Views
1 year ago

121516_SWB_DIGITAL EDITION

4 x December 15, 2016 -

4 x December 15, 2016 - January 4, 2017 x www.SouthwestOrlandoBulletin.com TABLE OF CONTENTS FOODIE FOR THOUGHT......................................................................5 Fantastic Flavors From Around the Globe BREAKFAST WITH Santa DECEMBER 17, 18, 22 & 23 8 - 10AM Meet Mr. & Mrs. Claus plus • DELICIOUS BREAKFAST BUFFET • EARLY BIRD SHOPPING AT WORLD OF DISNEY FROM 9 – 10AM AND T-REX DINO STORE MAKE YOUR RESERVATION TODAY AT TREXCAFE.COM DISNEY SPRINGS TM 407.828.8739 PROMOTIONAL FEATURE.....................................................................8 The Woodhouse Day Spa / Relax & Rejuvenate in Luxury TOURISM UPDATE.............................................................................10 Central Florida Hotel & Lodging Association LAST-MINUTE HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE....................................................14 BUSINESS PROFILE............................................................................18 A Boutique-Style Medispa / Spa Blue REDISCOVER I-DRIVE .........................................................................19 IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD ..............................................................22 25TH ANNUAL STORIES OF THE SEASON..........................................25 STATEPOINT YEAR IN REVIEW CROSSWORD PUZZLE ..........................42 NEWS & BUSINESS BRIEFS................................................................44 COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD ........................................................47 SOUTHWEST SERVICE DIRECTORY ....................................................48 Dec. 15, 2016 Vol. XXXI, No. 4 P.O. Box 851 Windermere, FL 34786 407-351-1573 www.southwestorlandobulletin.com The Southwest Orlando Bulletin is published semimonthly by Kearney Publishing Corp. No material may be reproduced without written permission. Subscriptions are available in the U.S. and Puerto Rico for $25.56 per year and in Canada for $31.80 per year. For foreign surface mailing, add $20 per year. Neither the publishers nor the advertisers are responsible or liable for typographical errors, misinformation, misprints, etc., unintentionally contained herein. All letters received become the property of Kearney Publishing Corp. and may be reproduced and edited without consent. ©2016/KEARNEY PUBLISHING CORPORATION PRESIDENT Clay Kearney VICE PRESIDENT Brenda Kearney VICE PRESIDENT SALES & OPERATIONS Donna Wolk MANAGING EDITOR Lisa Sagers EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Lauren Salinero CIRCULATION Robert Barlow ADMINISTRATION Michelle Moniz SOCIAL AMBASSADOR Lauren Bocken CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Kirsten Harrington, Karen Nimetz, Blair Parke MARKETING CONSULTANTS Diana Kastner (407) 376-6959 diana@kearneypublishing.com Madeline DeVito (407) 351-1573, option 1 mdevito@kearneypublishing.com Lindsay Richardson (407) 351-1573, option 2 lindsay@kearneypublishing.com

From lucky lentils to tempting tamales, people from around the world welcome the new year with a mixture of tradition and superstition. Danes ring in the special day with boiled cod and lemon caper sauce, and some Mexican families gather for traditional tamales. In Greece, the savory-sweet vasilopita takes center stage, and the person who finds the coin or trinket hidden in the cake receives good luck. Jennifer Dunagan of Gotha and her family celebrate by eating 12 grapes at the stroke of midnight — a popular Latin tradition that symbolizes good luck for each month in the new year. In a nod to the Pennsylvania Dutch, Megan Gardner of Orlando feasts on pork and sauerkraut. “For Russians, the biggest holiday of the year starts around 9-10 p.m. and lasts well into the new year,” said local resident Evgenia Volkonitskaya, originally from Krasnoyarsk, Siberia. “People prepare for days and then eat all of the food for days,” she said. The evening starts off with canapes with red caviar, pickled vegetables, cold cuts and salads. Main dishes include roast pig or duck. “My parents also normally make a large savory pie, called a pirog, which looks like a slab pie filled with www.SouthwestOrlandoBulletin.com x December 15, 2016 - January 4, 2017 x 5 FOODIE FOR THOUGHT Fantastic Flavors From Around the Globe Food Traditions that Ring in the New Year! by Kirsten Harrington Many Americans believe eating black-eyed peas on New Year’s Day brings good luck. something savory like fish and onions,” Evgenia said. Xuan Tian of Windermere recalls celebrating New Year’s Eve in her native China with firecrackers and a huge family dinner with meat, dumplings and vegetables. “Some families put a coin or peanut in the stuffing of the dumpling, and it is believed the people who get to eat that will be lucky in the new year.” Xuan continues the tradition now, gathering friends to make dumplings and watching the New Year’s Gala on Chinese television. Probably the best-known American tradition involves black-eyed peas. Some say they bring luck because they look like coins. Others believe the tradition dates back to the Civil War when all food crops were destroyed, except fields of black-eyed peas, which sustained the soldiers. Americans aren’t the only ones who embrace lucky legumes. In Brazil, lentils cooked with sausage are a popular New Year’s dish. “Every grain symbolizes how much money you will make next year,” explained Priscila Portugal of Brazil em Casa Emporio, a Brazilian grocery store and café in Ocoee. CONTINUED ON PAGE 6 Best Of Southwest 2016 W I N N E R PROPERTIES SW For Your Total Real Estate Needs ... www.BobbyBaldor.com Call Today! 407-342-6980 U.S. Marine Corps., Vet. Your Real Estate Hero Visit our site to download your free copy of our comprehensive Buyer's and Seller's guides, or to request a free home valuation! Bobby Baldor, P.A. ABR, CSP, FMS, GRI, REALTOR ® /BROKER ASSOCIATE