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ENGAGED COUPLES

FINANCIAL AND HEALTH MATTERS

FEBRUARY 2014


$2,399,000

$1,650,000

PENDING

FOX LANDING IN BOCA RATON $849,000

Fox Landing a gated community in the city limits of Boca Raton, Lake

front estate home with 5 Bedrooms, 3.5 baths and 3 car garage. Marble

thru-out split bedroom plan, updated kitchen with granite counter

tops, full back splash and under counter lighting; French doors

thru-out, accordion shutter; All Natural gas, house generator,hot water

heater and built in summer kitchen. Hurricane Garage doors. Open

pool and screened patio with beautiful lake views.

SOLD

$699,500

MAJESTIC GROVE IN PARKLAND $499,000

One of the last exclusive and prime locations in parkland; an enclave

of 6 custom, one acre plus home sites with 4 home sites remaining to

build your dream home; paved roads, city water and sewer and total

privacy. Surrounded by multimillion dollar estate properties on a cul du

sac and private street. Estate homes begin with a Minimum of 5000 fq

ft, and home sites starting at $499,000


The Promenade Mall - 4443 Lyons Rd #102, Coconut Creek, FL 33703 (954) 582-9888

City Place

700 S. Rosemary Ave, #208,

West Palm Beach

FL 33401

(561) 296-8881

Boynton Beach

8316 Jog Road

Boynton Beach

FL 33472

(561) 369-1788

Wellington

10240 Forest Hill Blvd, # 140

Wellington

FL 33414

(561) 296-8888

www.saitosteakhouse.com

Palm Beach Gardens

4675 P.G.A. Blvd

Palm Beach Gardens

FL 33418

(561) 202-6888

Boca Raton

8842 Glades Rd

Boca Raton

FL 33434

(561) 218-8788


2 FEBRUARY 2014


MORE THAN A

CLUB MEMBERSHIP,

Luxury for a Lifetime.

In your Premier playground, there’s plenty of time for

after-hours and weekend socializing at the Boca Beach

Club or deal-making on the golf courses or tennis

courts; spa afternoons, romantic dining to casual

family meals by your choice of pools; kite flying or

surf lessons on a 1/2 mile of pristine beach. You’ll only

find it all here at the Boca Raton Resort & Club and

Boca Beach Club, Waldorf Astoria ® Resorts.

To schedule your private tour, please contact

Premier Club Membership Sales at 561.447.3100.

501 EAST CAMINO REAL, BOCA RATON, FLORIDA 33432 TEL 561.447.3000 BOCARESORT.COM

the PARKLANDER 3


[ CONTRIBUTORS ]

SERVING: PARKLAND • CORAL SPRINGS

MARGATE • DELRAY BEACH • BOCA RATON

POMPANO • DEERFIELD BEACH • TAMARAC

PUBLISHERS

OFFICE MANAGER

OFFICE ASSISTANT

INTERNS

EDITOR

FOOD EDITOR

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Sharon and Jack Kornreich

Mattie Howard

April Miller

Rachel Carney, Joanna Zhuang

Candice Russell

Charles Marcanetti

Paula Glickman, Nancy Gonzalez,

Karen Silver, Fern Weissman

Stacy Angier, Jeffrey Bradley, Dr.

Howard Bush, David Duresky,

Jen Esposito, Mark King, Martin

Lenkowsky, Steven Marks, Sue

Merklin, Donice Muccio, Hon.

Michael Udine, Nancy Washor

®

Jack Bloomfield is the

co-founder and executive

director of One Planet United,

a non-profit humanitarian

organization that promotes

unity among all people.

Sheila & Bennet

Bodenstein have been

married for 49 years and

have been writing about

wine for 29 of those years.

Mark Bohm is an attorney

and freelance writer living

in Parkland.

George Faragi is Senior

Pastor of Cornerstone

Christian Center in

Boca Raton.

Elliot Goldenberg, an

award-winning journalist,

has written books on serious

topics such as espionage

and terrorism, and has been

featured on CNN.

Dr. Renae Lapin, LMFT

and author, provides free

counseling services to

children and families with

the Broward County School

Board.

Freelance writer/editor

Cynthia MacGregor

is the author of over 100

published books. She has

also worked as the editor

of magazines and books.

Charles Marcanetti has

been around the food

industry most of his life,

beginning with working in his

father’s restaurant. He enjoys

writing about food.

PGA Golf Instructor John

Nelson is the Director of Instruction

at the Country Club

of Coral Springs. He is in the

Hall of Fame and teacher of

the year.

Nancy Ouhib is a

registered dietitian who

lives with her family in

Parkland. She works in

Broward County Schools

with Fuel Up to Play 60.

9381 W. Sample Road, Suite 203,

Coral Springs, FL 33065

Phone: 954-755-9800 • Fax: 954-755-2082

E-mail: publisher@theparklander.com

Contact our writers at editor@theparklander.com

Copyright 2014 by Calliope Enterprises Corp. All rights

reserved by Calliope Enterprises Corp. All submissions

and published materials are the property of Calliope

Enterprises Corp. This publication may not be reproduced

in whole or in part without express written consent from

Calliope Enterprises Corp. The publishers reserve the

right to edit all submissions and to reject any advertising

or copy they regard as harmful to the publication’s

good or deemed to be libelous. The publishers are not

responsible for typographical errors, omissions or copy or

photos misrepresented by the advertiser. Liability shall

not exceed the cost of the portion of space occupied by such

error or advertising items or information.

the Parklander® is a monthly publication mailed or

distributed to homes and businesses in north Broward

County and south Palm Beach County.

Follow us on Facebook and Twitter!

the Parklander is

printed on recyclable

paper.

Bill Johnson is a freelance

writer. He semi-retired to

Coconut Creek after a career

as

a journalist and congressional

aide.

Dr. Glenn Kalick is the

owner of Brookside

Animal Hospital in

Coral Springs.

Victoria Landis is a

freelance writer and

artist living in West Boca.

MONTHLY

» GIVEAWAY

Cheryl Pangborn is

a Parkland resident

and the mother of two

elementary age children,

one with special needs.

Guillermo Salazar is

a master gardener with

degrees in environmental

horticulture and landscape

design. He is a certified

landscape inspector and a

certified ISA arborist.

David Volz has written for

many publications over the

last 25 years, including the

South Florida Sun-Sentinel,

Miami Herald and South

Florida CEO.

Our February giveaway is a darling

bejeweled elephant on a keychain,

part of a limited edition jewelry line

from St. Jude Children’s Research

Hospital. When the line was sold at

Ann Taylor, half of the purchase price was given to the hospital.

The retail price of the keychain is $29.50.

To win the giveaway, find the dollar

bill that looks like this somewhere other

than this page. Send an email, identifying

the page number with the dollar bill,

to editor@theparklander.com, including

your name, address, telephone number, and email address.

Please type “February Giveaway” in the subject line of your email.

One winner will be chosen at random.

Congratulations to Adria Minevich of Coral Springs, winner of

the Exfoliate Foaming Cleanser from Suki-Face.

4 FEBRUARY 2014


Lauderdale by the Sea

Leisure Towers

$249,999

• Ocean front condominium

with pool

• 2 bedrooms /

2 bathrooms

(2nd bedroom convertible)

• Well maintained building

& leasing is permitted

• Views of ocean & city

from balcony

Pelican Isles/Wyndham Lakes

Coral Springs

New Listing

Tall Pines • Parkland

$625,000

Pine Tree Estates • Parkland

$649,000

• 4 bedrooms/3 baths/3 car garage

• Covered Patio/ Open Pool

• Tile/ Laminate floors/ ¼ acre

• 42”upper kitchen cabinets/ granite tops

Cypress Trail • Parkland

$650,000

• 5 bedrooms /4 baths/3 car garage

• 3650 a/c sq ft/high ceilings/pool & spa

• Interior ½ acre estate/Fenced yard

• Triple bedroom split floor plan

Cypress Head • Parkland

New Listing

• 5 bedrooms/4 baths/2 half baths

• Over 3900 a/c sq ft /pool/ huge patio

• Expansive master suite + study

• Fireplace/Generator/Newer Roof

Whispering Woods • Coral Springs

$750,000

• Beautiful ¾ acre estate w/ 4 bedrooms/3.5 baths

• Split bedroom plan, volume ceilings, gas range

• Screened pool & huge covered patio w/ built in grill

• Lushly landscaped, next to community tennis court

Boca Raton • The Addision

$850,000

• Over 3800 a/c sq ft/ 4 car garage

• Wood burning Fireplace

• Wood kitchen cabinets

• Expansive patio & pool

Cypress Head • Parkland

1,249,000

• 1 acre estate w/ over 4600 a/c sq ft

• 5 bedrooms/ 4 bathrooms/ 3 car garage

• Newer roof, heated pool & spa, Generator

• Granite, crown moldings, fireplace, Summer kitchen

Pine Tree Estates • Parkland

1,700,000

• Direct ocean views & city views from master

• Over 2300 sq ft/ 2 bedrooms 2 bathrooms

• Onsite restaurant, fitness, 2 pools & pool bar

• Luxury building with lots of amenities!

• 5 bedrooms/5 baths/3 car garage

• 5479 a/c sq ft/ Casement windows

• Lakefront ¾ acre estate

• 2 Fireplaces/Marble floors

• 5 bedrooms/5.5 baths/4 car garage

• 1.09 acre estate/Elaborate pool/patio

• Media Room + game room

• Loaded with upgraded features

the PARKLANDER 5


Give the gift of a smile.

[ FROM THE EDITOR ]

February ushers in our annual focus on finances.

It’s getting close to April 15, the deadline

for federal taxes, so the gathering of documents

and calculations for business expenses,

among other things, have begun in many households.

A tax professional in our area, Mark King, has

written a fascinating breakdown of the options available

to people who haven’t paid their taxes.

But there is more to the financial picture than paying

taxes. We have stories exploring the real cost of divorce,

which can be prohibitively expensive, and Bitcoins, the

hot new currency that is not tied to any country. Planning

for retirement is always tricky, especially since

no one can predict what the stock market will do or

whether one’s job will be eliminated.

Pamela Rosen, MD, T.A.C.S.

PLASTIC

SURGERY

The Center For Medical Arts

8130 Royal Palm Blvd, Suite 204, Coral Springs

(SE Corner of Royal Palm/Riverside)

954-341-8907

Valentine's

Special

Save $75.00

for 1 syringe of Restylane

Save $150.00

for 2 syringes of Restylane

Lips

Get kissable

• Surgical & Non-Surgical Facial

Rejuvenation • Breast Enhancement

• Body Contouring

• Laser Skin Resurfacing & Hair Removal

• Juvederm • Restylane • Perlane

• Sculptra • Botox • Dysport • Latisse

Skin Care Products From

Obagi and Skin Medica

Are you a saver or a spender? There are advantages

and disadvantages, within limits, to both. Another financial

issue in families is teens and money. Cynthia

MacGregor asks the experts how to handle allowances,

money management, and jobs outside the home.

For the second month, medical matters is emphasized

in our pages. We have a wide range of stories, from the

myths of addiction to lessons from hospice patients.

February is American Heart Month and National Children’s

Dental Health Month, which our writers address.

Explaining the skinny-fat phenomenon is among other

topics tackled.

Synonymous with this month is Valentine’s Day and

everything lovely associated with it, like flowers and

chocolate. Humor writer Martin Lenkowsky gets personal

about what works as a good gift for his wife (hint:

it’s not flowers or lingerie), year after year. In her Mom’s

Perspective column, Cheryl Pangborn’s idea of romance

involves the eating of barbecue ribs with her husband as

a form of culinary indulgence. My Last Word column

deals with the pitfalls of online dating.

Continuing the theme of love, we celebrate the upcoming

nuptials of engaged couples who are planning the biggest

events of their lives. We wish them all the best.

— Candice Russell

954-341-8907

8130 Royal Palm Blvd, Suite 204

(SE Corner Of Royal Palm/Riverside)

www.pamelarosenmd.com


6 FEBRUARY 2014


the PARKLANDER 7


[ PA R K LAN D M AYO R MIC HAEL U DIN E ]

New Western Fire Station

And Brisk Home Sales

By now, everyone is back up to speed after

the holidays. It is hard to believe we

are already one month into 2014.

I am happy to report that we have officially

broken ground and started construction

on the new western fire station,

located north of Heron Bay in the wedge

area. It will help service the western portion

of the city.

This completes our fire stations in accordance with the expert

report we received a few years ago, discussing the location and

need for three stations to make sure response times are sufficient

and appropriate. We were able to construct this station with the

assistance of some wedge developers, in accordance with our

theory that development pays for development. This helps keep

our millage rate for existing residents as low as possible.

&

We look forward to the rapid and cost-effective completion of

this facility in the near future. Public safety is of paramount importance

to us as your

elected officials and all

of us try to do whatever

we can to make

sure residents have the

highest level of public

safety and public safety

professionals.

The school boundary

issue is progressing. At

this point, no children

who are currently in the

boundaries for a school

located in Parkland will

be moved outside of

I value your questions or

comments. Reach out and

“friend me,” if you want to

follow me on Facebook, or

look me up on Twitter (www.-

twitter.com/michaeludine),

if you want to follow my

updates. As always, if you

have any questions or concerns,

please email me at

MUdine@cityofparkland.org.

the city. The boundary process is always a difficult and emotional

one and we will always keep you informed. We continue to

work with Broward County School Board staff to try to provide

additional student stations.

We also continue to see the local real estate market push forward.

Sales of homes in Parkland are brisk. We continue to

actively monitor and demand that the building is in line with

Parkland’s high standards.

From the farmers’ markets, to our senior programs, teen groups,

and buddy programs, there truly is something for everyone. I

encourage people to frequently check our web site, www.cityofparkland.org,

for different events. There are so many activities

for Parkland residents of all ages.

8 FEBRUARY 2014


the PARKLANDER 9

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ACHIEVEMENTS

community

NEWS

EVENTS

The city of Parkland’s Farmers’ Market takes

place on February 2 and 16, from 9 a.m. to 1

p.m. Kids will enjoy a free bounce house and face

painting. Most vendors only accept cash at the

market, set for the Equestrian Center at 8350

Ranch Road.

Racquel Goldman

Racquel Goldman of Parkland leads the VolleyGirls promotional team for the

Delray Beach Open tennis program as a co-captain. The tournament takes place

from February 14 to 23 at the Delray Beach Stadium & Tennis Center in Delray Beach.

The city of Parkland city commission recently recognized the heroic actions of

Kenneth More, Timothy Whitman, Peter Glassberg, and Dr. Glen Meyers. On

September 26, they witnessed a person drive a car into a canal. They waded to the

sinking vehicle, pulled the unconscious driver to safety on the embankment, and

administered life-saving first aid.

The Rice family of Cooper City won a $1,000 drug prevention grant for Pioneer

Middle School and an iPad for their home, from the National Red Ribbon Photo

Contest, sponsored by the National Family Partnership. Noah Rice, a student, entered

the contest, which emphasizes the message of staying healthy by not using drugs.

Principal Ty Thompson and Eagle Regiment Director John Rusnak of Marjory

Stoneman Douglas High School extend congratulations to Rebecca Tutunick for

being selected as a merit winner in classical music and flute by the National YoungArts

Foundation. A total of five students from Broward County from more than 11,000

applicants nationwide were chosen.

More than $60,000 was raised for the Partners in Breast Health program at the

Holy Cross Dorothy Mangurian Comprehensive Women’s Center at Holy Cross

HealthPlex during the recent sixth annual This One’s for the Girls luncheon. It provides

women with mammograms.

The Unforgettable Prom Foundation, a non-profit organization providing a prom

experience for kids battling cancer, is partnering with three other non-profits for

a collaborative fundraising event. Called the L.O.V.E. Project (Las Olas Valentine’s

Extravaganza), it will take place on February 10 at Timpano Italian Chophouse on Las

Olas Boulevard in Fort Lauderdale.

Beginners and advanced players are welcome

to adult outdoor bocce ball on Tuesday,

February 4, from 10 to 11:30 a.m., in Pine Trails

Park, Field #5, Parkland. To register, call 954-757-

4142 or email Tammy Lustig at tlustig@-

cityofparkland.org.

The judging day for Parkland’s garden contest

is February 5, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Applications, found on the city web site, www.-

cityofparkland.org, are due by Monday, February

3. Contact Caitlin Crossin for more information at

954-757-4113 or via email at ccrossin@-

cityofparkland.org.

Parkland is sponsoring the Walkabouts

Walking Club on February 7 and 21 from 9

a.m. to 10 a.m., at Terramar Park, 6575 NW 75th

Drive. It is open for anyone age 21 and older.

Participants may join from any time throughout the

seven-month program. To register, contact Tammy

Lustig at 954-757-4142 or via email at tlustig@-

cityofparkland.org.

See a free movie, Cloudy with a Chance of

Meatballs 2 (rated PG) on February 7, at 7

p.m. at Pine Trails Park, 10555 Trails End, in

Parkland.

The 57th Annual International Red Cross Ball

takes place on Friday, February 7, at The

Breakers in Palm Beach. Proceeds from the ball

will benefit the organization’s mission, to prevent

and alleviate human suffering in the face of

emergencies. Tickets start at $1,000. Contact

Jennifer Durant by telephone at 561-650-9105 or

via email at Jennifer.Durant@redcross.org.

Smooch Your Pooch is an event on Saturday,

February 8, from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m., to pamper

your dog at Barkland Dog Park, 9245 Ranch Road,

in Parkland. Vendors will sell products, including

pet food and accessories. To learn more or become

a vendor, contact Caitlin Crossin at 954-757-4113

or ccrossin@cityofparkland.org.

10 FEBRUARY 2014


EVENTS

The 5K Family Walk Challenge: Step Up for Education takes

place at 8:30 a.m. on February 8, with participants from Country

Hills and Coral Park Elementary Schools. It takes place at North

Community Park in Coral Springs. This event was created to bring

students an awareness of community, fitness, and the need to work

together to further education needs. For more information, email

Robyne at rowbyknee@gmail.com or Irene at irbrenner@gmail.com.

An AARP Driver’s Safety Program will be held from 9 a.m. to 3

p.m. on Saturday, February 14, at Parkland City Hall, 6600

University Drive. It is designed for drivers age 55 and older. It costs $15

for AARP members and $20 for non-members. Participants may receive

discounts on their car insurance. To register, call 954-757-4129 or

email gdougherty@cityofparkland.org.

Adult Open Lawn Croquet takes place on Wednesday, February

19, from 10 to 11:30 a.m. in Pine Tails Park on Field #2. Advance

registration is required; contact Tammy Lustig by phone at 954-757-

4142 or email at tlustig@cityofparkland.org.

Dr. Tara Solomon, a gynecologist and promoter of women’s

health, will be the guest speaker at the Parkland Woman’s Club

on Thursday, February 20, at 7 p.m. The location is the Cypresshead

Clubhouse. Contact Traci Sharf at 954-242-2392 for more information.

Parkland’s first-ever hoedown is scheduled for Friday, February

21, from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Parkland Equestrian Center, 8350

Ranch Road. Rope tricks, barrel racing, music, and bull riding are

available. This is a free event for Parkland residents, but registration is

required. Space is limited to the first 100 families registering online at

cityofparkland.org or at the Parks and Recreation Building at 10561

Trails End.

The Parkland Woman’s Club will present the Great Treasure Sale

on February 22, from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., at the Parkland

Equestrian Center, 8350 Ranch Road. Reserve a spot for $40 and sell

your goods. Call Cindy at 954-663-6391 or email at parklandwc@-

gmail.com.

Boomer Impact Day targets Parkland residents born between

1946 and 1964. It will be held on Saturday, February 22, from 9

to 11 a.m. The event will feature a keynote speaker, breakfast, and an

introduction to the volunteer initiative.

Enjoy a performance of dueling pianos at Pine Trails Park

Amphitheater, 10555 Trails End, in Parkland, on February 22

from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Food trucks will arrive at 6 p.m. Bring lawn chairs

and blankets, but no alcohol.

The Humane Society of Broward County presents the annual

Walk for the Animals at Huizenga Plaza in downtown Fort

Lauderdale on Saturday, March 1. Registration takes place at 8 a.m.,

while the 1.25-mile walk (bring your dogs, but no cats) starts at 10 a.m.

Create a personal fundraising page at www.Walk4theAnimals.com,

and ask your friends and family to join you in reaching the non-profit

organization’s goal of $530,000.

“On the Road: Sotheby’s Appraisal Day at Florida Atlantic

University” takes place on Saturday, March 1, from 9 a.m. to 2:30

p.m. in the Boca Raton campus’ Live Oak Pavilion, 777 Glades Road.

Experts from American and European painting, European furniture, and

Chinese ceramics and works of art will be on hand to provide verbal

appraisals at $45 per item. For more information, call 561-297-2337.

Enjoy bingo on Thursday evenings with cash prizes at Temple

Beth Orr, 2151 Riverside Drive, in Coral Springs. Early bird

games will run from 6 to 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 954-753-

3232.

PICTURE YOUR COMPANY’S NAME

AT THE TOP OF A SIX-STORY BUILDING!!

One opportunity for building signage exists.

Your Company Name Here

Towers of Coral Springs

2825 & 2855 University Dr.

Coral Springs, FL 33065





Space available fr 850 sq ft to 10,000 sq ft

iate occupancy or

custo built suites are available.

Call For Details (954) 492-0101

Raintree Properties & Investments, Inc., Licensed Real Estate Broker.

the PARKLANDER 11


12 FEBRUARY 2014


the PARKLANDER 13


No other south Florida

magazine has better articles

than . . .

Intelligent people savor our stories,

from humor columns to health, from


different themes

each month.

“I have been advertising in the Coral

Springs-Parkland area for about six

years. I have tried just about everything

in the area. Recently, I have put

tracking numbers on several of my ads

and the Parklander clearly had two to

three times more response than the

others.”

—Ernie Bilodeau,

regional director of Club Z

Local businesses appreciate

the magazine, too!

Tammy and Peter Leeman of Absolute

Patio in Pompano Beach like the fact

that it is distributed in many different

places around the region.

“We love the response we have gotten

from the ads we have placed in the

Parklander magazine. Never have we

had such a great response. It is a

pleasure to work with them and the

especially wonderful sales

representative, Fern Weissman. Thanks,

“Parklander” magazine!

—Debra Altier of

A. Altier Jewelers in Coral Springs

NEW LISTING

FABULOUS WATER VIEW

NEW LISTING

CONTRACT IN 1 DAY

If you’re looking

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for a fulltime,

hands-on, results

oriented ed Realtor...

I LOVE THE LANDINGS $535,000 I LOVE THE LANDINGS $499,000

FANTASTIC WIDE & LONG LAKE VIEW! This 4 bed 3 bath pool home Immaculate 4 bed 3 bath home on interior corner lot and cul de

is a keeper. The Lot size is 13,487 sq. ft. (wow). It has Nearly 2700 sq.ft. sac location with a lot size of nearly 13,000 sq. ft. Upgrades

under air plus a 3 car garage, open pool, screened lanai & large paverdriveway.

The home has Volume ceilings throughout and is located on a

include: Complete upgraded kitchen, Newer Roof, Hurricane

cul de sac. The kitchen has been upgraded with White Wood Cabinetry.

accordions, newer A/C, upgraded laminate in all bedrooms,

New carpet in all bedrooms. The air conditioners are both newer & 18 Newer and extended Screen enclosure and more. This home

SEER. The owners have added Hurricane shutters as a complete set. is Approximately 2600 sq. ft. under air and has a large 2

Also, when built, the owners extended the footprint of the home by nearly car garage. Recently painted inside and out even the pool is

9 feet to back making 1 bedroom en suite with private bath and another

bedroom with pool access large enough to be a game room or in-law

pristine. This home is also a triple split floor plan. A favorite of

suite. Light and bright and immaculate as well. A Must See!

many buyers.

PENDING SALE

JUST SOLD

Call Kate,

today!

954-592-9311

katefontenot@bellsouth.net

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REGENCY LAKES $299,000

Wow What a price for a 4 bedroom 3.5 bath home in the Wonderful Regency

Lakes community of Eagle Cay. The owners have upgraded the kitchen with

pretty cherry cabinets and granite counters as well as back splash and new appliances.

All bedrooms are upstairs. There is a great private patio in the back and a

2 car garage that seems much larger. The home has approximately 2000 sq. ft.

under air and Hurricane accordions installed by current owners. A Must See!

MARVELOUS IN MEADOW RUN $460,000

Fantastic opportunity to own a 6 bedroom 4 bath 3 car garage pool

home in Parkland’s own Meadow Run. The home has approximately

3000 sq. ft. under air and a large screened lanai. Volume

ceilings throughout and a triple split floor plan . A favorite of many

buyers. Wow, This is It!

14 FEBRUARY 2014


Could you have a

ADVERTORIAL

Slow Metabolism?

BY KENNETH N. WOLINER, M.D., A.B.F.M.

“I was always skinny but … now I don’t even recognize

myself.” Jennifer pulled out some old college pictures from her purse. “See!

This is what I used to look like!”

I nodded empathetically, realizing that Jennifer couldn’t believe what

happened to her body, and she worried that no one else would believe it either.

“You looked pretty athletic. Let me guess, tennis?”

“I was varsity at Radcliffe. I still play six days a week.”

Jennifer continued, “Anyhow, you wouldn’t know it from looking at me.

Ever since I had David eleven years ago, I’ve been gaining almost ten pounds

every year.”

“Hmmm, your symptoms sound a lot like POSTPARTUM HASHIMOTO’S

THYROIDITIS, where something related to pregnancy causes women to need

more thyroid hormones than they can make on their own [1]”.

“They actually tested me for that. My doctors always told me my tests

were normal.”

“There is a difference in having labs ‘in the reference range’ and having

an ‘optimal thyroid state’. Dr. Leslie DeGroot, of Brown’s Alpert Medical School,

described the ‘Dangerous Dogmas in Medicine’ as they relate to treatment of

thyroid disorders [2]. Unfortunately, there are quite a few doctors out there

that rely highly upon the gospel they were taught twenty years ago, without

paying enough attention to new data, or their patient’s clinical symptoms.”

I continued taking my history. “So what have you tried to lose weight?”

“My diet was always pretty clean, so even when I tried going ‘low-carb’ or

‘low-fat’, it didn’t seem to make any difference. One health spa in Brazil cut me

down to 300 Calories a day and had me exercise all day. I didn’t lose a pound!”

Jennifer blushed a bit, “I’m ashamed to admit it, but I fall for whatever the latest

diet fad that promises ’30 pounds in 30 days!’ [3]”

“I’m glad you’ve realized that these bogus diet clinics should really say, ‘I

lost $350 in two weeks! Ask me how!’ [4]”

“It was worse than that. One diet clinic sold me ‘vitamin supplements’

from their office pharmacy, but they really contained amphetamines, diuretics,

laxatives, and other stuff I still don’t know what was in them. I had the worst

palpitations, headaches and I couldn’t sleep through the night [5]. My primary

had to put me on anti-depressants for six months to handle the withdrawal

symptoms after I stopped them.”

“I’m glad you survived that ordeal, but honestly, you got off lucky. Crash

diets are known to cause hair loss (sometimes permanent), muscle weakness,

and potentially fatal heart arrhythmias [6]. The latest diet craze, the ‘HCG Diet’,

is nothing new; it was debunked back in the 1970’s as a fraudulent scheme

by doctors to exploit their patients for financial gain [7]. Just last October,

the Texas Attorney General forced hCG clinics in that state to stop defrauding

patients with their unethical marketing tactics [8].”

“Well, I’ve finally decided to make my health a priority. I checked you out

on www.vitals.com, so I know you are board-certified and legit. So what are

you going to do for me?”

“I scheduled 80-minutes with you today, so I have plenty of time to do a

complete history and physical exam. There are some tests I would like done to

pin down exactly what is going on with your metabolism. Untreated thyroid

disorders can lead to pre-diabetes, and that can also lead to weight gain [9].”

Jennifer did test positive for hypothyroidism and insulin resistance, as

well as a low metabolic rate measured by indirect calorimetry [10]. After being

put on a regimen of behavior changes, diet, exercise, OTC supplements, and

prescription medications, steadily, but surely, her weight decreased an average

of two pounds per week until she lost the 60 pounds she put on over the last

ten years.

“Dr. Woliner, ever since you fixed my metabolism, I’m not hungry anymore.

Really, I don’t even feel like I’m on a diet. I just eat normally.”

“I’ve finally decided to

make my health a priority.”

REFERENCES:

1. Galofré JC, et al. Increased postpartum thyroxine replacement in

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. Thyroid. 2010 Aug;20(8):901-8.

2. De Groot LJ. Dangerous dogmas in medicine: the nonthyroidal illness

syndrome. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1999 Jan;84(1):151-64.

3. I’m confused by the numbers of fad diets available that tout great

weight loss. Are there any basic, simple weight loss strategies I can fol

low? Duke Med Health News. 2011 Jul;17(7):8.

4. Federal Trade Commission. “Red Flag Bogus Weight Loss Claims” Wash

ington DC. 2003. http://www.ahpa.org/Portals/0/pdfs/03_FTC_Media

%20Guide_redflag.pdf

5. Smith BR, Cohen PA. Dependence on the Brazilian diet pill: a case re

port. Am J Addict. 2010 May-Jun;19(3):291-2.

6. Goette DK, Odom RB. Alopecia in crash dieters. JAMA. 1976 Jun

14;235(24):2622-3.

7. Robb-Nicholson C. By the way, doctor. I’ve been trying to lose weight

for a long time and nothing seems to work. What do you know about

the HCG diet? Harv Womens Health Watch. 2010 May;17(9):8.

8. Texas Attorney General. Multiple Texas Weight-Loss Clinics Agree To

Stop Marketing Prescription Drugs Improperly. October 27, 2011.

https://www.oag.state.tx.us/oagnews/release.php?id=3883

9. Liu C, Scherbaum WA, Schott M, Schinner S. Subclinical hypothy

roidism and the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome. Horm Metab

Res. 2011 Jun;43(6):417-21.

10. Perseghin G. Pathogenesis of obesity and diabetes

mellitus: insights provided by indirect calorimetry in humans.

Acta Diabetol. 2001;38(1):7-21.

Dr. Kenneth Woliner is a board-certified

family physician in private practice in Boca

Raton. He can be reached at 9325

Glades Road, #104, Boca Raton, FL, 33434;

561-314-0950;

cornell.edu; www.holisticfamilymed.com


[ ENGAGED COUPLES ]

A

summer stint working at the Jackson Lake Lodge in Moran, Wyoming

brought Elizabeth Ann Leinster and Devin Blann together.

They were friends for six months before starting to date. Two years

passed from the time they met to Devin’s proposal, which he planned on

the beach with her friend filming the big moment. There was a heart drawn

in the sand.

“I blacked out, cried, and shook the whole time,” said Elizabeth.Their courtship

involved lots of traveling, cooking, bar crawls, trying new foods, water

activities, movies, and “attempting to garden,” says Elizabeth, admitting that

both she and Devin have brown, rather than green, thumbs.

The Addison is the site of their wedding under the old banyan trees. The

Christian contemporary ceremony will be officiated by Reverend Jones. “We

went with neutral colors (champagne, ivories, and golds) with pops of pink

for spring,” says Elizabeth. “My personality is classic and timeless.”

Elizabeth Ann Leinster & Devin Blann

Wedding date: April 27, 2014

The reception is also at the Addison, followed by dancing. The couple is

registered at Kohl’s, Walmart, and Target because they are national and offer

free shipping options. Gifts for bridesmaids include pearl earrings and

personalized flip-flops, given at the bachelorette party in the Bahamas, eye

shadow for the big day, and a framed picture of all six women. Groomsmen

will receive personalized flasks and mugs.

Elizabeth, an in-house marketing coordinator at Wyndham Palm Aire in

Pompano Beach, and Devin, a front office manager at the Trump International

in Sunny Isles, plan to move to Orlando, where they will eventually

have and raise their children. But first comes their honeymoon - a group

tour throughout Asia.

16 FEBRUARY 2014


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the PARKLANDER 17


[ ENGAGED COUPLES ]

The online dating site OkCupid united Aubrie Judka and Jeremiah Rose.

Their relationship built slowly, from emails, to texts, then talking – all before

meeting in person at a restaurant in Pompano Beach. Afterward, they

walked miles on the beach, talking, and ended the night with a kiss.

They moved in together after seven months. After a year of dating, Jeremiah

popped the question, by dropping to one knee on the beach. His six-year-old son,

Dylan, seemed to know that the proposal or something big was in the works and

blurted out earlier that day, “I think you’re going to get married tonight.”

Their dating activities include cooking dinner together, watching favorite TV

shows, and playing endless hours of their favorite game, Phase 10. On weekends,

the couple would go to the beach, spend time with family, and go to the park

with Dylan.

A summer wedding is planned at Skyview Golf Club in Sparta, New Jersey,

since both of their families are from the New Jersey and Staten Island area. Aubrie

found this perfect venue, which will also host the reception, in one day. It

has floor-to-ceiling glass doors, a beautiful open covered patio overlooking the

mountains, and an outdoor gazebo for the ceremony. To echo the tropical Florida

wedding they wanted, Aubrie and Jeremiah will use tropical colors – bright purple,

orange, and turquoise.

Aubrie Judka & Jeremiah Rose

Wedding date: August 30, 2014

The couple is registered at Bed Bath and Beyond. “The two of us both had fully

furnished places before we moved in together, so we don’t need much,” Aubrie said.

Though they haven’t decided on a honeymoon destination, they are seeking an allinclusive

resort, perhaps in Hawaii or Jamaica. This trip will be taken six months

or a year after they wed. Aubrie, a photographer, and Jeremiah, a manager at a

world-wide call center, rent a town home in Delray Beach, but hope to buy their

own home in a couple of years.

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the PARKLANDER 19


[ VALENTINE’S DAY ]

What Should Men

Buy Women?

There’s Only One Answer

pure milk chocolate. It was also filled with little chocolate

truffles.

When she woke up in the morning, it was already on the

kitchen table wrapped in red cellophane, awaiting her arrival. It

was all she had for dinner when she got home from work that

evening, with, of course, some of her favorite cabernet. I admit

that I helped her eat some of her chocolate shoe.

By Martin Lenkowsky

Buying the right Valentine’s Day gift should be considered

nothing less than an art form. Selecting that special present for

your wife or girlfriend takes time and practice to bring it to

perfection. (And you thought Michelangelo had it hard painting

the Sistine Chapel ceiling?)

After years and years and many tries and efforts, I finally figured

it out. Attention, all my fellow members of the male species.

The only word to know for this holiday is chocolate.

Buying the sugary shoe from a local chocolatier was fun, too. I

even got to sample a few of the store’s specialty items. The shoe

itself was already molded into a woman’s size 6. When I asked

the store owner if she could, perhaps, personalize it and mold

one to my wife’s size 9, she said, “Yes, but it will cost thirty more

dollars.”

We won’t go there, either. Suffice it to say, I thought that was

funnier than my wife did.

Overpriced Valentine’s Day dinners are nice, as are flowers and

bottles of fine wine. In years past, I’ve also made a few trips to

Victoria’s Secret for some burning hot lingerie. But who was I

kidding? Those gifts were for my gratification, as much as my

wife’s. Gentlemen, take heed -- the ultimate magic word for

Valentine’s Day is chocolate. Women go absolutely wild for

scrumptious chocolate.

In order to show some originality every year, I heartily recommend

a simple change in the chocolate scenery. One year

chocolate roses might work. Then, the following year, try a

pretty glass dish filled with chocolate placed on her pillow

when she’s ready for bed.

Last February, I went out and bought my wife a highheeled

shoe (private joke; let’s not go there) made out of

20

2 FEBRUARY JANUARY 2014


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the PARKLANDER 21


[ PEOPLE WATCHING ]

Connor Yockus

Connor Yockus of Coral

Springs, who attends the

North Broward Preparatory

School, is a National

YoungArts Foundation

Finalist in Tap Dance and

Merit Winner in Dance

Choreography. Out of approximately

11,000 applications

from students in

ten disciplines across the

literary, performing, visual

and design arts fields,

Yockus has been recognized

for his outstanding

work and accomplishments.

Of 687 winners

from 46 states, 171 finalists

from across the nation came together for the 33rd

Annual YoungArts Week in Miami early last month.

Bastian Weiss, a gifted student

at Heron Heights Elementary

School, attended

the national grade chess

championship in Lake

Buena Vista, Florida. He

received first place for the

under thousand rating in his

division. He has been playing

local and district chess

for the past three years. This

was Bastian’s first national

tournament.

Bastian Weiss

Pictured, from left to right: Travis Burton, a foundation

board member and vice-president of business development;

Lauren Bendesky, Winterfest Boat Parade junior

captain; Karin Burton, a volunteer; Amanda and Michael

Burton, volunteers; and Juliet Roulhac, Florida Power

and Light regional manager of external affairs, aboard

the Carrie B during the 2013 Winterfest Boat Parade.

Parkland Pokers

The 11U Parkland Pokers keep rolling over the

competition. The team of local young men, playing

together the past few seasons, play in the highly

competitive Premier Majors League. The Parkland

Pokers are a three-time Florida Premier Travel

Baseball Division Champion. Last season, the Pokers

entered five tournaments, making the finals in

all five, losing two in extra innings, and winning

the last three. In the last tournament of the season,

the team took the championship, playing up an age

division and competing with 12U travel teams.

The Unforgettable Prom Foundation, a 501©3 nonprofit

organization, was created to provide the ultimate

high school prom experience for kids battling

cancer who are unable to attend their own proms. A

Prom to Remember takes place every May. This year’s

event is scheduled for May 9 at the Ritz Carlton in

Fort Lauderdale. On December 14, the foundation’s

Fort Lauderdale chapter hosted its annual boat parade

party, during the Winterfest Boat Parade at a

private residence on the Intracoastal Waterway. Three

hundred party guests cheered on the parade’s Junior

Captain, Lauren Bendesky, a cancer patient, who also

attended a past Prom to Remember. The event raised

$7,000 that will go toward the prom.

22 FEBRUARY 2014


[ FINANCIAL AFFAIRS ]

Money - it’s a problem bedeviling nearly everyone. There is a balance

to be struck between the desire to spend (on clothes, cars, vacations and

dining out) and the necessity to save for the future.

IN THIS SECTION

As the tax season looms, the Parklander

takes a hard look at a number

of issues facing families. A tax

expert addresses the thorniness of

not paying federal taxes. Those

in default do have options and

hope. The same is true for couples

contemplating divorce. Whether

they opt for a peaceful mediation, a

reconciliation or a dissolution of their

union, knowing what works best is a form of

power.

How much should teens learn about money?

Bitcoins may not be in your personal portfolio, but

they are certainly a hot topic in the media. We also look

at retirement and how to reach that stage of life in comfort.

Planning ahead and setting money aside throughout one’s

working life will ease the path to not working any longer.

24 – TAX PROBLEMS: Not paying

the IRS can have serious

consequences.

26 – THE COST OF DIVORCE:

Think of more than lawyers’

fees when dissolving a marriage.

28 – SAVERS AND SPENDERS:

Take hold of your habits and

create wealth.

30 – RETIREMENT: Invest early in

life for big rewards later.

32 – BITCOINS: Learn about the hot

new digital currency.

34 – TEENS AND MONEY: Parents

can help children sort out jobs,

credit cards, and allowances.

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the PARKLANDER 23


[ FINANCIAL AFFAIRS ]

Unfiled

Delinquent

By Mark King, E.A.

Tax Returns

How to Settle Them

Did you know that unfiled tax returns are a criminal offense, one that

is punishable by one year in jail for every unfiled tax year? The same

punishment applies to willful failure to pay, or when the taxpayer

consistently files returns, but has a pattern of non-payment.

At first, you may receive notices to the effect that you must file your

return immediately to avoid penalty. In some cases, the IRS may

even file a Substitute for Return, or SFR, for you, only without any

of the credit, deductions, or exemptions to which you are entitled. In

other words, you’ll be paying a higher tax amount than you would

have otherwise.

Be proactive and handle your tax situation before the IRS resorts to

the SFR stage.

Turn to professionals for help. Enrolled agents are federally authorized

tax practitioners who have demonstrated technical competence

in tax law. They are the only taxpayer representatives licensed to practice

by the U.S. government.

24 FEBRUARY 2014

Here are the five basic ways to settle your tax debt:

1. Payment in Full - The best way to avoid any penalties, fees or tax

complications is, of course, to pay your bill in full, as soon as you are able.

2. Installment Plan - Try to negotiate a realistic payment plan that

works within your budget or your company’s budget.

3. Offer-in-Compromise - You may qualify for an Offer-in-Compromise

(OIC), where you pay the IRS an amount less than 100 percent

on the dollar, but as much as it otherwise would stand to collect. IRS

Offer Examiners are now permitted to consider a taxpayer’s current

and future income potential when evaluating these types of offers.

OICs are not granted freely.

4. Declare Bankruptcy - There are many different types of bankruptcy

filings. A reputable bankruptcy attorney will be able to inform you

about how much debt can be discharged and how these measures

will affect your credit record.

5. Declare as Currently Uncollectible – When your debt is declared

currently uncollectible, the IRS will temporarily stop all collection

measures. You may still have to pay your tax bill, eventually, when

your economic situation improves. The IRS will review your case in

18 months, to evaluate how your financial situation has changed.

Don’t let another day of fees or penalties accrue.

Mark King, EA, is the President of Tax Advisors, Inc., in Boca Raton. He

is an enrolled agent with over 35 years’ experience in helping taxpayers

with their IRS problems.


CYPRESSHEAD • PARKLAND

Boasting a lakefront, cul-de-sac location, this 6BR/4.5

BA/3CG .94 acre estate defines contemporary elegance!

With 6587 sq. ft. A/C, the home includes: 30’ x 37’ recreation

room and 27’ x 15’ gym! Upgrades incl: Jerusalem stone

floors, coral fireplace, wet bar, impact glass, etc. Exquisite

pool, patio & spa! $1,150,000. MOTIVATED SELLER.

CYPRESSHEAD • PARKLAND

This lakefront acre estate offers over 4000 square feet of

elegant living space, with 5 BR/3.5 BA/3CG. Outstanding

features incl: upgraded kitchen w/ granite, mahogany

& stainless steel; 24” marble floors; fireplace, wetbar

& crown molding; exquisite screened pool & patio,

overlooking 62 acre lake! $899,000

PARKLAND ESTATES • PARKLAND

Situated on 1/3 acre, this 5 BR/3 BA/3 CG home has been

completely renovated and boasts granite & stainless steel

in kitchen; marble and wood floors throughout; butler’s

pantry with wine cooler; split bedroom plan; gorgeous

pool & built-in Jacuzzi; spacious covered patio; and

impact glass windows! $769,000

CYPRESSHEAD • PARKLAND

Lakefront, cul-de-sac location, .7 acre estate offers 5

BR/3.5BA/3CG with 4051 sq. ft. a/c. Split bedroom planchildren’s

wing with two full baths. Extras incl: fireplace,

wetbar, & recreation/game room. New roof in 2006!

Pretty pool/patio and gorgeous, custom built outdoor

kitchen. $749,999

MEADOW RUN • PARKLAND

This 5 BR/ 3 BA/ 3 car garage home boasts a magnificent

waterfront location and is nicely tucked into lovely

guardgate community. Offering 3300 square feet under

air, the home has been extensively remodeled, including

stunning hardwood floors in master suite and dining area.

Oversized, screen-enclosed pool. $695,000

BROOKSIDE GROVE • CORAL SPRINGS

Lakefront, cul-de-sac location, this .36 acre estate

offers 5 BR/3BA/3CG & 3630 sq. ft. A/C! Desirable

features incl: 3-way split w/ separate guest suite &

private entrance; spacious kitchen w/ granite; newer

roof, circular drive, large deck & shutters; and freeform

pool w/spa. $649,999

HIDDEN HAMMOCKS ESTATES • CORAL SPRINGS

With a spectacular lake view, this 5 BR /3.5 BA /3 car

garage home is located within guard-gated community.

No expense has been spared remodeling, including top of

the line new kitchen with granite & stainless steel; brand

new floors throughout; California closets in every BR;

hurricane screens & saline pool. $499,000

NORTH SPRINGS • CORAL SPRINGS

Hurry! This completely remodeled home will not last!

Offers 4BR/2.5BA and a huge 29’ x 17’ game room. New

kitchen w/wood & granite; wood-look floors in bedrooms;

Stunning, remodeled bathrooms! Huge MBR w/custom

closets. New roof ‘06, hurricane shutters & pool fence.

Stunning pool! $438,000

CYPRESS CAY • PARKLAND

This spacious, bright 2-story 5 BR/4 BA home is located

in guard gated community on large corner lot. The master

suite is located on the ground floor as well as #2 bedroom.

Low maintenance fee includes pool, tennis and lawn

maintenance. This home needs TLC and is a great

opportunity for a handyman. $379,000

SABLE PASS • BOCA RATON

Just reduced $15K, this home will go fast! Offering

3BR / 2.5 BA, this 2-story home includes a loft which

can easily convert to #4 bedroom. Master suite is

located on the first floor. Situated on one of the larger

lots in gated community, this is affordable, desirable

Parkland! $375,000

BOCA BAYOU • BOCA RATON

This totally upgraded 2 BR/2BA condo has it all...including

a deeded dock! Everything has been upgraded-floor to

ceiling: bathrooms, kitchen, moldings, floors, etc. Enjoy

the split BR plan, eat-in kitchen & large family area.

6 comm. pools, tennis, gate, etc. Quick boat ride to

Hillsboro inlet. $225,000

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FAIRWAY VIEWS • MARGATE

Stunning 3 BR/2 BA villa in desirable Fairway

Views! Immaculate unit offers: split bedroom plan,

1-car garage, vaulted ceilings, screen-enclosed

patio and walk-in closet. This preferred corner unit

is situated on beautiful Carolina Country Club golf

course. $189,900

the PARKLANDER 25


[ FINANCIAL AFFAIRS ]

The Real Price of Divorce

Consider Your Options

By Shari Lynn Rothstein-Kramer

You can’t live with ’em, you can’t live without ’em. Why? Because the

cost of divorcing your significant other is sometimes so expensive

that people can’t, don’t, or won’t spend the money to do so.

It sounds crazy, but it’s true. Taking back one’s independence comes

at a high price. Between lawyer’s fees, alimony, child support, and

assets, the more you collectively have, the worse it is to want out. So,

what’s a miserable couple to do?

It depends on who’s unhappy. If both parties are looking to get

out of a failing marriage and the divorce is uncontested, the procedure

is relatively quick and as painless as possible. But, unfortunately,

more often than not, that’s not the way it happens. By the

time a person reaches the point that he or she wants to officially

split, it’s often too late for civility.

And the more hostile the

process gets, the more expensive

it gets.

“A divorce can cost anywhere

from $3,500 to $35,000,”

explains Laura Schantz, one

of the partners at Schantz &

Schantz, a Broward County

law firm that specializes in

divorce and family law. “Fees

depend on many things – the

number of issues to be ironed

out, alimony, child support, custody,

the splitting of assets and

more – but mostly on the complexity

of the overall divorce.”

While there’s no average number

of hours spent to legally dissolve

a marriage, most divorces last ap-

proximately six months to one

year. During that time, each party will look for any and all ways to

infuriate the other. “The more issues, the more money,” Schantz continues.

“That’s just the way it is. Law firms generally bill by the hour.

Our fees are based on need and the ability to pay, so while there is a

retainer, who earns more money picks up the tab. After all, everyone

has the right to counsel.”

According to Scott Brook, P.A., who practices family law in Coral

Springs, an uncontested divorce can cost as little as $2,000. “It can

also cost over $1 million for high-end litigation that is complex with

a lot of assets involved,” he says. “More typical is the moderately litigated

case with time-sharing of the children. Every case is different.

I typically don’t give a quote for a retainer.”

Divorce occurs for so many reasons. Historically, cheating, abuse

(mental or physical), or falling out of love were frequent culprits.

And now? “Facebook is a major factor,” says Schantz. “People are

looking to rekindle old flames and they are finding them via social

media. Next is living longer. People get married and, because they are

living longer, it’s difficult to stay married to the same person for so

long. There is also an increase in violence because people stay around

longer than they should.”

The rise and fall of the economy affects divorce. According to

Schantz, when times are tough, people stay, even if they’re unhappy:

“They simply can’t afford to go. With the economy coming back,

people are now able to leave.”

Brook says that the poor economy

used

to be the reason to postpone

divorce for unhappy couples a

year or two ago, but not so much

these days. “Now it’s a mat-

ter for some that they can’t afford

NOT to get a divorce,” he

says. “When the issues are so

huge, the attempt to live a lie

for the children’s sake takes a

toll. Some people are even borrowing

from their parents to

finance a divorce.”

Why hire an attorney and not

a mediator? “I thought I’d get

a better deal if I went with a

mediator,” a friend of mine

told me. “What I learned

was that, on average, he was

about the same price, but he

couldn’t do as much. Since my divorce

was not amicable, (hiring the mediator) was dumb. He couldn’t even

give me legal advice and it cost me plenty. In the end, I hired an attorney

(at close to $400 an hour) anyway.”

There is an alternative. A divorcing couple can minimize the costs

of a divorce. “I strongly suggest a collaborative legal resolution,” says

Brook. “If the parties can’t be amicable, hire lawyers who are only

willing to reach mediation and will not litigate the remaining issues.

The focus is on compromise.”

The next time divorce comes into the picture, think about your options.

If you cannot work out your differences, go for the marital

dissolution, because taking someone for all they’re worth might be

more obtainable than you think.

26 FEBRUARY 2014


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the PARKLANDER 27


[ FINANCIAL AFFAIRS ]

Savers and Spenders

Which are You?

By Cynthia MacGregor

Are you a saver or a spender? How do you think you got

that way? Have you changed your spending habits since the

recession? If married or co-habitating, is your spouse or

significant other a saver or spender? If he/she is the opposite

of you, how does this dichotomy play out for the two of you?

The Parklander consulted financial experts on the evercompelling

subject of money.

Phil Fremont-Smith, founder/CEO of ImpulseSave (https://-

impulsesave.com), counsels, “Go on a savings spree.”

He says that 53 percent of Americans won’t have

enough to retire and 64 percent of Americans don’t

have even $1,000 in their savings account. Only

40 percent of Americans actually sit down with a

budget and allocate savings. Fremont-Smith says,

“People want to save money. People love to save

money. So, why are they so bad at it?”

People can become savers “by making the option of

saving money just as impulsive and instantly

gratifying as spending it and by actually using the

same marketing tools that retailers depend on

to pick our pockets, but to put cash in

your account rather than taking

it out. Our users are now saving

over $3,000 per year.”

But how do people get to be spenders

or savers? Judi Cinéas, LCSW, Ph.D, is a

psychotherapist practicing in Palm Beach and an author of

several books. She says, “How an individual will come to view

and deal with money will depend largely from the money

lessons that they got in their home of origin and how they

interpret these in their current situation.

“For example, a child who grew up in a home where the

parents struggled to provide for them may grow up to be a

penny pincher who needs to be convinced to spend every

dime, because that child picked up the message that money

is not guaranteed and that he needs to save to prevent having

to re-live these struggles. On the other hand, a child whose

parents did not have enough to provide for the family may

also grow up to spend frivolously, because he is making up

for the times when he did not have.

“Children who come from families where money is available also

get different messages. One may be taught that money is there to

spend, while the other is taught to save and invest to insure it will

be there in the future.”

Noah B. Rosenfarb, CPA and Personal CFO/Holistic Wealth

Coach, from Parkland, talks about what happens when a saver

marries a spender. “One of the most common reasons

cited for divorce is conflict around money,” he says. “If

savers and spenders don’t reconcile and agree upon a

life-long strategy that works for their relationship,

there is constant financial stress.”

Dr. Cinélas agrees: “When couples with different

financial views become involved, this can become

problematic, if they do not learn to adapt. There is a

middle of the road where they can happily exist. Both

parties will need to teach each other the value of their

side. The savers can learn to live a little and splurge once

in a while, and the spenders can learn, too, that some

money needs to be set aside to secure future

spending.

“If they don’t have a plan

that both parties agree

and adhere to, then finances

can become a strain on the

relationship. When they are working

together, the saver knows how spending and even splurging a

little helps the relationship, and the spender can also share that

view of saving for the sake of the future of their relationship.

“The recession has made people much more aware of the

finiteness of money. I have seen that both spenders and savers

have been sent to more extremes of their behaviors. The fear of

money not being there has increased for many people who were

savers, while others have jumped off that wagon and become

spenders, seeing that their efforts at being fiscally responsible

did not completely shield them.

“For many spenders, there was a reality faced in seeing

that the flow of money they are used to can go away, which

has caused them to begin to look at saving differently. Still

28 FEBRUARY 2014


other spenders found the recession to be a justification of their

behavior and reinforced that ‘enjoy it while it lasts’ mentality.”

South Floridian Steve Siebold, the author of How Rich People

Think, says the recession got people to start looking at money

more in terms of fear and scarcity, instead of from the point

of view of freedom, abundance, opportunity, and possibility.

“While saving is good, the real answer is to focus on earning,”

says Siebold. “What good is saving, if you’re only earning

$30,000 a year? It will take you forever to get rich.”

He adds, “Spending isn’t necessarily a bad thing, but don’t

spend money on pointless things.”

Apart from the effects of the recession, how do spenders turn

into savers? Ken Rupert, author, strategic life coach, and financial

mentor in Hampstead, Maryland, tells us, “When the pain of a

specific activity outweighs the pleasure associated with that

activity, behavior will change. A spender will become a

saver when the pain associated with not saving begins

to eclipse the pleasure associated with spending.”

Elle Kaplan of New York City is the CEO

and founding partner of Lexion Capital

Management. She advises, “If one partner is

a spender and one is a saver, devise a plan to

make both people comfortable.

It can be hard to talk

openly about

money,

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absolutely

essential to ensure

that both people

are on the same

page. You need to

reach a balance that will

work for both of you and

is a good strategy for your

financial needs and goals.”

There will always be spenders, always

be savers, and always be couples

trying to find a middle ground. Those

people not in a relationship will have

to navigate financial waters on their

own, without the balance provided

by a partner. It will be interesting to

see how many newly converted savers

from the recession will revert to their

former spending ways. P

the PARKLANDER 29


[ FINANCIAL AFFAIRS ]

By David Volz

RETIREMENT PLANNING

ESSENTIAL FOR THE FUTURE

Retirement is coming. And, for those who are approaching

middle age, it is fast approaching. Working people need to plan

for retirement. They need to establish a disciplined savings plan

and make sound investments during their working years.

Years ago, most people would retire around age 65 and live into

their seventies. Now, people retire in their early 60s and may

live into their nineties. People need to plan for a much longer

retirement, perhaps even as long as they worked. A retirement

that can last for around 30 years may require a person to have

saved $1 million or more.

Usually, when people leave the workforce, they are no longer supporting

children and may choose a smaller home. They may want

to travel and pursue hobbies, but their overall expenses will decline.

“Younger people need to plan for retirement and start saving

early,” said Peter Weitz, a Senior Vice President of Investments

for Fusion Analytics Investment Partners in Coral Springs.

He offers one easy way to save -- give up Starbucks coffee. Or

if you have another indulgence, like candy bars from the office

vending machine, try to quit the sugar habit.

Arthur B. Barzilay, Managing Director - Wealth Management and

Wealth Management Advisor at Merrill Lynch in Coral Springs,

said, “With advances in technology and medicine, Americans are

living longer. According to the Social Security web site, the average

life expectancy for a man turning 65 today is 83, and for a woman,

it is 85. This is an optimal time to meet with a financial advisor

who can assist in building a diversified portfolio designed to help

provide for long-term growth, while keeping pace with inflation.

Do not forget to budget for increasing health care costs.”

It is very important for younger people to invest aggressively

and be willing to accept the risks associated with the stock market.

Weitz said, “A younger person has time. And, while you can

lose money in the stock market, over time, people who invest in

the stock market will do well. It is important to have a diverse

stock portfolio.”

Those who work for companies with 401K plans should invest

as much as possible in them. This will pay off in the end. People

should prepare for major expenses or setbacks in life. Those who

have children will have to factor in paying for college, while

also planning for retirement. They should buy a Florida Prepaid

College Plan.

People in their 40s and 50s should be investing systematically

and saving for their retirement. “This is like paying yourself,”

said Weitz. “When receiving your paycheck, put some aside in

your savings account.”

One problem Weitz sees is that people are afraid to lose money:

“There is a strong aversion to loss. People are still reeling from

the 2008 recession and they talk about how bad the economy

is. The stock market has recovered more than 100 percent, but

people are scared and want to hold onto their money.”

The earlier a person or married couple can begin saving for retirement,

the better, according to Cecelia Darden, a Certified Financial

Planner and chartered retirement planning counselor in

Coral Springs. She operates an Ameriprise Financial franchise.

Darden said, “People should have a diversified portfolio with a

number of different investments. An individual should know

their risk tolerance. People who work for companies with

a 401K plan should participate. This is one of the best ways

people can accumulate money for retirement income, so when

they quit, they will have money for the rest of their lives. Some

employers match a percentage of employee contributions.”

Younger to middle-aged people should make a strong commitment

to saving for retirement. They should have an arrangement

with money taken out of their checking account

every 30 days and put into a retirement savings account, such

as a Roth IRA. “People really need to save for their retirement

and have a separate retirement account,” said Darden.

“This account should not be co-mingled with other financial

assets that are earmarked for other financial goals, like a new

house.”

Retirement will be an important period of one’s life. A person should

plan carefully for it and follow a disciplined financial plan.

1 JANUARY 2014


the PARKLANDER 31


[ FINANCIAL AFFAIRS ]

THE BUSINESS

OF BITC INS

New Currency Changes Model

By Jeffrey Bradley

Bitcoins. You can’t run your fingers through ’em, or find a chestful by

following a pirate map marked with an X. You can’t even get change

for one. But they let you buy stuff, and lots of it. Bitcoin is a digital-only

decentralized currency with no central banking hub. But it

does have a computer network instead that records transactions and

makes more Bitcoins. Which is about as clear as Pluto on a cloudy

night, but it works. Bitcoins are currently accepted at Reddit, OkCupid

and Virgin Galactic, among other vendors.

Bitcoins eliminate calculating annoying exchange rates and the

middlemen who drive up costs. Consumers like the protection of

anonymous transactions, and businesses get to keep more of the

profits. Bitcoins, in fact, have turned the concept of money upside

down. Unlike wealth made by minting precious ores into ingots or

bullion, Bitcoins are the ultimate philosopher’s stone able to transmute

base metals into gold — only minus the alchemy, the metal,

or the stone.

Think of it as a type of weird PayPal. Making transactions requires

installing a Bitcoin “wallet” app on your computer or smartphone.

Identified only by a string of numbers and letters, the digital wallet

address guarantees your anonymity. Wallets are free and easy to

download; they can be opened and closed at will. Purchase Bitcoins

online, or “mine” (generate) them by having your computer

solve mathematical algorithms that help verify the creation and

transfer of new Bitcoins. These algorithms rapidly become exceedingly

dense to prevent Goldfinger types from cornering the market.

Transactions are tracked by an official log and released over

a network of participating computers. Approved log updates earn

users fresh Bitcoins.

Their progression has been bumpy, but steady. In 2009, a U.S. dollar

would net 1,300 Bitcoins. As the economy sagged and faith in world

money markets fell, speculation increased a Bitcoin’s value. It was

worth $230 in early 2013. Cyber attacks caused panic selling that

dropped the price to $72. Chinese speculation drove it up markedly

before the central bank stepped in and dampened trading. This predictably

caused a spike that topped out at $1,200. Bitcoins’ current

value can be monitored on various exchanges, which also allow their

purchase or sale. With real money, of course.

Things can get rough and tumble. The U.S. government is considered

Bitcoin-friendly, only because the currency poses no threat. But

the shadowy legality of the currency has emboldened criminal elements

to attack Bitcoin. Hackers have disrupted service, and server

breaches by malware have emptied more than one infected computer’s

account. Unfortunately, “cryptocurrency” means that you don’t

get back your stolen Bitcoins.

Despite illicit activity, Bitcoins are burgeoning as a peer-to-peer payment

method. Small businesses find the concept especially attractive,

as transaction fees are lower than credit card or debit fees.

The Clevelander Hotel in South Beach hosted the 2014 Bitcoin

Conference on January 25 and 26. Over 500 technology professionals,

business people and policy makers, Bitcoin freaks all, were in attendance

to discuss Bitcoin’s future. Hotel guests got to pay for their

goods and services through BitPay, the conference sponsor. Vanity

Cosmetic Center of Miami also accepted Bitcoins, as did Planet

Linux Caffe in Coral Gables. Customers easily used their phones to

pay for their coffee and pastries, says owner Daniel Mery.

Bitcoins are gaining ground internationally. Bitcoin Black Friday

featured 300 participating merchants last December. Don’t discount

the cachet in being a Bitcoin vendor. “We want to promote Bitcoins

like we promote new technologies,” says Mery.

Even the unofficial Bitcoin wiki now features a tutorial on how small

businesses can implement the system. Radical new systems come

with glitches and setbacks. Yet, Bitcoin’s future seems assured. Why

not? Small businesses get a better rate, and stick it to the man, too.

And there’s hardly a doubt that, when a currency without a middleman

exists, prices will drop. That is, until the big box companies get

wise.

32 1 FEBRUARY JANUARY Y2

2014

2014


the PARKLANDER 33

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3


[ FINANCIAL AFFAIRS ]

Teens

Money

and

Teach Them

Important Lessons

By Cynthia MacGregor

One of the most important lessons for teens to learn, and one

seldom taught in schools, is money management. How can you

be sure your teenager is learning to handle money responsibly,

to budget, and to use a credit card properly?

Lorra Brown, MBA, author of the Prosperity Diva Financial

Literacy Book, believes teens should not have their own credit

cards until they are 17 or 18, after a bout of financial literacy

education.

Bret Shroyer, co-author (with Tracie Shroyer) of Investing in

Your 401k Kid: From Zero to Little Financial Genius in Five Easy

Steps, suggests that, while teens should never have their own

credit cards, they should learn, from the age of 13 or 14, to

manage a pre-paid debit card. This gives them “some freedom,

but not enough to get in trouble,” he says. “Learning to use a

pre-paid debit card will be good practice for having a credit card

later on.”

Mark King, E.A., of Boca Raton-based Tax Advisors, Inc., believes

that, if teens are 15 or 16 and have jobs, they should have

their own credit card, but with a limit. Or perhaps they should

have a pre-paid debit card instead.

What’s an appropriate allowance for a teenager? Lorra Brown

believes $20 per week is right at age 13, “with an increase every

year of perhaps $10, depending on the family’s financial circumstances.”

If teens have jobs, though, the allowance should

be reduced “because they will budget more wisely knowing they

don’t have that allowance as a fallback, and they won’t feel they

can blow the whole paycheck.”

But teens should be permitted to keep and budget their own

income from after-school jobs, because it gives them a sense of

being responsible and handling money responsibly. If they have

less time for chores, though, their allowance should be reduced

commensurately. “If they have no time at all for chores because

of an outside job, then they should get no allowance at all,” says

Brown.

Bret Shroyer has a different take on these matters. “Chores

should not be tied to allowance,” he believes. “Chores in the

house are done by the members of the family who have the

ability and the time. Allowance is a money-teaching tool. It’s

not a gift of extra money. It’s allowing teens to manage money

they would have gotten anyhow. An allowance is the money the

parents would have spent on their teens regardless. It’s handing

over the spending authority to the child. The actual amount depends

on the parents’ resources and the teens’ activities. Whatever

the parents would have spent on the teens anyhow — for

fun, for food outside the house, for clothes — is the appropriate

amount for their allowance.”

If the teens have jobs, he believes, the allowance should be reduced,

starting at age 16 or 17, because you want to wean them

off it totally. By the time they are adults, they are drawing no

allowance at all.

Shroyer believes teens should be permitted to keep and budget

their own income from after-school jobs. But they should

be encouraged to put a substantial portion of that money into

long-term savings.

That naturally raises the question of how to teach teens to budget.

Shroyer believes you should go over their allowance with

them and create a list of needs and wants. For example, they

may need a new pair of jeans and want a designer brand. They

may need school lunch money and want after-school pizza.

Mark King says parents should start teaching kids about budgets

based on an allowance, with ten percent or more of all

monies the kids earn, as well as gifts for birthdays and holidays,

to go into a savings account. He believes age 13 is a good time

to start, especially for Jewish kids, who will get plenty of monetary

gifts for their bar/bat mitzvahs. He also suggests teens

watch webinars from investment companies.

Learning to handle money responsibly may be the most important

lesson your teenager learns.

34 FEBRUARY 2014


the PARKLANDER 35


[ CAR TALK ]

Vehicle Variables

Buy, Lease and Other Decisions

By Steven Marks

Buying a new vehicle can be stressful. The process comes with a

number of decisions. Besides deciding what brand of car to buy,

body style, color, and budget limitations, there are several other

factors to consider.

Probably the most important factor to examine in deciding

to get a new vehicle is how the purchase will be financed. The

buyer’s budget, time frame, and other variables must be taken

into consideration.

The first option is traditional financing. Recognized as the most

popular alternative, it allows buyers to pay off the loan over a

long period of time. Typically, financial institutions will offer a

48-, 60-, or even a 72-month term to finance the vehicle.

An APR, or annual percentage rate, is also set at time of purchase,

based on varying elements, including credit history, and

could also determine the overall factor of payment. A down

payment is also recommended for many buyers to help reduce

the monthly payment; it is accepted at time of purchase.

Another suitable finance option to obtain a vehicle is leasing.

Essentially, leasing is a long-term rental alternative, but can

grant the buyer the option to obtain a higher priced vehicle for

a slightly lower monthly payment. Determined by a number of

contrasting components, including varying rates and residual

values, a lease payment avoids a long-term commitment for the

buyer, since leases tend to last for fewer than four years.

Other benefits of leasing include driving a new car, full warranty

coverage, and no headaches from the car’s depreciation.

However, leasing may not be suitable for many buyers, as there

is typically a mileage restriction on the agreement, which can

carry substantial costs when exceeded. Since the vehicle is on

lease, there are also conditions set related to modifications and

damage done to the vehicle. At the termination of the lease,

the buyer has the choice to purchase, finance, or return the

vehicle.

As an alternative purchase option, many manufacturers also offer

a certified pre-owned selection. Vehicles that are accepted

into this program go through a rigorous, multi-point inspection

that carefully covers interior, exterior, and mechanical operation

and appearance factors.

The CPO, or certified pre-owned program, could also include

a supplemental factory warranty, roadside assistance, and other

benefits that mirror a brand new vehicle purchase. Many times,

there are finance offers with special APR rates to make the purchase

more attractive for the buyer.

The remaining choice for purchasing a vehicle is probably the

most flexible. Cash remains king with all purchases. When purchasing

an automobile with cash, it’s possible to receive a better

deal that can discount the manufacturer’s suggested retail price.

Buyers can also visit “buy here, pay here” dealers, who typically

offer used cars that may not be offered with a factory warranty

and may rely on local banks for financing options, but are much

more affordable for some. Another growing alternative from

cash is a one-time lease payment that can cover the entire lease

agreement in one lump sum payment.

Every consumer has a different financial situation, and should explore

each option carefully before making a final decision. Rates, payments,

and terms can vary per consumer, based on credit status and situations.

When financing or leasing, credit history plays a key role in

determining the final outcome of the vehicle’s monthly payment.

Purchasing a new vehicle is considered the second largest purchase

decision behind financing a home, so be sure to take time

to review the purchase options that are available.

36 1 FEBRUARY JANUARY A

Y2

2014


the PARKLANDER 37


[ GARDENING ]

Pretty Palm Trees

By Guillermo A. Salazar

Heed Their Needs

Sunny South Florida with inviting temperatures is the epitome of

tropical landscapes. It is composed of many tropical plants and lush

foliage. One of the most iconic elements in the landscape is the

palm tree.

Palm trees are monocots, one of the largest groups of plants in

the world. Members of the monocot group include corn, lilies,

bamboo, and grasses. Palm trees grow in tropical and subtropical

regions of the world like Asia, Africa, Central America, South

America, and the Caribbean.

Many characteristics make palm trees unique as part of the plant

family, like their ability to tolerate high temperatures. In some instances,

palms can resist temperatures beyond 100 degrees Fahrenheit.

Palm trees also have a high degree of drought tolerance, like

some members of the genus phoenix. Many of these are common

in our region, including phoenix roebelenii (dwarf palms) and

phoenix canariensis (canary date palm), among others.

Some of the species of the palm family require minimal care and

fertilization, while other ones require very consistent and high levels

of fertilization in South Florida, due to our high pH, sandy, and

alkaline soil levels. Some palm trees possess an added attribute.

They are self-pruning palms; their long fronds fall down to the

ground after they turn yellow or brown, helping homeowners make

the regular landscape maintenance an easier task than it would be

otherwise.

Palm trees have very unique characteristics that make them different

than shade trees. For example, they have a single growing point

at the apex or tip of the palm tree crown. Palm trees never develop

branches. Keeping them healthy and fertilized will prevent the

death of the main growing point tip, which will consequently kill

the whole palm tree.

Palm trees depend on sunlight to process their nutrients

through the process of photosynthesis.

Having many leaves and fronds will ensure

that the palm grows strong and healthy.

Over-pruning is one of the main causes of

death in palm trees. Follow the appropriate palm-trimming techniques

recommended by the state, county, and the International

Society of Arboriculture.

Some of the easiest care palm trees are native to Florida. They

include the saw palmetto, sabal palm and thatch palm, which require

low or no fertilizer at all. They can grow naturally in our

existing soils without any additional inputs.

But many commonly used landscape palms are not native to

our state. Some of the palm trees that we enjoy come from tropical

countries with excellent annual average temperatures and rich

dark nutritious soil structure, which is acidic with a low pH. Some

of the high maintenance and nutritionally demanding palm trees

commonly used in South Florida include: foxtail palm, royal

palm, queen palm, phoenix roebelli, and adonidia palm.

When fertilizing palm trees, follow the recommendations of

horticulture experts and University of Florida fertilization techniques.

The ideal fertilizer combination for fertilizing palm trees

is 8-2-12 + 4 magnesium. Micro-elements are extremely crucial

and an essential requirement for palms in South Florida.

The application rate of fertilizer should be based on the trunk

caliper or thickness of the trunk. Apply in a wide radius around

the palm base and scatter evenly, instead of applying the typical

ring around the trunk.

Palm trees are wonderful additions for any South Florida landscape,

if you follow recommendations and requirements for

their basic care.

Guillermo Salazar is a Master Gardener with degrees in Environmental

Horticulture and landscape design. He is

a certified landscape inspector and a certified ISA

Arborist. He currently works as adjunct

faculty for the landscape technology program

at Miami Dade College. He lives

in Cutler Bay.

38 FEBRUARY 2014


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the PARKLANDER 39


[ MOM’S PERSPECTIVE ]

Love is in the Air

Over Barbecue Ribs

By Cheryl Pangborn

Love is in the air? Oh wait -- that shouldn’t be a question but a

statement. Love is in the air! It’s Valentine’s Day, a time for romance,

flowers, candy, maybe a shiny gemstone ring, thank you

very much!

All that sunshine and lollipops isn’t impressing me these days. I

hope I haven’t become cynical about romance. I think it’s more

like I’ve matured to a point where I can see past the expected platitudes.

Lately, when I read someone’s deep and meaningful post on

Facebook like “if I had to choose between loving you and breathing

my last breath, it would be to say ‘I love

you.’ ”

of time, so we mapped out a course of action with a complete lay

of the land that would have put Lewis and Clark to shame. We

had one goal: create the perfect itinerary. No resting. No stopping.

Naturally, even the best-laid plans go awry. That brings me to my

second of the off-the-beaten path romances: the change-up that

goes swimmingly. Nothing is more romantic than having unexpected

changes wind up being better than the plan.

My husband and I have a theory that, if plans go south, and you

have success on the first regroup, you’re golden. That happened on

our Epcot trip. It was like crowds miraculously moved out of our

way. We walked in and were seated immediately at popular restaurants

without a reservation. It was as if the monorail was waiting

there just for us.

Maybe you’re thinking right now that my definition of romantic

is seriously leaning toward loony. Sure, I love a dozen roses as

much as the next girl, but with age came the appreciation for more

tangible things. Like a meal without the little people or strolling

through a store that doesn’t have the word “super” in front of

its name.

On a recent trip to Memphis, our

romantic moment was eating the

most fabulous ribs on planet Earth

at midnight in a little restaurant filled

with locals. Why is this romantic? Having

barbecue sauce up to the elbows, sitting

at a chipped Formica table, feeling like a water

buffalo? Not a recommendation for a first date.

This cracks me up. Or maybe even makes me gag.

Years ago, I would have gushed at this declaration. Now, I think it’s

hilarious. I couldn’t imagine my husband saying this to me – with a

straight face. We are one of the most in-sync couples around. We’re

just not cheesy in the lovey-dovey sense. If I think back to some

of our most romantic moments, they’re usually oozing with some

type of humor.

Recently, on our anniversary, we went to Epcot overnight – kidfree.

We don’t have very high expectations for romance. We’re

alone – that qualifies. We had a great time. But I have to say the

romance started with the planning. Sitting outside at our favorite

eatery, we intensely plotted every minute of our 24-hour getaway.

Some might imagine moonlight strolling and hand-holding. But

we were all about doing everything possible in our short window

Most guys would have taken one look at me sucking barbecue sauce

off my fingers and headed for the hills. But after 20 years, hours in

the gym, and the scourge of chronic healthy eating, going completely

against the grain is so freeing. Yes, you read this right, eating ribs,

French fries, and corn fritters is like living on the edge for us. Simply,

this translates into a great memory and that’s romantic to me.

Trust me, we’ve had lots of fancy dinners and strolled beaches hand

in hand, and I love to remember those times. But the moments

that give me the most satisfaction are the ones that involve funny

mishaps, spontaneous date nights, hair-brained schemes, crazy

planning, and even giggling together, covered with sticky food.

Perhaps our idea of romance is unique, but it’s uniquely ours and it

has kept us going in good times and bad.

Happy Valentine’s Day to all you romantics. May you find true love

over a plate of barbecue.

40 FEBRUARY 2014


954 - 283 - 7775

the PARKLANDER 41


[ HUMOR ]

Letters of love

Blackmail Potential

By Victoria Landis

Many moons ago, we humans used a form of communication

called writing. Our parents lectured us on the crazy expense

of long-distance phone calls. According to them, one call to

the friend who had moved to California would send them into

debtors’ prison. So, we wrote — with a pen or pencil on actual

paper — letters.

It’s a quaint notion now, but one I wish we could bring back.

The U.S. Post Office was awesome then. It used to allow almost

anything as an envelope. We mailed coconuts with the addresses

written in black marker right on the husk. When McDonald’s

came out with the hot apple pie, it was sold in a red cardboard

sleeve, and we used those, too, for mailing purposes. Our keen

eyes began to see every object as having envelope potential.

Guess we thought it was cool. The more we liked someone, the

more inventive we became.

There were a lot of letters exchanged. This should put a permanent

cringed expression on the face of every friend and ex-beau

of mine — I saved all of them. If any of you become amazingly

famous, I could cash in big-time. I’d have to consider it on a

case-by-case basis and the amount of moolah it might bring.

There’s no need for panic, though. Figuring out where the

darned things wound up after the last move could take a while.

Heaven knows what box they could be hibernating in.

About a decade ago, my mom was in one of her cleaning modes.

Mom can’t stand having stuff around. So much so that she’s

constantly trying to give the six of us kids back the tchotchkes

we gave her as presents over many, many years. “Here, honey, I

know you’re going to want this.” No, Mom, I don’t. I gave it to

you.

In some cases, she’ll swear I gave her some weird object that I

have no recollection of ever seeing. Much less buying. Much,

much less ever considering as a gift to my beloved mother. I

think she just wants to get rid of it so much, she’ll convince me

it was my fault it now sits in her cabinet and hopes I simply

don’t remember. Oy.

Recently, I received a sizable box in the mail from my mom. I

opened it and unloaded it, item by item, of stuff you couldn’t

pay me to take. The further I got, the wackier it was. Old and

tattered organza shaped to look like roses and meant to hold

candles. Strange plates with dancing cows and daisies. A white

satin Jackie O-style dress with a little matching jacket. A yard

of monkey-print fabric. Pez dispensers, but not in the original

packages and obviously used.

The entire box was jammed with junk that should have spent its

declining years adorning a landfill. Although I do have a friend

who loves monkeys, and I suppose I could make her a pillow.

During a tornado-like sweep of the upper shelves of the front

hall closet, Mom found a bag filled with old letters. Apparently,

she had deposited every letter each of us kids wrote to my parents

after we went to college or moved away. Pleas for money.

Notes from my grandmothers and aunts and uncles. Descriptions

of family events and disasters. She saved serious missives

from my brother (fondly known as Dr. Vegetables) during his

doctorate studies.

I happened to be visiting that day and luckily glimpsed inside

the bag by the garage door, meant for the garbage can. I asked

what it was, and when she told me, I grabbed it and squirreled

it away. It made the move to Florida with me and, years later, I

finally tackled it.

Boy, did I hit the mother lode. I have enough good fodder to

last for quite some time, and, as a bonus, plenty of embarrassing

evidence to blow my siblings away, if they ever get too big for

their britches. Not that I’d ever do that, but it’s always a good

idea to have leverage with your brothers and sisters. You never

know when it’ll come in handy.

There were some poignant cards and letters in the bag. Tender

sentiments from good and bad times. And it got me to thinking

how — oops — I wrote earnest letters to those I loved. I

sure hope they had the good sense to throw mine away.

42 2 FEBRUARY JANUARY 2014


the PARKLANDER 43


44 FEBRUARY 2014


LIPOSCULPTURE/VAGINAL REJUVENATION

Now offering

Plasma Vaginal Therapy

the PARKLANDER 45


[ BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT ]

Go to ginjer.

For Designer

Clothing and More

Ginjer. is a UNISEX clothing boutique

that has been a fixture on trendy

Atlantic Avenue in Delray Beach for

over a decade. We, the team at ginjer.,

are thrilled to invite you to visit our

newly renovated destination! ginjer...

is where South Beach chic meets edgy

elegance.

Having had the pleasure of providing

our clientele, both loyal locals and

returning guests alike, with the latest

high fashion trends, we are now able to “BRAND” ginjer. ANEW!

After an adventure of shopping at ginjer., you can rest assured that you will not experience

the embarrassment of wearing the same outfit as the bride’s Mother or the

boss’s Wife. We proudly and diligently hand-select, “boutique only,” Novel pieces in

ONE size run ONLY! These special pieces are produced at the beginning of each

season from luxurious couture fabrics! Even our vast denim collections of sought-out

emerging brands are continually evaluated and changed due to customer request.

ginjer. is largely defined by EXCLUSIVITY sans the “exclusive price-tag.”

Our customers are not defined by age and appreciate limited product and numerous

choices that allow them to select pieces that define their lifestyle and spirit of

individuality! Some of the select brands at ginjer.

include, but are not limited to: Haute Hippie,

Torn by Ronnie Kobo, MIH, Calvin Rucker, Illia,

IRO and Jakett for women, and Scotch and Soda, ARI,

and Moods of Norway for men. ginjer. also carries items that have mass

appeal such as: Robert Graham, John Varvatos, USA, and VINCE; yet collection

pieces are more exclusive to ginjer.

New to ginjer. this season is the celebrated ROCKWELL THARP boot collection.

This collection is a year-round fashion MUST - HAVE with a recent boost in

celebrity following at AFFORDABLE prices. ginjer. is proud to be one of a handful

of boutiques in the U.S. that carry the boots for your convenience.

Our Brand Representatives will make shopping at ginjer. the perfect experience by

taking convenience and service to the next level. ginjer. provides a relaxing and, most

of all, fun environment. There is free valet parking for ginjer. after 5 p.m.

ginjer....... It’s An Attitude!

ginjer. is located 133 East Atlantic Avenue in Delray Beach. The phone number is

561-272-1033. The website is www.ginjerdelraybeach.com. Follow ginjer. on Facebook

– www.facebook.com/ginjerdelraybeach. The hours of operation are Monday

to Thursday from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m., Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to midnight,

and Sunday from 12 noon to 11 p.m.

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the PARKLANDER 47


[ GUY TALK ]

The Power OF WORDS

Influence a Child

By Mark Bohm

Of everything that gets stuffed into the equipment bag, it’s a

sock that often gets lost. Maybe it’s because the fabric readily

gets stuck on other things. Maybe it’s because all the kids have

ones that look the same. For whatever reason, both socks simply

don’t always make it home from hockey practice.

A couple of months ago, I saw my son packing his game socks for

a practice scrimmage. Game socks have a unique color pattern. I

can’t easily replace them at the local pro shop. I told him I’d prefer

he wear some old practice socks, like usual. But, that night, he

wanted the game socks.

When he came home from practice, he unpacked his bag. A while

later, I took a look at the equipment, pieces hanging on hooks

and tubes to dry. Sure enough, one of the socks was missing.

My blood pressure started to rocket. How many times had I reminded

him that he needed to make sure everything made it

back into his bag? And, that night, I’d specifically advised against

wearing the special order game socks.

ever, this one would vie for the upper tier. After deep apologies,

things settled down quickly, but the nagging ache in my stomach

would linger.

I decided, that night, I’d be more careful with the words I direct

toward the kids. What bothered me most wasn’t that I had

raised my voice, or that I’d been mistaken about the lost item

to begin with. My big lament was that I’d unintentionally conveyed

an awful, incorrect message. Although never using these

words, I essentially said, “You’re irresponsible,” or worse, “I

don’t trust you.”

Those are feelings I don’t have, and certainly would never wish

to impart to my child. I’m afraid, however, at that moment, it’s

what I might have unwittingly communicated.

When I was a boy of probably eight or nine, I came home for

dinner one night and noticed that someone had left one of our

sliding glass doors cracked open. My mom was in the kitchen fixing

the meal, and other adults were milling about, occupied with

this or that. Without anyone asking, I walked behind the dinner

table and closed the door.

I was displeased and made it known. He raced into the room,

startled, embarrassed, probably alarmed at my tone. He said he

was sure he had everything, and started frantically searching

around the room, digging deep inside the bag. When he looked

on the backside of his hockey pants, he found the missing black

sock stealthily attached to a fastener on his hockey pants, dangling

hidden against the black fabric.

“It’s right here!” he barked, throwing the sock to the ground.

Upset, he stormed out of the room.

I stood momentarily speechless, overcome with a sickening combination

of guilt and shame. It was a more penetrating version of

how I typically feel when I lose my temper with one of my kids. I

feel it even when the kid truly did something wrong.

On that night, my boy had done absolutely nothing to deserve a

reprimand. If I were to try and rank my worst parenting moments

Unbeknownst to me, my grandfather had been watching. He

praised me to the hilt. What a smart boy! Look how he takes care

of things! He told me how much he liked it that I’m someone

who sees something wrong and fixes it.

That was about thirty-five years ago, and my grandfather has

been gone for about thirty of those, but I remember that seemingly

trivial event to this day. His words sent a message to a child

that helped shape that kid’s view of himself. He recognized me

as responsible, independent, competent — powerful stuff to a

child.

I try to express positive messages toward my kids, whenever the

circumstances allow it. I’m not big on New Year’s resolutions.

But if I have one, it’s to continue trying to boost their self-esteem

through the thoughtful use of language. After all, nothing could

be a bigger shame than sons or daughters not realizing how highly

their parent thinks of them.

48 FEBRUARY 2014


Book your

Valentine's

Reservations

Now

Live Entertainment

every Thursday,Friday

and Saturday

Comedy night every

Wednesday

the PARKLANDER 49


Trisha

Yearwood

events

Julio Iglesias

calendar

FEBRUARY 1

The Kinsey Sicks

Amaturo Theater

FEBRUARY 8

Monster Jam

Sun Life Stadium

FEBRUARY 22

The Fab Faux

Parker Playhouse

FEBRUARY 1

Color Me Rad 5K

Sun Life Stadium

FEBRUARY 1

The Rite of Spring

Knight Concert Hall

FEBRUARY 8

The Ed Tour

Parker Playhouse

FEBRUARY 8

Jay Leno

Kravis Center

FEBRUARY 22

Soulfrito Music Festival

Sun Life Stadium

FEBRUARY 22

Julio Iglesias

American Airlines Arena

KRAVIS CENTER FOR THE

PERFORMING

ARTS

kravis.org

FEBRUARY 1-2

Miami City Ballet Presents:

See the Music

Kravis Center

FEBRUARY 1-2

Shen Yun 2014

Au-Rene Theater

FEBRUARY 3

Miami Heat vs. Detroit Pistons

American Airlines Arena

FEBRUARY 3

Merle Haggard

Kravis Center

FEBRUARY 3

Mac Frampton with his Orchestra

& Singers

Yesterday Once More

Kravis Center

FEBRUARY 4

Panthers vs. Toronto Maple Leafs

BB&T Center

FEBRUARY 5

John Prine

Parker Playhouse

FEBRUARY 6

Kenny Loggins

Kravis Center

FEBRUARY 6

Panthers vs. Detroit Red Wings

BB&T Center

FEBRUARY 6, 8

Nabucco - Florida Grand Opera

Au-Rene Theater

FEBRUARY 9

SOA- Pops on Parade

Amaturo Taheater

FEBRUARY 9

Stephanie J. Black

Aventura Arts & Cultural Center

FEBRUARY 12

Christopher O’Riley

Out of My Hands

FEBRUARY 12

From Russia with Love

Knight Concert Hall

FEBRUARY 13-16

Eth’s Dinosaur Zoo

Parker Playhouse

FEBRUARY 14

Andrea Bocelli

BB&T Center

FEBRUARY 14

Darlene Love

Parker Playhouse

FEBRUARY 15

The Love Rule

Amaturo Theater

FEBRUARY 16

Irish Rovers Farewell Tour

Kravis Center

FEBRUARY 19

Trisha Yearwood

Au-Rene Theater

FEBRUARY 20

Megan Hilty with Seth Rudetsky

Parker Playhouse

FEBRUARY 23

Miami Heat vs. Chicago Bulls

American Airlines Arena

FEBRUARY 23, 25

The Amazing Adventures

of Dr. Wonderful and Her Dog

Amaturo Theater

FEBRUARY 25

Demi Lovato

BB&T Center

FEBRUARY 25

2013-2014 Smart Stage Matinee

Series

Parker Playhouse

FEBRUARY 25

Roslyn Kind

Kravis Center

FEBRUARY 25-27

Memphis

Au-Rene Theater

FEBRUARY 27

Miami Heat vs. New York Knicks

American Airlines Arena

FEBRUARY 27

Panthers vs. Washington Capitals

BB&T Center

FEBRUARY 28

RHAW

Carnival Studio Theater

FEBRUARY 28

Disney Junior Live! Pirate and

Princess Adventures

BB&T Center

AMERICAN

AIRLINES

ARENA

aaarena.com

BB&T CENTER

thebbtcenter.com

MIAMI

DOLPHINS

miamidolphins.com

FLORIDA

PANTHERS

floridapanthers.com

PARKER

PLAYHOUSE

parkerplayhouse.com

FLORIDA

MARLINS

floridamarlins.com

BROWARD CENTER

FOR THE

PERFORMING ARTS

browardcenter.org

ADRIENNE

ARSHT CENTER

arshtcenter.org

50 FEBRUARY 2014


the PARKLANDER 51


WINE

WATCH

Sweet, Sweet Wine

Gains in Popularity

By Sheila and Bennet Bodenstein

For centuries, the French style of wine ruled the world. In earlier

times, French wines were probably on the sweet side. But, in

the twelfth century, after the marriage of Eleanor of Aquitaine

and the future king of England, Henry Plantagenet, the wine

style changed to please the British palate, since the bulk of the

wine production was then destined for England.

Moving ahead to modern times, the fledgling American wine

industry emulated the French wines as closely as possible. It

must be understood that, up to the Prohibition period in the

U.S., any wine of consequence came from France or Italy, while

domestic wines were imperfect imitations of the real thing.

After Prohibition, wineries began to spring up all over the

country, continuing the process of selling simply made wines.

Most of these were of questionable quality, except for those

from California, where the wines were mostly carbon copies of

those from France. The California grapes, however, produced

wines that were far fruitier than those of France or Italy, while

still remaining dry. As time went on, the fruitier style of the

California wines caught on and became the standard style for

domestic wines.

Today, a new style is being born. Since the California grapes are

so fruity, why not make them sweeter? The idea took time to

take hold, as the wine industry is slow to change. The tendency

toward the new style was propelled by America’s love of sweet

soft drinks.

Bob Trinchero of Sutter Home Vinyards was the father of the

new style when he introduced the world to blush zinfandel. His

sweet, fruity wine swept the country and, before long, was the

most popular style of wine among consumers, but not with the

gurus who still preferred their wines dry. Since these were the

guys and gals with the power of the press behind them, the new

style was played down and even denigrated in print.

It was the power of the consumer and not the opinions of the

gurus that set a new direction for the wine industry. In the

1980s, many growers pulled out their old familiar varieties and

replanted with zinfandel.

It took about a decade before the public tired of the same

old sweet thing and looked around for a new style. Out came

the zinfandel and in went the Moscato. Currently, the sweet

52 FEBRUARY 2014

Moscato wines are outselling all the other varieties by a very

large margin.

Now, another new style of wine is entering the marketplace. It

lies halfway between the sweet wines and the dry wines. These

new wines express a bigger, bolder fruit flavor with just a bit of

sweetness in the background to please the advocates of both

styles. Among the first of this new style are the wines from wine

industry legend Cheryl Indelicato under her HandCraft label.

HandCraft Artisan Collection Inspiration White Wine

($12.99): This wine is a blend of some favorite white wine

varieties -- Riesling, Sauvignon Blanc, Viognier, Moscato and

Pinot Grigio. Some of these varieties are famed for their classic

dry wines and others for their sweet wines. When blended together,

as in Inspiration White, they form a symphony of flavor

and aroma, without being too sweet or too dry.

HandCraft Artisan Collection Inspiration White Red

($12.99): Again, we have a blending of red wine grapes. In this

case, it is with grapes that display a positive and definable flavor

and aromas -- Syrah, Zinfandel, Merlot, and Sangiovese. This

wine too displays an explosion of flavor and aroma while retaining

a bit of the sweetness of the grapes.


the PARKLANDER 53


[ RESTAURANT REVIEW ]

By Charles Marcanetti

54 FEBRUARY 2014

Welcoming a New

Restaurant

High Quality Food

Just about one month ago, Landlubber’s Neighborhood Bar

and Grill opened at the Regency Lakes Plaza (just north of the

Sawgrass exit/entrance on 441, on the west side of the road)

and just south of Regency Lakes Blvd. (in the strip mall behind

Walgreens and the Shell Station/Firestone Tire store, 6370

North State Road 7, in Coconut Creek – 954-422-WING or

9464).

The menu is huge and exceptionally cheap in price, but high

in quality. And, just because it says Landlubber’s, don’t think

there’s no fish. In fact, there is a wide array of many, many different

creative comfort foods and foods with attitudes. “Why,”

you might ask, “would anyone do such a crazy thing?”

I asked Kevin (who, along with his partners, Chris and Alex,

opened this, the third Landlubber’s – Plantation and Cooper

City being one and two) and he said, “It’s simple: We live here,

we hang out here, we raise our families here, so it was only

natural to bring a restaurant to our neighbors where we can all

meet and enjoy ourselves without breaking the bank and without

compromising on quality.”

If that philosophy is indicative of success, Landlubber’s will be

around a long time. Plus, since this is the third installment of a

great eatery, it is reasonably safe to assume that the model for

their business works. So, again, welcome to Landlubber’s and

I hope my friends and readers and neighbors check out this

place. I am certain it will make your go-to list.


Now Hiring After School Staff

Genuine “New York Chinatown” Cuisine

SPECIALIZING IN CHINESE BBQ & DIM SUM ALL DAY!

$14.95

CRISPY DUCK

Not to be combined w/other offers

Includes Soup, Fried Rice,

Hot Tea & Dessert

Brown Rice Now Available



the PARKLANDER 55


[ RELIGION ]

Purim is both a morality play, and, in one way at least, the Jewish version

of Halloween. True, there are no pumpkins, witches, or Barack

Obama masks. But for this joyous holiday, recalling the deliverance

of the Jews from their enemies in ancient Persia, there is often a par-

the king that, since the stubborn Jews refuse to obey the king’s

ty, sometimes with colorful costumes, and an oft-told Biblical tale laws, it would be best for the king to

of good versus evil – with good, of

have them all killed.

course, winning out in the end.

Always celebrated on the 14th

day of the Hebrew month of

Adar, that “morality play” – Purim

– takes place this year on

March 15 and 16. Purim is celebrated

in synagogues and Jewish

day schools in our community.

One of those synagogues, Congregation

Shaarei Kodesh of Boca

Raton, annually holds a Sunday

Purim carnival. Children at its Ruth

and Lewis Davis Religious School

learn to bake hamentaschen cookies,

named after Purim’s arch-villain,

Hamen.

The Donna Klein Jewish Academy,

also in Boca Raton, celebrates the

holiday with an annual parade, during

which the school’s children, as

well as its teachers, get to dress up for the

occasion. Since many of those teachers are Sephardic Jews, whose fa-

milial roots go back to the days of the Persian empire, the fun festival

includes colorful tents and gyrating belly dancers.

The cast of characters in this centuries-old story includes the

Persian King Ahasuerus, who has the most desirable women

in the kingdom, including the beautiful Esther, brought before

him to become part of his harem. Esther, like her cousin Mordecai

(who raised Esther as if she were his daughter), is among

the Jewish exiles living in Persia. Soon, she becomes the king’s

favorite and is made his queen.

The twist is that the king doesn’t know that Esther is Jewish. At

the same time, after Esther becomes queen, the proud Mordecai

A Dress-Up Morality Play

By Elliot Goldenberg

56 FEBRUARY 2014

refuses to bow to the king’s grand vizier, Haman, and offends

him. For this transgression, Haman decides to not only punish

Mordecai, but all the Jews in the kingdom. Haman convinces

Hamen’s name has gone down in history

as a metaphor for all those – whether

Hitler, the Crusaders, or the ayatollahs

in today’s Iran – who were desirous of

seeing the Jewish people annihilated.

Perhaps, Mordecai tells Esther, she

became queen in order to save her fellow

Jewish exiles. So, bravely, Esther

admits to the king that she is a Jew

and asks that he grant her a special

favor: to spare her people. Outraged

that anyone would threaten his beautiful

queen, the king takes it even one

step further and condemns Hamen,

not the Jews, to death.

The Passover Seder reminds us that,

in every generation, there are those

who rise up to destroy the Jews, but

God saves the Jews from their hand.

“The Passover story teaches us many

moral lessons,” says Rabbi Charles

Aronson. “One lesson we learn is that

tyrants who try to destroy the Jews

are themselves destroyed. A second lesson is that we must have

courage and confidence in God. And a third lesson is that God

watches over us, and protects us from danger and trouble, if we

have confidence in him.”

Today, besides being a holiday in which people get to dress up

as Purim characters, celebrants also get to enjoy a sumptuous

meal, while having an added treat of delicious hamentaschen

cookies for dessert. Those old enough to legally drink are also

allowed to get so drunk at Purim parties that they can’t tell

the difference between Mordecai and Hamen. Naturally, people

with health issues, and recovering alcoholics, are encouraged

not to participate.


The History of Valentine’s Day

BY REVEREND GEORGE FARAGI

Usually, the first thing people think of in February is Valentine’s

Day and what to get and do for that special loved one. But

I wonder if anyone ever thinks about the roots of this special

holiday.

Valentine’s Day began in the third century with an oppressive

Roman emperor named Claudius II and a Christian martyr named

Valentinus. Claudius had ordered all Romans to worship twelve

gods and made it a crime punishable by death to associate with

Christians.

But Valentinus was dedicated to the ideals of Christ. Not even

the threat of death could keep him from practicing his Christian

beliefs. He was arrested, imprisoned, and sentenced to death.

During the last weeks of Valentinus’ life, one of the jailors, who

had seen that he was a man of learning, asked if he could bring his

daughter, Julia, to him for some lessons. Julia had been blind from

birth and was a pretty young girl with a quick mind for learning.

Valentinus read stories of Rome’s history to her, as well as

describing the world of nature to her. He taught her arithmetic

and, most important, he told her about God. Consequently, Julia

saw the world through his eyes, trusted in his wisdom, and found

comfort in his quiet strength.

Julia asked him one day if God really heard our prayers. He

answered, “Yes, my child, He hears each one and answers them.”

She told him that she always prayed every morning and evening

that God might give her sight back to her. Valentinus said that

God always does what is best for us, if we will only believe in

Him. She told him that she did believe. They grasped each other’s

hands and prayed together.

Suddenly, there was a bright light that lit up the prison cell and

she cried out loud, “Valentinus, I can see, I can see!”

“Praise be to God,” he exclaimed. On the eve of his death, he

wrote Julia a letter, urging her to stay close to God and he signed

it “From your Valentine.” His sentence was carried out the next

day, February 14, 270 A.D., near a gate that was later named

Porta Valentini, and buried at what is now the Church of Praxedes

in Rome.

It is said that Julia planted a pink-blossomed almond tree near

his grave. Today, the almond tree remains a symbol of abiding

love and friendship. Each February 14, St. Valentine’s Day,

messages of affection, love, and devotion are exchanged around

the world.

This Valentine’s Day, remember to stay close to God, your true

love, and let us love one another as God would want us to. Happy

Valentine’s Day!

Reverend George Faragi is the Senior Pastor at Cornerstone Christian

Center Church in Boca Raton. The email is Cornerstoneboca@aol.com.

The web site is www.cornerstoneboca.com

Trip of a Lifetime

BY ERIC B. STILLMAN

What started as a dream more than two years ago turned

into fantastic reality when more than 100 members

of our Broward County Jewish community united in

camaraderie and shared values for A Trip of a Lifetime in

Israel this past November.

Together, we embarked on a journey of exploration.

Whether a person was a first-time traveler to Israel or a repeat

traveler, this was an opportunity to see Israel through a new

lens:

• enjoying the beautiful and historic landscape of our

Jewish homeland;

• learning from Israelis what their daily life is like;

• smelling the spices in the markets, trying new foods, and

drinking delicious wine;

• hearing the beautiful voices welcome Shabbat in

Jerusalem;

• visiting our Jewish family in Nesher, our partnership city

in northern Israel;

• and, feeling the strength of a people and the power of our

community as we participated in an international gathering of

Jews from all over North America.

Most important, we galvanized our Broward County

Jewish community. Many have expressed how deeply they

were impacted by different experiences, from seeing how

our federation helps support a respite camp for children with

serious illness to how we are striving to improve the lives of

soldiers in the Israel Defense Force.

Whatever the reason, whichever moment it was, it

became clear that the Jewish Federation of Broward

County transforms lives every day. Those who were on the

trip now have the good fortune to reflect on their blessings

and to be ambassadors for our Jewish community. For

those who, unfortunately, could not join us this time in

Israel, plans are already underway for another fantastic

trip in 2015.

Stay tuned because I will be asking the question: where

will you be in 2015? With us, making memories of a

lifetime!

Eric B. Stillman is the President and CEO of the Jewish Federation

of Broward County.

1 the JANUARY PARKLANDER 2014

57


By Stacy Angier, M. Ed.

[ SCHOOL SCOOP ]

Selecting a School

As we enter the new year, many parents are ready to begin their

search for the best school to meet their family’s educational needs.

In the past, most parents were faced with the local public school

as the only option for their child to attend. However, with Florida

being one of the forerunners in educational choice, parents now

have several options to explore.

Not only do they have the local public school, but also a growing

number of private schools, faith-based private schools, charter

schools, magnet schools, and virtual schools to choose from. Before

you begin your search, there are a few things that are important to

consider.

Begin by assessing your student’s needs. What type of program

do you think is needed to help your child be successful? Does

your child need a specialized program or a smaller classroom? Is

it important for your child to be placed in a faith-based setting,

an accelerated program, or is more individualized instruction warranted?

Maybe you are looking for a program that has a strong fine

arts offering or athletics for your child’s grade level. It is important

to decide what you are looking for before beginning your search.

For Your Child

Additionally, it is important to make a list of any questions you

have as a result of your research. Take the time to phone the schools

on your list and ask questions. Do you get a warm reception on

the phone? Are your questions thoroughly answered? Are the staff

members friendly? Are you treated with respect and consideration?

When you hang up the phone, you should have answers to your

questions and feel valued by the person from the school.

After making your calls, you will probably find your list is narrowing.

The next step will be your on-site visit or tour; it is essential to

make the visit a high priority. Be observant while on the property.

Does the school provide a safe, secure, and clean learning environment

for its students? Make it a point to tour the entire facility.

Ask to tour during the school hours in order to observe student

engagement.

Be observant of teacher interaction with the students. Are the relationships

professional yet helpful? Does the instructional setting

match your needs? Carefully examine the safety and security of the

facility as well. The environment and staff should appear prepared

for an emergency. Ask to see the school’s emergency plan.

After determining the type of program you are looking for, do your

homework. With the availability of Internet searches today, there

should be no lack of information about schools in your area. It is

imperative to research all of your options. Check the school web

site, find out what parents think, check inspection reports, and look

into the reputation the school has in your community. Make a list

of the schools that spark your interest.

Don’t forget to examine the cleanliness of the property, too. If the

school does not take care of its property, it is difficult to imagine

the children will be cared for, either. Tour all of the schools on your

consideration list, even if you fall in love with the first facility.

After touring all your possible options, make a list of pros and cons

for each school. Compare and contrast strengths and weaknesses.

Narrow your list to two or three schools. Ask the schools if your

child can shadow at the school; this provides the opportunity to see

how your child might engage in the school setting. Finally, examine

your results carefully prior to making a final decision.

Trust your instincts.

Stacy Angier is the Principal of Abundant Life Christian

Academy in Margate.

2 JANUARY 2014


Parkland

LIBRARY

FEBRUARY ARTIST

EVENTS

A large selection of watercolor paintings by artist

Barb Capeletti will be featured this month. She

enjoys expressing herself through landscapes, florals,

and still life paintings in bold, strong colors. Join her

for a reception on Saturday, February 8, at 11:30 a.m.

All Booked Up Book Group:

An Uncommon Grace

by Serena B. Miller

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 10:30 A.M.

Grace Connor, a military nurse formerly stationed

in Afghanistan, hopes that moving to a farm in rural

Ohio will help her recover from the ravages of war.

Knit N Knowledge

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 10:30 A.M.

New beginners should arrive at 10 a.m. and bring

two size 8 knitting needles and 2 worsted weight

yarns.

Valentine Stories and Craft

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 3:30 P.M.

Join us for a Valentine-themed story and craft to

make your holiday sweet. For age 7 and up. Parkland

Library card required to register.

Readers’ Theater

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 3:30 P.M.

Readers’ Theater, for children in grades three to five,

is an integrated approach for involving students in

reading, listening, and speaking activities. Read and

act out short skits based on famous children’s books.

Independent readers are encouraged to participate.

Parkland Library card required to register.

Coffee Bar and Used Book Fair

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8,

10 A.M. TO 1 P.M.

The book fair, sponsored by the Parkland Friends of

the Library, will be held in the lobby.

Teen Film Discussion:

Batman: The Dark Knight Rises

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1 P.M.

Eight years on, a new evil rises from where the

Batman and Commissioner Gordon tried to bury

it, causing Batman to resurface and fight to protect

Gotham City... the very city which brands

him an enemy. After the movie, viewers will discuss

their thoughts on the film and what to expect

for the upcoming Batman movie.

Reader’s Ring:

Piper Reed Navy Brat

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 3:30 P.M.

Join us for a book chat for third, fourth and fifth

graders. Read the book before the book club

meets. We will talk about the book, eat a snack,

and make a craft. Reserve your copy of the book

today.

Chess Club

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 12 AND 26,

4:15 P.M.

Parkland Library Chess Club is for children, age

8 and up. Beginners can learn to play. Players,

meet your match. You must be a Parkland Library

card holder to join. Registration is required for

each game date.

The Language of Love through Flowers

and Rose Petals

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 6:30 P.M.

Make your own personal flower arrangement for

that special someone. Participants will learn the

history and meaning of different colored roses and

how to properly arrange them for Valentine’s Day.

Tales to Tails

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13 AND 27,

4 TO 5 P.M.

Read to Daisy, a therapy dog, in a program developed

to encourage independent reading and

increase reading fluency. Each child can read for

about five minutes. This program is for children 5

to12 years old.

Films for a Saturday Afternoon – The Englishman

Who Went

Up a Hill but Came Down a Mountain

FEBRUARY 15, 1 P.M.

Starring Hugh Grant, Tara Grant and Colm

Meaney, the film runs 99 minutes. Two English

cartographers visit a small South Wales village

to measure what is claimed to be the “first

mountain inside of Wales.” It’s 1917, and the

war in Europe continues.

Learn How to Play KenKen

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 18,

4:30 P.M.

REGISTER

ONLINE at

www.cityofparkland. -

org/library

or CALL

954-757-4207

KenKen was developed in 2004 by a Japanese

mathematics instructor, Tetsuya Miyamoto, who

wanted to improve his students’ math and logic

skills. KenKen is a numerical puzzle that uses

basic math operations with logic and problemsolving

skills. For children in fifth grade to

adults.

Bricks and Books

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2 P.M.

Children age 7 and up, bring your imagination

and Lego building skills to a new building challenge.

Conquer each challenge with a buddy or

work your own. Parkland Library card required

to register.

Sketching Seascapes

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 10:30 A.M.

Learn the drawing techniques needed to complete

your own landscape or seascape. Pictures may then

be colored in with watercolor pencils or colored

pencils.

the PARKLANDER 59


School

NEWS

School

NEWS

COUNTRY HILLS ELEMENTARY

SCHOOL

February 6 will be an early release day. We

are very excited for our first 5K Walk/Challenge

with Coral Park Elementary School.

We hope everyone will participate in this

wonderful event on February 8 at North

Community Park.

We welcome new and prospective multi-age

families to join us for an informative orientation

on February 10, at 6:30 p.m. We would

love to welcome you to our fantastic school

and hope to answer questions about your

child’s education.

School is closed on Monday, February 17, for

Presidents’ Day. The PTA meeting will be held

on Tuesday, February 18, at 9:15 a.m. Our

SAC/SAF meeting is on Monday, February

24, at 6:30 p.m., in the Media Center.

Fourth graders are gearing up for FCAT

Writes on February 25. We have no doubt they

will do very well, as our teachers have been preparing

them all year.

Congratulations to our fifth graders who graduated

from the G.R.A.D.E. program. Special

thanks is due Officer Gasper for teaching our

children to be safe and aware.

To volunteer, sign up at www.getinvolvedineducation.com.

We have fantastic volunteers,

but can always use more.

Visit our PTA web site, www.countryhills.-

pta.org, for forms, Sunshine Math Sheets,

and other information. For questions about

the PTA, contact co-presidents Cathi Rush

at cathirush@yahoo.com or Christine Fris at

ctfris@msn.com – Betsy Zaslav

PARK TRAILS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

Field Day is on February 12 and 13, along with

our yearly Jump Rope for the Heart event. It’s

going to be a fun and active time for the students

and a great way to help fight against

heart disease. Contact your child’s teacher for

times and details about these events.

The third annual Man in My Life event will be

held on March 12, from 6 to 8 p.m. There will

be various games to play and treats to eat. Early

release is on Thursday, February 6. There is no

school on Monday, February 17, in honor of

Presidents’ Day. FCAT Writes for fourth grade

will be held from February 25 to 27. – Jeaneen

Muller

RIVERGLADES ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

Join our monthly PTA meeting on February

5, at 9:15 a.m., in the cafeteria. The PTA

continues to be busy, with fun-filled activities

planned. It’s always a good time to get involved;

we love your support.

Movie night brings Despicable Me 2 (rated

PG) to Pine Trails Amphitheatre on February

7. Don’t forget to visit the concession stand for

water and treats.

On February 14, it’s the PTA’s annual show

of heart-filled appreciation for our staff –

Riverglades Staff Valentine’s Treat Day. Also

on this day, our students will participate in

Jump Rope for the Heart. This is a great

event to fund-raise for the American Heart

Association by getting our kids active and

having fun giving back.

Get ready for our big event of the year

on Saturday, March 8, when the carnival

will feature exciting rides and attractions,

delicious food, and arts and crafts. To

sponsor a game or ride, contact RoseAnn

Brown at rmassa@bellsouth.net for further

details.

Look at the PTA web site, www.rivergladeselementarypta.org.

We add new and exciting information

to keep our families informed. As always,

thank you for your support. – Pam Ofstein

RIVERSIDE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

Our school is filled with love and caring,

highlighting the month with our Jump Rope

for the Heart Celebration on February 21.

Riverside students will be learning how the

heart works, why it is important to keep the

heart healthy, and how to be heart-healthy

for life, in conjunction with raising money

for the American Heart Association. Riverside

students will be jumping rope and enjoying

other heart-healthy physical activities.

Our calendar of events includes Muffins for

Moms, Donuts for Dads, sponsored by PNC

Bank, February 7, from 7:15 to 7:50 a.m.,

followed by our Valentine’s dance from 6 to 8

p.m. On February 11, interims go home. On

February 17, there will be no school. There

will be a PTO meeting starting at 8:15 a.m.

on February 19, Papa John’s Night. FCAT

Writes for fourth grade will be on February

25 and 26. Our SAC meeting will also be on

February 26 at 2:15 p.m. Please join us for

these events. For more information, call Mrs.

Rosen at 754-322-8250. – Sherry Rosen

WESTGLADES MIDDLE SCHOOL

Join us for the general PTA and board

meeting on Wednesday, February 19, at 8:15

a.m. in the Media Center. Our SAC meeting

will be held on Friday, February 21. To

learn more about the school, budget, and the

school improvement plan, you should attend

the very informative SAC meetings.

There will be no school on Monday, February

17, for Presidents’ Day. Our Spring Book Fair

will be held from February 28 through March

7. Students will visit during their Language

Arts classes. Please make sure your children

bring money, if they want to make purchases.

If you want a great way to advertise your

business, consider a banner at Westglades.

Contact me at bbzsmz@bellsouth.net to

become a banner sponsor. – Betsy Zaslav

60 FEBRUARY 2014


®









®


7827 N. University Dr.



The Goddard Schools are operated by independent franchisees under a license agreement with Goddard Systems, Inc.

Programs and ages may vary. License Pending. © Goddard Systems, Inc. 2013.

the PARKLANDER 61


from the

EXPERT

Parents Too Focused on Chores

DEAR DR. RENAE,

ASK DR. RENAE

Teen Wants More Consideration

This might not seem like a big problem, but it is a big problem to me. Almost every time my parents

talk to me, it is about cleaning up the house, my room, the kitchen, and other chores. It is as if there is

nothing more important to discuss in life!

I understand the need to have my chores done, but I do them in my own time, which is always upsetting

to my parents. I get good grades, have respectful friends, participate in sports and school clubs, and stay

away from drugs. I have a better relationship with my teachers than either of my parents and that doesn’t

seem right.

I am tired of constantly being yelled at about chores, instead of talking about my life. My parents are

always angry at me for not getting my chores done on their timeline, so I cannot talk with them about

important things. I have made a difficult decision about friends, am worried about my younger sister,

and trying to figure out a career for my future. I wish I could discuss these things with them instead

of dishes, room cleaning, and chores. – 15-year-old wishing for more

DEAR 15-YEAR-OLD WISHING FOR MORE,

If you go out of your way to do all your chores, going above and

beyond and doing more than what is expected of you, your parents

might be more likely to talk about what you want to talk

about. By doing your chores, you will be showing your parents

appreciation. By doing a kind act for them, they are more likely

to do a kind act for you by taking the time to talk about things

aside from chores. Also, by getting these chores done, they are

less likely to nag you about it, and it won’t be the only conversational

topic anymore. – Your friend

DEAR 15-YEAR-OLD WISHING FOR MORE,

I can relate very closely to what you are going through right

now. It can be extremely stressful and frustrating, but you cannot

allow it to bring you down. One thing is to always keep your

chin up. As for the situation with your parents, the best thing to

always do is try to communicate with them. Grab their attention.

They may not be hearing you right now, because all they

see is you not doing chores. But you should try and talk to them

and share with them exactly what you did with us. You sound

like a great student and person, especially with all the smart but

tough decisions you have made. Chores can be a pain. But, if we

don’t do them, they will never get done. I hope that what I have

said has helped in some way. – Compassionate Rose

DEAR 15-YEAR-OLD WISHING

FOR MORE,

I understand where you’re coming from.

Parents just seem to be pre-occupied

with other things. Maybe your parents

are nervous about talking with you

about your future because you are

their oldest child. Try sitting them

down after dinner, or even during

dinner, and tell them how you

feel. Try to get them to see things

from your point of view. Explain

to them that you want to talk to

them about your future, not just

chores. Tell them you’re worried

about your sister. Tell them everything.

Good luck. – Just an average

girl

DEAR 15-YEAR-OLD

WISHING FOR MORE,

I understand your yearning for more

with your relationship with your parents.

However, I think you need to think about

262 FEBRUARY JANUARY 2014 2014


their wishes as well. Their anger comes from the fact that you

do your chores in a different timeline from what they ask.

Maybe if you do your chores more quickly, they will be less

angry, and your conversations can broaden into more topics

that interest you. Compromises are a two-way street. – An

empathetic friend

DEAR 15-YEAR-OLD WISHING FOR MORE,

You present a problem with which many kids your age struggle.

It is important to present a suggested solution when you discuss

the problem with your parents. Make sure you include your responsibility

in developing, as well as solving, the problem. Your

parents will need to hear that you understand how stressful and

frustrating it is for them to rely on you to share the daily household

management. An activity away from the house, once your

chores are complete, would be a good opportunity to talk with

them. Show them this article, if you have trouble finding the

right words. It is impressive that you recognize the need to have

a good relationship with your parents, especially at this time in

your life. Don’t be discouraged, if your parents sound defensive

at first. They will think about what you have said and you

will likely notice more interest from them in the future. After

all, they want a better relationship with you, too. Good luck. –

Dr. Renae Lapin

ASK DR. RENAE is an advice column for teens with advice from real

teenagers. We are currently recruiting interested middle

and high school students to help provide advice to

their peers.

CALLING

All advice is reviewed, selected and screened

ALL

by Dr. Renae Lapin, a licensed marriage and

MIDDLE AND

family therapist currently working for the Broward HIGH SCHOOL

County School Board’s Family Counseling TEENS

Program. Dr. Renae has 30 years’ experience

as a family counselor and has been writing a

monthly column in the Parklander for the past four years on school related

and parenting issues. Your advice will be published anonymously (but

you can tell your friends that it is yours!). Teacher recommendation and

parent permission required. Interested? Write to ASK DR. RENAE for an

application at askdrrenae@att.net.

If you are a teen with a question or problem for which you would like

advice from a peer, write to ASK DR. RENAE for a confidential response

to your question printed in the Parklander. No names or identifying

information will be published. Please give your age and/or grade level in

school, and let us know if you are a guy or a girl. All inquiries should be

directed to: askdrrenae@att.net. Make sure to include ASK DR. RENAE in

the subject line.

®

FUSION

Fitness and 0 2 Yoga

Yoga

the PARKLANDER 63


[ SCHOOL SCOOP ]

By Nancy Washor

ASSISTANCE

One of the many benefits of working for the Broward County

Public School System for over 35 years is that I observed

the numerous changes and growth of the educational system.

When I began my career in the 1970s, I taught at a middle

school. My class consisted of eighteen mildly mentally challenged

individuals who remained in my room the entire day,

with the exception of going to lunch, music, physical education,

media, and art.

Many parents and educators did not believe this type of placement

was appropriate. Congress passed a law known as Public

Law 94-142 (Education of All Handicapped Children Act).

Before its implementation, beginning in 1975, the teacher had

to advise the guidance counselor and keep a log of the student’s

behavior for a couple of weeks. At the end of that time, the

child’s placement would be adjusted.

Times have changed, in many ways for the better. Thanks to

involved vocal parents and lobbyists, laws have been put in place

to insure proper, well-thought-out decisions in relation to an

individual student’s school placement. Additionally, parents

have become more involved in the decision-making concerning

in its place their child’s education.

Through the years, the school psychologists’ caseload became

dramatically larger. The caseload became so great that testing

often continued throughout the summer. The mind-set evolved

for many (parents and teachers alike) to identify a problem, refer

the student to be tested by the school psychologist, and hurry

up to place the child in the exceptional education program.

We can be grateful that the process has evolved. In recent years,

the tendency within the educational system is to provide equal,

appropriate education for all children, whether they are diagnosed

with a disability or not. This data-driven process uses an

For Students in Need

64 FEBRUARY 2014

approach referred to as Response to Intervention (RtI). It requires

a team effort.

A teacher or a parent contacts whoever is in charge of RtI in

the school. Some schools have assigned the guidance counselor,

exceptional education specialist, assistant principal or reading

specialist to organize this process. After a request for RtI is

made, the coordinator disseminates paperwork to the child’s

teacher(s) and parent(s) and the process begins.

The idea is to get the child help, not necessarily get him/her

tested.

Concerns can be related to the social, emotional, intellectual or

psychological needs of the child. Throughout this sometimes

lengthy process, forms are filled out and meetings are held,

which include the parent(s), teacher(s), administrator, guidance

counselor and reading specialist. Data is collected and goals are

created by the team. Interventions are put in place and the team

reconvenes every few weeks (or as identified by the RtI team

members) to discuss the results.

The goal is not to rush and test, but rather to get the child the

help he/she needs in a timely manner. This does not always end

in testing of the child. Examples of some services would be

placement of the child in a smaller reading group, specialized

reading instruction (a reading program, such as phonics, in addition

to the basal, the reading book for the class), behavior plan

formulation, or attending a social skills group.

Nancy Washor was employed for over 35 years as an educator for

children with special needs in the Broward County School System.

She received her B.A. degree at Barry University and her M.S. degree

at Florida Atlantic University. She presently advocates for parents

and their children in school-related meetings.


[ MEDICAL MATTERS ]

2014 ANNUAL HEALTH ISSUE

We continue our focus on medical

matters this month with a variety

of exciting stories. Whether

your household includes a family

with young children or a loved one

wondering why he or she is “skinnyfat,”

our writers have you covered.

February is National Children’s Dental Health Month.

Our story advises how to deal with a child fearful of

the dentist and a child’s age for a first visit, among

other tips. It is also American Heart Month, when

people should be mindful of their cholesterol numbers, diet,

weight, nutrition, and stress level.

Two stories address addiction from different angles. The addicted

brain is a revealing story about what happens in our heads, when

we put certain substances in our bodies. Another writer in the field of

addiction dispels the myths associated with getting sober.

If you know someone with cancer, there are experimental trials for the

person willing to take part. The chance to improve one’s health and help

medical science are the results of getting involved.

IN THIS SECTION

66 – THE ADDICTED BRAIN: Proof

that drugs can alter the mind.

68 – AMERICAN HEART MONTH:

Be pro-active in protecting

your heart through diet, exercise,

and more.

74 – MYTHS OF ADDICTION:

Dispelling beliefs about quitting

drugs and alcohol, among

other things.

76 – NEW CANCER TRIALS:

How to sign up for experimental

programs.

78 – LESSONS:Hospice patients

teach acceptance and grace.

82 – NATIONAL CHILDREN’S DEN-

TAL HEALTH MONTH: Learn

about tooth care for the youngest

members of the household.

84 – DIETITIAN’S VIEW: There are

benefits to adding turmeric to

one’s diet.

88 – EXPLAINING SKINNY-FAT:

A fitness professional breaks

down this body type.

No Heart Is Too Small




A Valentine’s Day Family Celebration

Saturday, February 15th, 2014


11:00 AM - 2:00 PM

FREE Admission

Refreshments

Fire Truck Tours

Children’s Entertainment

Face Painting, Balloon Art


Try out our world class

da Vinci ® surgical robot

Swimming and Water Safety

Learn about healthy eating

Teddy Bear Clinic

Wear

Red

To register or for more information, call



954.601.8094

Complimentary valet available at the main entrance.

2801 North State Rd. 7

Margate, FL 33063

NorthwestMed.com

the PARKLANDER 65


[ MEDICAL MATTERS ]

Drugs and the Brain

Proof of Alteration

By David Duresky, MA

For most of recorded history, we have reports of people using

and abusing substances. However, it has only been in the past

75 years that treatments for drug addiction and alcoholism have

been developed.

Sadly, the majority of these treatments have limited success,

are very costly, and can leave an individual, their families, and

friends feeling hopeless. Typically, drug and alcohol treatment

relies exclusively on “talk” therapy. Trying to talk someone out

of a brain disease is about as helpful as trying talk them out of

heart disease.

Recent research, led by Nora D. Volkow, M.D., Director of the

National Institute on Drug Abuse, has discovered medicines

that can help addicts through detoxification, and allow them to

quickly build a platform for long-term recovery. A platform that

would normally take two to three years without medications

can now be established within a few months or even weeks.

To know how medically assisted treatments work, it is helpful

to gain an understanding of how an individual becomes addicted

in the first place. Taking any substance alters the brain’s

functioning – that is how and why people get high or drunk.

When an individual begins experimentation with drugs or alcohol,

the neurotransmission (a term for how our brains function)

normalizes as the drug, or alcohol, wears off and the substance

leaves the brain.

After prolonged use, the drug wreaks havoc in cellular structure

and function, which then leads to long-lasting or permanent

neurotransmission abnormalities. That is why addiction is called

a brain disease. It is a profound disruption in the functioning of

specific neurotransmitters and brain circuits. Addiction involves

an expanding cycle of destruction, first in the areas of the brain

that process reward, followed by alterations in cognitive functions,

such as learning (memory, conditioning, habits), decisionmaking,

awareness, and emotional functioning.

Addiction impacts every area of the brain. With repeated drug

exposure, the brain becomes recalibrated, tilting the balance

away from willful control over one’s behavior toward behaviors

driven by strong and persistent cravings. The result is compulsive

drug or alcohol use, despite severe health and social consequences.

Changes in brain functioning can be restored with two to three

years of abstinence. That is the problem! During the first critical

months of abstinence, decision-making and judgment are critically

impaired, often resulting in relapse, which creates a vicious

new cycle of using. These changes can be seen in scans of the

brain in the illustration.

Medically assisted treatments come in two basic types. One employs

replacement medication that mimics the substance being used.

These include medicines, such as Suboxone, methadone, and others.

The challenge with these medications is that they are costly and also

addicting; withdrawal from them may be more difficult than from

the original substance used. The second and more promising approach

involves combinations of non-habit-forming, non-addicting

medications that effectively and efficiently restore brain functioning.

They leave the addicted person with the ability to make better judgments

and decisions. They also reduce urges and cravings.

The majority of individuals taking this approach can be treated in

an outpatient setting, under the continual supervision of a physician.

This approach is less disruptive to their lives, and allows them to be

treated in an environment that supports their recovery.

“Supportive counseling during this time allows the person to increase

their coping skills, deal with painful emotions, and begin to

make the necessary repairs to family and social relationships that

may have been damaged during their addiction,” said Debbie Vadell,

Clinical Director at Peaceful Ridge Recovery in Davie.

David Duresky

The future of addiction treatment

exists today, in the form of medically

assisted treatment and stabilization,

used in conjunction with

advanced, evidence-based behavioral

therapies.

David Duresky, MA, has worked

in the field of substance abuse and

mental health for over 25 years.

He is the Chief Operating Officer

at Peaceful Ridge Recovery in

Davie.

66 FEBRUARY 2014


[ BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT ]

Peaceful Ridge Recovery

Help for the Addicted

Peaceful Ridge Recovery in Davie provides the newest medical approach

to detoxification and treatment for drug and alcohol problems.

The experienced and professional team led by the medical

director with decades of treatment experience provides state-ofthe-art,

discreet treatment, with the mission in mind: “You only

have to do this once!” Peaceful Ridge Recovery offers outpatient

detox, an outpatient program, and specialty programming. This approach

allows addicted people to receive services while living in a

real world setting. For people with the time, the means, and/or the

need for a structured environment, or for those visiting from out of

town, Peaceful Ridge Recovery offers a residential treatment program

in a luxury setting with world-class amenities.

Understanding that addiction is a brain disease is critically important

and we use a medical approach, supported by counseling

to help people get their lives back. Peaceful Ridge Recovery

provides the most recent breakthroughs in medical approaches.

You will have daily meetings with the medical team who use

non-narcotic, non-habit-forming medicines that allow a person

to detox and build an effective and efficient platform for recovery.

For many people, underlying problems may be in play, such as

trauma, depression, anxiety, bi-polar disorder, obsessions, and

other psychiatric illnesses. The staff will treat these conditions

as a means of getting to the heart of the problem. Specialty

programs include Seeking Safety, an evidence-based program

for those who have suffered trauma, and a marijuana treatment

program. There is also wraparound treatment for adolescents

with substance abuse problems that are coupled with behavioral

problems. Our family therapy programs assist people in

rebuilding their support systems. Intensive individual counseling

is provided on a daily basis to help individuals address and

resolve issues related to their addiction.

Addiction, an interaction of environment, genetics, and biological

factors, is a complex problem affecting millions. Contact

Peaceful Ridge Recovery today for a complimentary evaluation

at 888-231-8956 and learn about its evidence-based medical

approach utilizing recent breakthroughs in treating addiction.

Peaceful Ridge Recovery is located at 5337 Orange Drive in Davie.

It is conveniently located minutes away from Fort Lauderdale/Hollywood

International Airport. The telephone numbers

are 954-284-8956 or, toll-free, at 888-231-8956. The fax number

is 954-252-4037. The web site is www.peacefulridgerecovery.com.

The email address is info@peacefulridgerecovery.com.

the PARKLANDER 67


[ MEDICAL MATTERS ]

Get Heart Smart

For Heart Month

By Howard Bush, M.D.

February is National Heart Health Awareness

Month, so now is the time to get heart

smart. Your heart is only the size of your

fist, but it’s the most important muscle in

your body. It is the body’s engine, and it

deserves to be taken care of. Many people

don’t realize that they are not living a

healthy heart lifestyle. Learning the risks

of heart disease can help you be your own

heart health advocate.

An estimated 17.1 million people die of

cardiovascular diseases every year, according

to the World Heart Federation. There

are many risk factors that contribute to

the development of heart disease. It’s important

to know that some risk factors can

be controlled or managed. The more risk factors you have, the

greater your chance of developing heart disease. Higher levels

of each risk factor correlate with a higher risk for heart disease.

Family history of cardiovascular disease, which cannot be controlled,

is an important risk factor. When it is present, it emphasizes

the importance of controlling the other risk factors.

Some of the risk factors can be controlled with just a few changes

in your daily routine. Maintaining a healthy diet, keeping an

active lifestyle, and relaxing are just a few of many steps you can

take to have a healthy heart.

For example, hypertension is the single biggest risk factor for

stroke, and also plays a significant role in heart attacks. It can

be prevented and successfully treated, but only if you have it

diagnosed and stick to your recommended management plan.

Abnormal blood lipid levels -- high total cholesterol, high levels

of triglycerides, high levels of low-density lipoprotein or low

levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol -- all increase

the risk of heart disease and stroke. Improving your diet,

exercising, and taking medication, if necessary, can modify your

blood lipid profile.

Tobacco use also increases the risk of heart disease. The risk

is especially high, if you started smoking when young, smoke

heavily, or are a woman. Stopping tobacco use can reduce your

Dr. Howard Bush with a patient.

risk of heart disease significantly, no matter how long you have

smoked.

Non-smokers exposed to second-hand smoke increase their

risk of heart disease as well. Physical inactivity increases the

risk of heart disease and stroke by 50 percent. People who

don’t exercise regularly are 1.5 times more likely to develop

heart disease. That’s why exercise is such an important part of a

heart-healthy lifestyle. Obesity or being overweight, especially

if a lot of weight is located in your waist area, increases your

risk for health problems, including high blood pressure, high

blood cholesterol, high triglycerides, diabetes, heart disease, and

stroke.

Type II diabetes is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease

and stroke. Having diabetes makes you twice as likely as someone

who does not to develop heart disease. If you do not control

diabetes, then you are more likely to develop heart disease at an

earlier age than other people, and it will be more devastating. If

you are a pre-menopausal woman, your diabetes cancels out the

protective effect of estrogen and your risk of heart disease rises

significantly.

Howard Bush, M.D., is a board-certified interventional cardiologist,

who has been a member of Cleveland Clinic Florida’s medical staff

since 1990. His specialty areas of expertise are cardiac catheterization,

stent angioplasty, treatment strategies for acute myocardial infarction,

and peripheral vascular interventions.

68 FEBRUARY 2014


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[ BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT ]

HEARING PROBLEMS SOLVED

BY AUDIBEL

If you are of a certain age or you ruined your hearing early in life

by blasting your eardrums with music via earbuds, you may need to

improve your hearing. When in need, turn to the best.

With two Broward County locations in Tamarac and Lauderhill,

Audibel and Quality Hearing Centers are part of the All American

Hearing Network. Care and service drive the company’s

health care practices. People come first. “Everybody who works

here shares a common goal: to help our patients hear their very

best,” says Geoffrey V. Savett, HAS, BC-HIS. “The All American

Hearing Network is setting a new standard for excellence

in hearing health care with commitment to our patient journey

philosophy.

“This philosophy is driven solely by the special needs of our patients

and our commitment to serve them. That means carefully guiding

you on how to choose the best style and technology to enhance your

lifestyle. We offer an unprecedented level of national hearing care.”

Audibel and Quality Hearing Centers operate under certain

mandates, including state-of-the-art technology, offering innovative

products and services. A team approach is used to coordinate

the staff ’s individual expertise of all staff members to

provide the best possible care.

Mobile testing is another hallmark

of the company. For people unable

to visit the office, the company provides

service at their place of residence at no additional charge. “We

Geoffrey V. Savett

will offer the community free hearing evaluations at our office and

participate in health fairs and other community events,” says Savett.

“We want our relationship with you to be a long-lasting one. We

encourage you to visit regularly, so we may continue to assist you in

any way possible.”

Audibel Hearing Center is located at 8283 North Pine Island Road

in Tamarac, just south of Southgate near Publix in the Town Center

Plaza. The telephone number is 954-721-0003. The office hours are

Monday to Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday hours

are available only by appointment.

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in Lincoln Park West Shopping Center, one block west of

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the PARKLANDER 73


[ MEDICAL MATTERS ]

?

Myths About Substance

Abuse and Addiction

Get Help for People in Trouble

By Sue Merklin

What is your vision of addiction? Is it the homeless man with a

bottle in a paper bag or a rock star shooting up on drugs?

Statistics show addiction is not associated with an age, a gender,

a race, an income level, or a profession. Addiction afflicts the

three-martini-lunch baby boomer, as well as the young professionals

on drugs to help them cope, perform, or manage pain. It

also afflicts the experimenting college student, the happy hour

senior, and the depressed, sleepless soccer mom.

Process addictions include gambling, sex, the Internet, and

shopping and eating disorders, to name a few. They are all conditions

that result from people ingesting

a substance or engaging in a pleasurable

activity that becomes compulsive

and interferes with health,

relationships, and finances. We all

know someone like this. Addiction

is mainstream.

Here are some myths dispelled:

MYTH 1: Overcoming

addiction is simply

a matter of willpower.

You can stop using drugs

or drinking alcohol if you

really want to. These substances

alter the brain in ways

that result in powerful cravings

and a compulsion to use. These brain changes

make it extremely difficult to quit by sheer force of

will.

MYTH 2: Addiction is a disease; there’s nothing you can do

about it. Most experts agree that addiction is a brain disease,

but that doesn’t mean you’re a helpless victim. The brain changes

associated with addiction can be treated and reversed through

therapy, medication, exercise, and other treatments in all stages

of recovery.

MYTH 3: Addicts have to hit rock bottom before they can get

better. Recovery can begin at any point in the addiction process

— and the earlier, the better. The longer substance abuse

continues, the stronger the addiction becomes, and the harder it

is to treat. Don’t wait to intervene until the addict has lost it all.

MYTH 4: You can’t force someone into treatment; they have

to want help. Treatment doesn’t have to be voluntary to be successful.

People who are pressured into treatment by their family,

employer, or the legal system are just as likely to benefit as those

who choose to enter treatment on their own. As they sober up

and their thinking clears, many formerly resistant addicts decide

they want to change.

MYTH 5: Treatment didn’t work before, so there’s no point

in trying again. Recovery from addiction is a long process that

often involves setbacks. Relapse doesn’t mean that treatment

has failed or that you’re a lost cause. Rather, it’s a signal to

get back on track.

MYTH 6: Treatment must be done in an in-patient facility.

Each individual’s

recovery is different.

Some addicts cannot

or will not go

away for treatment.

Many people successfully

recover as

out-patients, in their

homes. It is not the

location of treatment

that will determine

success, but the relevance

of the treatment

program and

the continuing commitment

level of the

addict and his/her support team.

Wherever an addict is in the recovery process, do not believe

the myth that the addiction will magically disappear or get better

all by itself. Recognize the signs and lend support. You could

save a life. If you are an addict, maybe you could even save your

own life.

Sue Merklin is the CEO and Founder of Addiction Reach, which

manages a concierge in-home practice of highly credentialed clinicians

who treat addicts in all stages of recovery. She manages

the concierge, in-home practices of addiction specialists throughout

Florida.

74 FEBRUARY 2014


Aileen Danko, M.D.



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the PARKLANDER 75


[ MEDICAL MATTERS ]

New Cancer

Trials

Reason for Hope

The basic problem researchers seek to overcome in finding

a cure for cancer is the body’s general inability to fight the

disease. Immune systems can do very little to penetrate the

robust molecular shield found in tumors.

But those shields may no longer be so impenetrable, thanks

to a new experimental drug called BMS-936558, according

to the American Society of Clinical Oncology. Studies show

it produces significant shrinkage when used in fighting specific

forms of lung, skin, and kidney cancers.

“Clinical trials with new drugs, like BMS-936558, offer

hope for patients battling advanced cancers and those that

are difficult to treat,” says physician Stephen Garrett Marcus,

a senior biotechnology research executive, and author of a

comprehensive new reference book, Complications of Cancer

(www.complicationsofcancer.com).

“While experimental treatments are not the best option for

everyone with cancer, they can be a very good one for people

for whom current treatments offer poor outcomes. And, in

the greater scheme of things, trial participants are making

an important contribution to others with the disease. While

they may not be cured, their involvement can significantly

move research forward.”

Investigate and, perhaps, enroll in a clinical trial.

• How can a person with cancer rapidly identify promising

clinical trials? The web site of the National Institute of

Health (www.clinicaltrials.gov) maintains the most comprehensive

registry of cancer clinical trials. The site includes

information regarding significant clinical trials in

progress. Each listing features the name of the clinical trial,

the purpose of the study, the criteria that make a person

eligible to participate, the study locations, and contact information.

• How does a person enroll in an experimental program? When

a good fit in a program is identified, a physician’s referral will

help expedite an evaluation. If necessary, self-referral can be

accomplished by calling the medical center directly and making

an appointment to see the physician running clinical trials.

Details for making an appointment can be found at www.-

clinicaltrials.gov.

• What preparations can be made prior to being seen at the

medical center? A complete package of information that gives

a clear story of a person’s medical illness can be very useful and

should be brought to the clinic at the time of the first appointment.

The center at which a person is evaluated for experimental

treatment may give a person a checklist of what to bring to

the appointment. This may include a letter from the person’s

physician, surgical, pathology and radiology reports, and other

test results. Having all relevant information organized for the

first visit streamlines the process for a comprehensive evaluation;

decisions regarding the best treatment option can be made

more quickly.

• How does a person make a decision about whether or not

to enter a clinical trial? Thoroughly understand standard

treatments and experimental options. Information about

these standard and experimental treatments can be provided

by physicians and other caregivers.

• Who pays for the experimental medication? The experimental

treatment itself should generally be free. Almost all

true experimental treatment programs will pay for the experimental

medication. Legitimate research almost never

asks for money from subjects. Be very wary of treatments

advertising high-cost, cash only payments. Experimental

treatment for a very high price is usually not associated with

legitimate research.

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the PARKLANDER 77


[ MEDICAL MATTERS ]

Does our society hold too narrow a view of what defines

strength? The things many would point to as indicators of

strength – youth, wealth, a fully capable body – fall short, says

Charles Gourgey, a veteran hospice music therapist and author

of Judeochristianity: The Meaning and Discovery of Faith

www.judeochristianity.org), a book that explores the unifying

faith elements of Judaism and Christianity.

“Youth is ephemeral, abundant wealth is for just a few, and we

all experience some kind of disability, usually at several points

in our lives,” says Gourgey. “A car accident, the loss of a job or a

home, grief over a loved one’s dying – such things can happen

to anyone and easily destroy our happiness.”

Gourgey says some of the greatest strength he has ever seen

was demonstrated by certain of his patients facing imminent

death. “Some people have complete love and grace when facing

death,” he says. “It’s how they have lived their lives. And, at the

end of their lives, it’s what supports them. Those who, at the

end, are peaceful, grateful and confident share some common

characteristics.”

• Their love is non-self-interested. When we have awareness

of and deepest respect for the individuality of others, we overcome

the high walls of ego and experience a tremendous sense

of freedom, says Gourgey. He says he continues to be inspired

by patients who cared more for the well-being of others, including

their fellow hospice patients, than themselves, while facing

their own mortality. Non-self-interested love – loving others for

themselves without expecting or needing anything in return – is

the greatest form of love, according to Gourgey.

Lessons to Learn

From Dying Hospice Patients

with their life’s journey were those who had faith in something

higher than themselves.

The problem with many concepts of faith, says Gourgey, is that

people attach specific doctrines to it, which means some people

will always be excluded. A unifying faith – that all people are

connected and love is the force that binds us – allows for trust,

compassion, and caring.

• They were motivated by an innate sense of what is good. They

didn’t get mad at themselves; they didn’t beat themselves up for

mistakes they might have made in the past. That’s because they

were always guided by their sense of what is good, and they

made their choices with that in mind.

That did not prevent them from making some bad choices or

mistakes over the course of their lives, Gourgey says. But, when

they erred, they addressed the problem with the same loving

compassion they extended to others. “Their compassion overcame

even any self-hate they may have experienced,” he says.

Many patients left lasting impressions on Gourgey and taught

him valuable life lessons. He remembers one in particular.

“She was in hospice, a retired nurse who had developed a rare,

incurable disease,” he recalls. “She would go around every day,

checking to see what she could do for the other patients. She

fetched blankets for a 104-year-old lady who always complained

of cold feet. She sat with and listened to patients who

needed company and someone to talk to. She had an attentive

awareness about her, like she was fully in touch with her soul.”

• They had an unwavering faith that transcended religious

dogma. Faith is the knowledge that there is more to life than

the apparent randomness of the material world; a sense that we

are known to a greater reality and will return to that reality. No

matter what their religion, the patients who were most at peace

Gourgey was with the woman when she died. “She was radiant,

she just glowed,” he says. “She kept repeating how grateful she

was for her life. It was as if the life of love she had lived was

there to transport and support her at the end.”

78 FEBRUARY 2014


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By Cynthia MacGregor

[ MEDICAL MATTERS ]

TOOTH TALK

Important for All Ages

Do you have a persistent tooth pain that you’re trying to ignore? Are

your pearly whites as pearly and white as you would like? Or, has

an aversion to the dentist kept you from paying proper attention to

your dental health?

The fact is, dental health is an important aspect of overall health.

Untreated dental issues can lead to general health problems. If you

have children, you need to make sure their teeth are getting the

proper attention, both in the dentist’s office and at home. What

better time to address the teeth upon which we all rely than now,

National Children’s Dental Health Month?

The Parklander spoke with three local dentists to get the lowdown

on good dental health, for both kids and adults. Dr. Keith Schwartz

of Coconut Creek treats adults in his practice. Dr. Michelle Handel

of Children’s Dental, of Wellington and East Boca Raton, treats

kids. Dr. Andrew Segelnick of Mini-Mouths Dentistry for Kids in

Coral Springs also treats kids.

Asked what he would tell a fearful patient, Dr. Schwartz said,

“There have been many advances in dentistry, including an anesthesia

wand, which is a computer-assisted anesthesia system. We can

sedate a fearful patient with nitrous oxide, also known as laughing

gas. Materials and techniques have improved, and there have been

advances in cosmetic dentistry, as well. The type of bonding materials

is better. We have porcelain veneers and ceramic crowns to

enhance a smile and take care of discolored or chipped teeth.”

Periodontal (gum) disease is very prevalent and, since it’s usually

painless, many people who have it don’t know they do. Dr. Schwartz

advises, “See your dentist regularly. Dentistry is now pleasant and

painless. We want to educate patients. An educated patient can

make his or her own informed decisions about treatment and

move forward with it to have a healthy mouth for a lifetime.”

Both Dr. Segelnick and Dr. Handel concur that age two is an appropriate

time for a child’s first dental visit, “or six months after their

first tooth erupts,” Dr. Handel adds. Asked if being cavity-prone is

hereditary, Dr. Segelnick says it’s possible, but, “The larger factors

are failure to brush and eating candy.”

Asked about periodontal exams or treatment for kids, he says, “In

any dental visit, the dentist should look for periodontal problems,

but it is not normally necessary for kids to see a periodontist.”

He cautions that some parents have an erroneous mindset that baby

teeth don’t matter, because they’re going to fall out anyhow. But,

he says, “The child will have those teeth till as late as age 11, and

cavities can cause pain, blood problems, and abscesses. They need to

have those cavities filled.”

If kids (and their parents) take care of those teeth, however, they

hardly ever get cavities, Dr. Handel says. Addressing the issue of

when kids have the proper manual dexterity to brush their own

teeth, she suggests a benchmark: “When they can tie their own

shoes.”

If kids do get cavities, Dr. Handel says there is less for them to fear:

“We do laser dentistry — no needle, no drill.”

With proper dental care for both you and your kids, your family can

have smiles that convey a feeling of pride. With the advances in

dentistry, there are many reasons to smile.

Asked how to prepare kids for their first dental

visit, Dr. Segelnick suggests that adults,

who often have a fear of dentists they

can pass on to their kids, say as little as

possible and leave it up to the dentist

to make the child comfortable. Dr.

Handel suggests buying books that

talk about a child’s visits to the

dentist. Read these to the child

and let the author provide preparation.

“If the child is fearful,” Dr.

Handel adds, “keep telling them

all we’re going to do is brush their

teeth, take pictures, and teach the

child how to keep his or her teeth

healthy.”

82 2 FEBRUARY JANUARY 2014 2014


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the PARKLANDER 83


[ DIETITIAN’S VIEW ]

TERRIFIC

TURMERIC

Notable Health Benefits

By Nancy M. Ouhib, MBA, RD, LD/N

Turmeric is a spice that is derived from the finger-like stems (rhizomes)

of the Curcuma longa plant. It has been used for centuries

in food preparation and traditional medicines to treat numerous

diseases and conditions.

Noted for its bright yellow color, it is related to and similar in size

to ginger. Turmeric has a characteristic musky, earthy aroma and a

pungent, slightly bitter flavor. Some say that turmeric’s flavor resembles

a combination of ginger and pepper.

Turmeric is grown throughout India, other parts of

Asia, and Africa. India is the primary exporter of

alleppey turmeric, although Peru and China are

additional sources. Alleppey turmeric is highly regarded

for its deep yellow to orange-yellow color.

Chinese turmeric, which is of comparable quality to

alleppey, is characteristically more brownish in color.

The use of turmeric as a powerful coloring agent for food

and fabric dates as far back as 600 B.C. Marco Polo, in

1280, mentioned turmeric in notes of his travels in

China: “There is also a vegetable that has all the

properties of true saffron, as well as the smell

and the color, and yet it is not really saffron.”

In medieval Europe, turmeric was known

as Indian saffron. Since then, turmeric has

been used as an inexpensive substitute for

saffron to color and flavor prepared mustard,

pickles, relish, chutneys, and rice dishes as

well as butter and cheese. It is also used in spice

blends in the Caribbean, India, North Africa, the

Middle East, and Indonesia, such as curry powder and

rendangs (spicy meat dishes). It is also commonly used in fabric dyes.

In traditional Chinese medicine and Ayurvedic medicine, turmeric

has been used to aid digestion and liver function, relieve arthritis

pain, and regulate menstruation. Turmeric has also been applied

directly to the skin for eczema and wound healing. Today, traditional

or folk uses of turmeric include applications to deal with

heartburn, stomach ulcers, gallstones, inflammation, and cancer. It

is dried and taken by mouth as a powder or in capsules, teas, or

liquid extracts.

The primary biologically active constituent of turmeric is a chemical

called curcumin, which only comprises about two to six percent

of the spice. It is believed that curcumin has potent anti-inflammatory

and antioxidant properties, which may contribute to its

potential to prevent such conditions as cancer, Alzheimer’s disease,

heart disease, and arthritis. Clinical confirmation of these benefits

is still very limited. Progress in establishing recommendations for

the effectiveness in people, especially at typical dietary intakes, is

still incomplete and unconfirmed.

It is important to note that curcumin is poorly absorbed through

the gastrointestinal tract. Formulations to improve the distribution

in foods and absorption of curcumin from ongoing

clinical studies should improve our understanding of how it

can best be used to improve human health.

Turmeric is considered safe for most adults. High dos-

es or long-term use of turmeric may cause indigestion,

dizziness, nausea, and/or diarrhea. In animals,

high doses of turmeric have caused liver problems.

No cases of liver problems have been reported in

people to date.

People with gall bladder disease should avoid using

turmeric as a dietary supplement, as it may worsen the

condition. Turmeric may slow blood clotting. Taking turmeric

along with medications that also slow clotting might

increase the chances of bruising and bleeding. Some medications

that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel

(Plavix), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), ibuprofen

(Advil, Motrin, and others), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn,

others), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin,

and warfarin (Coumadin).

The choice to use a dietary supplement can be a wise decision that

provides health benefits. However, these products may be unnecessary

for good health or they may even create unexpected risks. Unlike

drug products that must be proven safe and effective for their

intended use before marketing, there are no provisions in the law

for the Food and Drug Administration to approve dietary supplements

for safety or effectiveness before they reach the consumer.

Always tell your physician about any complementary health practices

you use. Give him/her a complete picture of what you do to

manage your health. This will help to ensure safe and coordinated

care.

84 FEBRUARY 2014


the PARKLANDER 85


[ BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT ]

With a Special Difference

Royal Palm Ob/Gyn in Coral Springs

is the largest independent provider of

women’s health care in Broward County.

With a staff of six physicians, five nursemidwives,

and advanced nurse practitioners,

this 13-year-old business deals

Bruce Zafran, M.D.

with women of all ages, from adolescents to seniors. Menopausal

concerns, aging issues, reproductive medicine, and infertility issues

are all dealt with at Royal Palm Ob/Gyn.

“We deliver over 1,000 babies each year,” says President Bruce

Zafran, M.D. “Patients are offered a variety of birthing options,

including water births in a natural environment at the hospital.

High-risk obstetrics and advanced maternal age are of special interest

in our practice.”

Treating “young women of all ages,” the practice prides itself on

having some of the most experienced gynecologists in the field of

minimally invasive surgery. This includes Da Vinci robotic surgery

for hysterectomies, allowing the patient to return to work often

within a week. Minimally invasive surgery is a rapidly growing

field in women’s health care, treating conditions such as abnormal

uterine bleeding, and permanent contraception without traditional

surgical methods. Cancer screening, preventive care, and pre-conception

counseling are essential concerns at Royal Palm Ob/Gyn.

Fashion models and Olympic swimmers are among the patients.

Service is provided to women with all kinds of insurance from

Medicare to military. Even the uninsured are given care. Also provided

is care on an emergency basis at Northwest Medical Center

in Obstetrics and Gynecology. Physicians are available for questions

by email. The languages spoken are English, Spanish, French,

German, Russian, and Hebrew.

With hours extended for the convenience of patients, they are

Monday and Friday from 8:45 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday and

Wednesday from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., Thursday from 8:45 a.m. to 8

p.m., Friday from 8:45 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Saturday from 8:30 a.m.

to 12 noon. Saturday hours are twice monthly.

Royal Palm Ob/Gyn is located at 8110 Royal Palm Blvd., Suite

108, in Coral Springs. The telephone number is 954-341-8288.

The fax number is 954-341-5165. The web site is www.royalpalmwomenshealth.com.

New Year

New You

86 FEBRUARY 2014

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Bruce M. Zafran, M.D., F.A.C.O.G

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Tara Dennis, D.O.

Val Petrosian, M.D.

Jamie Burrows, D.O., F.A.C.O.G.

Jill Boland, M.D.

Karen Saver, CNM, MSN, ARNP

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the PARKLANDER ANDE

R 87


[ HEALTH & WELLNESS]

What is Skinny Fat?

Define Your Exercise Goals

Beforе

By Jen Esposito

After

Skinny fat represents people who have average, or even below average,

weight for their age, sex and height, but have a higher body fat

percentage than would be appropriate for them. These people are

skinny, but not lean. In women, this may result in a size 4 gal who

still has visible cellulite in the hips, thighs, and buttocks. In men, you

may see a flabby mid-section or lower back, even though they may

be able to maintain a size 34 waistline.

Now that you know the definition, you may wonder if you are skinny

fat, how you got this way, and what you can do to change. Perhaps

you are thinking, “I am an avid runner.” Or, “I take spin class several

times each week, so why am I still not lean?”

Several factors contribute to becoming skinny fat, which include

what kind of food you eat and your exercise program. Additionally,

your heart rate range while exercising can significantly influence

your body composition.

From a nutritional perspective, the amount of available fuel you have

in your body as stored carbohydrate and stored body fat, as well as

the food you eat each day, will help determine what you burn for

fuel while you are exercising. Many people benefit from nutritional

counseling and using a meal plan designed to help them direct their

bodies to burn more fat for fuel, both when exercising and at rest. It

is recommended to seek a qualified and appropriately credentialed

professional to further discuss your nutritional needs.

When evaluating your workouts, think about why you are exercising.

There are many healthful reasons to do so. But, if your reason for exercising

is to reduce body fat, you may be doing yourself a disservice.

It is worth considering that, when exercising at a high level of exertion,

during which you may be breathless and sweaty, your heart

must work harder or faster to meet the demand for oxygen created

during that exercise. The primary job of the body is to stay alive under

all conditions, and this means your body will choose the most

readily available and easily

processed fuel to meet the

present demand.

This is important for you,

because it means that

when you are really pushing

yourself while working

out, your body will likely

choose carbohydrates as

its source for fuel. Unfortunately,

carbohydrates from

your last meal and easily accessible

carbohydrates, which

are stored in your muscles, actually

provide less energy when

broken down than stored body

fat. As a consequence, when you are

really exerting yourself, not only are you burning

carbohydrates for fuel, rather than fat, you are also getting less

energy out of the process.

Stored fat molecules are much larger than carbohydrate molecules.

It costs energy for your body to tap into and break down these cells

for fuel. When you’re working out at a high intensity, your energy is

better spent supporting the job your heart is doing keeping you alive,

rather than tapping into and breaking down fat cells for fuel.

Have hope. You can enjoy the health benefits of exercise and also

look leaner. The bottom line is, the next time you get ready to exercise,

consider whether or not you want to burn your last meal for fuel

or you want to burn your cellulite or spare tire for fuel. Then, adjust

your diet and intensity of exercise accordingly, and let skinny fat be

someone else’s problem.

Jen Esposito is the General Manager of Anytime Fitness Parkland, a certified specialist

in performance nutrition, and doctor of chiropractic, among other professional titles.

88 FEBRUARY 2014


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the PARKLANDER 89


[ PET TALK ]

An Interesting

Second Opinion

Don’t Trust Dr. Google

By Glenn Kalick, D.V.M.

Last fall, I had an interesting email correspondence with a client who

was moving from Massachusetts to Coral Springs. He wanted to ask

me a few questions about myself and my practice. But, quickly, the

interview went from my background and the policies of Brookside

Animal Hospital to his dog Gus, a one-year-old English Bulldog

with a vomiting problem.

Gus was vomiting frequently. It was apparent he didn’t bring Gus to

a veterinarian. I asked him about the medications he was giving Gus.

The dose, the frequency of administration, and the types of medications

were not typical of what veterinarians use or recommend.

The client did tell me that he did not have a veterinarian and he was

using information from Google. Most veterinarians and physicians

whom I know refer to people like this client as consulting with Dr.

Google, who answers all, but knows no specifics. He is never liable.

Veterinarians and physicians spend hours defending their points of

view as doctors of record, compared with a computer.

Dr. Google recommended a dietary change. The owner tried venison,

duck, salmon, and a raw diet. Gus vomited repeatedly through

all of the changes. He tried Pepcid and Cimetidine for acid control.

That didn’t stop the vomiting, but the situation was a little better. He

tried to feed Gus with elevated food bowls. No luck. He fed Gus

multiple small meals a day and that seemed to work the best. But

he also worked and twice-a-day feeding was all he had time to do.

The dog owner read that Gus might have a foreign body in his stomach

or something called an intusseption, but he said that he couldn’t

afford an x-ray or ultrasound. He did tell me that, along with consulting

Dr. Google, that his friend was a veterinary technician who

said there were other things that he could try.

He read about a product called Cerenia that stops dogs from vomiting

and wanted to know if I could write him a prescription for it and

I told him that I could not. There is something called a veterinarianclient-patient

relationship that had yet to be established. I need to

see the patient and we need to establish a relationship before prescriptions

are written. I told him that I had a veterinarian friend in

his area who owed me a favor and that I would ask him to see Gus.

But the owner would need to pay for his own diagnostics, if needed.

Dr. Rob saw Gus and took an x-ray. They immediately saw something

strange. Dr. Rob showed the client the gastric foreign body

on the radiograph. Dr. Rob performed the required surgery and removed

two pacifiers and one pair of infant socks from Gus’ stomach.

The dog had a history of eating the client’s daughter’s baby toys,

pacifiers, and socks.

For months, Gus suffered. Dr. Google can only make recommendations

based on the information supplied by the computer operator.

He can’t take x-rays or blood for analysis. He can’t palpate an animal’s

abdomen or evaluate its hydration status. He can’t comment on

enlarged lymph nodes or take a temperature.

As with most cases, Gus needed diagnostic tests and someone who

could properly evaluate the tests. This also necessitated a current

relationship with a doctor who could ask the pertinent questions and

set up a diagnostic and treatment plan.

4 4

Dr.Glenn Kalick, Dr. Amber Callaway,

Dr. Jessica Garcia, Dr. Erin Leff,

Dr. Donna Hekman and Dr. Nelly Jehn

Gus did very well after surgery. The owner said that he will be happy

when his daughter is finished with the pacifier. I told him that, as his

daughter gets older, the pacifier and socks become Barbie dolls and

hair scrunchies.

Glenn Kalick, D.V.M., is the owner of Brookside Animal Hospital of

Coral Springs. The web site is www.Brooksidevet.com.

90 FEBRUARY 2014


[ EQUESTRIAN NEWS ]

THE AGE TO BEGIN

RIDING

By Donice Muccio

Around the Barn…

I am frequently asked what is a good age for a child to start riding

lessons. For teaching purposes, a five-year-old child is not too young,

as long the school horse is safe and will tolerate a beginner learning

balance and how to be kind to the horse’s mouth.

A young child who shows an interest in horses is quickly able to

learn good form. I have found that children want to please their instructors

and show kindness to the horses, if correctness is explained

in a manner they can understand.

Our six-year-olds are able to show independently in Walk/Trot

classes because they have learned proper body positions and control

of the horse or pony. Obviously, the instructor needs patience

to teach the very young, as sometimes the lessons include discussing

the student’s daily school activities or the last fun family outing. As

an instructor, I absolutely love the stories and then we get right back

to working on riding skills.

Alyssa Catania, shown above on Malachi Acres’ Arabian mare, Kat’s

Simone, is now six years old. She is a very gutsy little girl. Her confidence

is amazing, as you can see the moment she lands in the saddle.

The most satisfying part is watching the five-year-old beginners turn

into college-bound students who have some kind of equestrian goal

while attending college. Many of the students participate on the college

equestrian team. I suspect Alyssa will be one of those students.

The college students have started coming back to visit Malachi

Acres during the winter break. It is a thrill to see them and I always

offer them a ride on one of their favorite horse buddies or a chance

to test-ride one of our new school horses. It is a special time of the

year for all of us who have taught these students, now young adults

still loving horses.

The barn is a wonderful place to be!

the PARKLANDER 91


[ RECREATION ]

Braving the Cold

By Martin Lenkowsky

Only for Diehard Fans

It has been more than 32 years since Amy and I moved to Coral

Springs from our apartment in Forest Hills, New York. During

those three-plus decades, I’ve had to brave the cold New York

City winter on just three occasions. The first was my nephew’s

bar mitzvah. The second visit was to surprise my sister-in-law

on her birthday. The most recent trip was last January, when I

went to visit my brother in the hospital.

During each Big Apple visit, I couldn’t wait to get back to my

warm, sunny South Florida pool and backyard. I had almost

forgotten how horrible it was to get into a freezing cold car, or

to scrape ice and snowflakes off the windshield.

Now that February – winter’s harshest month – has arrived,

I can’t stop thinking about this month’s Superbowl. This year,

unlike any before, the biggest extravaganza in sports will not

be played in the temperate confines of some mild sunbelt

stadium. Nor will the AFC and NFC champions face off

under a climate-controlled, domed arena, no matter what

the latitude.

This month’s big game will be played at MetLife Stadium in the

New Jersey Meadowlands, an outdoor venue with no protection

from the blustery northern cold or potentially heavy snowfalls.

From a sports perspective, I kind of like it. If a six-foot, fiveinch,

320-pound athlete making millions of dollars for playing

a game catches a cold, it’s not my worry. Nor do I have much

sympathy for those crazy fans willing to brave the harshest of

elements. (I guess if they can afford those ticket prices, they

deserve to go and enjoy.)

Putting the subject into a little more perspective, my daughter

and I went to New York a few weeks ago for a New York

Giants/Minnesota Vikings Monday night football game at

MetLife Stadium. The air temperature at game time was somewhere

in the low 50s. Granted, it was not exactly a New York

City winter night by any stretch of the imagination. However,

to a man who has lived down here for more than thirty years,

and his daughter, a Coral Springs native, it might as well have

been minus 10 degrees.

We were freezing! Before the game even started, I bought, for

the two of us, thick New York Giants’ scarves. Plus, my daughter

went to the concession stand – not for a bottle of beer, but

for a cup of hot chocolate.

The kind folks sitting in front of us probably thought we

were doing this for their amusement. They had just flown

down from Minnesota to cheer on their team. Not only were

they wearing sleeveless shirts, but they were laughing at our

freezing cold Florida bodies. They even said, “This is like July

to us.”

Of course, I can only take this hypocrisy so far. Should someone

offer me a free ticket to the big game, my only response

would most likely be, “How much for a hot chocolate?”

92 2 FEBRUARY JANUARY 2014


the PARKLANDER 93

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9


By Candice Russell

[ LAST WORD ]

Singer Rick

Springfield

Searching for Love

In All the Wrong Places

What do you notice first in someone you might like or even

love? Is it eyes or a winning smile? Many women say they’re

drawn to men for their intelligence or sense of humor. Many

men want women with a slim or athletic body.

Because people have such trouble finding mates these days, they

turn to web sites like Plenty of Fish, which is free, and feebased

services like eHarmony and Match.com.

Interests can be the points around which men and women or

women and women or men and men unite. I foolishly joined

Meet Cat Lovers, in the hope of meeting a man who liked cats.

But many of the profiles of men don’t even mention ownership

of a single feline. In fact, some men post photos of themselves

with dogs.

Hope was momentarily raised in one response -- an age-appropriate,

self-employed male with a master’s degree. He listed a

wide range of reading interests and relatable hobbies, including

cooking, learning and music. I was on

board. I also appreciated the fact that he

was a non-smoker with a dry, sarcastic

sense of humor.

But further reading provided information that

left me less than thrilled. This guy doesn’t drink.

Ever. Not even a glass of champagne on December 31.

His favorite hobby is camping, which I would only do if held

as a hostage at gunpoint. Camping is my definition of a horrific

experience. I tried it in childhood and adulthood with results of

sleeplessness and body aches. But, for the right guy with chemistry

ignited between us, maybe I could try camping again. So, I

was still interested in reading the rest of his profile.

Then came the worst possible admission by my potential suitor,

a revelation that was a deal-breaker. The site asked him to fill

out an answer to this: “Always wanted to try.” Of all the things

he could have answered, from sky-diving, to a weekend in Paris,

he wrote about sharing in the bedroom.

(Those who have seen the film Bob and

Carol and Ted and Alice will know what I

mean). This is something I would never

do, even at gunpoint.

So, it’s “no” to dating sites for me. But

I remain optimistic. If you happen to

meet the clone of tall, sensitive, rumplyhaired

singer Rick Springfield in your

travels, please suggest he stop by.

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Over 6,000 Sq. Ft., 5 True Brs. + Game Rm., 3 Car Garage, Elegant,

Wood Floors, French Doors, Fireplace, Huge Kitchen, Wood, Granite,

SubZero, Lux. Master Suite 1st Flr., Expansive Cov. Scr. Patio, Pool,

Accordions, and so Much More!

PARKLAND / CYPRESS HEAD $889,900

SPRAWLING ESTATE!

Very Big & Beautiful 5 Br / 5 Ba + Ofce! Hardwood Floors, Crown

Molding, Gourmet Kitchen, Wood Expansive Pool & Spa, Granite &

6 Burner Gas Range. ¾ Acre On Cul-De-Sac. Guard Gated

Community W/ Many Amenities.

WATERFRONT

GATED

GATED

PARKLAND / CYPRESS HEAD $875,000

NEWER UPGRADED BEAUTY!

Outstanding 5 Br / 3.5 Ba Plus Ofce, 3 Car Garage, New Designer Kitchen

Featuring Wood, Granite, & S.S. Appliances. Marble Floors, Crown Molding,

Resort Style Pool / Patio, Full Summer Kitchen & Bar. Guard Gated

Community W / Amenities Tennis, Pool and More!

PARKLAND / PINETREE ESTATES $825,000

NORTH PINETREE!

Big 5 Br / 4 Ba Includes a Huge Game Rm. New Kitchen, Wood,

Granite, Wet Bar and Fireplace, One Of a Kind Pool. Patio W/

Fabulous Entertaining Bar & Cave Hot Tub + 2,000 Sq. Ft. Bonus

Building, Beautiful Acre Plus Homesite.

JUST LISTED

JUST LISTED

PARKLAND / MEADOW RUN $595,000

KNOCK OUT KITCHEN!

5 Br Plus a Game Room, 3 Way Split Plan, New Kitchen With

Dark Wood Cabinets, Gleaming Granite & S.S. Appliances

Soaring Ceilings & Great Design Details. 3 Car Garage, Lovely

Pool & Patio, All In Guard Gated Community W/ Amenities.

96 FEBRUARY 2014

HERON BAY / VILLA SORRENTO $414,000

BEAUTIFUL ONE STORY HOME!

Pristine 3 Br. / 2 Ba. Formal Living & Dining + A Family Room.

Split Br Flr. Plan, Soaring Ceiling, Big Covered & Screened Patio, 2

Car Garage & Accordion Shutters! Guard Gated Comm. W/ All The

Amenities, Fitness, Tennis, Pools Etc.!

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