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Issue 37 / September 2013

September 2013 issue of Bido Lito! Featuring FOREST SWORDS, NATALIE MCCOOL, JAMES SKELLY, MOON DUO and much more.

September 2013 issue of Bido Lito! Featuring FOREST SWORDS, NATALIE MCCOOL, JAMES SKELLY, MOON DUO and much more.

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<strong>Issue</strong> <strong>37</strong><br />

<strong>September</strong> <strong>2013</strong><br />

Forest Swords by Keith Ainsworth<br />

Forest Swords<br />

Natalie McCool<br />

James Skelly<br />

Moon Duo


Bido Lito! <strong>September</strong> <strong>2013</strong> 3<br />

Editorial<br />

We’re big fans of Drenge at Bido Lito! Magazine. Their guttural, very British, grunge-blues<br />

fusion is so compelling live - and so essentially direct on record - it comes as no surprise they’ve<br />

developed the momentum akin to a freewheeling juggernaut. What has come as a surprise,<br />

mind you, was their mention in the resignation of Labour MP Tom Watson.<br />

Having tipped the band to Labour Leader Ed Miliband in his resignation letter (true, as odd as<br />

it sounds), Watson went on to enthuse in a guest Glastonbury column for Noisey:<br />

“One day down and I was feeling listless. No band had really hit home. It felt tame. Then it<br />

happened. I was seized with those fragmentary moments of pure music joy that festival goers<br />

live for. I found Drenge. Two brothers on a drum kit and lead guitar. I’m 46 years old. But I’m in<br />

a field in Glastonbury falling in love with a bloke barely in his twenties playing the guitar like<br />

a mid-west cyclone.”<br />

OK, so we’ve a few issues to pick our way through with this one. Firstly, an MP resigning<br />

and shooting straight down to Worthy Farm does, on initial inspection at least, sound like the<br />

mother of all midlife crises. The accompanying video on Noisey of Tom attempting to throw a<br />

tent up does little to dispel this conclusion.<br />

But why should it seem so alien that a politician would<br />

want to go to Glastonbury? After all, the days of festivals being<br />

the reserve of falafel-munching, free-love advocating, musicaficionado<br />

lefties are well and truly gone - the festival supplies<br />

aisle in your local Tesco and Cosmopolitan’s ‘survival guide’<br />

bear testament to that. Has our relationship with politicians<br />

become so strained, so distrusting, that the thought of an MP<br />

wellie-tapping to Drenge has become so unpalatable? MPs<br />

Drenge: Eoin Loveless, totally<br />

are - in theory - representatives of the population. I for one<br />

thrilled with the Tom Watson<br />

would be encouraged by the sight of Angela Eagle or Frank<br />

endorsement...<br />

Field pogoing along to Deerhunter at East Village Arts Club<br />

- a better news story than that pompous clown Jacob Rees-Mogg getting rumbled as a guest<br />

dinner speaker for the ultra-rightwing, pretty damn evil, Traditional Britain group.<br />

The problem we’re faced with is that so often in the past music has been used as a notso-subtle<br />

tool in attempting to relate to the masses. We all remember the George Bush iPod<br />

revelations - apparently a spot of My Sharona was the perfect accompaniment to lazy weekends<br />

at Camp David - and Tony Blair wheeling out Noel Gallagher for his election victory knees-up.<br />

Apparently David Cameron is a sucker for a touch of Mumford And Sons you know? (Offensively<br />

bland, sounds about right to me - bet he loves The Hummingbirds).<br />

Michael-taking aside, what we want from our politicians is honesty. We all know that Gordon<br />

Brown didn’t listen to Arctic Monkeys (given the fact that his Desert Island Discs highlight was<br />

Runrig’s Loch Lomond, it seems highly unlikely) and, not only did the claim make him look like<br />

a bit of a tit, it helps to further dehumanise politics - adding to the idea that these smiling, suitencrusted<br />

creatures reside in a world of spin, where little of what we hear is actually true and<br />

everything, down to their choice of LP - or burger for that matter - is a calculated PR exercise.<br />

We all know that a record collection says so much about someone; it exposes you in an<br />

honest and naked truth. It gives away your intimate tastes, aspirations and guilty pleasures.<br />

That, on the whole, is probably a touch too much for politicians - away from the safe confines<br />

of Radio 4 at least.<br />

Perhaps Tom Watson is one of the rare good guys. (Mind you, he had just resigned.)<br />

Craig G Pennington / @BidoLito<br />

Editor<br />

Features<br />

6<br />

FOREST SWORDS<br />

8<br />

PSYCHEDELIC<br />

RENNAISANCE<br />

10<br />

NATALIE McCOOL<br />

12<br />

THE CURFEW TOWER<br />

14 TOOLS OF THE TRADE<br />

16<br />

JAMES SKELLY<br />

Regulars<br />

4 NEWS<br />

18<br />

PREVIEWS/SHORTS<br />

20<br />

REVIEWS<br />

Bido Lito!<br />

<strong>Issue</strong> Thirty Seven / <strong>September</strong> <strong>2013</strong><br />

bidolito.co.uk<br />

4th Floor, Mello Mello<br />

40-42 Slater St<br />

Liverpool L1 4BX<br />

Editor<br />

Craig G Pennington - info@bidolito.co.uk<br />

Assistant Editor<br />

Christopher Torpey - reviews@bidolito.co.uk<br />

Reviews Editor<br />

Sam Turner - live@bidolito.co.uk<br />

Online Editor<br />

Joshua Nevett - online@bidolito.co.uk<br />

Features Editor<br />

Mike Doherty - features@bidolito.co.uk<br />

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Proofreading<br />

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Media Partnership Manager<br />

Naters Philip - naters@bidolito.co.uk<br />

Words<br />

Craig G Pennington, Christopher Torpey, Phil Gwyn, Jessica<br />

Main, Richard Lewis, Joshua Potts, Jason Stoll, Francis<br />

Gallagher, Joshua Nevett, Sam Turner, Maurice Stewart, Alex<br />

Holbourn, Mike Townsend, Sean Phillips, Rob Syme, John<br />

Wise<br />

Photography, Illustration and Layout<br />

Luke Avery, Keith Ainsworth, Charlotte Patmore, Mark McNulty,<br />

Oliver Catherall, Gareth Arrowsmith, Sam Wiehl, Robin Clewley,<br />

Gaz Jones, Adam Edwards, Michael Sheerin, Glyn Akroyd<br />

Adverts<br />

To advertise please contact ads@bidolito.co.uk<br />

The T<br />

views expressed in Bido Lito! are those of the respective contributors<br />

and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the magazine, its staff or<br />

the publishers. All rights reserved.<br />

RKZ, DJ & musician


News<br />

Here Comes The Pzyk<br />

LIVERPOOL INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL OF PSYCHEDELIA returns to fix the steely gaze of the ‘global psychedelic village’ upon<br />

our city once more. The full programme of music has been broken into day line-ups, with individual day tickets and weekend<br />

wristbands now on sale at bidolito.co.uk. . Friday 27th <strong>September</strong> sees the might of MOON DUO and DEAD MEADOW engulfing<br />

Camp and Furnace, while CLINIC and FUZZ (pictured) lead the cosmic array on Saturday 28th. A full cast of DJs, short films, trippy<br />

visuals and psychedelic talks will complement the music – don’t let the PZYK pass you by. liverpoolpsychfest.com<br />

Bido Lito! Dansette<br />

Our pick of fresh wax cuts from the<br />

Liverpool Psych Fest bill...<br />

Calling All Emerging Musicians<br />

The chance to win a year of professional music industry mentoring, plus a weekend of studio recording time, is still up for<br />

grabs courtesy of the MERSEYRAIL SOUND STATION PRIZE. The prize is open to all musicians on Merseyside, and all you have to<br />

do to enter is film yourself playing one of your own songs at one of the Sound Station Upload Locations and post the video on<br />

Merseyrail Sound Station’s Facebook wall.. But you’d better hurry if you want to be in with a shout: the entry process closes on 30th<br />

<strong>September</strong>, and the entries have been coming in thick and fast already. Full details can be found at merseyrailsoundstation.com<br />

11 Years And Counting<br />

After yet another trailblazing year for CIRCUS - Liverpool’s flagship house and techno imprint/clubbing behemoth – East Village Arts<br />

Club will host the brand’s 11th birthday on 28th <strong>September</strong>. Circus bossman/global house and techno figurehead YOUSEF (pictured)<br />

will be sat at the head of the table to blow out the candles, performing live music written and produced under his recently FFRR/<br />

Warner Records-signed guise THE ANGEL. Meanwhile, headliners SETH TROXLER, CASSY, SCUBA and CATZ & DOGZ will cut the cake, with<br />

Circus residents LEWIS BOARDMAN and SCOTT LEWIS assigned to party-bag distribution duties. Simply unmissable. circusclub.co.uk<br />

Live Transmission<br />

In a sonic re-imagining of the seminal oeuvre of post-punk iconoclasts Joy Division, HERITAGE ORCHESTRA and electronic producer<br />

SCANNER (pictured) have teamed up to reinterpret the band for an audio/visual collaboration like no other. LIVE_TRANSMISSION – which<br />

features Adam Betts (Drums) and Matt Calvert (Guitar) of Three Trapped Tigers, John Calvert (Bass) of Ghostpoet and Jules Buckley (Conductor)<br />

of Heritage Orchestra – takes place on 30th <strong>September</strong> at Liverpool Philharmonic Hall. The visually immersive artwork of Matt Watkins will<br />

be projected upon huge screens to offset the music, creating a powerful sensory homage of unknown pleasures. liverpoolphil.com<br />

A New Penny Lane?<br />

There are few Liverpool music photographers with an archive to rival that of MARK MCNULTY, who has been documenting the<br />

city’s music for thirty years. It’s only fitting then that Liverpool International Music Festival have commissioned Mark to create A<br />

NEW PENNY LANE?, a new exhibition which runs 22nd August - 22nd <strong>September</strong>. The collection encompasses portraits of musicians<br />

playing the festival - including Vasily Petrenko, Natalie McCool, Garry Christian, Bird, The Sugarmen (pictured) and The Tea Street Band,<br />

and will be housed at the LIMF Hub, Grand Hall, Albert Dock and is open Thursday until Sunday, 11am - 5pm. markmcnulty.co.uk<br />

Studio 2 Re-Boot<br />

COMPETITION!<br />

Ever a favourite of Liverpool music lovers, Studio 2 on Parr St re-launches in <strong>September</strong> as Liverpool’s only dedicated jazz, swing<br />

and blues live music venue. With new ownership, this fresh era for Studio 2 opens with a performance from Manchester blues and<br />

soul singer, Kyla Brox (pictured) – daughter of legendary blues singer Victor Brox. The venue has been given a complete makeover, with<br />

the bar area reflecting the studio’s illustrious history which has seen the likes of Black Sabbath, Björk, Coldplay and The Smiths record<br />

there. Regulars are reassured that the ever-popular Parr Jazz will also continue their Tuesday night residency. studio2liverpool.com<br />

Fancy a fun fling of a weekend at a fancy boutique festival? Good, because that’s what’s on offer at FESTIVAL NUMBER<br />

6 between 13th and 15th <strong>September</strong>. The festival earned itself an excellent name on the circuit after its debut last year,<br />

and this year they’re looking to top it all with a line-up including DAUGHTER, WAVE MACHINES (pictured) and MY BLOODY<br />

VALENTINE, along with poetry readings and talks from JOHN COOPER CLARKE and TRACEY THORN. Set in the pseudo-<br />

Mediterranean Mecca of Portmeirion, Festival Number 6 is sure to make for a truly memorable experience - one that is<br />

different from any other festival this summer.<br />

We have teamed up with the bods at Festival Number 6 to offer a pair of tickets for one lucky reader. To get your mitts on them just answer this question:<br />

What famous 60s TV series was set in the village of Portmeirion? a) The Royle Family b) The Prisoner c) Shameless<br />

To enter, email your answers to competition@bidolito.co.uk<br />

by Friday 6th <strong>September</strong>. All correct answers will be placed in a pink lottery wheel, the<br />

winner drawn at random and notified by email. Good luck!<br />

The Lucid Dream<br />

In Your Eyes<br />

THE GREAT POP<br />

SUPPLEMENT<br />

You may, understandably, not expect<br />

a track of such beauty as this to reside<br />

on an LP titled Songs Of Lies And Deceit.<br />

THE LUCID DREAM’s ability to marry the<br />

sinister with the anthemic, the abrasive<br />

with the enveloping, the melodic with<br />

the motorik, is in full force on this debut<br />

album stand-out. If this is what lies and<br />

deceit sound like, spin me all the untruths<br />

under the sun.<br />

Lorelle Meets The Obsolete<br />

What’s Holding You?<br />

SONIC CATHEDRAL /<br />

CAPTCHA<br />

The parched, aping bassline of What’s<br />

Holding You? rattles along like the<br />

Mexico City subway that inspired it, as<br />

wailing synths and guitar-tronics overlay<br />

a passive, sexy-as-fuck vocal line from<br />

Lorena Quintanilla. LORELLE MEETS THE<br />

OBSOLETE are right at the centre of the<br />

global psychedelic village and Mexico<br />

City never sounded so good.<br />

Night Beats<br />

Outta Mind<br />

THE REVERBERATION<br />

APPRECIATION SOCIETY<br />

Good, old fashioned, balls-out garage<br />

rock will never go out of fashion,<br />

especially when its present and future<br />

rests in the hands of headcases like<br />

NIGHT BEATS. Taken from their second<br />

full length record Sonic Bloom, Outta<br />

Mind is a taste of the debauchery that’s<br />

to come: rock, soul and blues, soaked<br />

in reverb and shaken together with a<br />

healthy dose of drones.<br />

Eat Lights; Become Lights<br />

Modular Living<br />

THE GREAT POP<br />

SUPPLEMENT / ROCKET GIRL<br />

The experience of listening to EAT LIGHTS;<br />

BECOME LIGHTS is like being strapped<br />

to the back of some runaway red blood<br />

cells as they course through the veins of<br />

a pilled-up raver (or so we imagine), and<br />

on third LP Modular Living they get the<br />

ebb and flow of high-octane electrified<br />

krautrock moments, interspersed with<br />

navel-gazing psychedelic swirls, just right.<br />

Gig Guide and Ticket Shop live at www.bidolito.co.uk


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Forest Swords<br />

Forest<br />

Swords<br />

Words: Phil Gwyn / @notmanyexperts<br />

Photography: Keith Ainsworth / arkimages.co.uk


Bido Lito! <strong>September</strong> <strong>2013</strong> 7<br />

It was back in 2010 that a shadowy figure known as FOREST<br />

SWORDS dropped a lengthy EP called Dagger Paths which had critics<br />

insisting it was a full-length album seemingly just for the pleasure of<br />

slotting it towards the higher echelons of their end-of-year album lists;<br />

according to the left-field bible FACT, this wandering EP was the best<br />

album of 2010. It turned out that it was the work of Matthew Barnes, a<br />

Wirral resident and graduate of a Liverpool art college, who had been<br />

unexpectedly cast as a hero of inventive electronica by everyone from<br />

Pitchfork to that perennial stalwart of experimental music, the NME. As<br />

Bido Lito! sits down with the inadvertently elusive character in a tiny<br />

boozer near where he sought inspiration for his forthcoming debut<br />

record on the weather-battered hills of the Wirral’s North West coast,<br />

he wastes no time stressing just how unlikely Forest Sword’s career<br />

is, as he insists that “It was completely accidental first time round -<br />

having people compliment you on something you just made in your<br />

bedroom is completely insane!” But after a cavernous three-year wait<br />

that threatened to become a full stop rather than a pause at many<br />

points, Barnes is finally ready to let the swampy textures of actual<br />

debut album Engravings engulf both Liverpool and the wider world.<br />

Listening to Engravings now, with each trembling guitar line<br />

and ghostly sweep of vocals nailed in place by Barnes’ individual<br />

vision, it’s hard to believe that this really is a record that was nearly<br />

never made at all. During that nervous three-year break there were<br />

snatches of rumours that the whole Forest Swords project had been<br />

shelved after the overwhelmingly positive reaction to Dagger Paths,<br />

and it’s slightly surprising that, face to face, Barnes admits this to<br />

be the truth. “It felt weirdly like [it would be] a statement if I did<br />

[end it] like that,” he explains, “because it was never planned, it<br />

would be kind of punk to say, ‘no, I’m not doing it again’. And also<br />

there was a lot of personal stuff.” Yet after this period of doubt there<br />

wasn’t a conscious decision to make an album; in fact, it’s probably<br />

a testament to how inspired the process of making Engravings was<br />

that even after all of the attention that had come from Dagger Paths,<br />

Engravings was essentially another body of work made by accident,<br />

as Barnes slipped into his music again. “I never really sat down and<br />

thought, ‘I’ve got to make a full length record now.’ It just came very<br />

naturally, I was just working very, very slowly, and gradually things<br />

were starting to take form. I kind of like the idea of just taking it as<br />

it comes, and the music should just happen, really. I actually only<br />

decided it was going to be an album maybe six or seven tracks in.”<br />

That spark of inspiration came from the striking panoramas of<br />

the Wirral, as well as Barnes’ personal life. “I wouldn’t say it was<br />

about the Wirral,” he explains. “I see it as personal, but where I live<br />

is a natural extension of that. It has definitely influenced my whole<br />

aesthetic.” It’s an influence that’s suggested throughout Engravings,<br />

which has an earthy, windswept feel to it, and so it’s no surprise that<br />

his locality played an integral part in the initial sketching of tracks.<br />

He tells me that he let the dramatic landscapes of Thurstaston, the<br />

forest skirting The Column in West Kirby, and the beaches of that<br />

north end of the Wirral bleed into his sound. “I took field recordings<br />

and photos and pasted them up. I wasn’t really looking at it and<br />

trying to reflect it in a very specific way, just the loose feel of it,<br />

because I’m a designer so it triggers a lot more for me.”<br />

It’s at this point that the divergences from Dagger Paths begin<br />

to appear. As Barnes says himself, “With Dagger Paths it was a<br />

subconscious thing, but with this one I was much more influenced<br />

by consciously being aware of my environment.” As a result, there’s<br />

something intensely and emotionally resonant about tracks like<br />

An Hour, a hypnotic trip through orphaned house piano stabs and<br />

disconsolate whispers of vocals. That certainly seems to have been<br />

Barnes’ intention: “I think Engravings was more about an emotional<br />

pull, for me. I felt sort of like Dagger Paths was quite cold in places,<br />

which is fine, but for this one I was really conscious of it being a bit<br />

more human.” This approach has sprung not just from being inspired<br />

by the Wirral, but by Barnes’ life, too. “There was so much stuff going<br />

on in my life that it felt like a release making it. It’s definitely more<br />

of a cathartic thing this time.” From the ethereal wash of a voice that<br />

hangs over Anneka’s Battle to the strangled slivers of chanting that<br />

slip through the cracks of Gathering, it often feels like that human<br />

connection is established by the prominence of vocals, which<br />

Barnes says was a conscious decision on his part. “It feels like quite<br />

a personal record, and I think part of that’s through the vocals, even<br />

though the vocals aren’t lyrics, just a lot of sounds, but I think that<br />

as a listener you can instantly latch onto that.”<br />

And yet, despite Barnes’ initial indecision over whether to pursue his<br />

work as Forest Swords, once he had fallen into the process of making<br />

an album, he gave himself up to that process completely. He confesses<br />

that “There were so many revisions of this record, but I’m pleased that<br />

I put so much work into it, because I feel like it’s a concise body of<br />

work now. I was very conscious of it not being as meandering this<br />

time.” Ironically, after all of the hesitancy that had marked the start<br />

of the project, Barnes found that, three years down the line, he was<br />

finding it tough to draw a line under the album that had become such<br />

a big part of his life. “You become so involved in it that when you think<br />

there’s going to be an end point, it’s almost a little bit terrifying. It’s<br />

almost as if you can’t break up with someone, because there’s a weird<br />

sort of void after it’s finished. But I suppose it’s actually understanding<br />

when an album is done that is just as important as the process of<br />

doing it; understanding when it’s a complete thing.”<br />

It was at this point that he turned to Tri Angle, the otherworldly<br />

electronic label that would be releasing the record. “I actually only<br />

finished it in May... I was speaking to Tri Angle, and they were like,<br />

‘You come to a point where you have to stop working on it.’ I was<br />

listening to it and I was like, ‘Shit... I’ve got nothing else to do, now.’”<br />

Apart from nudging Barnes towards releasing Engravings, the label<br />

also had a bearing on the way that the album ebbs and flows. “I had<br />

problems with the sequencing,” admits Barnes, “because when you<br />

get so involved in something, you lose all objectivity about what it<br />

feels like, so it was the label that sequenced it, actually.” It seems like<br />

a wise creative decision, as the album feels like a journey mirroring<br />

Barnes’ steps over the past three years. It progresses from those<br />

spidery guitars so reminiscent of Forest Swords on opener Ljoss,<br />

through the dense, foggy climes of The Weight Of Gold, eventually<br />

emerging somewhere that feels completely new for Forest Swords:<br />

the sprawling masterpiece that is Friend, You Will Never Learn, built<br />

around an insistent R&B groove and eight sublime minutes of<br />

sidesteps, screwed vocals, and clawing tension.<br />

It’s the culmination of these sounds that makes Engravings<br />

something truly unique, something that feels like its own space,<br />

somewhere to get lost in and retreat to, perhaps even something<br />

that seems like it could really leave a serious impression. But,<br />

as Barnes explains, the title indicates that permanence was<br />

always sort of at the back of his mind. “When I was in art school<br />

in Liverpool, the buzzword was always ‘mark making’: making an<br />

impact in something, something that’s very permanent and very<br />

personal and very direct, and so when I came up with a title it sort<br />

of fitted perfectly. For me it feels like a very permanent piece of<br />

work.” It sounds like an ambitious aim but, given the innovation<br />

that’s cloaked in Engravings’ deeply resonant take on shards of the<br />

outside world, it’s not so unrealistic; this is a record that is firmly<br />

rooted in its locality, yet carries a universal appeal in its menacing,<br />

subterranean tones that rumble and shake their way through your<br />

whole being. Even so, Barnes’ initial aim for the record is more<br />

modest: “It’s just a relief to have it out finally,” he says. But, from our<br />

perspective, it’s just a relief to have it at all.<br />

Engravings is released 26th August via Tri Angle Records.<br />

forestswords.tumblr.com<br />

Gig Guide and Ticket Shop live at www.bidolito.co.uk


Bido Lito! <strong>September</strong> <strong>2013</strong><br />

8<br />

Gig Guide and Ticket Shop live at www.bidolito.co.uk<br />

It was on 16th October 1965 when the first selfbilled<br />

psychedelic rock show took place at<br />

the Longshoreman’s Hall, San Francisco,<br />

dubbed by its comic-book-loving<br />

promoters ‘A Tribute to Doctor<br />

Strange’. Attended by 1,000<br />

devotees, the gig featured<br />

The Marbles and<br />

Jefferson<br />

Airplane,<br />

who invited their<br />

followers on stage<br />

to sip acid-spiked<br />

punch from a<br />

gigantic<br />

chalice.<br />

Almost 50 years<br />

later<br />

LIVERPOOL<br />

INTERNATIONAL<br />

FESTIVAL<br />

OF<br />

PSYCHEDELIA<br />

hosts its second<br />

outing<br />

on<br />

27th and 28th<br />

<strong>September</strong> <strong>2013</strong>;<br />

is<br />

psychedelia<br />

having<br />

a<br />

renaissance<br />

moment<br />

and<br />

enjoying<br />

its third if<br />

not<br />

fourth<br />

summer<br />

of<br />

love?<br />

Bido<br />

Lito!<br />

asked me, Jason Stoll<br />

of MUGSTAR, to interview<br />

Erik ‘Ripley’ Johnson about the<br />

renaissance of psychedelic rock. He is one of<br />

the most important figures in today’s burgeoning<br />

scene, in not just one, but two of the current scene’s leading<br />

bands: MOON DUO and Wooden Shjips. I had the pleasure of<br />

meeting Ripley a few years ago when Mugstar played with Moon<br />

Duo in Brighton and we have regularly crossed paths since; the<br />

last time being in Belgium in 2012 with San Francisco’s Carlton<br />

Melton in tow. He is now in a blazing hot Berlin, having a welldeserved<br />

break halfway through the tour, though Berlin is “maybe<br />

not the best city for resting [in]”.<br />

Ripley started Moon Duo with his other half Sanae Yamada,<br />

also Wooden Shjips projectionist, in San Francisco in 2009 “as<br />

an attempt to compress the rock band format down to just two<br />

people”. It is a format influenced by the likes of Suicide, Cluster,<br />

Silver Apples and Royal Trux, taking a very minimalist approach to<br />

recording and performance, which also allows for an easy set-up<br />

to tour. They have, however, added a touring drummer in the last<br />

few weeks. The group prefer to be described as a rock ‘n’ roll band,<br />

rather than psychedelic, as Ripley explains, “I don’t think you can<br />

use that tag generally, it’s more of a personal thing, depending<br />

on the listener. I find a lot of hip hop and jazz to be psychedelic,<br />

and most so-called psychedelic rock very straight. Not that there’s<br />

anything wrong with that.”<br />

At the beginning of this year Mojo magazine featured a covermount<br />

CD entitled “Echoes: A Compendium of Modern Psychedelia”,<br />

which suggested that “away from the glare of the mainstream,<br />

the last decade has seen the dawning of a new era of psychedelic<br />

music.” However, with the influx of neu ‘psych’ bands and the<br />

success of the likes of Tame Impala does this mean psychedelia<br />

is having a global<br />

renaissance moment?<br />

Ripley<br />

responds:<br />

“Everyone’s<br />

been<br />

telling me that on<br />

this tour. I’m not sure<br />

I buy it”, so I follow<br />

up the question<br />

with another: when<br />

Clinic toured America<br />

earlier this year<br />

they said it’s all<br />

gone psych rock in<br />

America right now<br />

- is that the case<br />

in other countries<br />

he’s played? “I<br />

haven’t<br />

noticed<br />

that in the US, or<br />

anywhere really,<br />

but it’s been the<br />

topic du jour<br />

in<br />

interviews<br />

in Europe this<br />

summer.”<br />

For White Hills’<br />

Dave W “Psychedelic is<br />

music that is disorientating,<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

can’t ignore that but I think there’s ultimately a place beyond the<br />

drug experience. ‘Other planes of there’, as Sun Ra put it.”<br />

Psychedelic music today seems to encompass a diverse area<br />

from the experimental electronic music of Black Dice to<br />

the indie rock of Toy and all in-between. Can this be a<br />

healthy approach to labelling music? “I just think<br />

it’s not helpful.” Ripley explains. “’Psychedelic’<br />

is more of an experience, not a genre,<br />

and you may have a psychedelic<br />

experience listening to Bach or<br />

Shabbazz Palaces or Miles Davis. I<br />

understand why it’s done, of course.<br />

But the danger is that it becomes<br />

codified, like ‘Stoner Rock’, and then<br />

it becomes boring with all the bands<br />

sounding the same. That would be<br />

unfortunate.”<br />

In this resurgence of all things<br />

‘psychedelic’ will the bands involved<br />

have a lasting impact? Is it copying or<br />

are they offering something new? Or<br />

is it just articulated differently? Ripley<br />

ventures that “Nothing is ever really new,<br />

but that’s OK. Everything’s interconnected. I<br />

don’t know about leading figures but I have my<br />

favourites. Lots of them actually: Sun Araw, Cave, Psychic<br />

Ills, Herbcraft, Blues Control, Peaking Lights, Umberto, and on<br />

and on.” There seem to be places far and wide springing up with<br />

their own psych-rock scenes, but with a unique takes on what<br />

constitutes ‘psychedelic rock’. Just like Argentina in the late 1960s<br />

with Os Mutantes or Zambia in the 1970s with ‘badass rock’ bands<br />

like Witch. Ripley says “I absolutely love the Zamrock.” Check<br />

Föllakzoid from Santiago, Chile, signed to the über-hip Scared<br />

Bones imprint and incorporate kraut/psych/space/drone rock.<br />

There are Psych festivals popping up all over the world:<br />

Austin, Tokyo, Los Angeles, Cincinnati, London, Aarhus, Bolton,<br />

Glasgow, and of course Liverpool’s very own. Is this a part of<br />

the global psychedelic renaissance? “My best guess is that the<br />

success of the Austin Psych Fest has inspired other people to<br />

give it a go. And why not?” Ripley started his own ‘psych fest’<br />

Frisco Freak-out in 2009 where people would be encouraged to<br />

bring food to give to the homeless community, which seemed<br />

to have a conscience more in line with ethical ideals than the<br />

typical rock festival. “Our goal was to not end up with any<br />

money, so we gave it away up front. But if you’re putting on a<br />

fun, peaceful event, it’s got be a good thing for the bands, the<br />

fans, the community - profit or not.”<br />

Even metal behemoths Metallica seem to being getting in on<br />

the psychedelic trip, recording with early exponent Lou Reed on<br />

the ill-advised Lulu album and more importantly asking Wooden<br />

Shjips to play a festival they curated. As Ripley explains “The<br />

Metallica fest was interesting. It was in a field outside of Atlantic<br />

City, so not the most charming locale. But it had the swankiest<br />

backstage area I’ve ever seen. Unfortunately, we didn’t get to<br />

meet any of the band, though I did see James Hetfield drive by<br />

on a golf cart.” Maybe not the most shining example of a global<br />

psychedelic renaissance but indicative of the fact that even rock’s<br />

most dysfunctional band see its significance.<br />

So, are we witnessing a global psychedelic renaissance right<br />

now? I’m not so sure. What we are seeing are more bands coming<br />

into the spotlight tagged as ‘psych’ but, as Mojo Magazine<br />

suggested, this has been bubbling away for a long time. Maybe<br />

the scene is being unified somewhat at the moment but<br />

think of bands like Clinic, Dead Meadow and Psychic<br />

Ills who have been plying their trade for years<br />

- as Ripley states “It’s possible that the<br />

media just needs something new<br />

to focus on.” However, with tons of<br />

remarkable music coming out, more<br />

people getting involved and some<br />

amazing festivals happening, it’s<br />

an exciting time. And with Wooden<br />

Shjips having a new album coming<br />

out in November <strong>2013</strong> and Moon<br />

Duo with their eyes on touring<br />

South America next year, at least for<br />

Ripley and Sanae this trip is going to<br />

last a whole while longer.<br />

Liverpool International Festival Of<br />

Psychedelia, featuring MOON DUO, DEAD<br />

MEADOW, PSYCHIC ILLS, CLINIC, MUGSTAR and<br />

many more takes place 27th - 28th <strong>September</strong>.<br />

LiverpoolPsychFest.com<br />

The Psychedelic Renaissance:<br />

Mugstar’s Jason Stoll in conversation with Moon Duo’s Erik ‘Ripley’ Johnson.<br />

Words: Jason Stoll / mugstar.com<br />

Illustration: Sam Wiehl / samwiehl.co.uk<br />

Bido Lito! <strong>September</strong> <strong>2013</strong><br />

8<br />

Gig Guide and Ticket Shop live at www.bidolito.co.uk<br />

bidolito.co.uk<br />

bidolito<br />

It was on 16th October 1965 when the first selfbilled<br />

psychedelic rock show took place at<br />

the Longshoreman’s Hall, San Francisco,<br />

dubbed by its comic-book-loving<br />

promoters ‘A Tribute to Doctor<br />

Strange’. Attended by 1,000<br />

devotees, the gig featured<br />

The Marbles and<br />

Jefferson<br />

Airplane,<br />

who invited their<br />

followers on stage<br />

to sip acid-spiked<br />

punch from a<br />

gigantic<br />

chalice.<br />

Almost 50 years<br />

later<br />

LIVERPOOL<br />

INTERNATIONAL<br />

FESTIVAL<br />

OF<br />

PSYCHEDELIA<br />

hosts its second<br />

outing<br />

on<br />

27th and 28th<br />

<strong>September</strong> <strong>2013</strong>;<br />

is<br />

psychedelia<br />

having<br />

a<br />

renaissance<br />

moment<br />

and<br />

enjoying<br />

its third if<br />

not<br />

fourth<br />

summer<br />

of<br />

love?<br />

Bido<br />

Lito!<br />

asked me, Jason Stoll<br />

of MUGSTAR, to interview<br />

Erik ‘Ripley’ Johnson about the<br />

renaissance of psychedelic rock. He is one of<br />

the most important figures in today’s burgeoning<br />

scene, in not just one, but two of the current scene’s leading<br />

bands: MOON DUO and Wooden Shjips. I had the pleasure of<br />

meeting Ripley a few years ago when Mugstar played with Moon<br />

Duo in Brighton and we have regularly crossed paths since; the<br />

last time being in Belgium in 2012 with San Francisco’s Carlton<br />

Melton in tow. He is now in a blazing hot Berlin, having a welldeserved<br />

break halfway through the tour, though Berlin is “maybe<br />

not the best city for resting [in]”.<br />

Ripley started Moon Duo with his other half Sanae Yamada,<br />

also Wooden Shjips projectionist, in San Francisco in 2009 “as<br />

an attempt to compress the rock band format down to just two<br />

people”. It is a format influenced by the likes of Suicide, Cluster,<br />

Silver Apples and Royal Trux, taking a very minimalist approach to<br />

recording and performance, which also allows for an easy set-up<br />

to tour. They have, however, added a touring drummer in the last<br />

few weeks. The group prefer to be described as a rock ‘n’ roll band,<br />

rather than psychedelic, as Ripley explains, “I don’t think you can<br />

use that tag generally, it’s more of a personal thing, depending<br />

on the listener. I find a lot of hip hop and jazz to be psychedelic,<br />

and most so-called psychedelic rock very straight. Not that there’s<br />

anything wrong with that.”<br />

At the beginning of this year Mojo magazine featured a covermount<br />

CD entitled “Echoes: A Compendium of Modern Psychedelia”,<br />

which suggested that “away from the glare of the mainstream,<br />

the last decade has seen the dawning of a new era of psychedelic<br />

music.” However, with the influx of neu ‘psych’ bands and the<br />

success of the likes of Tame Impala does this mean psychedelia<br />

is having a global<br />

renaissance moment?<br />

Ripley<br />

responds:<br />

“Everyone’s<br />

been<br />

telling me that on<br />

this tour. I’m not sure<br />

I buy it”, so I follow<br />

up the question<br />

with another: when<br />

Clinic toured America<br />

earlier this year<br />

they said it’s all<br />

gone psych rock in<br />

America right now<br />

- is that the case<br />

in other countries<br />

he’s played? “I<br />

haven’t<br />

noticed<br />

that in the US, or<br />

anywhere really,<br />

but it’s been the<br />

topic du jour<br />

in<br />

interviews<br />

in Europe this<br />

summer.”<br />

For White Hills’<br />

Dave W “Psychedelic is<br />

music that is disorientating,<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

can’t ignore that but I think there’s ultimately a place beyond the<br />

drug experience. ‘Other planes of there’, as Sun Ra put it.”<br />

Psychedelic music today seems to encompass a diverse area<br />

from the experimental electronic music of Black Dice to<br />

the indie rock of Toy and all in-between. Can this be a<br />

healthy approach to labelling music? “I just think<br />

it’s not helpful.” Ripley explains. “’Psychedelic’<br />

is more of an experience, not a genre,<br />

and you may have a psychedelic<br />

experience listening to Bach or<br />

Shabbazz Palaces or Miles Davis. I<br />

understand why it’s done, of course.<br />

But the danger is that it becomes<br />

codified, like ‘Stoner Rock’, and then<br />

it becomes boring with all the bands<br />

sounding the same. That would be<br />

unfortunate.”<br />

In this resurgence of all things<br />

‘psychedelic’ will the bands involved<br />

have a lasting impact? Is it copying or<br />

are they offering something new? Or<br />

is it just articulated differently? Ripley<br />

ventures that “Nothing is ever really new,<br />

but that’s OK. Everything’s interconnected. I<br />

don’t know about leading figures but I have my<br />

favourites. Lots of them actually: Sun Araw, Cave, Psychic<br />

Ills, Herbcraft, Blues Control, Peaking Lights, Umberto, and on<br />

and on.” There seem to be places far and wide springing up with<br />

their own psych-rock scenes, but with a unique takes on what<br />

constitutes ‘psychedelic rock’. Just like Argentina in the late 1960s<br />

with Os Mutantes or Zambia in the 1970s with ‘badass rock’ bands<br />

like Witch. Ripley says “I absolutely love the Zamrock.” Check<br />

Föllakzoid from Santiago, Chile, signed to the über-hip Scared<br />

Bones imprint and incorporate kraut/psych/space/drone rock.<br />

There are Psych festivals popping up all over the world:<br />

Austin, Tokyo, Los Angeles, Cincinnati, London, Aarhus, Bolton,<br />

Glasgow, and of course Liverpool’s very own. Is this a part of<br />

the global psychedelic renaissance? “My best guess is that the<br />

success of the Austin Psych Fest has inspired other people to<br />

give it a go. And why not?” Ripley started his own ‘psych fest’<br />

Frisco Freak-out in 2009 where people would be encouraged to<br />

bring food to give to the homeless community, which seemed<br />

to have a conscience more in line with ethical ideals than the<br />

typical rock festival. “Our goal was to not end up with any<br />

money, so we gave it away up front. But if you’re putting on a<br />

fun, peaceful event, it’s got be a good thing for the bands, the<br />

fans, the community - profit or not.”<br />

Even metal behemoths Metallica seem to being getting in on<br />

the psychedelic trip, recording with early exponent Lou Reed on<br />

the ill-advised Lulu album and more importantly asking Wooden<br />

Shjips to play a festival they curated. As Ripley explains “The<br />

Metallica fest was interesting. It was in a field outside of Atlantic<br />

City, so not the most charming locale. But it had the swankiest<br />

backstage area I’ve ever seen. Unfortunately, we didn’t get to<br />

meet any of the band, though I did see James Hetfield drive by<br />

on a golf cart.” Maybe not the most shining example of a global<br />

psychedelic renaissance but indicative of the fact that even rock’s<br />

most dysfunctional band see its significance.<br />

So, are we witnessing a global psychedelic renaissance right<br />

now? I’m not so sure. What we are seeing are more bands coming<br />

into the spotlight tagged as ‘psych’ but, as Mojo Magazine<br />

suggested, this has been bubbling away for a long time. Maybe<br />

the scene is being unified somewhat at the moment but<br />

think of bands like Clinic, Dead Meadow and Psychic<br />

Ills who have been plying their trade for years<br />

- as Ripley states “It’s possible that the<br />

media just needs something new<br />

to focus on.” However, with tons of<br />

remarkable music coming out, more<br />

people getting involved and some<br />

amazing festivals happening, it’s<br />

an exciting time. And with Wooden<br />

Shjips having a new album coming<br />

out in November <strong>2013</strong> and Moon<br />

Duo with their eyes on touring<br />

South America next year, at least for<br />

Ripley and Sanae this trip is going to<br />

last a whole while longer.<br />

Liverpool International Festival Of<br />

Psychedelia, featuring MOON DUO, DEAD<br />

MEADOW, PSYCHIC ILLS, CLINIC, MUGSTAR and<br />

many more takes place 27th - 28th <strong>September</strong>.<br />

LiverpoolPsychFest.com<br />

The Psychedelic Renaissance:<br />

Mugstar’s Jason Stoll in conversation with Moon Duo’s Erik ‘Ripley’ Johnson.<br />

Words: Jason Stoll / mugstar.com<br />

Illustration: Sam Wiehl / samwiehl.co.uk<br />

ventures that “Nothing is ever really new,<br />

but that’s OK. Everything’s interconnected. I<br />

don’t know about leading figures but I have my<br />

favourites. Lots of them actually: Sun Araw, Cave, Psychic<br />

to sip acid-spiked<br />

punch from a<br />

gigantic<br />

chalice.<br />

Almost 50 years<br />

later<br />

LIVERPOOL<br />

INTERNATIONAL<br />

FESTIVAL<br />

OF<br />

hosts its second<br />

outing<br />

on<br />

in Europe this<br />

summer.”<br />

Dave W “Psychedelic is<br />

music that is disorientating,<br />

Bido<br />

Lito!<br />

asked me, Jason Stoll<br />

of MUGSTAR, to interview<br />

Erik ‘Ripley’ Johnson about the<br />

renaissance of psychedelic rock. He is one of<br />

the most important figures in today’s burgeoning<br />

scene, in not just one, but two of the current scene’s leading<br />

is having a global<br />

renaissance moment?<br />

Ripley<br />

responds:<br />

The Psychedelic Renaissance:<br />

Mugstar’s Jason Stoll in conversation with Moon Duo’s Erik ‘Ripley’ Johnson.<br />

Words: Jason Stoll / mugstar.com<br />

Illustration: Sam Wiehl / samwiehl.co.uk<br />

Mugstar’s Jason Stoll in conversation with Moon Duo’s Erik ‘Ripley’ Johnson.<br />

that in the US, or<br />

anywhere really,<br />

but it’s been the<br />

topic du jour<br />

in<br />

interviews<br />

in Europe this<br />

The Psychedelic Renaissance:<br />

Mugstar’s Jason Stoll in conversation with Moon Duo’s Erik ‘Ripley’ Johnson.<br />

“Everyone’s<br />

been<br />

telling me that on<br />

this tour. I’m not sure<br />

I buy it”, so I follow<br />

up the question<br />

with another: when<br />

Clinic toured America<br />

earlier this year<br />

they said it’s all<br />

gone psych rock in<br />

America right now<br />

- is that the case<br />

in other countries<br />

he’s played? “I<br />

haven’t<br />

noticed<br />

that in the US, or<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

music that is disorientating,<br />

music that is disorientating,<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

music that is disorientating,<br />

music that is disorientating,<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

music that is disorientating,<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

music that is disorientating,<br />

music that is disorientating,<br />

music that is disorientating,<br />

music that is disorientating,<br />

music that is disorientating,<br />

music that is disorientating,<br />

music that is disorientating,<br />

music that is disorientating,<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

music that is disorientating,<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

music that is disorientating,<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

music that is disorientating,<br />

music that is disorientating,<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

music that is disorientating,<br />

music that is disorientating,<br />

music that is disorientating,<br />

music that is disorientating,<br />

music that is disorientating,<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

music that is disorientating,<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

music that is disorientating,<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

music that is disorientating,<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

music that is disorientating,<br />

music that is disorientating,<br />

music that is disorientating,<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

music that is disorientating,<br />

music that is disorientating,<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

music that is disorientating,<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

music that is disorientating,<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

music that is disorientating,<br />

music that is disorientating,<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

visceral, and visual. The key to this<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

the difference? “Certainly for some people. Yes. I guess you<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

psychedelic trip is.” So I ask Ripley, can drugs make<br />

definition is disorientating, like what a<br />

of MUGSTAR, to interview<br />

Erik ‘Ripley’ Johnson about the<br />

renaissance of psychedelic rock. He is one of<br />

the most important figures in today’s burgeoning<br />

devotees, the gig featured<br />

The Marbles and<br />

Jefferson<br />

Airplane,<br />

who invited their<br />

followers on stage<br />

to sip acid-spiked


10<br />

Bido Lito! <strong>September</strong> <strong>2013</strong><br />

Natalie McCool<br />

Words: Jessica Main / @JessieMainMusic<br />

Photography: Charlotte Patmore / charlottepatmore.blogspot.com<br />

“I really like dark things, like dark<br />

stuff,” confesses NATALIE<br />

MCCOOL as she battles with MelloMello’s jazz soundtrack and<br />

runs me through her lyrical tendencies. She explains the concept<br />

behind her song America, and the distinct narrative is both<br />

courageous and carefully sensitive:<br />

“My tutor printed out this forum and gave it to me. It’s people<br />

talking about bringing back public executions – pay to watch. It was<br />

really interesting. America is meant to be such a free place, first<br />

world country, really humanitarian, but…” she leans back and grasps<br />

the air for the words, “...they have capital punishment. It’s interesting<br />

having these two sides. And that’s what the song’s about.”<br />

Natalie McCool seems to be a musician of dichotomies. Her<br />

self-titled album (released in April this year) is highly charged and<br />

yet coolly relaxed and in person she is upbeat, talking animatedly<br />

about the almost palpable melancholia running through her<br />

writing, reminiscent of Jeff Buckley or Radiohead. I still can’t<br />

help but be surprised when this friendly-faced, vivacious music<br />

graduate tears down the world of pop, with the blunt strike of<br />

one word – vacuous. “It bugs me about music now – pop music is<br />

just completely vacuous.”<br />

But she’s no stranger to controversy, describing herself<br />

as “dead political”, and her involvement in a protest against<br />

austerity cuts last October certainly did her career no harm – not<br />

a lot of 25-year-olds from Widnes can say they’ve played to an<br />

audience of 120,000 in Hyde Park. “We came out of the green<br />

room to a sea of people and I just looked at my guitarist like, ‘Oh!<br />

Holy shit!’ It was boss though, easily the biggest gig we’d done<br />

and we got loads of tweets afterwards and videos uploaded to<br />

YouTube; everyone was just in the right mood.”<br />

Clearly this was a defining moment, but she pulls off the story<br />

with humility; as she does when telling us of each of her short<br />

career’s highlights so far:<br />

“Bernard Butler played on Thin Air and I used to listen to<br />

Suede when I was nine years old and now he’s on my track<br />

and I’m like ‘Yeeeah!’,” she says, emanating the modest joy<br />

that her success has brought.<br />

And yet, listening to her Live At Abbey Road EP - streaming<br />

exclusively for Bido Lito! now at bidolito.co.uk<br />

- it is clear that<br />

Natalie has a precise, confident sense of her musical self and<br />

aims for her songs to never fall victim to the “rudimentary fingerpicking”<br />

she criticises.<br />

For an artist who performs live with a full band and aspires<br />

to create music that is both “really interesting rhythmically and<br />

harmonically: the rhythm of the guitar will inspire the rhythm<br />

of the lyrics and the rest of the instruments”, this solo offering<br />

provided a different challenge, perfectly demonstrated by the<br />

image of a solitary ancient amp sitting in the legendary studio.<br />

Size Zero shines through on the release with its mournful,<br />

honest melody - delay giving an almost cinematic, haunting<br />

quality that ends with a troubled descent – a subtle reference to<br />

the album track. The contrast of this live recording to the heavily<br />

produced version on the album demonstrates Natalie’s strength<br />

as a solo artist in a self-assured stride. “I would have really liked<br />

the band there to flesh it out but actually it was OK without them. I<br />

started out as just me and it was kind of nice to go back and be me<br />

again.” Each track works well stripped back, and even though they<br />

are clearly well refined it somehow feels as though we are being<br />

given a glimpse into these early, birth stages of her songwriting.<br />

For someone who claims to have never sung before starting<br />

her course at LIPA, where she met her bandmates, Natalie’s voice<br />

is strong and distinctive, a powerful force with a folk edge. She<br />

resists being classified into a genre, preferring instead to pull<br />

apart each facet of her performance and pinning them to different<br />

80s icons – guitar parts akin to The Smiths, vocals in the vein of<br />

Kate Bush or Cocteau Twins – although lyrically she draws from<br />

those who have cropped up in her own lifetime – PJ Harvey, and<br />

more recently Alt-J and Everything Everything.<br />

The process of recording the Live At Abbey Road EP has clearly<br />

been liberating – in the world of a busy musician, being able to step<br />

back and concentrate on a defined goal seems to have brought<br />

out the drive in her. She lets me in on her plans for a second tour<br />

this year, scheduled for November. Her solo tour in May was her<br />

first, and this time her band will join her for ten dates of what she<br />

describes as “a lot of fun, actually”, taking herself off around the<br />

country, still surprised by the idea people will come to watch.<br />

But, here in Liverpool, Natalie has found a home in the music<br />

scene, despite a brief foray to the capital. When asked about her<br />

experience here compared to other cities she says in a romantic<br />

gesture “Oh, it’s Liverpool”. And now her producer (the iconic Steve<br />

Levine) has set himself up in the Baltic Triangle, she is revelling<br />

in her re-location. “London is so big, you get swallowed up, and<br />

there’re lots of little scenes, but it’s not really substantial. I’m<br />

glad I lived there, but I much prefer it here. You know everyone,<br />

it’s nice.” And after our hundredth interruption from another<br />

acquaintance, she smiles, “I dunno, I think I’m the kind of person<br />

that just suits here.”<br />

Natalie McCool’s Live At Abbey Road EP<br />

is streaming exclusively<br />

now at bidolito.co.uk<br />

NatalieMcCool.co.uk


12<br />

Bido Lito! <strong>September</strong> <strong>2013</strong><br />

For those familiar with the work<br />

of Bill Drummond, it will come<br />

as little surprise that the popprovocateur<br />

owns a four-storey,<br />

nineteenth-century tower in the<br />

centre of Cushendall, a tiny town<br />

nestled on the Northern Irish<br />

coastline. Originally built in 1817<br />

to incarcerate riotous locals, the<br />

Gig Guide and Ticket Shop live at www.bidolito.co.uk<br />

STATIC IN THE<br />

CURFEW TOWER<br />

Words: Francis Gallagher<br />

Illustration: Oliver Catherall / o-c-design.tumblr.com<br />

tower was acquired by Drummond in 1999 and has since hosted<br />

a series of rolling artist residencies. According to Drummond,<br />

artists are “expected to produce work that is somehow inspired<br />

by their stay in the tower, the locality, or the people they meet<br />

while here. We also expect them to leave something of the work<br />

behind.”<br />

In late 2011, Liverpool’s Static Gallery were invited by Bill<br />

Drummond to curate The Curfew Tower for 2012. Static decided<br />

to alter the convention by incarcerating the previous 13 years’<br />

worth of artworks in the ground-floor prison cell of the tower<br />

and to leave each new resident with a four-storey empty<br />

tower, a Tascam four-track cassette machine for company and<br />

an instruction to make a field recording. The resulting eighty<br />

minutes of field recordings were then edited into a forty-minute<br />

album by Ade and Hartley from Clinic, Liverpool-based designer<br />

Sam Wiehl and Static’s Paul Sullivan, and formed the first release<br />

of PRODUCT Records, Liverpool.<br />

On 7th August <strong>2013</strong>, Static carried out a radio broadcast in<br />

sounds,<br />

and<br />

Dave<br />

Cushendall with a two-mile radius, which played the entire<br />

Jackson (ex. The<br />

unedited eighty minutes of field recordings. Static also carried<br />

out a gig at the Curfew Tower garden as part of the Festival of<br />

the Glens in order for the people of Cushendall to choose their<br />

favourite artwork of the 2012 residency. Rather than being<br />

Room,<br />

Profane,<br />

Cowboys,<br />

Jackson<br />

Benny<br />

Dead<br />

Dave<br />

&<br />

presented with visual artworks, as was the norm for previous<br />

The<br />

Cathedral<br />

years, the public were presented with a shop selling the Curfew<br />

Tower albums and a live show featuring Ex-Easter Island Head,<br />

Easterjack, Jinx Lennon, Damon Fairclough, Clinic and Tenzing<br />

Scott Brown accompanied by Johnny Gauld on bagpipes. Bido<br />

Mountaineers)<br />

providing<br />

vocals. A threetrack<br />

set containing The<br />

Lito! sent Francis Gallagher<br />

along to report on proceedings...<br />

Ex-Easter Island Head (Benjamin D. Duvall and Patrick Morrison)<br />

open the Curfew Tower garden proceedings with A Curfew Tower<br />

For Bill Morrison. Duvall explains, “We worked noon until<br />

2am for five days to create the piece. Bill Morrison<br />

[1940-2011], Patrick’s father, was a Northern Irish,<br />

Co. Antrim-born playwright most famously known<br />

for the works Flying Blind and the trilogy A Love Song<br />

for Ulster.” The work created over the residency is a<br />

remembrance, tribute to and reflection on Bill’s life,<br />

developed to include two guitars played with a variety<br />

of extended techniques - from mallet percussion played<br />

on the body to ‘Third Bridges’ being inserted under the<br />

strings to elicit a ghostly timbre. This is alongside<br />

tabletops, dinner bells and other percussive objects<br />

found in the tower. The whole of the first half of the<br />

piece is underpinned by a percussive loop<br />

created by sampling Bill’s Baby Hermes<br />

typewriter on which many of his works<br />

Wind, Song From A<br />

The haunting primacy of Ex-Easter Island Head is followed by<br />

the stinging bass and wallowing timbres of Easterjack, a oneoff<br />

collaboration by Andy Eastwood (Sex Gods) on guitar and<br />

trip for the<br />

forthcoming<br />

feature film<br />

Crock of Gold amongst other novels and numerous poems and<br />

[who] adapted Traditional Irish Fairy Tales.”<br />

If death, the process of grieving, and remembrance were<br />

omnipresent undercurrents in<br />

the first two sets, Jinx Lennon’s<br />

opening track made for the Curfew<br />

Tower album Get The Tension Out<br />

is more of a near-death experience.<br />

Lennon explains “The song I did<br />

was just an excavation beneath my<br />

epidermis to where my brain was at<br />

in March 2012 when I did the piece.<br />

I had had a near-death experience on the main road before I<br />

arrived up on Friday to start in the tower to write and record my<br />

piece, so I was a bit wired up. I wanted to soak up all the smells,<br />

sights and sounds filtering through my head while I stayed in<br />

the Tower and walked the streets of Cushendall, keeping it a bit<br />

slanted and full of anxiety and life-saving humour. I had Dylan<br />

Thomas in mind for some reason, though I’m not that familiar<br />

with his material. I was imagining if he’d been a Napoleonic-era<br />

jail host transported to the spiky-headed marble-eyed joyride<br />

era of the modern age of brain-trance Domino’s Pizza Xbox.”<br />

Lennon is a preacher performer who takes his audiences on<br />

emotional roller-coasters, giving beat orations overlaid by<br />

acoustic, electronic synth, samples and effects that can make<br />

them break out into sporadic laughter and fall into deep<br />

reflective angst in the space of one verse, over and over again<br />

Tower<br />

during the set.<br />

and<br />

Elfish<br />

By this stage, dusk is coming. Enter Damon Fairclough and<br />

Bootstomp<br />

CLINIC. Fairclough, son of Sheffield and aficionado on all things<br />

comprises a series<br />

of droning cathartic<br />

reflections on loss<br />

musical from the Steel City, stands centre stage and recites his<br />

spoken-word field recording No Idlers, No Rioters, a take on<br />

his sometimes spectral experience at the Curfew Tower. He is<br />

and a summer<br />

flanked either side by Ade Blackburn and Hartley from CLINIC,<br />

stint spent in the<br />

tower which also<br />

who sit like Buddhas on the stage, Ade on acoustic guitar and<br />

Hartley on percussion performing a hypnotic version of The<br />

doubled as a<br />

Curfew Tower In Spring. Blackburn reflects that “It was the first<br />

production<br />

time we’d revisited the tracks, which gave it an energy. Damon<br />

Fairclough did his spoken-word piece over our music. It was a<br />

different combination than you hear on the record and Damon<br />

played a blinder. We were making it up as we went along and<br />

the gig was all the better for it.”<br />

As night falls, a table lamp is introduced to the front of the<br />

stage as an impromptu lighting effect as Tenzing Scott Brown<br />

and Johnny Gauld arrive on stage, shadows being cast on the<br />

gable behind, an ephemeral mural of a three-<br />

minute cameo of fame. Scott Brown with Jinx<br />

Lennon’s acoustic guitar in hand - such is the<br />

improvised nature of the event - launches into<br />

his theme tune True To The Trail accompanied by<br />

Gauld’s bagpipes, filling the night air of Cushendall with<br />

distant echoes of the ancient connections between<br />

Antrim and the nearby mulls of Scotland. True To The<br />

Trail by Bill Drummond was originally recorded and<br />

released by Creation Records in 1986 and Tenzing<br />

Scott Brown is Bill Drummond’s alter ego.<br />

The gig finishes with Drummond’s end game,<br />

and so a project that started in late<br />

2011 as a conversation between Bill<br />

Drummond, Paul Sullivan and Craig<br />

were written, and brought back to County Antrim in a symbolic<br />

Violet City, written<br />

Pennington comes full circle.<br />

homecoming. The piece’s five sections were recorded in almost<br />

by Dave Jackson, directed by John Maxwell<br />

and featuring<br />

all of the rooms of the tower, with the natural resonance and<br />

echoes of the narrow wooden stairways and stone walls serving<br />

to further amplify the yearning cascades of electrified strings.<br />

background photography shot in Antrim by Andy Eastwood.<br />

Jackson states that the Curfew Tower recordings “were freely<br />

adapted from the writings of James Stephens who wrote The<br />

The Curfew Tower<br />

album is available through PRODUCT Records<br />

Liverpool, featuring: Alan Dunn, Jinx Lennon, Sophie Coyle, Point5<br />

(Thorpe/Woodward), Clinic, Daniel Simpkins/Penny Whitehead,<br />

Damon Fairclough, Jeff Young, Paul Simpson, Easterjack,<br />

Singersongwriter, Ex-Easter Island Head (Duvall/Morrison), Liam<br />

O’Callaghan, Paul Sullivan and Tenzing Scott Brown.


14<br />

Bido Lito! <strong>September</strong> <strong>2013</strong><br />

TOOLS OF THE TRADE<br />

Climbing The Ladder To Music Industry Success With Thomas J. Speight<br />

Words: Joshua Potts<br />

Illustration: Gareth Arrowsmith /<br />

garetharrowsmith.blogspot.co.uk<br />

Amidst the perpetual gloom of the modern music industry<br />

landscape sits a shining summation of Liverpool’s grassroots,<br />

collective spirit. After a highly successful 2012, the MERSEYSIDE<br />

ARTS FOUNDATION are once again running their music<br />

development programme, an opportunity for emerging musical<br />

talent to both develop creatively and learn the realities and<br />

practicalities of the music business. As well as seminar sessions<br />

with industry insiders, artists are given the chance to record at<br />

the iconic Parr Street Studios. The project, backed by Arts Council<br />

England and Youth Music, has already cultivated the likes of By<br />

The Sea, Sankofa and Ali Ingle. After all, Liverpool has a tradition<br />

of successful artists meeting on such programmes - The La’s had<br />

their roots in a city-run course for unemployed musicians in the<br />

late 80s.<br />

But what does the need for such local support say about<br />

the state of the country’s music industry? After all, many of the<br />

areas covered within the Merseyside Arts Foundation course<br />

fall under what would be seen as traditional record label artist<br />

A&R. Is it a healthy state of affairs when developing embryonic<br />

talent is left to local community arts foundations, rather than to<br />

the industry? Or, is this a situation of ultimate empowerment,<br />

giving artists the knowledge and skills to plot their own way<br />

through a changing industry, without having to rely on the old<br />

major label structure?<br />

We talked to Merseyside Arts Foundation alumni THOMAS J.<br />

SPEIGHT, who’s set to hit the road this autumn with Travis, to<br />

get an insider’s opinion. Having released on independent label<br />

Young & Lost Club (home of Noah and The Whale and Johnny<br />

Flynn) and signed a publishing deal with Universal, he’s better<br />

positioned than most to provide an insight...<br />

Bido Lito!: The industry is in a different place compared to<br />

how it was, say ten years ago. Labels don’t seem to invest in<br />

and develop new talent in the way they once did. What impact<br />

do you think this has on emerging artists such as yourself?<br />

Thomas J. Speight: It hasn’t been detrimental. I’ve actually<br />

had on-going development money from Universal, and they<br />

gave me studio time before I was involved in the Foundation’s<br />

development programme. Even if you get a big advance from<br />

a label, you’re just going to have to pay that back anyway. So<br />

I don’t think it’s a bad thing there is less money from major<br />

labels - maybe that’s the reason indie labels are booming.<br />

BL!: What do you regard as the main challenges to the<br />

modern music landscape?<br />

TJS: Vinyl collectors are still in the minority. Gigs have become<br />

the main way we can earn. For example, Nigel Godrich made a<br />

good point about Dark Side Of The Moon: it wouldn’t have been<br />

made today, just for the lack of money that is put into albums.<br />

It’s so difficult to say whether the actual quality of records is<br />

suffering. I think things like Spotify and all that stuff are having<br />

a horrendous effect, though.<br />

BL!: Were media platform sites how you got noticed and<br />

secured funding in the first place?<br />

TJS: No, it was when the guys from Keane got behind us. A lot<br />

of opportunities opened up after they came to one of our gigs.<br />

At that point, I didn’t even have any management, but it’s good<br />

Gig Guide and Ticket Shop live at www.bidolito.co.uk<br />

that artists have to do a lot of the initial groundwork<br />

by themselves. It makes dealing with the next stage<br />

more rewarding.<br />

BL!: Up to this point you have built a bespoke team<br />

around you - with a manager, a booking agent, a press agent,<br />

etc - and doing specific deals for licensing releases and<br />

publishing. Do you see this as being a healthy, empowering<br />

situation for an artist going forward?<br />

TJS: You’re not being swayed to water things down, like a<br />

major label might want you to do. Yes, there is a certain power<br />

in how things turn out but also a lot of responsibility.<br />

BL!: Has anyone ever tried to sway you?<br />

TJS: I’ve been asked to do co-writes and stuff like that,<br />

but it all gets a bit tiresome, that attitude. I think it’s best if<br />

things are more organic and honest. You can’t beat playing<br />

and writing music with your best mates.<br />

BL!: Do you still find Liverpool to be very supportive of<br />

its local music community?<br />

TJS: Oh, definitely. LIPA [Liverpool Institute of Performing<br />

Arts] is great for getting people to attend each other’s<br />

shows. Everyone I play with, I’ve met through there.<br />

Never underestimate the importance of collaboration.<br />

BL!:<br />

How did you hear about the Merseyside Arts<br />

Foundation?<br />

TJS: My flatmate and I saw an advertisement<br />

somewhere and went for it with my friend Mike, who’s<br />

in Clean Cut Kid.<br />

BL!: And how much did you benefit?<br />

TJS: My music has become a lot more full-time<br />

since November, when the demo was sent out.<br />

Those guys at that studio [Parr Street] know their<br />

craft inside out.<br />

BL!: So is it necessary for you to record half<br />

of your new album in London? Do you ever feel<br />

forced to go?<br />

TJS: We’re doing all the band<br />

stuff in Liverpool but . . . it’s<br />

hard to describe . . . there’s a<br />

bit less of a distraction down<br />

there. I don’t know if that<br />

really makes much sense.<br />

There are showcases I<br />

play in London but there<br />

is no reason why people<br />

wouldn’t travel here to<br />

see me either. One of<br />

my recent highlights is<br />

playing Sound City and<br />

drawing a larger crowd<br />

than the headliners at<br />

Leaf on the last day.<br />

BL!: Is there any advice you<br />

would like to give the next<br />

group of artists<br />

taking part in<br />

the Merseyside<br />

Arts Foundation<br />

course?<br />

TJS: Try and ride the momentum<br />

and don’t sit on songs that become<br />

stale – I wrote mine before I went<br />

into it. Keep your contacts close. Use<br />

your time effectively for planning<br />

the next stage. Do those things,<br />

and that’s how you’ll get the most<br />

out of it.<br />

Merseyside Arts Foundation’s<br />

Music Development Programme<br />

has been funded by Arts<br />

Council England and Youth<br />

Music and is now accepting<br />

applications. Forms can be<br />

requested by emailing hello@<br />

merseysideartsfoundation.org.uk<br />

merseysideartsfoundation.<br />

org.uk


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16<br />

Bido Lito! <strong>September</strong> <strong>2013</strong><br />

GOOD INTENTIONS<br />

James Skelly Gets Straight To The Point<br />

Words: Richard Lewis<br />

Photography: Mark McNulty / markmcnulty.co.uk<br />

James Skelly plays The O2 Academy with The Coral in 2005<br />

Gig Guide and Ticket Shop live at www.bidolito.co.uk<br />

This month the O2 Academy celebrates a decade of bringing<br />

some of the world’s best new artists to Liverpool. And what better<br />

way to mark the occasion than hosting JAMES SKELLY (backed by<br />

his group THE INTENDERS) as he plays in support of his debut solo<br />

LP. Bido Lito!<br />

found the former Coral main man with a new sense<br />

of focus and only too keen to shine a light on his intentions...<br />

Following the announcement last spring that The Coral were<br />

taking a hiatus, a decade since their first album, all five band<br />

members have gone on to separate projects. Lead singer and<br />

principal songwriter JAMES SKELLY was the second alumnus to<br />

break cover, unveiling well-received solo debut LP Love Undercover<br />

in early June.<br />

Boasting the same keen ear for melody as his previous<br />

band, Skelly’s album moves in different circles to the whimsical<br />

psychedelia of The Coral, honing in on the sounds heard emanating<br />

from Memphis and Detroit in the mid-sixties with a soupçon of<br />

Bruce Springsteen’s lyrical grit. “There’s more of a thirst as you<br />

get older; you start listening to all different stuff, mariachi music,<br />

different genres. I started off with Stax and Motown and moved<br />

into blues and soul,” James explains on the phone from his base<br />

in Hoylake.<br />

With all the songs pulled together within a year, the immediacy<br />

in the writing process was carried over into the recording. “The<br />

direction was to go in, do the songs live, knock it out, then play it<br />

live, that was the idea of it. We recorded it in a couple of weeks.<br />

Butterfly House [2010] and all of The Coral’s albums were pretty<br />

intense, which was a good thing, but it was good to do something<br />

different. The last Coral album was so intricate, my brain didn’t have<br />

the room. When it came to this album I wanted to do something<br />

that was just banged out, give my brain a rest. I like to do different<br />

albums each time.”<br />

Assembling a crack team of players for the sessions at Parr<br />

Street Studios, The Intenders are comprised of a mixture of Coral<br />

members, siblings from The Sundowners and James Redmond<br />

from seminal Bandwagon linchpins Tramp Attack on bass. “They<br />

did it for free, they weren’t charging me,” James deadpans when<br />

asked why Niamh Rowe and his sister Fiona, lead singers from The<br />

Sundowners, appear on the album as backing vocalists. “Nah, I<br />

wanted harmonies but if we did them with the lads from The Coral,<br />

it would have just sounded like The Coral,” he elaborates.<br />

Another notable guest, albeit one who doesn’t appear on the<br />

record, is Paul Weller, who sent an incomplete demo for James to<br />

put words to, resulting in the stunning soul-infused stomper You’ve<br />

Got It All. The Jack White-inspired holler of recent single Do It Again<br />

and Sacrifice, a ringer for early Elvis Costello, all demonstrate the<br />

punchy arrangements and concise structures of the disc’s eleven<br />

tracks, with James in impressively full voice throughout.<br />

In addition to the new roster of musicians another change<br />

on the record is the presence of James at the recording console,<br />

making his debut as producer alongside his brother Ian. “It is good<br />

having a producer, it’s quite hard doing it on your own,” James<br />

ruminates. “I think a producer can push you and take you in a<br />

direction you’d never thought of. This was more like I went in and<br />

just knocked down what I had kind of live; that was the spirit of<br />

it. Where maybe next time I’ll get a bit more intense and look for<br />

more of a direction.”<br />

A highly impressive array of production talent featured across<br />

The Coral’s six studio albums, with Ian Broudie, Portishead’s Geoff<br />

Barrow and Adrian Utley, and John Leckie all on the other side of<br />

the soundproof glass over the years. “I learnt loads from them,”<br />

James enthuses of the time spent working with the venerated<br />

quartet. “I think I’m better at producing if I’m working with another<br />

group, in a way. I’m trying to learn and get better.”<br />

A new development in James’ writing is the perspective from<br />

which the lyrics are sung, with almost all of Love Undercover sung<br />

from the first person, minus characters such as Simon Diamond<br />

and Bill McCai who populated The Coral’s LPs. “On Butterfly House<br />

I pushed quite far into the style I was into and I just wanted to<br />

step back a bit from it,” James explains of his change in direction.<br />

“I just wanted to get straight to the point; that was the theme of<br />

the whole record, really. I didn’t think I could better it in that way,<br />

so I did something else; then I’ll do something different again on<br />

the next album.”<br />

The influence of Bruce Springsteen can be clearly discerned in You<br />

And I and I’m A Man, songs which hark back to the blue-collar themes<br />

The Boss explored on The River. “On I’m A Man I’m sort of playing a<br />

character, he’s a working class kind of a guy, whereas Bill McCai was<br />

more the guy who works in an office and lives in the suburbs. I’m A<br />

Man is more like ‘Fuck it, I’m going out’, he’s not gonna let them beat<br />

him; Bill McCai is more of a suburban nightmare.”<br />

Observing the album artwork the sharp eyed will notice the<br />

absence of the Deltasonic label, as the release is being handled<br />

by a collaboration between James’ imprint Skeleton Key and<br />

storied indie Cooking Vinyl. (“Ironically, we do the vinyl,” James<br />

points out of the arrangement.) Alongside himself, Ian and The<br />

Sundowners, and Birmingham band The Circles - who James heard<br />

via a recommendation from younger brother Alfie - are all signed<br />

to the set-up.<br />

The O2 Academy celebrates its tenth anniversary this month<br />

and is the scene of The Intenders’ next gig, as well as being<br />

the location where The Coral’s story decisively kicked up several<br />

gears after future Deltasonic label founder Alan Wills saw the<br />

band supporting The Real People. Beyond that further live dates<br />

over the winter are also in the pipeline. “It’s good for live work<br />

this album, the situation I’m in,” James notes. “It’s different live,<br />

it’s heavier, there’s jams in quite a lot of the tunes, it’s bluesier.<br />

I realised in The Coral we sometimes played live a bit too much<br />

like the record, when we could do something completely different;<br />

that’s why you go and see someone live.”<br />

With the first entry in his solo ledger completed, in keeping<br />

with the prodigious work rate established in the previous decade<br />

the next Intenders album is already being prepared. “For the new<br />

stuff me and Nick [Power] have been writing, which is good ‘cos<br />

I can concentrate on the words. In a way I’d love to be able to<br />

release two albums.”<br />

James Skelly and The Intenders play the O2 Academy 2 on 21st<br />

<strong>September</strong><br />

jamesskellyandtheintenders.com


Youth Music Arts01 - Bido Ad.pdf 1 16/07/<strong>2013</strong> 22:26<br />

C<br />

M<br />

Y<br />

CM<br />

MY<br />

CY<br />

CMY<br />

K<br />

1 HESKETH ST<br />

AIGBURTH, LIVERPOOL<br />

L17 8XJ<br />

020 7232 0008


18<br />

Bido Lito! <strong>September</strong> <strong>2013</strong><br />

Edited by Richard Lewis<br />

Previews/Shorts<br />

SPACE IS THE PLACE<br />

As a tribute to jazz pioneer and<br />

Saturnian dreamer SUN RA, A Culture<br />

Less Ordinary present SPACE IS THE<br />

PLACE at The Kaz. Liverpool steps<br />

up to celebrate the groundbreaking<br />

catalogue of jazzy experimentation from a figure who influenced George Clinton, The MC5 and<br />

Damon Albarn, amongst a myriad others. Expect live sets from UNITED VIBRATIONS (pictured) and<br />

SPACEHEADS, along with cosmic tunes spun by the LIVERPOOL PSYCH FEST PSOUND PSYSTEM.<br />

The Kazimier / 31st August<br />

DINOSAUR JR.<br />

One of the most influential<br />

American bands of the 1980s/1990s,<br />

alt. rock veterans DINOSAUR JR. visit<br />

the city for the first time in eons. A<br />

marked influence on Pixies, Nirvana<br />

and just about every US indie band that followed them, the trio, restored to their original lineup<br />

of J Mascis, Lou Barlow and Murph since 2007, are renowned for their stunning live show<br />

and tickets are sure to move fast for their EVAC date.<br />

East Village Arts Club / 3rd <strong>September</strong><br />

All rise for a final hurrah from<br />

GIANT DRAG who are calling it<br />

GIANT DRAG<br />

a day after ten years of forging<br />

sparkling shoegaze and grunge<br />

hits. Calling in at The Kazimier on<br />

their last ever tour, the indie veterans - fronted by Annie Hardy - released third LP Waking<br />

Up Is Hard to Do after a lengthy hiatus to glowing reviews back in March. Miss them here<br />

and you miss out forever.<br />

The Kazimier / 14th <strong>September</strong><br />

A Decade At The O2 Academy<br />

One of the most enduring American bands to have emerged in the 1990s and whose new<br />

material is still as vital today, EELS play the O2 Academy on 5th <strong>September</strong>, kicking off the venue’s<br />

anniversary month in style. Fronted by Mark ‘Mr. E’ Everett (pictured), the band recently unveiled<br />

their tenth LP, the highly acclaimed Wonderful, Glorious - the most successful album the US alt. rock<br />

vets have issued in several years.<br />

Expanding their sound beyond the sublime grunge pop of 1996 debut album Beautiful Freak, E has<br />

solo-piloted the group on a course taking in baroque pop, blues and ambient textures. Possessor of<br />

a pitch-black wit that frequently skewers his highly personal lyrics, Everett’s confessional writing has<br />

marked him out as a disaffected LA-bound version of Morrissey.<br />

The month also sees a glut of high-profile shows to mark the Academy’s first decade of operation. Pete<br />

Doherty brings the latest incarnation of BABYSHAMBLES with him on 9th <strong>September</strong>, and The Courteeners’<br />

LIAM FRAY heads a solo gig on the 19th: both should draw large and raucous crowds, so get your tickets<br />

well in advance. Liverpool promoters I Love Live Events and Kong Live also split a 10th Anniversary Local<br />

Showcase between them over 20th and 27th <strong>September</strong>, featuring performances from 23 FAKE STREET,<br />

HIGH VIOLET, and a special EP launch from homegrown rockers THEY’RE COMING TO GET YOU BARBARA.<br />

O2 Academy / throughout <strong>September</strong><br />

COLLEGE<br />

This is the debut visit to<br />

Liverpool for this ambient French<br />

electro project, who are perhaps<br />

best known for A Real Hero, which<br />

featured on the rather ace soundtrack<br />

for Drive. The project of David Grellier, who founded the project as an offshoot of his blog/<br />

label/musical collective Valerie, COLLEGE are on the road to promote forthcoming LP Heritage,<br />

which is being released through Geoff Barrow’s label Invada.<br />

Leaf / 23rd <strong>September</strong><br />

NO CEREMONY<br />

One of the most hyped bands<br />

of the year, Manchester’s NO<br />

CEREMONY check in at EVAC this<br />

month, riding a wave of critical<br />

expectation. In thrall to the sounds<br />

of their native city, the three-piece blend this with Pixies’ guitar lines and Coldcut-style<br />

beats. Resolutely low-key, if the positive press is to be believed, they’ll be headed for<br />

larger stages soon.<br />

East Village Arts Club / 13th <strong>September</strong><br />

One of this year’s big success<br />

stories, Midlands indie grunge trio<br />

SWIM DEEP<br />

SWIM DEEP more than lived up to<br />

the hype as their debut LP Where The<br />

Heaven Are We crashed into the Top<br />

20 of the Album Charts. Quickly amassing a fanbase via tours with Two Door Cinema Club and<br />

Bastille earlier in the year, expect tickets to be in short supply come showtime.<br />

The Kazimier / 18th <strong>September</strong><br />

Boss <strong>September</strong><br />

The movers and shakers behind LFC music/culture/events zine BOSS MAG have been staging top-notch<br />

events for the past few years, and <strong>September</strong> heralds two of the biggest shindigs they’ve ever staged.<br />

First up on Saturday 7th <strong>September</strong> we head to the dancefloor with RUBIX, held at the none-moresuited<br />

Haus Warehouse in the Baltic District. The minds at Boss have scored something of a coup for<br />

this event, with revered techno/underground house DJ SHLOMI ABER (pictured) headlining. As head of<br />

the Be As One label, the DJ has created some of the most recognisable techno cuts ever to be heard on<br />

dancefloors, while working with a range of the world’s most prestigious labels: Objectivity, Renaissance<br />

Cocoon, Desolat, Cadenza, Ovum and R&S. Rubix residents Chris McGee, Phil Fearon and Lee Charnock all<br />

feature on the undercard for the event.<br />

The week after brings a change in focus, as BOSS IN THE BASEMENT #2 (Saturday 14th <strong>September</strong>) sees<br />

the action move to The Black-E for an intimate show in the storied venue. SHELLSUIT head the bill, with<br />

a selection of nu soul nuggets from their two LPs Wednesday Morning Bootle Strand and Walton Prison<br />

Blues likely to feature. Support comes from THE SUMS, led by Peter ‘Digsy’ Deary, formerly of Britpop-era<br />

gunslingers Smaller.<br />

A more than fully laden platter for both events; each cost a wallet-boosting £9 earlybird and £7 respectively.<br />

Haus / 7th <strong>September</strong> - The Black-E / 14th <strong>September</strong><br />

Gig Guide and Ticket Shop live at www.bidolito.co.uk


Cheshire’s Multi Award Winning Arts Venue<br />

Some highlights from our new season…<br />

Comedy<br />

Andrew Lawrence<br />

Marcel Lucont<br />

Chris Ramsey<br />

Andrew O’Neill - Heavy Metal: A History<br />

10 October<br />

11 October<br />

20 November<br />

13 February<br />

Chris Ramsey<br />

Films<br />

The Heat, Stand Up Guys, Summer in February,<br />

The Place Beyond the Pines, Before Midnight, RED<br />

2, Alan Partridge: Alpha Papa, Sing-a long-a Rock Horror<br />

Music<br />

The Christians<br />

Glenn Tilbrook<br />

From The Jam<br />

19 Oct<br />

21 Nov<br />

5 Dec<br />

The Christians<br />

Exhibitions (Free)<br />

Domesticity (until 31 August) by Jo Hall and Louise Hesketh<br />

A unique take on the way we relate to everyday objects<br />

Full details on our website at www.thebrindley.org.uk Box Office: 0151 907 8360<br />

The Brindley, High St, Runcorn, Cheshire WA7 1BG<br />

www.facebook.com/brindleyartscentre<br />

www.twitter.com/TheBrindley


20<br />

Bido Lito! <strong>September</strong> <strong>2013</strong><br />

Reviews<br />

FESTEVOL<br />

Kazimier Club and Garden<br />

Everything is in place for another great<br />

FESTEVOL: the sun beams down on Liverpool’s<br />

beloved Kazimier Garden, the bar is fully<br />

stocked, and much-hyped local five-piece<br />

SANKOFA kick out their hazy blend of 60s blues<br />

and psychedelic rock to an appreciative crowd.<br />

The hypnotic guitar work is compelling in itself,<br />

and the band have an impressive ear for vocal<br />

melody and overall structure which enables<br />

them to build quality songs on top of that<br />

rhythmic base. The addition of synth on top of<br />

a pounding rhythm section and reverb-drenched<br />

guitars gives their compositions that bit more<br />

texture, and an original sound.<br />

Back in the club, WHITE BLACULA introduce<br />

a touch of playful chaos to proceedings. The<br />

seven-piece’s electric combination of rock<br />

and Cramps-style punk with a healthy dash<br />

of ska is both disorientating and thrilling to<br />

listen to, and the band’s slick instrumental<br />

performances compete for attention with the<br />

boundless energy and potent stage presence of<br />

their bizarrely-clad frontman. White Blacula are<br />

undoubtedly one of Liverpool’s most unique<br />

bands, and their live show goes a long way to<br />

cementing their reputation as one of the most<br />

exciting acts in the city.<br />

CLANG BOOM STEAM’s dirty, down-tuned,<br />

jagged rock songs are heavy in Nick Cave-esque<br />

wordplay and full of visceral guitar work that<br />

Josh Homme himself would be proud of. Despite<br />

the obvious influences their music sounds<br />

genuinely fresh, and they have clearly spent<br />

time honing their song-writing craft, as you can<br />

hear in the dark swagger of Worms. This is dark,<br />

dangerous, rock music that you can dance your<br />

arse off to. At last.<br />

The key to keeping things fresh at marathon<br />

all-day affairs such as this is balance, and BIRD<br />

provide a welcome antithesis to some of the<br />

more raucous acts that come before them.<br />

Rather than sheer volume, their musical potency<br />

stems from the rich harmonic texture of their<br />

arrangements. Their beautiful vocal harmonies<br />

and haunting compositions seem to improve<br />

every time. Bird have also recently recruited a<br />

new bass player, and the band really benefit<br />

from the extra pair of hands in their live set-up,<br />

as it frees the other multi-talented members up<br />

to perform extra percussive and synth duties,<br />

making Bird’s ethereal wall of sound all the<br />

more powerful.<br />

Seven days later and the weather is not as<br />

glorious. DEATH MASKS take to the Garden stage<br />

at the start of Part Two and the sun remains<br />

stubbornly behind thick cloud, but their sunny<br />

indie pop more than compensates. Uniformed in<br />

striped T-shirts, the St Helens five-piece set the<br />

tone brilliantly for another day celebrating local<br />

talent. The barbecue is being fired up as the<br />

Garden is rocked to the heady scent of smoke<br />

and aftershave. It’s going to be a great day.<br />

Inside there is a decidedly less summery<br />

atmosphere. VEYU battle through onstage<br />

sound problems to produce a solid set of synthdriven<br />

80s pop. Word has obviously spread<br />

about this band as the Kazimier is almost full<br />

at this early stage despite this only being Veyu’s<br />

third gig. Signature song Running sounds<br />

perfect in the darkness of the club away from<br />

the jovial garden crowd, and the autumnal hue<br />

of Morning Light also strikes a chord with the<br />

growing crowd. Expect these boys to be further<br />

up the bill next year.<br />

Unfortunately, the sun-hungry hoards escape<br />

back to the burgers and fresh air in time to miss<br />

upstarts THE LIBERTY VESSELS. Singer Oscar<br />

Reddrop prowls around the stage like a man on<br />

a mission. His arrogant schtick could grate if it<br />

wasn’t backed up by such solid tunes. There’s<br />

no dead weight in this young band’s line-up,<br />

with guitarist Sam Downes supplying chunky<br />

and furious pop punk riffs of the catchiest order.<br />

It seems a shame that their set is witnessed<br />

by so few but there’s likely to be ample more<br />

opportunity to see this young act.<br />

Liverpool has clearly taken to Sheffield<br />

metallers WET NUNS. Despite an awful gag<br />

about Scousers stealing their heart, there is<br />

an obvious reciprocated love for This two-man<br />

juggernaut. Comparisons to the Black Keys<br />

have doubtless been made because of their<br />

Wet Nuns (Robin Clewley / @robinscamera)<br />

number and bluesy riffs, but as darkness falls<br />

over the Garden it is only Wet Nuns that this<br />

crowd want to see. Diehard fans mosh on the<br />

front row, resident Bido Lito! sketcher Mook<br />

Loxley manages to draw the carnage whilst<br />

simultaneously head-banging, and guitarist Rob<br />

Graham finishes the set by being hoisted onto<br />

a makeshift (and perhaps structurally worrying)<br />

zip line. If the Garden collapsed there and then it<br />

would be a fitting close to the festival.<br />

However, there is more fun to be had inside.<br />

BALTIC FLEET are putting their all into energising<br />

the daytime drinkers. Despite their best efforts<br />

with highly danceable tunes taken from album<br />

Towers, Paul Fleming and co’s motorik post-rock<br />

fails to get the Kaz moving. This is obviously a<br />

transitional period in FestEvol’s bill as punters<br />

stream in from the outside rain in free ponchos<br />

to prepare for top dogs OUTFIT.<br />

National recognition and the release of debut<br />

album Performance to nigh-on universal praise<br />

means the timing of this headline slot is perfect.<br />

As such, the five-piece get the entire Kazimier<br />

club moving in unison for the first time tonight.<br />

From opener House On Fire to Everything All The<br />

Time there are smiles all around as a realisation<br />

pulses around FestEvol that this is the time<br />

for this special band. FestEvol once again has<br />

provided a fitting platform for Merseyside’s best<br />

and brightest – wonder who’ll shine next year…<br />

Alex Holbourn / @AlexHolbourn<br />

Sam Turner / @samturner1984<br />

Gig Guide and Ticket Shop live at www.bidolito.co.uk


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22 Bido Lito! <strong>September</strong> <strong>2013</strong><br />

Reviews<br />

TRASH TALK<br />

Alpha & Omega – Iron Witch<br />

THRASHGIG @ The Blade Factory<br />

An evening of last-minute changes makes<br />

for an incendiary start, but not quite in the way<br />

we were expecting: a venue fire in Manchester<br />

results in the remaining elements of one gig<br />

being transplanted into another. Along with this,<br />

rumours circulating from the outset of the night<br />

are sadly confirmed when local hardcore veterans<br />

SSS are forced to pull out due to illness, leaving<br />

Shangaan Electro (Michael Sheerin / michaelsheerin.photoshelter.com)<br />

of the Liverpool scene for the evening.<br />

With a string of critically embraced smallscale<br />

releases under their belt, Iron Witch prove<br />

that they are easily one of the heaviest, most<br />

consistent and tragically undervalued live<br />

bands to come out of the city in recent years.<br />

IRON WITCH as the last-standing representatives<br />

Their booze-fuelled fusion of EyeHateGodaping<br />

nihilistic aggression and Sabbath-on-acid<br />

sludge riffery floods the Blade Factory with a sea<br />

of nodding heads, a fervent crowd that would<br />

have had no difficulty remaining entranced for<br />

the duration of a headline slot. A tour through<br />

mainland Europe later this year with London’s<br />

Dead Existence looks likely to elevate the group<br />

to the status that they have been pushing<br />

towards since 2010.<br />

Los Angeles melodic hardcore outfit ALPHA &<br />

OMEGA are a last-minute addition to the lineup<br />

as a result of the fire at Manchester NQ Live.<br />

Their set is as engaging as it is unexpected, and<br />

is generally well received by both the home<br />

crowd and the faithful few that have taken the<br />

extra trip down the M62 to hear new tracks from<br />

their upcoming sophomore release No Rest,<br />

No Peace. On witnessing the diversity of the<br />

assembled audience, vocalist Luis Hernandez<br />

stresses the importance of everybody, from<br />

“skinheads and punks to hardcore kids and<br />

hipsters” actively engaging in their local music<br />

scene. As gushing as it sounds, this message in<br />

essence is the core of our music community, and<br />

the ongoing regeneration of the Baltic Triangle<br />

and city in general is a testament to this.<br />

TRASH TALK have suffered somewhat of an<br />

unfair backlash from a small sub-section of<br />

hardcore purists over the past few years. Their<br />

growing affiliation with rap collective Odd<br />

Future has led to all-too predictable calls of<br />

‘selling out’ that in reality are in direct contrast<br />

to the relentless punk energy that the group<br />

display both on record and in their riotous live<br />

performances. New material from their fourth<br />

full-length, 119, appears alongside better-known<br />

crowd pleasers in a set that is presented with<br />

a seasoned accuracy that allows the group to<br />

devote themselves entirely to the energy of the<br />

performance. Frontman Lee Spielman operates<br />

on a seldom-found level somewhere between<br />

approachable and menacing, switching<br />

effortlessly between chatting to the crowd<br />

and prowling the small stage with all of the<br />

psychologically detached fury you would expect<br />

from the genre. The absorption of former Mars<br />

Volta drummer Thomas Pridgen into the group<br />

is seamless, his technical prowess feeding the<br />

destructive energy of the band, which transfers<br />

into the crowd throughout the set; a blistering<br />

period of unremitting stage dives and circle pits<br />

proving that the Californian punks have far from<br />

lost their edge.<br />

Sean Phillips<br />

SHANGAAN ELECTRO<br />

Auntie Flo - Yola Fatoush<br />

Deep Hedonia @ The Kazimier Garden<br />

For the umpteenth time this summer, we’re in<br />

the Kazimier Garden. As we bask in the July heat,<br />

sampling the traditional African food on offer,<br />

we overhear someone nearby declaring that<br />

this place has Sefton Park beaten as Liverpool’s<br />

best summer hang-out spot. Tentatively nibbling<br />

on Phutu Pap and sipping craft beers in the<br />

sunshine, we can’t help but think they’ve hit the<br />

nail on the head.<br />

YOLA FATOUSH occasionally conjure up<br />

comparisons to the edgier club sounds of today<br />

– Jam City, Fatima Al Qadiri et al. – though their<br />

performance channels Hype Williams’ ambience,<br />

featuring unsettling samples, church organ<br />

sounds and choral vocals. On one occasion<br />

a chart-ready melody is carried by something<br />

resembling a garage beat, though overall<br />

the group’s material would not translate as<br />

readily to a club setting on account of the rich,<br />

experimental soundscapes they embrace.<br />

A raft of warm, appreciative applause meets<br />

the five-strong SHANGAAN ELECTRO collective<br />

as they take to the stage, led by creator and<br />

overlord of the sound, the charismatic Nozinja.<br />

There is a sense that something amazing is<br />

about to unfold as he positions himself behind<br />

the decks at the rear of the stage, introducing<br />

his four dancer/singers to the crowd. The two<br />

female dancers sport something akin to hula<br />

skirts, designed to emphasise the notoriously<br />

fast dancing that Shangaan is renowned for,<br />

whereas the two gents in the troupe, known<br />

as the Tsetsha Boys, don less traditional outfits:<br />

orange jumpsuits, bandit masks and padding<br />

on their bellies and behinds. Aside from the<br />

occasional thunderous kick-drum pattern, the<br />

music over the next hour is essentially a blur of<br />

frenetic, worming marimba melodies and pitch-<br />

Gig Guide and Ticket Shop live at www.bidolito.co.uk


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ent synths, the likes of which you might hear on<br />

Crash Bandicoot, running at breakneck speeds of<br />

up to 189 bpm. To put that in perspective, house<br />

music runs between 120 and 130, while even<br />

drum and bass rarely exceeds 180. Shangaan’s<br />

extreme tempo is an integral part of its identity,<br />

framework and fuel for the mesmerising displays<br />

of rapid-fire dancing displayed by the group<br />

Nozinja has brought with him. Emphasising its<br />

importance, the man himself begins a chant of<br />

“One! Eight! Nine!”, which is readily returned<br />

by a crowd completely caught up in the spirit<br />

of things. As they make their way off stage to<br />

rapturous applause, many in attendance rush<br />

to thank the performers; it is rare you get the<br />

chance to witness something as fresh as this.<br />

Following Nozinja and co’s barnstorming<br />

performance the natural high that seems to<br />

course through everyone in attendance ensures<br />

things really take off for the remaining hours<br />

of the event. AUNTIE FLO create a real carnival<br />

atmosphere in a now rammed Garden with<br />

Afrobeat-influenced house, while down in<br />

what has recently been dubbed Rat Alley (The<br />

Kazimier’s smoking area), Abandon Silence head<br />

honcho ANDREW HILL and Boiler Room founder<br />

THRISTIAN capitalise on the positive atmosphere,<br />

delivering solid DJ sets to an animated crowd. The<br />

narrow, high-walled alleyway is another string to<br />

The Kazimier’s bow, and another top venue for<br />

the summer months. Fingers crossed that events<br />

as inspiring as this one are held here in future.<br />

Rob Syme<br />

COWTOWN<br />

Peter Smyth - Coltsblood<br />

PostMusic @ MelloMello<br />

Tonight sees the return of Leeds’ pumped-up,<br />

poppy post-punk trio COWTOWN to Liverpool,<br />

a band who are familiar faces on the Leeds<br />

DIY scene and also the Liverpool gig circuit,<br />

garnering many fans and much acclaim here on<br />

previous visits to the city. Following the release<br />

of their third album Dudes vs. Bad Dudes in<br />

April, there’s exhilarating new riffs aplenty<br />

within MelloMello tonight, accompanied by<br />

an interesting line-up of bands in the form of<br />

COLTSBLOOD and PETER SMYTH.<br />

First up on tonight’s bill is Coltsblood, who<br />

begin to literally shake the delicate surroundings<br />

of MelloMello with their melancholic,<br />

sludgy doom metal. Loud would be a severe<br />

understatement here. Seething, thick distortion<br />

and incisive basslines get the night started in<br />

a pretty unforgettable fashion. Next up on the<br />

bill is Mugstar’s Peter Smyth, opting for a solo<br />

acoustic set that promises to be nothing short of<br />

brilliant. He certainly isn’t disappointing either,<br />

coming onstage to a larger crowd and filling<br />

the room with his spaciously crafted dream folk,<br />

reminiscent of Mojave 3 and the earlier work<br />

as Slowdive on Pygmalion. Crowd numbers are<br />

beginning to escalate even further in time for<br />

tonight’s headliners, even though they’re coming<br />

onstage just shy of 11pm. After lumping their<br />

amps and instruments together, Cowtown launch<br />

into their set in rip-roaring fashion. The short,<br />

punky and energetic bursts of I’ve Heard Enough<br />

and Panasonic Youth show a band still brimming<br />

with ideas and enthusiasm, and who somehow<br />

make a Gibson SG look and sound pretty cool<br />

indeed. Watched from the crowd by Dan Croll<br />

and members of Stealing Sheep, Cowtown are<br />

bringing the night to a peak with a barrage of<br />

and synth and distortion. The punchy, nimble riffs<br />

of recent single Nightbeats show similarities to<br />

their Leeds contemporaries Dinosaur Pile-Up and<br />

Pulled Apart by Horses, but still manage to stand<br />

out as their own identifiable sound. Boasting a<br />

set worthy of much bigger venues, Cowtown are<br />

certainly due to garner even more success in the<br />

near future.<br />

John Wise / @John__Wise<br />

AMERICANA WEEKEND<br />

BeauSoleil Avec Marcel Doucet - Steve<br />

Riley And The Mamou Playboys - Chris<br />

Moreton – Hazel Scott Playboys<br />

Liverpool Philharmonic<br />

With THE LOOSE MOOSE STRING BAND<br />

busking their brand of hillbilly bluegrass from<br />

the Hope Street sidewalk (yes, ‘sidewalk’, this is<br />

an Americana Weekend), tonight’s opener CHRIS<br />

MORETON says the atmosphere outside reminds<br />

him of the early Cambridge bluegrass festivals.<br />

And with that the Mersey delta centred around<br />

the streets of Hope, Myrtle and Catharine swings<br />

into action on the Phil’s second annual weekend<br />

of Americana-dedicated music. Starting promptly<br />

at 7.30pm (some of the Moose revellers are in<br />

danger of being locked out of the first act due<br />

to their tardiness), bluesman Moreton rocks<br />

us gently into the mood with some expertly<br />

executed standards and original compositions.<br />

Joined by his wife Wendy, the award-winning<br />

guitarist provides a warm welcome to the<br />

festival. A cover of Leadbelly’s Little Sadie, and<br />

renditions of Doc Watson tunes and blues and<br />

country classics leave the Phil folks ready for the<br />

weekend ahead.<br />

Taking us away from the bluegrass of the<br />

1960s, Cajun collective BEAUSOLEIL AVEC MARCEL<br />

DOUCET go about delivering us to the bayous<br />

of Louisiana. Cajun music originates from the<br />

French-speaking Acadians, who settled in the<br />

States’ swamplands in the eighteenth century,<br />

and BeauSoleil are one of a number of bands<br />

who have been spreading the Cajun gospel to<br />

the world for the last quarter of a century. Doucet,<br />

looking like Father Christmas on a wine-tasting<br />

holiday, is genial in his repertoire about his<br />

band’s culture and the history of the songs they<br />

perform. For a band who have been performing<br />

for 25 years the six-piece still show plenty of<br />

enthusiasm for their music. There is a delightfully<br />

relaxed attitude to the performance as one band


Reviews<br />

Bido Lito! <strong>September</strong> <strong>2013</strong> 25<br />

member, periodically taking up bass-playing<br />

duties, wanders on and off the stage mid-song.<br />

Taking in Creole, jazz and calypso influences, the<br />

Cajun music BeauSoleil perform is vibrant and<br />

enlivening. Therefore, although the acoustics of<br />

the Phil give the fiddle-led rockers the sound<br />

they deserve, it seems a shame not to be up<br />

dancing. It is easy to imagine these sounds<br />

being developed on wooden porches around<br />

raucous crawfish barbeques surrounded by the<br />

swamps of Lafayette. This makes the Phil an allthe-more-unlikely<br />

venue. Doucet and his pals<br />

play tunes taken from their many albums that<br />

have been released to critical acclaim down<br />

the years: from the waltz of Little Darlin, to the<br />

bluesy Bamako and Carencro from their recent<br />

album, Doucet plies his unique howl to more<br />

traditional French-speaking ditties and the odd<br />

English number. With bongo beats, duelling<br />

fiddles, and brother David Doucet’s guitar<br />

picking, each song provides something different<br />

but equally compelling.<br />

The good times rumble on at The Caledonia<br />

each night, with the Catharine Street boozer<br />

taking the baton faultlessly with a bill of local<br />

and international revivalists. Following on<br />

from previous nights’ performances from KORY<br />

QUINN and THE DOWNTOWN DIXIELAND BAND,<br />

THE FLAMIN MAMIES play to a packed house on<br />

Saturday night. A little more boisterous than its<br />

neighbour, the Cali crowd need no coaxing to get<br />

dancing to the sounds of these Scouse Yankees.<br />

Sunday night follows a similar formula, with<br />

the evening opening with accordion and guitar<br />

duo Chris Hall and Hazel Scott as THE HAZEL<br />

SCOTT PLAYBOYS. Joined by Mamou Playboy<br />

Brazos Huval on fiddle, the trio play country<br />

Cajun classics to warm up the soaking-wet crowd<br />

(the rain outside threatens to turn Liverpool into<br />

Steve Riley (Glyn Akroyd)<br />

England’s only bayou). STEVE RILEY AND THE<br />

MAMOU PLAYBOYS are a similar proposition<br />

to Friday night’s headliners but perhaps with<br />

a bit more showbiz sheen. Steve Riley is the<br />

consummate entertainer, complete with shiny<br />

waistcoat and van Dyke beard. He leads his<br />

five-man troupe through an up-tempo set of<br />

zydeco, Cajun and swamp pop. The majority of<br />

songs are sung by Riley and fiddle-player Kevin<br />

Wimmer in harmony and the pair stick to the<br />

Cajun tradition of singing purely in French, save<br />

for a couple of numbers. There’s the same party<br />

flavour to the music as BeauSoleil, even when<br />

the Lousiana lads do a Cajun version of Edith<br />

Piaf’s Je Ne Regrette Rien. There are also some<br />

blues stompers led by guitarist Sam Broussard,<br />

who could quite easily be the Cajun Hendrix.<br />

Before the encore, we are treated to the pretty<br />

cheesy single Chatterbox, a poppy zydeco piece<br />

which would have gone down a storm in 1986.<br />

The crowd is a bit thinner on the ground than on<br />

Friday night, perhaps due to the weather: there<br />

is the obligatory clap-along now and then from<br />

an enthused crowd but the following ambitious<br />

sing-along falls pretty flat. All in all, a great<br />

closing performance - if a little damp.<br />

Sam Turner / @samturner1984<br />

SILENT SLEEP<br />

Voo – Puzzle<br />

Leaf<br />

It’s a cosy candlelit summer’s evening in Leaf,<br />

and in flagrant disregard for their surroundings,<br />

local three-piece PUZZLE are kicking out a hell<br />

of a racket. It’s a little bit alt, a little bit punk,<br />

and very, very 90s. It’s also highly enjoyable.<br />

Frontwoman Lucy Johnson is an impressive<br />

Thu 12th <strong>September</strong>, 8:00pm. In the BLUE LOUNGE.<br />

ALBERT LEE & HOGAN’S HEROES<br />

Fri 13th <strong>September</strong>, 7:30pm.<br />

THE BEATLES<br />

A MUSICAL CELEBRATION<br />

Fri 13th <strong>September</strong>, 8:00pm.<br />

LED ZEPPELIN EARLS COURT<br />

1975 SHOW BY MOTHERSHIP<br />

Sat 14th <strong>September</strong>, 7:30pm.<br />

FISH MOVEABLE FEAST TOUR<br />

Sat 5th October, 8:00pm. In the BLUE LOUNGE.<br />

THE SPIRIT & SOUND OF STEELY DAN<br />

NEARLY DAN IN CONCERT<br />

Sat 19th October, 8:00pm.<br />

WISHBONE ASH<br />

Sun 20th October, 7:30pm.<br />

THE SOUTH<br />

BILL WYMAN . STEELEYE SPAN<br />

JOE BROWN . JOHN WILLIAMS<br />

SHOW OF HANDS . WALTER TROUT<br />

IAN McNABB . EMILY BARKER<br />

CAPERCAILLIE . COLIN HAY<br />

GLENN TILBROOK . TONY REMY & THE STOLEN CLONES<br />

+ MANY OTHER ACTS & WORKSHOPS<br />

For details of performances contact our box office on<br />

0151 666 0000 or visit our website www.bestguitarfest.com


26<br />

Bido Lito! <strong>September</strong> <strong>2013</strong><br />

Reviews<br />

singer, her vocal register slicing adroitly<br />

through the bass-heavy fuzz being belted out<br />

behind. The guitar work is innovative and highly<br />

accomplished, and the songs are of consistently<br />

high quality. What seems to be lacking in places<br />

is depth. Some of the arrangements seem like<br />

they could be so much more powerful with an<br />

extra guitar or even just a well-placed vocal<br />

harmony behind them. However, most of their<br />

material stands up nicely as it is, and if this area<br />

of alternative is your cup of tea, you’ll be more<br />

than satisfied. Puzzle wear their influence on<br />

their sleeves, and it makes perfect sense when<br />

they launch into an impressive cover of Belly’s<br />

Dusted towards the end of the set.<br />

In a sense, VOO pick up where Puzzle left<br />

off. Their influences definitely have a large<br />

overlap, and although their approach is more<br />

melodic and a little more textured, they’re<br />

definitely singing from the same hymn sheet.<br />

They channel the songwriting spirits of Hüsker<br />

Dü, The Replacements, et al. and, although<br />

you can hear this loud and clear, they certainly<br />

aren’t lacking in originality. More importantly,<br />

the songs are great and the band is tight as<br />

hell. Having formed nearly ten years ago, Voo<br />

are definitely reaping the benefit of their live<br />

experience tonight.<br />

By his own admission, SILENT SLEEP frontman<br />

and songwriter Chris McIntosh is a little worse<br />

for wear by the time the headline act take to<br />

the stage. Perhaps this is understandable, given<br />

that he has opened tonight’s proceedings with<br />

a lengthy solo spot, played guitar for Voo, and<br />

is just about to start his third set of the night.<br />

However, he’s not going to let fatigue stop<br />

him from belting out some of the best pop<br />

gems the city has produced in years. Black<br />

Tide is a standout, its beautiful harmonic vocal<br />

hook competing for attention with McIntosh’s<br />

outstanding lyrics. Walk Me To The Sea is<br />

an equally well-crafted tearjerker, coloured<br />

with a markedly Celtic wistfulness that runs<br />

as a common theme through most of their<br />

songs. Despite his apologies for being too<br />

drunk, McIntosh looks naturally comfortable<br />

on stage, and is charming and engaging<br />

throughout. Notwithstanding a few minor<br />

technical mistakes, no doubt chalked up to the<br />

excess sauce, the passion and conviction of<br />

Silent Sleep’s performance is unquestionable,<br />

and tonight’s set ends triumphantly with a<br />

rousing rendition of the anthemic On The Steps<br />

Of The Bombed Out Church. The quality of the<br />

songwriting is blindingly obvious, but ultimately<br />

that’s not what separates Silent Sleep from the<br />

crowd. There is just something incredibly<br />

sincere about this music, and that’s what really<br />

hits home. Their songs are unpretentious,<br />

relentlessly romantic, and brutally honest. In<br />

other words, they are quintessentially Scouse.<br />

Perhaps that’s why, even if you’ve never heard<br />

them before, they feel as familiar and comforting<br />

as your favourite jumper on a cold winter night.<br />

Silent Sleep truly are a credit to the city.<br />

SCOTT AND CHARLENE’S<br />

WEDDING<br />

Mean Jean – Where We’re West – A.J.H.D<br />

Harvest Sun & Bam!Bam!Bam!<br />

@ The Shipping Forecast<br />

Caves, Scots screwball A.J.H.D does a great<br />

job of keeping the early birds at the Shipping<br />

Forecast entertained. His anti-folk musings<br />

would not seem out of place in the cafés of<br />

Scott & Charlene’s Wedding (Adam Edwards / @AdamEdwardsFoto)<br />

Cohen, here is one of a number of ‘ones-towatch’<br />

on tonight’s bill.<br />

WHERE WE’RE WEST produce a set which<br />

guides the growing crowd from low-energy<br />

stoner rock to up-tempo stadium anthems.<br />

Sound problems concerning singer Andrew<br />

Parry’s vocals are made up for by the<br />

mesmerising racket created by the rest of the<br />

band. The foursome combine Queens Of The<br />

Stone Age with Guns N Roses to great effect.<br />

Some good-natured banter with the front row<br />

and the throwing of classic frontman shapes<br />

justifies the vocalist’s place at front and centre.<br />

MEAN JEAN play to an almost full room and<br />

do not disappoint. With vocal responsibilities<br />

shared between all four members, the post-punk<br />

popsters bookend their set with Say It Like You<br />

Mean It and In Your Face. These are tunes that<br />

stay in your head as persistently as bubble gum<br />

in a hairbrush. Their paradoxical sweet and brash<br />

stylings go down a treat in the stifling heat of<br />

the Shipping Forecast’s basement and prepare<br />

the punters perfectly for the main event.<br />

“I’m only getting started,” decrees SCOTT AND<br />

Alex Holbourn / @AlexHolbourn<br />

CHARLENE’S WEDDING frontman Craig Dermody<br />

in Jackie Boy, and it’s a statement of intent not<br />

out of place in tonight’s whirlwind performance.<br />

With their recently released sophomore album<br />

Any Port In A Storm winning admirers all over<br />

the place, the Aussie-via-New Yorkers are riding<br />

a wave of critical plaudits after toiling in the<br />

background for years. Tonight’s set of slacker<br />

anthems from both LPs proves the band’s<br />

credentials and signals their coming of age. With<br />

As a last-minute replacement for River<br />

standard issue Australian blond surfer mop and<br />

vocals like an Antipodean Jonathan Richmond,<br />

Dermody is an engaging frontman. The lanky<br />

leader is at pains to offer apologies to a crowd<br />

member for not including an obscure request<br />

Greenwich Village. Looking like a young Neil<br />

on the setlist while also repeatedly thanking<br />

Young with songs in a similar vein to Leonard<br />

tonight’s promoters for putting on a “banging”<br />

line-up. Such gratitude must be reciprocated.<br />

Although this is the band’s first trip to Liverpool,<br />

the personnel involved are the latest in an<br />

evolving line-up some years in the making. It<br />

seems they have hit upon a winning formula.<br />

Guitarist Michael Caterer supplies jangly surf riffs<br />

which perfectly soundtrack Dermody’s tales of<br />

scraping a living in his adopted home of New York<br />

and hanging around with the aforementioned<br />

Jackie as well as his Lesbian Wife. The throng<br />

at the merch stand at the end of the gig is not<br />

only a sign that Scott And Charlene’s Wedding<br />

are a convincing proposition who have certainly<br />

added to their following tonight, but hopefully<br />

signals a return trip to Liverpool. After all, they’re<br />

only getting started.<br />

Sam Turner / @samturner1984<br />

RIKKY WILEY<br />

Probert – Stevie Banks<br />

Free Rock n Roll @ MelloMello<br />

When covering live music, it always helps<br />

to expect the unexpected. Despite the event’s<br />

name, two of tonight’s three artists are<br />

rappers, albeit with a headliner moonlighting<br />

from his rock ‘n’ roll day job. One great thing<br />

about MelloMello is its ability to create an<br />

atmosphere despite a relatively sparse crowd<br />

– dimly-lit chandeliers and a ska punk playlist<br />

prove a pleasingly potent mix, drawing in extra<br />

bodies before first act STEVIE BANKS takes the<br />

stage. Banks is an intriguing prospect and focus<br />

is drawn to his drum shoes. Yes, you heard me,<br />

drum shoes. Without rushing the stage to push<br />

him over I can’t confirm, but it appears he has<br />

sample pads featuring a bass and a snare drum<br />

sound plugged into each heel. I’m relieved to<br />

see he does not have cymbals on his knees. I<br />

move past relief headlong into enjoyment as<br />

Banks runs through a set of raucous bubblegum<br />

rock, recalling Ash, or a happier Nada Surf. Dust<br />

and Shooting Star crunch with a major chord<br />

power that gets them dancing in the aisles, and<br />

while his shoes may not outdrum Meg White<br />

they do add some meaty propulsion. It initially<br />

seems a bit gimmicky (a request for a shoe<br />

solo is gleefully granted) but in truth it’s more<br />

‘Liverpool Leg’ than Seasick Steve’s Stompbox.<br />

The most impressive element of Banks’ threepronged<br />

assault is his voice: able to nail the<br />

angst-ridden wail as well as some impressive<br />

high notes. The one-man-band genre isn’t<br />

given much respect, but if they sound less like<br />

Chas & Dave and more like Stevie Banks that<br />

may change.<br />

One-man hip hop shows are a lot more<br />

common, and RIKKY WILEY has certainly done<br />

his homework, which he hands to the crowd<br />

in the form of secret white envelopes. Wiley<br />

opens with a poem about maturity, before<br />

bemoaning his impending 30th birthday. He<br />

appears determined to rage furiously against<br />

the dying light of youth, delivering a variety<br />

Gig Guide and Ticket Shop live at www.bidolito.co.uk


UPCOMING GIGS<br />

SAT 21ST SEPTEMBER<br />

FLAT BACK FOUR<br />

HATED TIL PROVEN + PETE BENTHAM & THE DINNER LADIES + THE KIRKZ + OLD RADIO<br />

@ RENDEZVOUS, ST HELENS<br />

FRI 27TH SEPTEMBER<br />

DIRTY REVOLUTION<br />

+ HONNINGBARNA + THE VERMIN SUICIDES<br />

@ MELLO MELLO, LIVERPOOL<br />

CONAN<br />

THURS 3RD OCTOBER<br />

BURDEN OF THE NOOSE + NINKHARSAG + COLTSBLOOD<br />

THE ZANZIBAR, LIVERPOOL<br />

SAT 5TH OCTOBER<br />

THE RESTARTS<br />

BITEBACK + ROTPM + HATED TIL PROVEN<br />

THE KAZIMIER, LIVERPOOL<br />

SAT 12TH OCTOBER<br />

RASTA4EYES<br />

BROKEN 3 WAYS + THE SPORADICS<br />

MELLO MELLO, LIVERPOOL<br />

SAT 2ND NOVEMBER<br />

THE FRANCEENS<br />

ELMO & THE STYX<br />

MAGUIRE’S, LIVERPOOL<br />

FRI 8TH NOVEMBER<br />

COUNTING COINS<br />

JERAMIAH FERRARI<br />

MELLO MELLO, LIVERPOOL<br />

WWW.ANTIPOPRECORDS.COM<br />

SEETICKETS | TICKETMASTER | WEGOTTICKETS | BIDOLITO


Kyla Brox GoGo Penguin Stevie Williams<br />

show peppered with slapstick jokes, before<br />

the bassy funk of Sky+ kicks in and reminds<br />

us what he’s good at – delivering intelligently<br />

crafted stupidity, the kind honed from years on<br />

the battle rap circuit. Wiley is clearly a funny<br />

man, and those who have never seen him<br />

before are lapping up his antics, even though<br />

his envelope experiment is even less successful<br />

than that of Brendan Rodgers. Wiley mines his<br />

group The Dick Limerick Academy’s underrated<br />

album Merseycide for his whole set, and there’s<br />

a strong urge to join in the impromptu stage<br />

invasion during On Having Boss Powers, but<br />

getting through just three songs in a half-hour<br />

set when there are so many gems left unsung is<br />

a criminal waste.<br />

That crime is compounded once PROBERT<br />

takes the stage, alongside Alec, hype man and<br />

promoter for the evening. It’s immediately<br />

evident that the comedy hip hop template is<br />

extremely delicate, and Probert and Alec stretch<br />

it to breaking point. In their minds their act is<br />

a playful homage to Flight Of The Conchords,<br />

but from where we stand they resemble a pair<br />

of Butlins Redcoats with better than average<br />

record collections. Even the addition of live<br />

bass lacks lustre as it becomes apparent it<br />

bears no discernible difference to the backing<br />

track. In glimpses it’s possible to view Probert’s<br />

more than capable rhyming ability, and some<br />

slack must be cut considering this is the live<br />

debut of an embryonic project. The truth is at<br />

present this is a project drowning in a river of<br />

gimmickry. Indeed gimmickry appears to be<br />

the thread connecting these three acts, with<br />

wildly varying degrees of success. But this is<br />

the chance you take when setting out to do<br />

something a bit different, and for that Free Rock<br />

n Roll deserve credit.<br />

Maurice Stewart /<br />

theviewfromthebooth.tumblr.com<br />

COLD CAVE<br />

Natural Assembly – Salem Rages<br />

EVOL @ East Village Arts Club<br />

Despite starting almost an hour after doors,<br />

local dark punk outfit SALEM RAGES open<br />

the night to a practically non-existent crowd,<br />

something that is to be expected at the<br />

beginning of a show, yet tonight the audience<br />

never really seems able to assemble itself.<br />

However, the considerable sparseness of the<br />

congregation is far from a reflection of the<br />

group’s ability and doesn’t put them off as they<br />

plough through their brooding 80s-influenced<br />

set with a self-assured confidence.<br />

The metamorphosis of COLD CAVE’s Wes<br />

Eisold from aggressive hardcore frontman to<br />

crooning synth-pop authority has undoubtedly<br />

birthed a myriad of imitators, and tonight this is<br />

no more evident than in tour support NATURAL<br />

ASSEMBLY. Essentially sounding like a cross<br />

between Music For The Masses-era Depeche<br />

Mode and a well-studied impression of Eisold’s<br />

vocal delivery, every time the group appear to<br />

produce something different or unique, there is<br />

the realisation that Cold Cave either have done<br />

or could do it better.<br />

Making your inspirations clear is an integral<br />

element of art and creativity, but as this<br />

performance serves to prove, this can all too<br />

easily cross over into mere imitation that is<br />

uncomfortable for all involved.<br />

Opting to perform as a two-piece as opposed<br />

to the full live band that undertook their recent US<br />

tour, Cold Cave’s stripped-back personnel further<br />

contribute towards an intimate atmosphere for<br />

the remaining crowd in East Village Arts Club,<br />

one that is emphasised by the set comprising<br />

mainly darker electronic cuts from across the<br />

group’s back catalogue. With minimal stage<br />

activity, the group allow a series of captivating<br />

image projections and Eisold’s commanding<br />

persona to drive the performance. Silhouetted<br />

by visuals ranging from harsh industrial static<br />

to bold sunflowers, the band become lost in<br />

their sound, with only the occasional glance to<br />

the crowd or frustrated outburst towards the<br />

sound engineers breaking their immersive state.<br />

Cold Cave are art, and they expect you to know<br />

it. Standards from Love Comes Close, 2009’s<br />

definitive release, and one of a few recent 7-inch<br />

releases, Oceans With No End, are highlights<br />

that stand above the rest.<br />

Allowing the turnout to play towards their<br />

strengths, Cold Cave host an enclosed, up-close<br />

evening that exemplifies their influence across<br />

the genre that they helped to reinvigorate and<br />

bring to new ears.<br />

Sean Phillips / @seanmphillips<br />

KENDAL CALLING<br />

Lowther Deer Park, Lake District<br />

Kendal Calling <strong>2013</strong> has a lot to live up to.<br />

Not just its growing reputation as the best of<br />

a competitive field of small festivals, but also<br />

my last visit to the Lake District in 2006, when<br />

Liverpool’s music community spent a magical<br />

weekend in Coniston. Those memories flood<br />

back during a picturesque train journey, and<br />

arriving on site triggers that first-day-of-a-festival<br />

urge to smile uncontrollably at strangers. Tent<br />

erected and cider in hand, my calves and eyes<br />

sing in harmony on my first wander of the<br />

site. Kendal Calling is a village in a park, unlike<br />

Glastonbury’s city on a farm, with each stage<br />

within staggering distance of the next.<br />

Opening the Main Stage, the inappropriately<br />

named THE LAST PARTY capture the mood<br />

perfectly with their innocently optimistic<br />

jangle-pop. CLEAN BANDIT’s string-tinged future<br />

RnB proves popular with the sizeable teenage<br />

contingent, but us non-teenagers console<br />

ourselves with a pint of festival ale and a fishfinger<br />

sarnie. A visit to the Chai Wallahs tent<br />

lifts the spirits, if not the musical quality. BO


I DESIGN<br />

BIDO LITO!<br />

// LUKE-AVERY.COM<br />

// INFO@LUKE-AVERY.COM<br />

// 07729 308307


BRUCE’s warbling is as beige as her Florencelite<br />

dress, but her interpretive dance moves,<br />

apparently stolen from a sixth-form Drama<br />

teacher, raise a chuckle.<br />

SOLKO turn the tide on the Riot Jazz stage,<br />

their lilting hybrid of funk and reggae going<br />

down as smoothly as that fourth pint in the<br />

evening sun. But it’s time to shake this mellow<br />

buzz; it’s time for PUBLIC ENEMY. Almost. First, the<br />

warm-up DJ butchers a few classics. Fortunately,<br />

cider and the arrival of Chuck D and the boys<br />

soothe the pain.<br />

After a Flavor Flav-ourless showing at<br />

Glastonbury, there’s a palpable determination<br />

from these grandfathers of rap to show Britain<br />

that they’re not finished yet. Bring The Noise and<br />

Rebel Without A Pause explode with fury. Flav<br />

is making up for lost time, gambolling across<br />

the stage, barking out rhymes, and proving<br />

he’s the best hype man of all time. He even<br />

shows hitherto hidden skills as both drummer<br />

and bassist, and a talent for well-meaning, yet<br />

awkwardly rambling speeches.<br />

BASEMENT JAXX then bamboozle us with a<br />

hyperactive stage show of lights, lasers and<br />

multiple costume changes from their stable of<br />

singers. Do Your Thing creates bouncing bodies<br />

as far as the eye can see but the atmosphere<br />

predictably dips for new material - the horrific<br />

Back To The World offering a depressing view of<br />

their future - before a belting Bingo Bango wins<br />

us back.<br />

The evening ends with the 12-legged assault<br />

of THE MOUSE OUTFIT: the twin vocals of old<br />

pro Dr. Syntax and future star Sparxx excel to<br />

irresistible live funk, wringing every drop of<br />

energy from tiring drunken limbs.<br />

Saturday morning brings the comforting sight<br />

of THE TEA STREET BAND, bleary-eyed like their<br />

audience following a whirlwind trip to Australia.<br />

Thankfully, their Ibiza rock anthems work like<br />

audio Alka Seltzer, bringing us back to life with<br />

fizzing synths and bubbling bass. Good food<br />

and more familiar faces in the shape of ALL WE<br />

ARE help to accelerate the reanimation. There’s<br />

a soothing quality to their psych pop that’s<br />

perfect for the time and place. Retreating to the<br />

tent to dress for the rumoured downpour, we’re<br />

caught in a hurricane of Supermen, women and<br />

children, aiming to smash the world record for<br />

most Supermen in one place. Festival fancy dress<br />

days are becoming the norm, but nearly threequarters<br />

of revellers getting involved produces a<br />

truly remarkable spectacle.<br />

Amateur meteorologists are proved right,<br />

just as ASH take the stage looking like they’ve<br />

spent the 12 years since their last successful<br />

album cryogenically frozen. Oh Yeah and Shining<br />

Light draw arms and voices skywards and prove<br />

perfect rainy festival anthems. With cover being<br />

sought by all caught in the downpour, it’s<br />

TEMPLEBYS time as we scuttle for shelter at the<br />

Riot Jazz Stage. Once the band fire up, singer Kim<br />

Hollins casts off last night’s excesses to become<br />

the northern Alice Russell, displaying power and<br />

poise as raincoats are tossed to the floor. Dinner<br />

is abandoned in favour of another helping of The<br />

Mouse Outfit, the bigger Chai Wallahs tent giving<br />

them room to breathe. A sizzling closing medley<br />

of funk and hip hop standards takes the breath<br />

away, and there’s a unanimous belief that we<br />

have seen the festival’s musical peak.<br />

THE CHARLATANS aren’t changing minds,<br />

enjoyable as they are. The biggest crowd so<br />

far witness the house band (7 appearances in<br />

8 years) slam straight into Forever’s rumbling<br />

breakbeat to rapturous delight. Tim Burgess<br />

shoulders the responsibility of all onstage<br />

movement, his blond bob shaking like the many<br />

umbrellas appearing in the crowd. The dizzying<br />

proposition of SLAMBOREE overloads my already<br />

spinning head with an orgy of gypsy brass ‘n’<br />

bass, fire and circus tricks. Featuring Kendal<br />

Calling co-founder Ben Robinson on bass, this<br />

crazy collective add an exclamation mark to a<br />

great day, despite the downpour.<br />

Sunday brings astonishment at the lack of<br />

downpour damage and, as we catch teenage<br />

tyros AEROPLANES on the Woodlands Stage, the<br />

sun is blazing and the grass dry. A tight classic<br />

rock band with zesty streaks of emo, they seem<br />

destined for bigger things, as do Ashford’s THE<br />

INTERMISSION PROJECT (despite the godawful<br />

name). These handsome mini-Mumford boys,<br />

with an ear for folk and sensitive soulful voices,<br />

could become as popular as they undoubtedly<br />

were at school. After seeing two bands on the up,<br />

it’s a shame to see where MYSTERY JETS are now.<br />

Their evolution from English psychedelic whimsy<br />

to full-on Americana-rama may bring a few extra<br />

fans, but it’s robbed them of all originality.<br />

Eschewing grumpy Bobby Gillespie in favour<br />

of FOREIGN BEGGARS is a masterstroke. Kids<br />

in DayGlo warpaint pack the aptly named Glow<br />

Tent, providing more energy (and a bigger<br />

moshpit) than a field of thirty-somethings<br />

sporting Screamadelica logos. Songs are short<br />

and sweet, delivering two brutally serrated<br />

drops and a verse each for MCs Metropolis<br />

and Vulgatron.<br />

As the rain falls so does the curtain on<br />

proceedings in Chai Wallah, with Danish Titans<br />

TAKO LAKO, at their third festival of the day,<br />

thrashing through their fantastic “psychedelic<br />

gypsy beats”, before DJ YODA’s mix of cartoon<br />

nostalgia, YouTube videos and block rocking<br />

beats brings a perfect end to an exhaustingly<br />

excellent weekend.<br />

Maurice Stewart /<br />

theviewfromthebooth.tumblr.com<br />

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. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .<br />

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Tickets currently on<br />

sale at bidolito.co.uk<br />

Eliza And The<br />

Bear<br />

The Shipping Forecast<br />

Red Sails<br />

Leaf<br />

Giant Drag<br />

The Kazimier<br />

Broken Hands<br />

The Shipping Forecast<br />

Jaws<br />

East Village Arts Club<br />

Blue Rose Code<br />

Leaf<br />

Liverpool Psych<br />

Fest <strong>2013</strong><br />

Camp & Furnace<br />

Conan<br />

The Zanzibar<br />

No Age<br />

Korova<br />

China Rats<br />

Korova<br />

Fossil Collective<br />

Leaf<br />

The City Walls<br />

Leaf<br />

Phosphorescent<br />

The Kazimier<br />

Low<br />

The Anglican Cathedral<br />

Yo La Tengo<br />

East Village Arts Club<br />

27/9<br />

28/9<br />

3/10<br />

1/11<br />

6/10<br />

11/10<br />

9/11<br />

18/11<br />

4/12<br />

4/9<br />

13/9<br />

14/9<br />

22/9<br />

22/9<br />

25/9<br />

4/10<br />

Basement Jaxx (Gaz Jones / @GJMPhoto)<br />

BRUCE’s warbling is as beige as her Florencelite<br />

dress, but her interpretive dance moves,<br />

apparently stolen from a sixth-form Drama<br />

teacher, raise a chuckle.<br />

SOLKO turn the tide on the Riot Jazz stage,<br />

their lilting hybrid of funk and reggae going<br />

down as smoothly as that fourth pint in the<br />

evening sun. But it’s time to shake this mellow<br />

buzz; it’s time for PUBLIC ENEMY. Almost. First, the<br />

warm-up DJ butchers a few classics. Fortunately,<br />

cider and the arrival of Chuck D and the boys<br />

soothe the pain.<br />

After a Flavor Flav-ourless showing at<br />

Glastonbury, there’s a palpable determination<br />

from these grandfathers of rap to show Britain<br />

that they’re not finished yet. Bring The Noise<br />

Bring The Noise and<br />

Rebel Without A Pause explode with fury. Flav<br />

is making up for lost time, gambolling across<br />

the stage, barking out rhymes, and proving<br />

he’s the best hype man of all time. He even<br />

shows hitherto hidden skills as both drummer<br />

and bassist, and a talent for well-meaning, yet<br />

awkwardly rambling speeches.<br />

BASEMENT JAXX then bamboozle us with a<br />

hyperactive stage show of lights, lasers and<br />

multiple costume changes from their stable of<br />

singers. Do Your Thing<br />

Do Your Thing creates bouncing bodies<br />

as far as the eye can see but the atmosphere<br />

predictably dips for new material - the horrific<br />

Back To The World offering a depressing view of<br />

their future - before a belting Bingo Bango<br />

Bingo Bango wins<br />

us back.<br />

The evening ends with the 12-legged assault<br />

of THE MOUSE OUTFIT: the twin vocals of old<br />

pro Dr. Syntax and future star Sparxx excel to<br />

irresistible live funk, wringing every drop of<br />

energy from tiring drunken limbs.<br />

Saturday morning brings the comforting sight<br />

of THE TEA STREET BAND, bleary-eyed like their<br />

audience following a whirlwind trip to Australia.<br />

Thankfully, their Ibiza rock anthems work like<br />

audio Alka Seltzer, bringing us back to life with<br />

fizzing synths and bubbling bass. Good food<br />

and more familiar faces in the shape of ALL WE<br />

ARE help to accelerate the reanimation. There’s<br />

a soothing quality to their psych pop that’s<br />

perfect for the time and place. Retreating to the<br />

tent to dress for the rumoured downpour, we’re<br />

caught in a hurricane of Supermen, women and<br />

children, aiming to smash the world record for<br />

most Supermen in one place. Festival fancy dress<br />

days are becoming the norm, but nearly threequarters<br />

of revellers getting involved produces a<br />

truly remarkable spectacle.<br />

Amateur meteorologists are proved right,<br />

just as ASH take the stage looking like they’ve<br />

spent the 12 years since their last successful<br />

album cryogenically frozen. Oh Yeah and Shining<br />

Shining<br />

Light<br />

Light draw arms and voices skywards and prove<br />

perfect rainy festival anthems. With cover being<br />

sought by all caught in the downpour, it’s<br />

TEMPLEBYS time as we scuttle for shelter at the<br />

Riot Jazz Stage. Once the band fire up, singer Kim<br />

Hollins casts off last night’s excesses to become<br />

the northern Alice Russell, displaying power and<br />

poise as raincoats are tossed to the floor. Dinner<br />

is abandoned in favour of another helping of The<br />

Mouse Outfit, the bigger Chai Wallahs tent giving<br />

them room to breathe. A sizzling closing medley<br />

of funk and hip hop standards takes the breath<br />

away, and there’s a unanimous belief that we<br />

have seen the festival’s musical peak.<br />

THE CHARLATANS aren’t changing minds,<br />

enjoyable as they are. The biggest crowd so<br />

far witness the house band (7 appearances in<br />

8 years) slam straight into Forever’s rumbling<br />

breakbeat to rapturous delight. Tim Burgess<br />

shoulders the responsibility of all onstage<br />

movement, his blond bob shaking like the many<br />

umbrellas appearing in the crowd. The dizzying<br />

proposition of SLAMBOREE overloads my already<br />

spinning head with an orgy of gypsy brass ‘n’<br />

bass, fire and circus tricks. Featuring Kendal<br />

Calling co-founder Ben Robinson on bass, this<br />

crazy collective add an exclamation mark to a<br />

great day, despite the downpour.<br />

Sunday brings astonishment at the lack of<br />

downpour damage and, as we catch teenage<br />

tyros AEROPLANES on the Woodlands Stage, the<br />

sun is blazing and the grass dry. A tight classic<br />

rock band with zesty streaks of emo, they seem<br />

destined for bigger things, as do Ashford’s THE<br />

INTERMISSION PROJECT (despite the godawful<br />

name). These handsome mini-Mumford boys,<br />

with an ear for folk and sensitive soulful voices,<br />

could become as popular as they undoubtedly<br />

were at school. After seeing two bands on the up,<br />

it’s a shame to see where MYSTERY JETS are now.<br />

Their evolution from English psychedelic whimsy<br />

to full-on Americana-rama may bring a few extra<br />

fans, but it’s robbed them of all originality.<br />

Eschewing grumpy Bobby Gillespie in favour<br />

of FOREIGN BEGGARS is a masterstroke. Kids<br />

in DayGlo warpaint pack the aptly named Glow<br />

Tent, providing more energy (and a bigger<br />

moshpit) than a field of thirty-somethings<br />

sporting Screamadelica logos. Songs are short<br />

and sweet, delivering two brutally serrated<br />

drops and a verse each for MCs Metropolis<br />

and Vulgatron.<br />

As the rain falls so does the curtain on<br />

proceedings in Chai Wallah, with Danish Titans<br />

TAKO LAKO, at their third festival of the day,<br />

thrashing through their fantastic “psychedelic<br />

gypsy beats”, before DJ YODA’s mix of cartoon<br />

nostalgia, YouTube videos and block rocking<br />

beats brings a perfect end to an exhaustingly<br />

excellent weekend.<br />

Maurice Stewart /<br />

theviewfromthebooth.tumblr.com<br />

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Eliza And<br />

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Eliza And<br />

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The<br />

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The<br />

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The<br />

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Bear<br />

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Red Sails<br />

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Red Sails<br />

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Leaf<br />

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Leaf<br />

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Leaf<br />

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Giant Drag<br />

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Giant Drag<br />

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Giant Drag<br />

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The Kazimier<br />

Broken Hands<br />

The Shipping Forecast<br />

Jaws<br />

East Village Arts Club<br />

Blue Rose Code<br />

Leaf<br />

Liverpool Psych<br />

Liverpool Psych<br />

Live<br />

Fest <strong>2013</strong><br />

Camp & Furnace<br />

Conan<br />

The Zanzibar<br />

No Age<br />

Korova<br />

China Rats<br />

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China Rats<br />

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China Rats<br />

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Korova<br />

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Korova<br />

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Korova<br />

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Fossil Collective<br />

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Fossil Collective<br />

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Fossil Collective<br />

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Leaf<br />

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Leaf<br />

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Leaf<br />

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The City Walls<br />

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The City Walls<br />

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The City Walls<br />

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The City Walls<br />

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Leaf<br />

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Leaf<br />

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Phosphorescent<br />

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Phosphorescent<br />

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Phosphorescent<br />

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Phosphorescent<br />

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The Kazimier<br />

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The Kazimier<br />

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Low<br />

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Low<br />

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Low<br />

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The Anglican Cathedral<br />

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The Anglican Cathedral<br />

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The Anglican Cathedral<br />

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Yo La Tengo<br />

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Yo La Tengo<br />

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Yo La Tengo<br />

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East Village Arts Club<br />

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East Village Arts Club<br />

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East Village Arts Club<br />

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27/9<br />

28/9<br />

3/10<br />

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1/11<br />

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1/11<br />

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1/11<br />

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6/10<br />

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11/10<br />

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11/10<br />

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9/11<br />

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9/11<br />

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18/11<br />

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18/11<br />

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4/12<br />

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4/12<br />

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4/9<br />

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4/9<br />

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13/9<br />

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13/9<br />

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14/9<br />

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14/9<br />

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22/9<br />

22/9<br />

25/9<br />

4/10<br />

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Basement Jaxx (Gaz Jones / @GJMPhoto)


LIVERPOOL INTERNATIONAL<br />

FESTIVAL OF PSYCHEDELIA<br />

camp and furnace / blade factory. liverpool<br />

2 7-28 SEPTEMBER <strong>2013</strong><br />

FRIDAY 27 SEPTEMBER<br />

MOON DUO. DEAD MEADOW.<br />

PSYCHIC ILLS. THE HOLYDRUG COUPLE.<br />

NIGHT BEATS. CARLTON MELTON.<br />

KLAUS JOHANN GROBE. YETI LANE.<br />

LORELLE MEETS THE OBSOLETE. THE OSCILLATION.<br />

STRANGERS FAMILY BAND. BARON MORDANT.<br />

EKOPLEKZ. VINDICATRIX. ZEKE CLOUGH. THE KVB.<br />

PLANKTON WAT. EAT LIGHTS; BECOME LIGHTS. KULT COUNTRY.<br />

NEGATIVE PEGASUS. DEAD HORSE ONE. OS NOCTAMBULOS.<br />

MIND MOUNTAIN. BASE VENTURA. THE COSMIC DEAD.<br />

MORDANT MUSIC MIASMA<br />

+ DJS RICHARD NORRIS. PETE FOWLER. SONIC CATHEDRAL. pms.<br />

BERNIE CONNOR. RICHARD HECTOR-JONES. THE BLACK MARIAH.<br />

SATURDAY 28 SEPTEMBER<br />

CLINIC. THE BESNARD LAKES.<br />

FUZZ. PEAKING LIGHTS SOUND SYSTEM.<br />

WHITE MANNA. HOOKWORMS. THE LIMINANAS.<br />

JACCO GARDNER. MUGSTAR. SINGAPORE SLING.<br />

THE RESONARS. THE PAPERHEAD. MASTON.<br />

CHARLIE BOYER AND THE VOYEURS.<br />

WARM DIGITS. NOVELLA. SAUNA YOUTH. COLD PUMAS. THE WANDS.<br />

THE LUCID DREAM. THE WOKEN TREES. CAMERA. TELEGRAM. LOLA COLT.<br />

HELICON. ALFA 9. MO KOLOURS. THE SOFT WALLS. THREE DIMENSIONAL TANX.<br />

DELTA MAINLINE. PSYENCE. BONNACONS OF DOOM. ALIEN BALLROOM.<br />

TROUBLE IN MIND RECORDS STAGE<br />

+ DJS MARC RILEY. ANDY VOTEL. TROUBLE IN MIND. FAUX VS GRINGO.<br />

AKOUSTIK ANARKHY. BAD VIBRATIONS. GREAT POP SUPPLEMENT.<br />

JOE MCKECHNIE. CAFE DEL LAR. S Norfolk (Shindig).<br />

+ EXCLUSIVE LTD EDITION 7” VINYL WITH WEEKEND WRISTBANDS (while stocks last)<br />

liverpoolpsychfest.com + Twitter:@LPoolPsychFest<br />

Weekend Wristbands £45. Day Tickets: Friday 27th <strong>September</strong> £20. Saturday 28th<br />

<strong>September</strong> £25. Available From bidolito.co.uk, ticketweb.co.uk, Probe Records<br />

(Liverpool), Piccadilly Records (Manchester), Jumbo Records (Leeds).


YOUSEF PRESENTS...<br />

BIRTHDAY / SATURDAY 28TH SEPTEMBER <strong>2013</strong><br />

YOUSEF / SETH TROXLER / CASSY<br />

SCUBA / CATZ & DOGZ<br />

THE ANGEL - LIVE / LEWIS BOARDMAN / SCOTT LEWIS<br />

TICKETS FROM WWW.TICKETARENA.CO.UK

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