - and whilst the emperor’s

clothes may be virtual, the successes of Jon Morter’s social media

endeavours are in plain sight.

Jon Morter will be appearing at the 2013 Liverpool Sound

City Conference

@jonmorter


COMEDY

Edwyn

Collins

plus special guest

Saturday 20 April

8pm £17.50, £23.50

Thea Gilmore

with Strings

Friday 10 May

8pm £15-£24.50

Lau Gretchen

Peters

Saturday 20 April

St Saturday George’s 9 March Hall

Concert The Epstein RoomTheatre

7.30pm £16.50 £19.50

Pink Martini

with the Royal Liverpool

Philharmonic Orchestra

Wednesday 8 May

7.30pm £26.50-£42.50

Rufus

Wainwright

Monday 1 July

7.30pm £29.50-£50

Loudon

Wainwright

Nasher

III

Friday 12 April

Tuesday

8.30pm

7

£12

May

7.30pm £22.50, £28.50

Steve Earle

& The Dukes

plus The Mastersons

Friday 31 May

7.30pm £26, £34

Skip ‘Little

Axe’ McDonald

Saturday 15 June 8pm

Camp & Furnace,

The Blade Factory

£10

Russell Kane

Posturing Delivery

Friday 3 May 8pm

£17.50, £23.50

Bill Bailey

Qualmpeddler

Friday 4 & Saturday 5

October 8pm

£25, £31

EXTRA DATE ADDED

Jimmy Carr

Gagging Order

Saturday 13 July

8pm £25, £31

Lee

Nelson

Tuesday 21 May

7.30pm £22.50, £28.50

Ardal

O’Hanlon

Saturday 2 November

8pm £20, £26

SOLD OUT

Micky Flanagan

Back in the Game

Wednesday 1 May

8pm £22.50, £28.50

Reginald

D Hunter

In the Midst of Crackers

Friday 14 June 8pm

£23, £29

ON

SALE

NOW

Box Office

0151 709 3789

liverpoolphil.com


14

Bido Lito! April 2013

Be Born Every Time

Bill Ryder-Jones meets Ludovico Einaudi

Illustrations: Alex Wynne / alexpaulwynne.tumblr.com

LUDOVICO EINAUDI’s name may be unfamiliar to many. His

music, however, is a different matter. The unassuming Italian

provided the score for Shane Meadows’ This Is England film and

the TV sequel This Is England ‘86, for which he earned a BAFTA

nomination. He also scored Darren Aronofsky’s Black Swan and

this year’s French international hit Intouchables. As an aside, he

sold out The Royal Albert Hall in 2010 and has, to date, racked

up album sales in excess of 1.5 million.

This month he comes to Liverpool Philharmonic Hall

in support of his twelfth studio album In A Time

Lapse, released earlier this year on Decca. Bido

Lito! thought it would be an interesting idea to

ask BILL RYDER-JONES to interview Ludovico. We

hoped they might get along splendidly. After all,

Bill’s debut solo work If... (released on Domino

in 2011) mines similar cinematic, orchestral

seams that have informed Ludovico

throughout his career. Bill’s eagerly awaited

second LP A Bad Wind Blows In My Heart

is released this month.

We were thrilled when both Bill and

Ludovico thought it a good idea. Below is

the interview that Bill posted to us after

they met. We’ve printed it in its entirety. We

thought they’d both like it that way...

BR-J: I am, a northern boy like yourself. I was asked by a

magazine to come and ask you a few questions and I’ve never

done this before in my life…

LE: Good… so it’s going to be more interesting than the usual…

Yesterday I was all day answering questions and I felt like I

wanted to be somewhere else, and it’s part of the job but, yes, it

makes me feel a bit like crap.

(We talk for a few minutes on the pains of answering questions

on your music before I dive straight in with a question about

answering questions about his music.)

BR-J: I often find it hard to sum up verbally what I’m trying

to achieve in my music (it was sweet of Ludovico to pretend he

didn’t know who I was), do you have the same problem?

LE: Yeah, because I also feel that the music itself can talk much

better than myself with words; when you use words they never

give the frame better than the music will.

BR-J: I guess maybe we do what we do because we struggle to

sum things up with words but in music...

LE: Yeah yeah, in music you have the nuances that are inbetween

words and for sure if you’re a poet you can probably

sum up in words. But I think anyway it is difficult to describe

the music, maybe it’s better to talk about the inspiration, I don’t

know.

Gig Guide and Ticket Shop live at www.bidolito.co.uk

It was a bit of an honour to be asked by

Bido Lito! to interview Ludovico Einaudi, a man

whose music I’ve admired for years and a writer

whom I believe to have had more influence on

modern contemporary classical music than any of

his counterparts. The man I was introduced to had an

obvious calm to him, one that very quickly seeped in

and flushed out my own anxiety. I think the first

thing you notice about Ludovico is this very

presence. He gives off a very relaxed and

endearing aura, the image of an artist

at ease with his own mind, which in

itself is a rare thing and something

well worth mentioning.

I told Ludovico how I wanted to

focus the interview on him as a

human creating art and how his life

affects music rather than looking at

his new (utterly brilliant) album In A

Time Lapse or any specific period of his

creative life. He seemed relieved to not have to go through the

usual ‘crap’ (his words) questions... by now we were best friends.

Bill Ryder-Jones: So, thanks very much for meeting.

Ludovico Einaudi: You are from Liverpool?

(It’s worth mentioning at this point that English isn’t Ludovico’s

first language and that he almost certainly had never heard a

Wirral accent before today.)

BR-J: So can you remember your significant first musical

experience at all?

LE: I think the first is coming from my mother. She was playing

the piano at home; she had quite a small repertoire, played

some Bach and a book of Chopin. Then she was playing for me

and my sisters a book of French children’s songs, folk songs... so

this… I think day after day listening to this music established an

aura in the house of sound and harmonies that I think stayed

with me forever.

BR-J: It just filtered through?

LE: Yeah, I still feel and remember the sound of my mother

playing the piano.

BR-J: And after that?

LE: After that I was growing up in the 60s, so grew up listening

quite early to the Beatles, Bob Dylan, Jimi Hendrix.

BR-J: Bugger me.

LE: Sorry?


Bido Lito! April 2013 15

BR-J: Never mind, carry on.

LE: So I bought a guitar and I played as it was part of my

life; and I felt between 10 and 20 the guitar was my main

instrument. I still have the guitar now and I also play a few

notes on my albums.

BR-J:

And what about reading? I know your father published Italo

Calvino, someone who I’m a big fan of, are you that way inclined?

To read I mean? [Editor - Bill’s debut solo LP, If..., , is a musical

adaptation of Calvino’s novel, If On A Winter’s Night a Traveler.]

LE: Well, our house was full of books but as a child I was reading

very little. Maybe, I don’t know, but if your father makes cakes…

you don’t eat so many.

(We laugh like only best friends can.)

LE: ...and also it’s always difficult, my father was very… err…

maybe there was always conflict with the father and I think

maybe I felt more freedom and more comfortable in the world of

music as it gave me the sense that it was less strict, especially in

the time I grew up with, the time of rock and roll.

BR-J: You paint quite an interesting picture of the stoic literary

father and the affectionate musical mother; it makes a lot of

sense that you moved into music…

LE: And for example Calvino, I love his work, he was an incredible

person and I was able to know him quite well.

BR-J: Shit, really?

LE: Yes he was living in the same building where we were, so

even when my father was not there he was coming for lunch; my

mother was like a sister to him...

(At this point I think Ludovico has picked up on my interest in Calvino

and like most Italians is more than happy to talk the man up.)

….and he was a very shy person but you could see from his eyes

that he was very careful about everything around him.

BR-J: Very meticulous?

LE: Like the detail in his writing.

BR-J: And music? Was he a listener? (People familiar with my

music will appreciate me trying to steer the conversation in a

certain direction.)

LE: Err no, not so much.

(Even though I was shot down I tell Ludovico about my record

and how it’s based on a Calvino novel; he tells me that Calvino’s

father was the first person to import avocados to Europe.)

BR-J: So enough about him, I’d like to know about Turin. I’ve

been there a few times and wondered if you feel the city itself

has had a lasting and direct affect on your music?

LE: Yeah, I have to say I never felt completely comfortable in

Turin; there was a pressure maybe from people. I felt observed;

maybe there was a strictness of the mind.

BR-J: Is that quite typical of northern Italy?

LE: Well, Milan is completely different, it’s more open…

BR-J: And that’s where you live now?

LE: Yes since 18… also, my family comes from a region even closer

to France, between Turin and the mountains. My grandfather had

a kind of country house there.

BR-J: And your grandfather was quite an important man,

wasn’t he?

LE: Yes, he was a politician.

BR-J: President of Italy?

LE: Yes, the first president after the war. He was an economist,

always studying, and nothing like the politicians of today.

(Ludovico is clearly proud of his lineage. He speaks

enthusiastically of his grandfather, telling how he “was obsessed

with the economy of his own life” and how all light bulbs

had to be of a certain wattage so he could balance

the books of his house. I asked about him

being given the Order of Merit - a kind of

Italian knighthood - to which he said

it meant nothing. He was really

surprised to learn that not every

Britain was in love with the

monarchy. At this point I’m

given the universal ‘you’ve got

5 minutes left…gobshite’ hand

gesture from his publicist, so I

get back into questionville.)

BR-J: Would it be possible to

sum up what it is you try and

achieve in music? Maybe give a

very simple example of what is

the main point you’re trying to

make?

LE: Well… err… it’s a mix of

emotions in different ways; when

you write music, it’s difficult to have all

emotions in one place…

BR-J:

And is that not what’s at the heart of

In A Time Lapse?

LE: Yes… err… what I feel is that the more I

grow up it’s like I have a stronger connection

with my emotions. At one point I had fear of my

emotions but there’s a moment when you really

want to share those things more and more.

BR-J: And would this be a celebration

of that step in life?

LE:

Yes, but always I felt that

without the emotion, I don’t get the

point of doing the music.

BR-J: And is there maybe one life event or

one memory that drives your creativity most?

LE: Yes, well there are of course some people you

have met, and I have three children and the moment they

are born is of pure joy to me. You play with your child; those

moments are really unique and full of mystery, and also a mixture

of very complex emotions for me. At the same time, yeah, I think

everything is connected with the human situations where you’re

sharing something with someone else.

BR-J: And is that connection something you think about when

writing? Are you ever thinking of the people who will eventually

enjoy your music?

LE: Not so much. When I’m composing I search inside myself, if

I think of the expectations then it’s not so good; it’s best to think

of where you are and be born every time.

BR-J: Well the listener benefits from getting more of your own

soul if you’re not concerned with what they’re thinking I guess.

(He doesn’t say it but he looks like he agrees.)

BR-J: My last question is probably one you won’t want to

answer… are you aware of your influence in other musicians’

work? I can hear you very much in Clint Mansell’s music for

example.

LE: Well I know of Clint Mansell and I quite

like his work…

BR-J:

Oh

me too! Though I

think he sounds a lot like you,

have you heard the Moon soundtrack?

LE: I don’t know that but I think maybe there is a certain

mood in the world that people become aware of together.

(I ended our interview there; it seemed fitting.)

Ludovico Einaudi plays Liverpool Philharmonic Hall on 15th

April. His album In A Time Lapse is out now on Decca. Bill Ryder-

Jones’ new album A Bad Wind Blows In My Heart

is released

8th April on Domino.

Gig Guide and Ticket Shop live at www.bidolito.co.uk


16

Bido Lito! April 2013

A Meeting In Berlin With

We Came Out Like Tigers

“Too long have we been respectful, Too

long have we allowed you to exist.”

Berlin, 2013

Six shows into their second European tour in two years and WE

CAME OUT LIKE TIGERS have sold out of their new LP Agelessness

And Lack, even after having emergency re-supplies airdropped

into Denmark. I manage to get myself the last copy. Hardcore

kids from Hamburg to Stockholm to Utrecht have been eager to

get their palms around the first long player from a band many,

including me, see as the best screamo outfit in the UK. And tonight

WCOLT do not disappoint. I push myself to the front, put my hood

up and, like so many times before, I get lost in the hardcore; the

frantic drum blasts, raging bass, blackened guitar, the screams,

the spoken word, the violin, the cleansing noise. This is why we

love heavy music.

“Don’t be alone, don’t dare be alone, rise

together, be exalted, take comfort in a godless

existence. Stay upright, stay strong.”

Tonight we are among peers, some knowing the band, others

enjoying them for the first time. A few days ago they were in

Stockholm, playing a show with the kind of electricity only a few

hundred straight-edge hardcore kids can produce, there purely

and simply to see a band they have fallen for. The front row even

knew the words. These new-found fans mean WCOLT’s latest tour

is at least self sufficient, keeping the band on the road and in the

studio. This is a DIY tour, no booking agents, just friends helping

friends, favours repaid, favours borrowed. It may seem daunting

to many fledgling UK bands, struggling to even get a show in

the next city down the road, being bitten by bad promoters with

broken promises. Maybe our island mentality makes us think

France, Holland and Germany are different worlds, impossible

to navigate, treacherously foreign. But WCOLT are proof that

you must cast your net further than

Manchester or London, especially

if your style of playing music

could be described as more

niche than others.

“Apathy is such

an evil trait, to

sacrifice ice others

for comfort is

not an accusation

I could take.”

WCOLT’s tour partners are one of Athens’ best

bands, Ruined Families (nine guys, one van). They have seen the

ugly face of fascism rise from the flames of their own economic

collapse, with dangerous groups of right-wing thugs gaining

control of the streets under the banner of Golden Dawn. Ruined

Families have met these fuckwits in the streets, as WCOLT have

met the EDL and BNP in the streets too, on many occasions. These

bands are kindred spirits, anti-fascism is in their lyrics, their music,

and their spirit. Many bands and artists talk about fighting racism,

sexism and homophobia in interviews and also in lyrics, but

how many are actually there on the Antifa frontline like WCOLT?

No Pasaran! So much UK music is bereft of political thought or

influence, as if we are so afraid of saying the wrong thing, or -

even scarier - something ‘uncool’. Fuck that. This is a real fucking

band.

“These things you do / Aren’t working.”

Liverpool, 2009

Packed into a derelict tiny room in the Wolstenholme Project, an

eclectic gang of Liverpool artists, enquiring minds and scenesters

have gathered to watch and support a heavy new band who have

been rumoured to push a few boundaries. There’s no Swedish

hardcore kids here, no keys on chain locks. Just a great space and

people who want things to happen. WCOLT blow all forty people

away, as they will continue to do every time they play at Don’t

Drop the Dumbells, Static Gallery or the A

Foundation

that year and the next.

Liverpool has the best DIY scene in

the

country: hardcore heads supporting pop wannabes,

DJs

supporting folk bands, friends supporting friends. It’s a year

before the Conservative-heavy coalition government will take the

reins, and we still do not know the true extent of their destructive

plans. WCOLT will do well though, we all agree.

“You thought the world was filled with

love and good intentions and it was not.”

I live in Berlin now, and I missed the closure of all the venues

mentioned in the above paragraph. But when I see a band like

WCOLT coming over to Germany, bringing some of the Liverpool DIY

grit, talent and ambition with them, it makes me so unbelievably

happy. Directly or indirectly, the cuts and actions of the elitist

criminals in charge may continue to fuck up our great city, and our

great music scene. But with a band like WCOLT showing emerging

bands and artists the true path, we will stay great. Creativity will

always be at the core of the city, and can and will still flourish in

hostile conditions, just as tolerance cannot tolerate intolerance.

These are the messages of WCOLT. Smash fascism, end racism,

stay DIY.

Agelessness And Lack

is out now.

wecameoutliketigers.

bandcamp.com

Words & Polaroids: Sam Archie Aston / lirdrecords.tumblr.com

Gig Guide and Ticket Shop live at www.bidolito.co.uk


18

Bido Lito! April 2013

As the shortlist for this year’s

GIT AWARD is announced,

we catch up with two of

the accolade’s judges, The

Quietus’ JOHN DORAN

and BBC6 Music’s TOM

RAVENSCROFT, to find out

how Liverpool’s current

musical crop are perceived

outside our fair city...

Words: Jennifer Perkin / @jhperkin

So the GIT Award rolls around again, boasting a dozen bit annoying.” Doran puts it more bluntly: “The Beatles split up

eclectic nominees and an impressively qualified panel of

two years before I was born and I’m a middle-aged guy. It’s kind

judges. The brainchild of Peter Guy, the journalist behind the

of like… it’s time to forget about it now.”

award’s namesake blog Get Into This, the award is designed

Doran continues, “speaking as someone who’s always lived

to celebrate all things music in the city. Last year’s inaugural

in working class - even down at heel - areas with low rent, I

GIT Award highlighted some of Merseyside’s upcoming and

would say that Liverpool now comes across as more like a proper

limelight-starved bands (spanning Esco Williams to Ex-Easter

bonafide international city rather than how it used to feel when

Island Head) to a national audience, with baroque rockers

I was growing up - which was like a former international city

Loved Ones taking the crown. As we prepare ourselves for this

that had fallen on very hard times.” Ravenscroft agrees that the

month’s awards by acquainting or reacquainting ourselves with

creative swell has been noted: ”I think so. I have certainly noticed

the current contenders, it’s also an opportune time to step back

‘Liverpool’ in brackets after more bands I like.”

and take stock of affairs.

And the sounds that are coming out are ever diversifying.

Liverpool music. We’re all living it, but what does it sound like Doran points to the incredibly ambitious Rhys Chatham ‘guitar

from afar? It can be hard for us, immersed in a city that is clearly

orchestra’ piece performed at the Anglican Cathedral last year as

humming and buzzing at its nucleus, to have a handle on where

part of the Biennial. A Crimson Grail utilised 100 electric guitars

we fit into the bigger national picture. Just how is Liverpool’s

and 8 basses, and has only been performed twice elsewhere, in

music scene in 2013 perceived outside the city? To try and attain

New York and in Paris. Doran adds, “all my mates in bands went

some national perspective, we took the opportunity to speak to

up to Liverpool and they loved it, they said it was amazing. So on

two of the judges on the GIT Award panel who call somewhat

one hand you’ve got the whole indie Beatles thing, but on the

sunnier southern climes home (and who know a thing or two

other hand that Rhys Chatham thing really represents to me…

about music as well).

you’ve got every kind of guitar music under the sun really.”

JOHN DORAN, as if you didn’t know, is the editor of The Quietus

It’s also helpful that, in the advent of burgeoning technology

and has contributed to just about every music publication worth

and a collapsing music industry, it’s becoming less important

reading (including VICE and the dearly missed Stool Pigeon).

that bands base themselves in London. It’s no longer a case of

He also happens to have been born in Merseyside and, though

‘you haven’t made it till you go to London’. Ravenscroft agrees,

he left at 18 and has established his career mostly from down

“Perhaps [that was the case] a few years ago but less so now;

south, he says that, “growing up Liverpool provided me with a

regional independent labels have certainly helped. I think you’re

musical education.”

probably better off not being in London, really.”

For Doran, it was the grindcore movement of his era and the

And as Doran notes, “London’s never produced a really great

scene around the Planet X club that moved him most. “I saw

band. People form great bands elsewhere and then go to London

bands that are kind of revered in metal circles these days who

to become famous. It’s kind of worth bearing in mind.”

were just playing in front of maybe about 100 people or so.

While we’re not here to London bash either, it is something

Bands like Napalm Death, Extreme Noise Terror and, of course,

to ponder: why is it that Liverpool remains, to paraphrase Du

local band Carcass. This is the thing about Liverpool music… in

Noyer, not just a place where music happens, but a reason

terms of indie or in terms of mainstream, bands like Cast or the

why it happens?

La’s are known all over the world. But if you actually talk to any

Self obsession, and a sense of camaraderie bordering on

American kid who’s into heavy metal, they know about Carcass.

insularity can be local traits; as Doran points out, Liverpool bands

And I’m sure if you ask anyone walking down Bold Street, they

continue to have a tendency for referencing the city in song titles

won’t know who you’re talking about.”

and lyrics in a way that bands nowhere else do.

Doran’s is a musical Liverpool that you won’t find in the tourist

Looking at how this feeds into the music of the city, he may

guides, nor will you even find Carcass or Planet X in the index of

have just hit the nail on the head: “Scousers love other Scousers,

Paul Du Noyer’s incredibly thorough and lovingly penned history

whereas people from Manchester love the bricks and mortar of

of Liverpool music, Liverpool: Wondrous Place. From the pop rap

the place. People from Liverpool all seek out other people from

of teenage Tyler Mensah to the sludgy metal of Conan, this year’s

Liverpool when they’re away from Liverpool, and I think that

GIT nominees list snapshots a musical city no longer dominated

maybe there’s something about that sense of community and

by the jangly guitars of yore. Or as Doran puts it, “there’s no

that sense of cooperation that feeds into the music that comes

fucking way I would go up to Liverpool for no money when I’m

out of the city.”

that impoverished if everybody just sounded like the La’s, do you

know what I mean?”

The GIT Award ceremony takes place on 19th April at Leaf

BBC6 Music presenter TOM RAVENSCROFT is another music

industry figure known for seeking out new and mould-smashing

The People’s Choice Prize

music; a genetic attribute no doubt passed on by his late father,

John Peel. Ravenscroft grew up in the south but, as he explains,

New for the GIT Award 2013 is the People’s Choice Prize. The

his Liverpool association is quite literally inescapable: “My dad

award’s judges were keen to open up the 12-strong shortlist to

was born there and we were brought up [as] LFC supporters, and

Liverpool music lovers and let you have your say on the year’s

my middle name is Dalglish. So I had little choice really.”

best sounds. Getintothis has teamed up with Bido Lito!, , Seven

On the issue of - as Doran puts it – “the monolithic shadow

Streets and Juice FM to host an online poll of the 12 shortlisted

of the Beatles”, Ravenscroft is pragmatic. “It was a great thing

artists asking Liverpool music fans to vote for their top act from

for the city, but I can see that it has its downsides. I’m not

2012-2013. The winner will perform at the GIT Award showcase

big on nostalgia in music and could see that for young bands

on 19th April and also receive a special memento produced by

starting out and wanting to make their own mark it could be a

Milk:Presents. Go to bidolito.co.uk

to cast your vote.

and the nominations are

Gig Guide and Ticket Shop live at www.bidolito.co.uk


Baltic Fleet

A kraut meets post-rock ‘creative open house’ spearheaded by

ex-Bunnymen keyboardist Paul Fleming.

Barberos

Abrasive, discordant and wonderfully weird silver spandexsuited

trio. Oodles of energy and originality. Exciting stuff.

By The Sea

To watch this band play is to lose time and to drift off in much

the same way you do when watching the waves lap the shore.

Clinic

The be-masked masters have been making unclassifiable music

since 1997. Free Reign proves they’re as awesome as ever.

Conan

In their own words, these doom metal lords, “seek nothing

less than the crushing of a million skulls”. Enough said.

Dan Croll

A talented multi-instrumentalist and darling of the scene who’s

currently enjoying success stateside on a cosmic trajectory.

Jetta

First spotted as backing vocalist with Paloma Faith and has

already signed a publishing deal with Sony ATV.

John Heckle

Makes his distinct brand of raw house using no samples and

100% hardware. Known for his stunning live shows.

Nadine Carina

Sickeningly talented Swiss artist - and last month’s cover girl -

who weaves a unique blend of electronic folk whimsy.

Stealing Sheep

It’s folky, it’s poppy and it’s a touch Stonehenge. Whatever it is

these ladies are doing exactly, they are doing it right.

Tyler Mensah

This teenage hip-popper is set for a big year, with debut EP

Twenty4seven released to mass industry salivation.

Wave Machines

Combining experimentation and space with a knack for a neat

hook. Pollen is one of 2013’s most critically acclaimed LPs.


20

Bido Lito! April 2013

Previews/Shorts

WHITE HILLS

FANG ISLAND

Harvest Sun have teamed up

with regular partners-in-crime Evol

to bring Rhode Island’s finest, FANG

ISLAND, to The Kazimier. The trio’s

2010 eponymous debut album scored

excellent reviews, as did second LP Major, and for good reason: recent single

Sisterly is full

of catchy riffs, sweet backing vocals and an exuberant pop rock chorus. Labelmates NO SPILL

BLOOD will be on hand to provide teeth-rattling support.

The Kazimier / 11th April

Contemporary folk innovators

LAU stop off in Liverpool this

LAU

New York trio WHITE HILLS

return to Liverpool with their

intoxicating blend of anthemic

chants, deep space bleeps and

otherworldly madness. Famous for

their dramatic live shows, this ridiculously prolific band released their latest album, Frying

On This Rock, last year. If you like your space rock heavy, nuanced and full of fuzz then get

down early, because this one’s for you.

The Blade Factory / 13th April

month in the middle of a mammoth

international tour. Recent album

Race The Loser saw the trio mix

traditional folk instruments such as the accordion, fiddle and acoustic guitar with laptops,

effects and loops, to startlingly beautiful effect. No wonder they’ve been awarded the Best

Group gong at the BBC Radio 2 Folk Awards four (!) times.

St George’s Hall / 20th April

Bongripper / Conan

Instrumental doom metal might not be everyone’s cup of tea, but Chicago’s BONGRIPPER have been

thrilling crowds worldwide with deafening performances since 2005. The prolific output of the four-piece

includes self-released debut The Great Barrier Reefer, which was a 79-minute one track doom experimentation,

and 2007’s Hippie Killer, which proved to be one of the year’s most popular stoner sludge albums. More

recently the band spawned a double LP, Satan Worshipping Doom, and the intense 7” Sex Tape / Snuff Film.

The always eclectic Antipop continue their tradition of celebrating and promoting musical forms

that some may perceive to be on the fringes of Liverpool’s music scene when they bring Bongripper

to headline the Kazimier, alongside a packed line-up of hardcore, doom and metal. Joining them are

local lords of sludge CONAN (pictured), who last year supported metal legends Sleep and whose album

Monnos, described by Bido Lito! as “operatic in arrangement, biblical in volume”, was streamed on

Metalhammer’s website. Fresh from a tour of Finland, the three-piece’s new live album Mount Wrath

exhibits the trademark slowed-down, fuzzed-up metal you come to expect from a band who describe

their sound as “heavy as interplanetary thunder”. Support also comes from HUMANFLY, METRO MANILA

AIDE, SWINELORD, and the brilliantly named HORSEBASTARD.

The Kazimier / 20th April

(Matt Thomas / mattthomas.co.uk)

I AM KLOOT

Since releasing their debut

album Natural History in 2001, I

AM KLOOT have become something

of a cult band: adored by critics

and fans but largely ignored by the

mainstream. Currently touring new album Let It All In (produced by Guy Garvey and Craig

Potter), expect Elbow-esque arrangements and melancholy lyrics sung in a Hyde accent. The

perennial stadium band support act may at long last be realising their potential.

O2 Academy / 27th April

Described by Mojo as “the

missing link between the Velvets

PERE UBU

and punk”, legendary underground

rockers PERE UBU look ready to

treat Eric’s to 38 years’ worth of

experimental noise. Lady From Shanghai, the band’s new album, produced by frontman

and long-standing band member David Thomas, is a post-punk mix of rock instruments and

strange sounds, and proves the pioneers haven’t lost their touch.

Eric’s / 22nd April

Moustachioed singer-songwriter

KING CHARLES royally charmed

KING CHARLES

listeners last year with the release

of his debut album Loveblood, a

collection of folk pop gems inflected

with hints of psych whimsy, skiffle and reggae. Songs such as Time Of Eternity are particularly

special, as Charles channels his inner-Devendra Banhart and sings repeatedly “My last breath

on Earth will be my first in eternity…”

The Kazimier / 8th April

Loka / Plank! / Dominoes

The two giants of the North West haven’t always got along, but a night of musical togetherness seems

certain when Kif and Kin bring together the tribes of Liverpool and Manchester at the Lomax.

At the top of the bill are Liverpool’s ever-evolving LOKA, who started out with studio experiments but

have since developed into a live set-up headed by Mark Kyriacou, crafting hauntingly beautiful music

drawing on jazz, classical and psychedelic influences. Their last album Passing Place (co-produced by

Thighpaulsandra, formerly of Spiritualized) featured an assortment of guest musicians, including a Welsh

brass band and various international vocalists, and created a lush sound of meticulously built up layers.

Manchester is well represented by instrumental three-piece PLANK!, whose debut LP Animalism won

over fans with a heady mix of prog and maverick krautrock. Not only did they play a blinding mainstage

set at last year’s International Festival Of Psychedelia, the band can also boast of live sessions for Marc

Riley on 6 Music and an upcoming support slot with White Hills.

Also in the Scouse corner are DOMINOES (pictured), who released their stunning first album The

Elemental Suite last year. Permanent member Dominic Lewington is sure to showcase something special

on the night, tinged as usual with elements of acid folk, blues and psychedelia. The bill is completed with

semi-improvisational electronic trio MELODIEN whose debut LP is set to land this summer courtesy of The

Great Pop Supplement.

The Lomax / 5th April

(Keith Ainsworth / arkimages.co.uk)

Gig Guide and Ticket Shop live at www.bidolito.co.uk


22

Bido Lito! April 2013

Reviews

Swim Deep (Adam Edwards / @adamedwardsF2)

SWIM DEEP

Paradise

Evol @ The Kazimier

Through a wall of drone and a viscous smog

of spaced-out gospel rock lurk PARADISE, five

shaggy shoegazers floating somewhere in the

region of Saturn. London duo Tony Harewood

and Joseph Marshall are the song-writing

partnership behind the band’s out-of-thisworld

sonics – and they perform looking as

mellow and sedated as their dystopian brainmelts

would have you believe. Between the

scuzzy dirges of country folk (Blue Flower) and

sprawled-out space pop (Endless Wave), you’d

be forgiven for thinking you were listening

to the Beach Boys on an acid trip. However, If

you’re not some kind of cosmic junkie looking

for your fix of space-age freak-outs, then

perhaps paradise is lost after all.

“Is this what an American high school

should sound like?” asks bemused SWIM DEEP

singer Austin Williams through a tumult of

high-pitched jeers and hoots. This is the sort

of reception that topping just about everyone’s

‘Ones To Watch’ list for 2013 affords you - and

that’s not to mention their status as the toast of

Birmingham’s burgeoning B-Town band circuit.

Such is the excitement on their first headline

UK tour in support of their forthcoming debut

album The Sea, even the passive nonchalance

of the four Brummies isn’t enough to quell the

boisterous caterwauling in the Kazimier tonight.

Swim Deep write sun-kissed pop songs that

hover close to a pastiche of mid-90s grunge

while still managing to convey the image of

kickin’ back on Venice Beach with an ounce of

high-grade marijuana. “Don’t just dream in your

sleep - it’s just easy,” clamours Williams on their

second single Honey, underpinning Swim Deep’s

escapist mantra while sounding deliriously

euphoric. Lyrically, they’re a by-product of their

disaffected youth, while still evading the tired

cliché of teenage tearaways. “We finished our

album a few days ago; I can’t wait to show you

all,” remarks Williams in a surge of endearment

- and with Charlie Hugnall (2:54, Florence Welch)

on knob-twiddling duties, we can’t wait to see

it either. The warm, fuzzy harmonies of recent

single The Sea coo gently as if to lull you into a

dreamy stupor, but everyone is too woozy with

the synthetic fumes of summer to be induced.

Chiming guitars blaze for their breakthrough

escapade King City: its driving bassline and

melodic inflections are a nod towards Wavves

or Splassh – 80s surf rock revival with a shared

adoration for the dynamic rhythmic shifts of

the Pixies. These lads aren’t fucking around to

lampoon you with surfer-pop gimmickry, but rest

assured they’ll have you frolicking around in a

kaleidoscope of tie-dye and charity shop frocks,

off your tits on their sun-drenched apathy.

Joshua Nevett / @joshuanevett

ETHAN JOHNS

Thomas J Speight – Marika Hackman

Harvest Sun @ The Capstone Theatre

After years of working with such critically

acclaimed artists as Ryan Adams, Laura

Marling and Rufus Wainwright, ETHAN JOHNS

is bringing his tour of debut album If Not Now

Then When? to the Capstone Theatre for an

evening of folk delights.

Taking to a candlelit stage, opener THOMAS

J SPEIGHT’s chilled out but downbeat set is

replete with songs of love and heartbreak,

often (and strangely) with a nautical twist. It’s

a crying shame that Speight’s backing singer

has fallen ill, as sweet moments like Willow

Tree are begging for some Staves-like folk pop

harmonies. The classic Americana folk of Tangled

Lines, on the other hand, comes across like Free

Wheelin’-era Bob Dylan or early Bert Jansch, full

of intricate guitar play and wistful lyrics - most

certainly a good thing. The only thing that mars

the set is the slightly stilted attempt at banter

with a very Guardianista audience, which falls

flat on its face, making the requested ‘upbeat’

ending barely a sliver less downcast than the

bulk of his set.

The bulk of MARIKA HACKMAN’s moody,

brooding set is fittingly reminiscent of Laura

Marling’s second album I Speak Because I

Can. The reverb-drenched, Sylvia Plath-esque

Cannibal, and the jingle-jangle of Here I Lie,

conjure morose moods that are usually the

preserve of indie pop, but feel surprisingly

apposite in this folksy setting. Having said that,

Hackman’s songs are not all plucked strings

and sorrow: the guitar distortion on Mountain

Of Spines is positively post-punk: definitely one

of those songs that makes more sense live

than on record.

Ethan Johns’ ponderous, befuddled art

teacher-like air works a charm on the audience,

completely changing the tone of the gig with

some rather erudite chatter alluding to Greek

mythology, Native American legends and

phosphorescent sand on a beach across the

pond. His set list’s dynamism also works in

his favour as, with the best will in the world,

three hours of singer-songwriters would have

even the most avid folkie comatose. On top of

the standard Dylan/Guthrie protest song fare,

there are some genuinely haunting moments

on his “end of the world song” (Eden), whose

ambient backing tape is weirdly reminiscent of

Kraftwerk’s Radioaktivität, and on Dylan cover

Corrina, Corrina. So, is the multi-faceted Johns

better suited to lighting up other people’s

records rather than creating his own? Given

that the night’s highlights come from his own

sublime compositions, it’s a no for now. Whip-

Poor-Will, using a Native American belief that

the bird is an omen of death, and the gorgeously

melancholic dissonance of Gillian Welch’s (Time

Gig Guide and Ticket Shop live at www.bidolito.co.uk


24 Bido Lito! April 2013

Reviews

The) Revelator, linger in the memory long past

the end of this unforgettable set.

Laurie Cheeseman / last.fm/

user/lacheesemaster

LEE “SCRATCH” PERRY

White Bicycles

Eric’s

WHITE BICYCLES are charged with getting

tonight off to a great start; the thirteen-piece

Liverpool band somehow squeeze onto Eric’s

stage and manage to get people’s feet tapping

with an eclectic blend of Latin, ska and west

coast pop. They are followed by a superb

dancehall, dub and reggae DJ set which gets

the place pumped up and manages to make a

concrete floor tremble with its thundering bass

to set the mood perfectly for the arrival of the

ground breaking LEE “SCRATCH” PERRY.

Perry has been described in thousands of

articles throughout his illustrious career, which

goes back all the way to the 1950s and includes

winning a Grammy. In every single article,

mountains of different superlatives are used,

and rightly so, to describe the original pioneer

of dub and reggae music. One further constant

throughout the thousands of words written are

the descriptors “crazy” and “mad”. And, as he

shimmies onto stage in a red onesie, a glittering

red baseball cap and a holiday wheelie travel

bag, you can see why. This is a man of 76. In a

onesie and with a seemingly pointless trolley

bag. If he was walking down Bold Street like

this, you’d be looking to call the local asylum

to see if any lunatics had escaped. But this is

exactly what the crowd at a chocker Eric’s have

come to see, the remarkable and quite unique

talent of Lee “Scratch” Perry.

Perry’s backing band, The Upsetters,

announce their arrival on stage with a rallying

Lee “Scratch” Perry (Matthew Thomas / @mattomica)

call of “can I get an irie” before launching into

to some funked-up reggae grooves. The MC then

builds up a frenzy and the cheers go up as Perry

toddles on. There are problems immediately

though as Perry starts to sing and his mic isn’t

working. He orders the music to be stopped

dead and demands a new mic. This takes an

uncomfortable ten minutes before we are back

on track with first song Panta Dub.

After the initial problems, the sound gets

increasingly better as Perry gets into the swing

of it with War Inna Babylon. In between each

number there is a bit of Perry preaching going

on as he repeatedly exhorts us all to “be perfect

like God.” Sometimes speaking in bizarre riddles

- “I conquer bad luck, I conquer unluck, I conquer

the chicken, I conquer the duck” - at one point

he declares, “eat your shit, drink up your piss,”

whilst balancing a bottle of water on his head.

Not many 76-year-olds can say that and hold an

audience in the palm of their hand. The rest of

the set plays out in a similarly eclectic fashion,

with superb deep dub and bizarre ramblings.

The classic Sun Is Shining unites everyone, and

Kaya gets the room moving whilst rounding off

the set in great fashion.

How long Perry will continue to tour is

unknown given his age, but I’d recommend you

catch him while you can. It is easy to describe a

musician as a legend, but for this bizarre nut-job

genius, the title is more than deserved.

Steven Aston / gigslutz.co.uk

EVERYTHING EVERYTHING

O2 Academy

Anticipation is high for Manchester quirk-pop

indie foursome EVERYTHING EVERYTHING, fresh

from releasing their sophomore album Arc. An eerie

guitar intro and hypnotic vocals open their set and

it’s a surprising choice: not their latest single or a

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26

Bido Lito! April 2013

Reviews

sing-along fan favourite from the first record, but

continue a journey through fragments of their

mid-Arc track Underworld. It soon proves to be

first album, stopping off at Schoolin’ before

well thought-out; with every beat and perfectly

launching straight into what is now considered

delivered falsetto tongue-twist from lead singer

a modern indie classic - Photoshop Handsome.

Jonathan Higgs the tension raises. After lengthy

Again, Higgs somehow manages to get his vocals

applause, it only takes the opening beat of latest-

spot-on despite the larynx-challenging labyrinth

single Kemosabe for the whole crowd to erupt.

of lyrics. And if you think Everything Everything

The powerfully distorted guitar and exclamation

are one of a slew of bands that are more

of “Hey!” pack the punch that the crowd had been

anticipating. This is going to be a night where

those boys on stage can do no wrong.

The band seems to know this is the case. Torso

Of The Week

concludes an opening trio of tracks

from their most recent album, causing Higgs

to announce “Thanks for spending this Sunday

evening with us... it is Sunday, right?” It is, but his

childlike smile shows that he’s revelling in the

experience as much as the crowd. A spiralling

guitar riff introduces the next track as the crowdpleasing

Qwerty Finger raises the mood inside

the O2 even further by dispelling concerns that

the set could be void of Man Alive material.

Surprisingly, it is the less energetic Leave

The Engine Room that delivers one of the more

memorable moments of the night. For several

touching minutes while the band perform this

slow burner, the crowd can be heard collectively

singing their hearts out, at times matching the

volume of the band. Everything Everything

Gig Guide and Ticket Shop live at www.bidolito.co.uk

Everything Everything (Keith Ainsworth / arkimages.co.uk)

comfortable in recording studios than on stages,

then they have the perfect ammo to dispel that

myth: Suffragette Suffragette comes across far

more raw, harsher-sounding and aggressive than

on record, and is mightily impressive.

As the lyrical adaptation of “Liverpool, you’re

landing” heralds the end is nigh, MY KZ UR BF

brings the atmosphere brimming to a crescendo

which nearly spills over the front safety barriers.

The group finish with the humbling Don’t Try, the

harmonies of which create an almost ethereal

curtain-fall to signal the end of the show.

Rob Dewis / @RobDewis

LOCAL NATIVES

Balthazar

Evol @ The Kazimier

Hailing from Orange County in the U S of

A, LOCAL NATIVES are a delivery of precursory

sunshine to the windswept streets of our

fair city in February. To play us in, Belgium’s

BALTHAZAR serenade the veritable torrent

of a crowd milling through the doors of the

Kazimier. A combination of mysterious, winding

verse and a hit of power chords on track Fifteen

Floors forces every arrival to turn and eyeup

the band’s slightly reserved demeanour.

Their sound is both euphoric and dark, with

heady grunge elements, an incendiary

mixture of moody bass, three-part harmonies

and whammy guitar effects. In spite of their

shyness, it’s all very lovely to hear.

Local Natives open with You And I off new

record Hummingbird, easing the audience into

their relaxed, sunshine-tinged grooves (if there

was ever any need to do so) before an uplifting

rendition of single Breakers lifts the crowd to

higher levels of excitement. With the jangly intro

of Eyes Wide, the band smile mischievously at

the instant recognition it sparks amongst the

hit-hungry audience: this continues right up to

the drum breakdown that closes the track, a riproaring

foot-stomper of a moment. The band seem

somewhat tentative in playing newer material

though, rushing through Heavy Feet, Mount

Washington and Ceilings to get to the cemented

classics of Gorilla Manor. The warm, upbeat

chorale of Camera Talk

is a shot of serotonin for

every member of the audience, culminating in

the percussive glory of front man Kelcey Ayer

pummelling the floor tom like his life depends on

it. It is a similar story for the rest of the evening:

the balance of enthusiasm between newer versus

older songs invariably weighted more towards the

latter. Whilst perhaps a disappointment to fans of

Hummingbird, the Californian outfit do not let

us down in the end. They take to their rendition

of Airplanes with prolific joy as the fanatical

audience replicate the “boos” that appear on the

recorded version. The delight is apparent on each

member’s face as this happens. They finish up

with the exquisite harmonies of Who Knows Who

Cares and, to play out, the shout-out-loud blinder

Sun Hands. At this point it all gets a bit mushy,

as the reciprocal love between band and audience

is apparent. Moustachioed guitarist Taylor Rice

responds to the set’s ovation with a moment of

dreamy-eyed consideration of the audience, and

a wistful smile that almost says “I love you, man.”

Before it turns into a full-on love-in, the band whisk

themselves off, leaving us reeling in the tangible

proof that Local Natives are the best thing to come

out of the O.C. since Seth, Marissa et al.

Flossie Easthope / @feasthope

SEAWITCHES

With Teeth – Super Space

Project – Claire Welles

Sirens @ Drop The Dumbells

According to Greek mythology, sirens are

seductive and beautiful nymphs who lure sailors

to destruction with their sweet, enchanting

vocals. And when a night is purposely established

upon those artistic motifs, you know you’re in

Local Natives (Adam Edwards / @adamedwardsF2)


Thu 16th May, 7:30pm.

THE SEARCHERS

Fri 17th May, 8:00pm.

SEYES THE LIVE RITUAL

Sat 18th May, 7:30pm.

LIVERPOOL MOZART ORCHESTRA

Sat 18th May, 8:00pm.

MARTIN SIMPSON

Sun 19th May, 8:00pm.

THE ZOMBIES

Tue 28th May, 7:30pm.

SUGGS MY LIFE STORY

IN WORDS AND MUSIC

Fri 22nd March, 7:30pm.

McCARTNEY: : YESTERDAY & TODAY

A MUSICAL CELEBRATION

Fri 5th April, 8:00pm.

LIVE/WIRE THE AC/DC SHOW

Fri 19th April, 7:30pm.

UK PINK FLOYD EXPERIENCE

Sat 20th April, 7:30pm.

GARFUNKEL & SIMON

Sun 21st April, 7:30pm.

MARTIN STEPHENSON

Sat 27th April, 8:00pm.

FLORAL FOLK NIGHT

SARA GREY & KIERON MEANS

Sat 4th May, 7:30pm.

THE BILLY FURY YEARS

30th ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL

Thu 9th May, 7:30pm.

ULTIMATE EAGLES

Fri 31st May, 7:30pm.

THE TWIST GREAT SONGS NEVER DIE

Sun 2nd June, 7:30pm.

LOUIS HOOVER’S MY WAY

WITH THE L.H. ORCHESTRA

& THE GROOVER SISTERS

Fri 14th June, 8:00pm.

DIRE STATES

THE ULTIMATE TRIBUTE TO DIRE STRAITS

Sat 29th June, 8:00pm.

LIMEHOUSE LIZZY

THE BEST OF THIN LIZZY

Sun 7th July, 5:00pm.

THE GLENN MILLER ORCHESTRA

...WITH STRINGS!

Fri 19th & Sat 20th July, 7:30pm.

JAMES BURTON:

ALOHA FROM NEW BRIGHTON

Sun 21st July, 7:30pm.

NIGHTS ON BROADWAY

THE BEE GEES STORY


for a treat. Embellished in such an awe-inspiring

manner by the likes of Eliza-Lee (Riddance) and

Jessica Doyle (Outline) – who provide the visuals

– and with an exclusively female-fronted line-up,

Sirens is probably one of the few types of events

Liverpool is currently lacking.

Though it is impossible to decide upon the

headliner, CLAIRE WELLES is the dame to open

the night; the anticipated numerous crowd are

already camped down at Drop The Dumbells

for the onset. With nearly 30 albums to date,

Welles’ inspirations seem to derive from highly

influential artists such as R. Stevie Moore, Ariel

Pink or Geneva Jacuzzi. While she’s providing

the buoyant vocals on a pre-recorded set, her

tracks are somewhere between a lo-fi (yet wellproduced)

synth-driven glam punk, and some

over-eccentric pop. Without Further Goodbye is

a very catchy, unconventional tune from Welles’

most recent album Nincompoop: the piece is

constructed upon an experimental honky-tonk

cabaret piano progression and some Maria

Minerva repetitive yet effective vocals.

The homemade, DIY recital is continued by

Kaja Haven, a Norwegian one-woman-band

who performs under the name of SUPER SPACE

PROJECT. Certain sounds immediately remind you

of artists like Cocorosie or Grimes, with a dazzling

ability to reiterate perceptions and inner feelings.

Accompanied by her looping pedals, she induces

collective, hypnagogic states that activate some

sort of stunning multi-dimensional impulses. As

unfathomable soundscapes are created, Haven

sets out on a wandering, experimental journey

starting from some Purity Ring harmonies

to a more feminine, psychedelic ambiental,

Tim Hecker/Oneohtrix Point Never sound on

Earthquake, an over-distorted guitar piece

unconventionally mirrored by some dreamy,

ethereal vocals.

With the appearance of WITH TEETH - the

new solo project of Veslemøy Rustad Holseter

(formerly of Wet Mouth) - on stage, the night

seems to have gained a more psychedelic side.

Though she obviously maintains a striking

DIY facet by continuing the main theme of

the event - spatial compositions built on loop

pedals - Holseter’s tracks bring an innovative

element: heavier and fuzzier distortions added

to kaleidoscopic guitar riffs. With a very punk

attitude and a noisy, grainy Kim Gordon sound,

Holseter seems to be getting all her dynamism

and inspiration from an extremely wide range of

genres. Based on punchy dark electronic drum

patterns, the entire performance reaches its

apogee when Kaja Haven is invited back on stage

for a Porcelain Raft-inspired collaborative piece.

For a second, Goddesses would have righteously

been a more appropriate name than Sirens.

Tonight also marks the grounding of

SEAWITCHES’ new EP Space Gun: the four-song

collection is characterised by the title track, a

psychedelic piece constructed upon a rough,

boisterous guitar-driven instrumental. With some

extra-reverberating vocals that remind one of the

noisy Dum Dum Girls or the powerful shoegaze

of Warpaint, SeaWitches prove that they definitely

deserve their current hype.

Original music, brilliant art, phenomenal

artists. Bravo.

Petricã Mogos / soundcloud.com/killotto

THRESHOLD FESTIVAL

Away from the smooth glide, wipe clean,

homogenous city centre lays a burgeoning

reformation of the city’s former heart. The bright

lights and swish architecture of the retail district,

like so much urban confectionery, will always

owe a debt to the neglected hulks of the old

warehouses, factories and offices along Jamaica

Street; essential components of Liverpool’s rich

industrial past.

Inevitably, and with the unyielding application

of hard work, the city’s creative community has

taken advantage of the vast, free open space that

lies on the outskirts of town. The third instalment

of the THRESHOLD FESTIVAL once again takes

root in this fertile Baltic Triangle area, kicking off

proceedings at the bustling Camp and Furnace.

Local promoters NewPath are one of the first to

get the ball rolling on their stage in the Blade

Factory, with WIRED TO FOLLOW’s expansive,

drawn-out collages, which seemed to lull you

into a Sigur Ros-like trance.

Then it’s the turn of the turbo-charged

CLEFT, a Manchester duo with certain proggy

tendencies who waste no time in setting off on

their odyssey of noise. Individual songs are not

given names, giving their performance an air of

an experimental journey that ventures into the

deepest realms of rock. At certain points during

the set the sounds become bleak as the pair get

lost in their own riffs, while echo effects and

occasional snippets of funk manage to colour

the music with light and exuberance.

With so much going on in and around Camp

and Furnace it proves difficult to stay in one

place. As the main hall plays host to a rapturously

received acrobatics show, we take the trip up a

winding staircase into the Gold Room, where the

ever-improving SO SEXUAL are weaving a web

of romantic apathy that calls to mind The Cure

and, latterly, Interpol. With a new single due to

be released imminently, and word of an album in

production, 2013 might be the year that provides

So Sexual with a little bump ‘n’ grind.

Over at Elevator Bar there’s a plethora of

talent heading up a decidedly rock-heavy night.

CLOCKWORK RADIO sound like your average

indie rock outfit at first but, if you listen carefully

throughout the set, subtle undertones point

to wide-ranging influences: tracks like Feeling

Up combine afrobeat percussion with frenetic

guitar picking.

FIDEL AFRO blast the audience with a wall of

heaviness upon arrival: their distorted guitars

charge through frequent chord changes with

an energy that reflects the band’s musical style.


Making Liverpool

sound great ...

call: 0151 707 1050

email: info@parrstreetstudios.com

rs

visit: parrstreetstudios.com

Parr Street Studios: 33 – 45 Parr Street, Liverpool L1 4JN


30

Bido Lito! April 2013

Reviews

BROKEN MEN provide a pleasant surprise to

end the night on, with each band member

thoroughly absorbed in perfecting their intricate

grunge rock sound for the crowd. They play with

such determination and focus that the audience

are left in awe.

Threshold’s Saturday abounds not only

with music performances, but also heaps of

workshops and cultural events. In what seems

to be some sort of alchemical initiation, NADINE

CARINA’s freak folk has the capacity to fuse its

way into one’s inner psyche with a calming yet

extremely lively performance. An innovative

mixture of instruments is assembled at her

fingertips, ranging from whirring keys to a

percussive glockenspiel. While distinct vibes are

being transmitted by the super-vivacious FIRE

BENEATH THE SEA (rapid flows and high-paced,

Balkan-inspired rhythms that threaten to ignite

the party), at Camp and Furnace’s Paper Garden

the soulful Merseyside four-piece COFFEE AND

CAKES FOR FUNERALS engage in a special way

with the crowd through their unusual mixture

of RnB beats and vocals, and straight-up indie

rock instrumentation.

The Sunday bill of artists veers across

the breadth of current local talent, from the

impressive collective harmonics of THE SENSE

OF SOUND SINGERS (at Circus Camp) to the wild

festival abandon of RUMJIG (getting Elevator Bar

in the swing). The day’s eclecticism also manages

to pitch the precocious talent of CHELCEE

GRIMES against raven-haired songstress NATALIE

MCCOOL on the specially constructed Paper

Garden stage. True to the ‘Collaboration’ theme

of Threshold’s final day, Natalie McCool arrives

on stage straight from performing as part of the

Liverpool: Wondrous Place conversation event

with esteemed author and journalist Paul Du

Noyer. Chosen as a representation of the city’s

musical talent, McCool is obviously a woman in

high demand. With a duo of backing musicians

on the floor tom and rhythm guitar, she moves

into her set with opener America, and the

meshing of guitar sounds and McCool’s echoey

vocals resonate around the space. Leading her

set out on more of the same well-crafted folk

and pop material, final song Thin Air is warm and

fuzzy to the core.

As a platform to scout the latest talent, and

a fantastic opportunity for Liverpool’s best to

shine, Threshold’s worth has never been clearer.

This year’s success should certainly ensure the

return of Threshold in 2014 and the continued

growth of the artistic community that surrounds

it. Can’t wait to do it all again next year.

Joseph Viney / @jjviney

Flossie Easthope / @feasthope

Jack Graysmark / @ZeppelinG1993

DUKE SPECIAL

Boxes

Floral Pavilion

The dulcet tones of Northern Irishman DUKE

SPECIAL, aka Peter Wilson, adorn the Floral

Pavilion’s Blue Lounge with a vaudevillian grace

as the eager crowd gather in anticipation.

Duke Special arrives, red wine in hand, a

humble stage presence, while adorning his

signature and unique look of eyeliner and

dreadlocks with a suit jacket that he himself

describes as “hobo chic”. He has a real Bohemian

mentality which he pairs with a theatrical style

inspired by music hall pomp, which brings

depth and a little drama to his performance.

The artistic nature of Duke Special sets a

Duke Special (Alex Nicholson / amhnicholson.blogspot.co.uk)

Fire Beneath The Sea (Jack Thompson)

great basis for his music, drawing inspiration

from art, photography and real-life experiences,

however surreal (such as an encounter with

Jedward). During his set he spins these ideas

and events into comical, theatrical stories as

introduction to the songs. He tells us a story

of a photograph he once saw from the 1920s

of a beautiful woman called Rita de Acosta

Lydig, the most photographed woman of the

20s, who married rich older men and inherited

their millions when they died. The ensuing fan

favourite Rita De Acosta, from his Under The

Dark Cloth album of 2011, has a slightly gothic

feel, and is reminiscent of a Tim Burton/Johnny

Depp production.

All of the songs in Duke’s set have a

beautifully romantic feel to them, his deftly

accented voice accompanied by the simplistic

sound of a piano lending a wonderfully relaxed

vibe to his performance. There’s also some oldfashioned

music hall fun to be had as he passes

around song sheets so that the seated crowd

can sing along. With diehard fans a-plenty, song

sheets are almost redundant as he kicks off the

audience participation with a track called Apple

Jack, a playful retelling of the story of Adam

and Eve with an alcoholic twist. Slip Of A Girl,

from his 2007 LP Songs From The Deep Forest,

rounds off the planned set on a feelgood note

before he takes audience requests, including

solid favourite Free Wheel.

Duke returns for the encore not to the stage

but by scaling a table, asking the audience to

join him in the bar of the Pavilion with the grand

piano. He lovingly names said piano ‘Chuck’

and they are soon joined by support act BOXES,

aka former Athlete bassist Carey Willets, who

proves a wonder in his own right, performing

Stickers, the title track from his brilliant 2012

indie/electro solo album.

The ever-so-intimate performance

continues long after the venue’s bar shutters

Gig Guide and Ticket Shop live at www.bidolito.co.uk


Liverpool’s International Arts Venue

What’s On - Spring Season

For full listings visit www.thecapstonetheatre.com

Manu Delago Handmade

Friday 19th April, 7.30pm, £12.50

Marius Nesset

Friday 26th April, 7.30pm, £15

Sonar

Friday 3rd May, 7.30pm, £12.50

Cubana Bop

Friday 10th May, 7.30pm, £15

Box Office

0844 8000 410

www.ticketquarter.co.uk


32 Bido Lito! April 2013

Reviews

are pulled down, with loyal fans hanging off

Duke Special’s every word, as he finishes on a

quirkily wonderful adaption of the Yeah Yeah

Yeahs’ Maps. Unusual and brilliantly different,

Duke Special is most definitely worth checking

out next time he’s in town.

Sarah Harman

LIVERPOOL INTERNATIONAL

JAZZ FESTIVAL

The Capstone Theatre

Opening the Capstone Theatre-hosted

LIVERPOOL INTERNATIONAL JAZZ FESTIVAL,

ROLLER TRIO deliver a gripping performance

as their cyclical yet magnetic loops and

harmonies represent a more contemporary

approach towards jazz music than staid

stereotypes suggest.

Having said that, the guys from Roller Trio

have never considered themselves to be jazz

musicians; their very categorisation into such

an eclectic league might easily have weighed

heavily on some performers, but not on them.

Like their fellow Leeds citizens, trioVD, Roller Trio

are a boundary-pushing group with a certain

ability to attract even those audiences that are

probably not very familiar with the most basic

set of jazz aesthetics.

By interweaving rock-inspired, powerful but

catchy guitar hooks with some brushed, hi-hat

driven percussion and idyllic saxophone loops,

the group’s lucidity, vitality and authenticity

cannot be denied. In a rather crepuscular miseen-scène,

the three members of the group

nonchalantly walk up on stage followed by a

dimmed, ever-present purple spotlight - a sort

of Capstone Theatre trademark. As they open

the night with Deep Heat - a dissonant and

jagged piece which is brought together by some

repetitive saxophone motifs - Roller Trio show

that their inspiration ranges from first-class

Roller Trio (Nata Moraru / natamoraru.com)

musicians such as Charlie Parker or Anthony

Braxton (influences that grant a passage

towards a jazz world which awaits broader

explorations), guitar riffs that remind us of bands

like Them Crooked Vultures and Wolfmother, to

downtempo, instrumental hip hop rhythms of

the likes of Flying Lotus or DJ Shadow.

As they manage to successfully explode

within a narrowed market, their music brings

together strong DIY aesthetics with some

obvious avant-garde, loft jazz traits that recall

Olivier Messiaen works, set about by some

midtempo J Dilla drum patterns.

Liverpool’s deep-rooted history regarding jazz

music is well documented, and the inclusion

of performances from local artists among the

International Jazz Festival’s headliners pays

homage to this aspect of the city’s musical

heritage. One of the musicians held to be the

continuator of these illustrious traditions is

Martin Smith. His newest project, THE WEAVE,

represents a collaboration between him and

five other outstanding performers, all highly

esteemed in the North West jazz community:

Rob Stringer (Piano, Vocals), Anthony Peers

(Trumpet, Flugelhorn, Vocals), Hugo Harrison

(Double Bass), Anthony Ormesher (Guitar),

Tilo Pirnbaum (Drums, Percussion) and Stuart

Hardcastle (Percussion).

Although part of a vibrant jazz community,

The Weave’s capacity to stand out among other

similar groups is staggering. With a pianodriven

sound, excellently complemented by a

superb use of trumpets, Never Better is a soft

composition that revives some Romantic erainspired

Riz Ortolani or Pierro Picioni’s 1970s

soundtracks. Inclining more towards a popular

or contemporary arrangement and structure,

this relatively slow-paced piece is built upon

repetitive motifs and multiple, beautifully

disjointed, breaks and brass solos.

Besides the band’s fantastic debut album,

Martin Smith proves his geniality in mingling

early swing and Kansas City jazz elements,

Gig Guide and Ticket Shop live at www.bidolito.co.uk


I DESIGN

BIDO LITO!

// LUKE-AVERY.COM

// INFO@LUKE-AVERY.COM

// 07729 308307


34 Bido Lito! April 2013

Reviews

with minimalist piano/guitar clamours and

fusion jazz-embellished facets collected from

contemporaneous eras.

For the festival’s climax, a full house

welcomes saxophonist and clarinetist

COURTNEY PINE, who returns to the Capstone

for his House of Legends Tour after playing its

opening performance in 2010.

With a slick backing of drums, guitar,

electronic double bass and steelpans, Pine

wields his soprano saxophone like a weapon,

delivering riffs at an incredible velocity.

Expressing his wish to “play, not chat”, Pine

opts for short outbursts on his instrument in

place of mundane inter-song banter. He does,

however, introduce tonight’s set as Caribbean

jazz, an oft-criticised and misunderstood

genre. This music takes the listener away

to sunnier shores and is unapologetically

upbeat and cheerful. Working up a sweat,

Pine ends each piece abruptly, before

launching into the next, drowning out the

audience’s still-ringing applause.

After sliding into an ‘accidental’ rendition of

Dave Brubeck’s Take Five, Pine stops to laugh,

and summons our applause for those musical

legends who are no longer with us, but who live

on through their music. Bob Marley’s Redemption

Song brings the audience to their feet, and is shot

through with a futuristic and ominous sound, like

something from a sci-fi horror soundtrack. Pine’s

EWI (electronic wind instrument) is responsible

for this, an electronic demon of an instrument

with an eight-octave range that causes the

foundations of the theatre to vibrate.

Music of this calibre is something very rarely

experienced, showing Courtney Pine’s deep

appreciation and understanding of his talent.

This music isn’t for the romantic, tender soul.

It’s bold, brash, exultant and very, very loud; a

thunderous torrent of sound. The concert has

been an ear-cleansing, fearsome end to the

Liverpool International Jazz Festival, of which

Il Sogno Del Marinaio (Gaz Jones / @GJMPhoto)

we hope there are many more to come.

Petricã Mogos / soundcloud.com/killotto

Clarry M / @everisland

IL SOGNO DEL MARINAIO

Super Fast Girlie Show

Antipop @ Eric’s

If you’re into American rock music, Mike Watt,

co-founder of short-lived 80s band Minutemen,

has played bass with just about all of your

heroes. The fact that a clutch of punks have

showed up to Eric’s on a weeknight to watch

him play experimental music with two unknown

Italians is testament to his legendary status.

With their set-up of bass, bass and drums and

flannel dress code, there’s no room for extra

fat with SUPERFAST GIRLIE SHOW - they’re fast,

furious and to the point. It’s that wonderful

combination of loud, abrasive music that comes

from a place of extreme love. At times a bit stoner

rock, the bassists share vocals and complement

each other - Phil Hartley is the intense type

while Pasha Coxhill has a smiley singing style

which belies his ability to roar. Compulsively

watchable, they have endless energy that whips

up the audience and, most importantly, damn

fine songs.

And so appear IL SOGNO DEL MARINAIO, an

entirely different prospect altogether. Guitarist

Stefano Pilia pulls out a guitar bow early on, a

sure sign of far-outness, while drummer Andrea

Belfi sports an excellent moustache and the best

retro jumper I’ve seen this side of Christmas.

The sheer enjoyment that exudes from Watt

is wonderful to watch too – and, as the songs

require, he blissfully slaps, noodles and bashes

at his bass.

The first songs, featuring some marvellous

“Wah wah wah” vocals from Belfi, call to mind

the Spaghetti Western record Rome that Danger

Mouse made with Jack White and Italian

composer Daniele Luppi.

But from here they go off on all sorts of

tangents, and really this is about three musicians

experimenting and playing off one another with

no rules, except for the loose theme in their

name - ‘A Sailor’s Dream’ in Italian. At times it

could be described as jazz, but for the most

part they sound like a wonderful cross between

Fugazi and Mahavishnu Orchestra - especially

when they rock out.

These moments are, alas, too infrequent for

some in the hyperactive crowd, who just can’t

seem to muster the attention span for this

challenging music. The audience’s reaction to

one song is particularly cringe-worthy, as some

members drown out Belfi’s spoken-word piece

with their inane pub chat.

Watt, however, takes it all in his stride saying,

“Thanks to the punk movement - you guys get it.”

The Italians appear to be ecstatic to be playing

at all - no doubt aware that they’ve struck gold

to play with such a legend and to reach the

audience he has brought with him.

Having tested the limits of this audience, the

band reward them with a phenomenal onesong

encore of Fun House by The Stooges (with

whom Watt plays), and things get crazy.

The audience is glowing and, before coming

round to quite literally hug every audience

member one by one, Watt leaves the stage with

the rallying cry “Form your own band!” If punk

rock is dead then no one’s told Mike Watt.

Jennifer Perkin / @jhperkin

MAPS & ATLASES

Tall Ships - Ninetails - Emperor Yes

Evol and Bam!Bam!Bam! @ The Kazimier

The Kaz promises much this evening, a

smattering of beardy/intellectual types setting

up camp early at the front of the stage,

overseeing EMPEROR YES’ arrival with what

looks to be a degree of scepticism. They haven’t

a clue what’s in store. It is a rare thing to laugh

out of sheer delight at a band that demand

attention by being utterly, majestically bonkers,

pulling together influences that encompass

synth pop and Barrett-era Floyd in one heady

trip. Seriously, you can hear echoes of the long

forgotten Canterbury scene in diamonds like

Cosmos, a song that has its eye fixed firmly on a

“young and curious” universe, and the whimsical

Fishes (“fish have no choice but to move for the

winter,” goes one line). Equally impressive are

self-confessed upstarts NINETAILS, who dazzle

despite a minor PA malfunction. Falling into

grooves out of nowhere with guitar work that

pushes the limits of their equipment, these

young lads play dark, estranged compositions,

possessing an ambition bordering on genius.

Time will hopefully mould them into the

contenders they so clearly deserve to be – when

talent is this raw, it’s shocking that the product

can be as cerebral, sophisticated and full of

tantalising after-taste as this.

Gig Guide and Ticket Shop live at www.bidolito.co.uk


36

Bido Lito! April 2013

Reviews

TALL SHIPS arrive with much fanfare. Their

joint headlining slot is a stepping-stone to

tackling distant corners of Europe, and the

band test the waters with an air of something

to prove. Wiggling the hips of the crowd, Gallop

is proof that indie still has plenty of chutzpah

when riffs are dissected and belched out amidst

a thunderous backing section. Frontman Ric

Phethean is out for blood. He lends Plate

Tectonics a more gritty vocal delivery than we’re

Maps & Atlases (Nata Moraru / natamoraru.com)

used to, steering the track’s sentiments about

shifting relationships onto bitter ground. Labels

cease to matter; some of these choruses could fill

an aircraft hanger, yet Tall Ships have a tendency

to switch gears from rumination to devil-maycare

rock in the blink of an eye. It’s a haphazardly

paced set, even though an enthusiastic crowd

feel the love while pondering just how to move

their heads at the correct BPM. Ode To Ancestors

takes off in its second half and unites the whole

room in appreciation of the most unexpected

xylophone in living memory.

Levity is something that falls by the wayside

for much of MAPS & ATLASES’ 50 minutes.

Instead, we are treated to quirky, occasionally

thrilling excursions into a maths student’s wet

dream, fretboard heroes Dave Davison and Erin

Elders trading complex ideas off one another

as if an exam paper is swimming in their eyes.

Somehow low-key, fiddly and exuberant all at

once, tracks like Remote And Dark Years get by

on slowly building and releasing a strand of

blues that has been fed through pretty much

every post-Black Keys outfit in the last ten years

or so. Luckily, Shiraz Dada is able to keep up with

his band-mates’ virtuosity, showing off fancy

footwork and a fantastic affinity for the bass as

an instrument, whilst hungering for some of the

spotlight. Winter is almost danceable, and at

last Davison promises to “have some fun,” with

a surprise cover of Tears For Fears’ Everybody

Wants To Rule The World, a move that blows

the roof off and sparks little light-up pyramids,

bathing the band in a blue glow that completely

matches their confident disposition.

THE STRANGLERS

O2 Academy

Joshua Potts

Since their 1977 advent, THE STRANGLERS

have distanced themselves from the rest of

the rotten pack via the application of staunch

determination, wanton aggression and a sense

of restlessness and propulsion that puts even

their younger contemporaries to shame. Whilst

the circuit is chock-full of auld bastards going for

one last payday, tribute acts for groups nobody

cared about in the first place, and nostalgia

packages that are great for some but beyond

ghastly for others, it’s heartening to see a band

both as weathered and hungry as The Stranglers

hacking at the coal face.

Much like their punk/new wave companions/

competitors The Fall, time means nothing for this

most curious of groups… and, again like The Fall,

the loss of a few band members here and there

doesn’t really hinder proceedings either. Baz

Warne, replacing founder member and vocalist

Hugh Cornwell in 2000, has proved more than

an able substitute for his predecessor. Replacing

your vocalist is a tricky game, having to skirt

that fine line between progression, pandering

to the old fans and, in some unfortunate cases,

rubbish karaoke. However, The Stranglers, with

typically dogged spirit, have found the right man

and soldiered on.

A curious blend of young and old, punk

and straight, clean and smelly pack out the

O2, and expectations are not dampened as

the band produce a strong, vital and tight set.

Opening with the rough and ready Toiler On

The Sea (the song from which synth-poodles

Flock Of Seagulls took their name, fact fans!),

there is not one dip in form or enthusiasm.

Jean-Jacques Burnel, hammering out those

trademark basslines akin to a rampaging Panzer

division, sways, provokes and teases the baying

audience, inflicting nothing but assault on them

with his four-stringed cannon.

There’s time for a bit of everything of course;

in a career spanning four decades you should try

your best to accommodate as much as possible.

Newer cuts from the Baz Warne years (Mercury

Rising, Norfolk Coast) prove to be neither

intrusive nor unwelcome at a show where,

admittedly, we want to hear the classics.

Tracks of the calibre of Golden Brown, Peaches,

Nice N’ Sleazy and the psychosexual, sneering

Bring On The Nubiles all come and go in a loud

and raucous fashion. Set closer No More Heroes

The Stranglers (Keith Ainsworth / arkimages.co.uk)

Gig Guide and Ticket Shop live at www.bidolito.co.uk


proves as appealing, obdurate, outspoken and

just plain powerful as ever; one of English rock’s

all-time great songs standing the test of time,

with a message as relevant today as it ever was.

And that just about sums The Stranglers up:

triumph through adversity; power and energy

that belie their age; and flags planted in the

past, present and future. A must-see band for

historians, newbies and those who crave the

excitement that live music can invoke.

Joseph Viney / @jjviney

RORY AND NED

Free Rock And Roll @ MelloMello

The regular Free Rock And Roll night

congregation clamours energetically towards

the stage at RORY AND NED’s appearance,

ready to bring a ruckus down on the nice

folks at MelloMello. Tonight is a comfy set-up

for the anti-folk upstarts since they adopted

Liverpool as their home from home, and clad

in matching lumberjack shirts the duo greet

the crowd like old friends. They pepper their set

with growly panache and jerky dance moves,

tracks like Make You My Baby and Death Race

expressing their gravelly, rockabilly side through

undulations of raw distortion. Their brazen lyrics

reference everything from doing the washingup

to family feuds, with the occasional naughty

word thrown in for good measure. Like two

boys who have sneaked out on a school night,

Rory And Ned are clearly having a ball. It is a

refreshing and salubrious change from more

austere performances by bands operating in the

same genre. Mr Wealthy is a rough diamond of

a tune that has elements of calypso-influenced

guitar and is underpinned by the strong rhythm

and blues theme that runs through all of their

music. The highlight of set is the rather puckishly

named The Horny Bag, which presents itself

as a reworked Johnny B. Goode, more Sweet

Home Alabama than the Home Counties. The

pair continue their rock and roll flourish and

rattle through their most popular hit Man Slag,

a hillbilly anthem with punk sensibilities, taking

cues from The Stooges in its grimy and riotous

delivery. Like two peas spawned in the same

earthy pod somewhere in Sussex, the duo

gyrate and enunciate their anthems in a semisynchronized,

wild-eyed routine. Underneath the

bravado of their stage presence, however, lurks

the evidence of well thought-out guitar melodies

as well as audacious and witty lyrics. The charm

of this band is in the simplicity of its form: two

guys, two guitars (OK, and a drummer…), playing

voracious rock and roll hits and having a great

time with it. The size and audience of the venue

makes for an apt setting for their weirdo folk

aura: here’s hoping that their sound translates

as they perform outside of the bubble of the

Mello community.

Flossie Easthope / @feasthope

DELPHIC

O2 Academy

It’s been a long time since DELPHIC fans in

Liverpool have had the chance to witness the

Stockport synth pop band. Their acclaimed debut

Acolyte was released almost three years ago

and the hype which followed its release saw

a meteoric rise to the forefront of the thriving

dance band scene. They have lain somewhat

low since then, until January this year when

they released their follow up album Collections,

albeit to a mixed response.

As it has been a while since their last visit,

surprisingly the show is not a total sell-out,

however a still healthy crowd of 500 or so

unromantics or singletons have ventured out

on Valentine’s night to swap a candle-lit dinner

for two in exchange for a sweaty rave and lager

from plastic glasses.

Recent single Baiya starts the set off with

its energetic and overbearing drum beat,

although it surprisingly receives a somewhat

subdued response. This is soon replaced by a

collective cheer as the crowd is awoken from

its slumber and the song mixes seamlessly into

the instantly recognisable Halcyon. The swirling

synths sound mega and the vocal effects make

it pitch perfect, although the near perfection of

the song unfortunately does prompt some bad

dance moves across the room.

Looking as smart as ever, the three-piece slide

into another from their new album, Freedom

Found. This highlights the slight change in

direction of the new record with James Cook

taking on a lot more of the lead vocal duties.

Although he’s vocally more present on the new

stuff, he still doesn’t address the crowd until

after the fourth song, when he gives a simple

“hello, thanks for coming”. They don’t exactly

look over the moon to be here, yet the music

is faultless and they move into another new

number, Memeo, which comes with its headbattering

hook. DFA founder Tim Goldsworthy

produced the new record in the same studio in

Bristol where Massive Attack cut Blue Lines, and

his influence is rabidly apparent on this number.

Clarion Call is then dropped in to a rapturous

response before the set hits a bit of a lull with the

slower tempo Don’t Let The Dreamers Take You

Away. The pace is soon picked up again though

with the euphoric fan favourite Red Lights,

which superbly morphs into the fantastic The

Momentary. The acid house loops and thumping

bass provided by Stu Coleman, formerly of

The Music, have the place in a frenzy and it’s

practically impossible not to want to dance.

Atlas marks the end of the set in colossal

fashion. It is obvious that the band won’t end

without playing their trademark tune and in due

course they return to the stage and play extended

versions of Counterpoint and Acolyte, which result

in a collaboratively air punching audience

All in all it’s a splendid return: you cannot fail

to have a good time at a Delphic gig, and it’s

encouraging to know that we only have to wait

a month to welcome them back for this year’s

Sound City. Roll on May.

Steven Aston / gigslutz.co.uk

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Tickets currently on

sale at bidolito.co.uk

Hookworms

Blade Factory

Quiet Loner

Leaf

Dead Belgian

The Kazimier

Mary Epworth

Leaf

Veronica Falls

The Kazimier

Liverpool Sound

City 2013

3-Day Wristbands

Loudon

Wainwright III

Liverpool Philharmonic

Phoenix

Foundation

The Kazimier

Rolo Tomassi

Blade Factory

Suuns

The Kazimier

How To Dress

Well

Leaf

The Computers

MelloMello

X & Y Festival

Weekend Wristbands

Liverpool Psych

Fest 2013

Camp & Furnace

11/5

14/5

27/9

28/9

17/5

20/5

31/5

6-7/7

4/4

4/4

4/4

7/4

17/4

2-4/5

7/5

Delphic (Adam Edwards / @adamedwardsF2)

proves as appealing, obdurate, outspoken and

just plain powerful as ever; one of English rock’s

all-time great songs standing the test of time,

with a message as relevant today as it ever was.

And that just about sums The Stranglers up:

triumph through adversity; power and energy

that belie their age; and flags planted in the

past, present and future. A must-see band for

historians, newbies and those who crave the

excitement that live music can invoke.

Joseph Viney / @jjviney

RORY AND NED

Free Rock And Roll @ MelloMello

The regular Free Rock And Roll night

congregation clamours energetically towards

the stage at RORY AND NED’s appearance,

ready to bring a ruckus down on the nice

folks at MelloMello. Tonight is a comfy set-up

for the anti-folk upstarts since they adopted

Liverpool as their home from home, and clad

in matching lumberjack shirts the duo greet

the crowd like old friends. They pepper their set

with growly panache and jerky dance moves,

tracks like Make You My Baby

Make You My Baby and Death Race

expressing their gravelly, rockabilly side through

undulations of raw distortion. Their brazen lyrics

reference everything from doing the washingup

to family feuds, with the occasional naughty

word thrown in for good measure. Like two

boys who have sneaked out on a school night,

Rory And Ned are clearly having a ball. It is a

refreshing and salubrious change from more

austere performances by bands operating in the

same genre. Mr Wealthy

Mr Wealthy is a rough diamond of

a tune that has elements of calypso-influenced

guitar and is underpinned by the strong rhythm

and blues theme that runs through all of their

music. The highlight of set is the rather puckishly

named The Horny Bag

The Horny Bag, which presents itself

as a reworked Johnny B. Goode, more Sweet

Home Alabama than the Home Counties. The

pair continue their rock and roll flourish and

rattle through their most popular hit Man Slag

Man Slag,

a hillbilly anthem with punk sensibilities, taking

cues from The Stooges in its grimy and riotous

delivery. Like two peas spawned in the same

earthy pod somewhere in Sussex, the duo

gyrate and enunciate their anthems in a semisynchronized,

wild-eyed routine. Underneath the

bravado of their stage presence, however, lurks

the evidence of well thought-out guitar melodies

as well as audacious and witty lyrics. The charm

of this band is in the simplicity of its form: two

guys, two guitars (OK, and a drummer…), playing

voracious rock and roll hits and having a great

time with it. The size and audience of the venue

makes for an apt setting for their weirdo folk

aura: here’s hoping that their sound translates

as they perform outside of the bubble of the

Mello community.

Flossie Easthope / @feasthope

DELPHIC

O2 Academy

It’s been a long time since DELPHIC fans in

Liverpool have had the chance to witness the

Stockport synth pop band. Their acclaimed debut

Acolyte

Acolyte was released almost three years ago

and the hype which followed its release saw

a meteoric rise to the forefront of the thriving

dance band scene. They have lain somewhat

low since then, until January this year when

they released their follow up album Collections,

albeit to a mixed response.

As it has been a while since their last visit,

surprisingly the show is not a total sell-out,

however a still healthy crowd of 500 or so

unromantics or singletons have ventured out

on Valentine’s night to swap a candle-lit dinner

for two in exchange for a sweaty rave and lager

from plastic glasses.

Recent single Baiya

Baiya starts the set off with

its energetic and overbearing drum beat,

although it surprisingly receives a somewhat

subdued response. This is soon replaced by a

collective cheer as the crowd is awoken from

its slumber and the song mixes seamlessly into

the instantly recognisable Halcyon

Halcyon. The swirling

synths sound mega and the vocal effects make

it pitch perfect, although the near perfection of

the song unfortunately does prompt some bad

dance moves across the room.

Looking as smart as ever, the three-piece slide

into another from their new album, Freedom

Found. This highlights the slight change in

direction of the new record with James Cook

taking on a lot more of the lead vocal duties.

Although he’s vocally more present on the new

stuff, he still doesn’t address the crowd until

after the fourth song, when he gives a simple

“hello, thanks for coming”. They don’t exactly

look over the moon to be here, yet the music

is faultless and they move into another new

number, Memeo, which comes with its headbattering

hook. DFA founder Tim Goldsworthy

produced the new record in the same studio in

Bristol where Massive Attack cut Blue Lines, and

his influence is rabidly apparent on this number.

Clarion Call is then dropped in to a rapturous

response before the set hits a bit of a lull with the

slower tempo Don’t Let The Dreamers Take You

Away

Away. The pace is soon picked up again though

with the euphoric fan favourite Red Lights

Red Lights,

which superbly morphs into the fantastic The

Momentary

Momentary. The acid house loops and thumping

bass provided by Stu Coleman, formerly of

The Music, have the place in a frenzy and it’s

practically impossible not to want to dance.

Atlas marks the end of the set in colossal

fashion. It is obvious that the band won’t end

without playing their trademark tune and in due

course they return to the stage and play extended

versions of Counterpoint

Counterpoint and Acolyte

Acolyte, which result

in a collaboratively air punching audience

All in all it’s a splendid return: you cannot fail

to have a good time at a Delphic gig, and it’s

encouraging to know that we only have to wait

a month to welcome them back for this year’s

Sound City. Roll on May.

Steven Aston / gigslutz.co.uk

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Tickets currently on

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Tickets currently on

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Tickets currently on

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sale at bidolito.co.uk

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sale at bidolito.co.uk

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sale at bidolito.co.uk

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. . . . . . . . ṡale at bidolito.co.uk

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sale at bidolito.co.uk

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. . . . . . . . .sale at bidolito.co.uk

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sale at bidolito.co.uk

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Hookworms

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Hookworms

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Hookworms

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Blade Factory

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Blade Factory

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Quiet Loner

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Quiet Loner

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Quiet Loner

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Quiet Loner

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Leaf

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Leaf

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Dead Belgian

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Dead Belgian

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Dead Belgian

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The Kazimier

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The Kazimier

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Mary Epworth

Leaf

Veronica Falls

The Kazimier

Liverpool Sound

City 2013

3-Day Wristbands

Loudon

Wainwright III

Liverpool Philharmonic

Phoenix

Foundation

The Kazimier

Rolo Tomassi

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Rolo Tomassi

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Rolo Tomassi

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Blade Factory

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Blade Factory

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Blade Factory

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Suuns

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Suuns

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Suuns

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The Kazimier

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The Kazimier

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The Kazimier

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How To Dress

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How To Dress

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How To Dress

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Well

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Well

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Well

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Leaf

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Leaf

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The Computers

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The Computers

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The Computers

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MelloMello

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MelloMello

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MelloMello

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X & Y Festival

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X & Y Festival

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X & Y Festival

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Weekend Wristbands

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Weekend Wristbands

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Weekend Wristbands

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Live

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Live

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Live

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rpool Psych

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rpool Psych

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rpool Psych

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rpool Psych

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Liverpool Psych

Live

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Live

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rpool Psych

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Live

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Live

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rpool Psych

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Live

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Fest 2013

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Fest 2013

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Fest 2013

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Camp & Furnace

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Camp & Furnace

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Camp & Furnace

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11/5

14/5

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27/9

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27/9

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28/9

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28/9

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17/5

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20/5

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20/5

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31/5

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31/5

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6-7/7

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6-7/7

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6-7/7

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4/4

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4/4

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4/4

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4/4

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4/4

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4/4

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7/4

17/4

2-4/5

7/5

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Delphic (Adam Edwards / @adamedwardsF2)

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