PROGRAMME

ltusm

RFU_Anti-DopingReport2015_16_Version4_English

ANTI-DOPING

PROGRAMME

2015-16 ANNUAL REPORT


Contents

6

10

11

12

12

14

15

ANTI-DOPING PROGRAMME

Foreword

Executive Summary

Anti-Doping Advisory Group

Education Programme

Testing Programme

Current Anti-Doping Rule Violations

Research

18

20

21

22

22

23

25

RFU ILLICIT DRUGS PROGRAMME

Foreword

Executive Summary

Objectives

Education

Specialist Assessment and Treatment

Testing Programme

Illicit Drugs Policy Violations

Contents

3


4 RFU Anti-Doping Report 2015-16


Header copy

ANTI-DOPING

PROGRAMME

Tutor Notes > October 2016

5


Foreword

As a player, coach and now the RFU Professional

Rugby Director, clean sport has always been of the

utmost importance to me.

A clean sport is one which can thrive and grow, and one which

will encourage the next generation of players to pick up a ball and

play. Since taking over the professional rugby department I have

been impressed by the genuine desire of all in the game to keep it

doping-free.

The RFU and its partners take their clean sport responsibilities

extremely seriously and this is reflected in the level of investment

in anti-doping in the game as a whole. We can be cautiously

optimistic, but never complacent, about the current position.

By having a strong sense of values we can continue to promote

a positive culture of fiercely competitive, but fair and clean

competition in our sport. With over 80 athletes involved in an

individual whereabouts programme and the latest detection

methods being utilised, I feel confident that rugby union is at the

forefront of the drive for clean sport.

We are constantly checking and challenging current thinking to

make sure that we are at the sharp end of good practice in this

area. This report shows that all the stakeholders involved in the

game are committed to keeping the game doping-free.

Nigel Melville

Professional Rugby Director, Rugby Football Union and chair of the

Anti-Doping Advisory Group

6 RFU Anti-Doping Report 2015-16


Foreword

Given the impact of doping on the wider sporting

landscape, it is reassuring to see another season

concluded with no indication of systemic doping or

illicit drug use among the elite player population in

England.

Clean sport is something the Rugby Players’ Association and its

members fully support. It is vitally important for the reputation

of the players as individuals and for the game as a whole.

Elite players in England continue to be advocates for clean sport.

However, there is some concern that the violations from the

community game are reflecting poorly on the game as a whole.

While we share these concerns, what is clear is that many of these

violations are the result of performance and image enhancing

drug use in a non-rugby context.

The importance of education in supporting the players’ desire for

a clean sport cannot be overestimated. A coordinated programme

of face-to-face and online anti-doping education is delivered every

season to all elite and academy players in England.

Richard Bryan

Rugby Director, Rugby Players’ Association and member of the

Anti-Doping Advisory Group

Anti-Doping Programme

7


Foreword

Premiership Rugby is committed to ensuring that

our competition, players and clubs remain strong

ambassadors for clean sport.

The content of this report reveals a sport that is committed to

its core values of Teamwork, Respect, Enjoyment, Discipline and

Sportsmanship. Anti-Doping plays a key role in underpinning

these core values - doping should play no part in our sport or any

other.

Only by working closely together can we continue to promote and

build upon our culture of clean sport. We must continue to invest

in ongoing education for players and support staff, while also

utilising the latest detection methods to deter and sanction those

who do not wish to conform to our values.

Premiership Rugby is committed to not only a clean professional

competition but also a clean game nationwide. It supports the

RFU fully in its endeavours to safeguard rugby against the greater

societal pressures the community game faces in this area.

Phil Winstanley

Rugby Director, Premiership Rugby Limited and member of the

Anti-Doping Advisory Group

Ultimately, we are working for everyone who loves

rugby union and sport – whether competing,

training or watching.

Together, we’re creating an environment where all players know

they can compete in the true spirit of sport.

The RFU and UK Anti-Doping have an excellent relationship built

on openness and transparency. We share the common goal of

keeping rugby clean.

Amanda Hudson

Head of Education and Athlete Support, UK Anti-Doping and

UK Anti-Doping representative to the RFU Anti-Doping

Advisory Group

8 RFU Anti-Doping Report 2015-16


Anti-Doping Programme in Numbers

1,001 15%

SAMPLES COLLECTED

FOR ANALYSIS

OF SAMPLES COLLECTED

WERE BLOOD

100

EDUCATION

SESSIONS

4

ANTI-DOPING

RULE VIOLATIONS

Anti-Doping Programme

9


Executive Summary

••

This sixth RFU Anti-Doping Programme Annual Report provides an

account of anti-doping activities in rugby union in England for season

2015/16. It fulfils the commitment made in season 2010/11 to report

publicly in this area of RFU operations.

••

Anti-doping education has been delivered to players at a wide range of

ages and levels, from the international and professional game, through

the RFU regional academies and national league clubs to the community

game and education providers. RFU anti-doping staff presented at

seminars for player agents, academics, parents, coaches, team managers

and medical personnel. In total almost 100 education sessions were

delivered during the course of the season.

••

The RFU research project, in partnership with Leeds Beckett University, is

progressing well. The data collection is completed and it is expected that

Leeds Beckett will publish associated academic papers in the near future.

••

Players in the English game were subject to 1,001 anti-doping tests, with

both blood and urine samples analysed. Testing has taken place both in

and out-of-competition and included both targeted and random selections

at all levels of the game.

••

Four anti-doping violations were reported: one for the presence of

Methandienone and Mesterolone, two for the presence of Oxandrolone

and one for refusing to submit to Sample Collection.

10 RFU Anti-Doping Report 2015-16


Anti-Doping Advisory Group

The Anti-Doping Advisory Group is

responsible for advising on anti-doping

policy and drafting anti-doping rules and

regulations for rugby union in England.

Formed in season 2010/11 the group

replaced a number of other committees with

responsibility in this area, bringing together

representatives from the professional league,

the players’ association and the governing

body. The group membership also provides

expertise in sports science, sports medicine,

law and anti-doping operations.

Membership:

Nigel Melville (Chair)

Professional Rugby Director, RFU

Steve Grainger

Rugby Development Director, RFU

Phil Winstanley

Rugby Director, Premiership Rugby

Andrew Rogers

Head of Governance and Regulation,

Premiership Rugby

Richard Bryan

Rugby Director, Rugby Players’ Association

Amanda Hudson

Head of Education and Athlete Support,

UK Anti-Doping

Angus Bujalski

Legal and Governance Director, RFU

Dr Simon Kemp

Chief Medical Officer, RFU

Stephen Watkins

Anti-Doping and Iliicit Drugs Programme

Manager, RFU

Richard Nunn

Anti-Doping and Illicit Drugs Programme

Officer, RFU

Anti-Doping Programme

11


Education Programme

Anti-Doping information is distributed widely throughout the game at all levels to ensure that members of

the rugby community are aware of the anti-doping programme and can help to support the objective of a

clean game.

Further bespoke anti-doping education is delivered to players and support personnel via multiple delivery

methods to ensure that they are aware of their responsibilities and know how to act on them.

The education programme consists of a mix of face-to-face group and individual workshops, online learning

resources, seminars and presentations. They are supported by a range of information materials.

In total, almost 100 face-to-face education sessions were delivered during the season, reaching an estimated

4,000 players and support personnel.

Testing Programme

The testing programme this season has seen a notable increase in samples collected when compared to

previous seasons. This is due largely to an increase in testing activity in the build up to and during the

2015 Rugby World Cup in England and the 2016 Rio Olympics.

The testing figures demonstrate that while preparing for and competing in the biggest global rugby

events, players can be confident that great emphasis is placed on ensuring clean and fair competition.

12 RFU Anti-Doping Report 2015-16


Season 2015/16 RFU World

Rugby

Six

Nations

EPCR

Total

Number of tests conducted using each sample collection method

Urine 620 186 12 28 846

Blood 53 102 0 0 155

Number of tests conducted In-Competition and Out-of-Competition

In-Competition 100 28 12 28 168

Out-of-Competition 573 260 0 0 833

Number of tests conducted at each level of rugby

International 60 288 12 0 360

Aviva Premiership / Aviva

Premiership clubs in

European competition

Greene King IPA

Championship

213 0 0 28 241

136 0 0 0 136

National League 1 143 0 0 0 143

Junior Academy

(U17/U18)

112 0 0 0 112

Other 9 0 0 0 9

Total number of tests conducted

Total tests conducted 673 288 12 28 1,001

Anti-Doping Programme

13


Current Anti-Doping Rule Violations

Season Name; Club Level of

Rugby

Violation Substance(s) Sanction

2015/16 Brandon Walker;

Esher RFC

Community

Rugby

Presence of

a prohibited

substance

Oxandrolone

4 years

2015/16 Connor Stapley;

Henley RFC

Community

Rugby

Presence of

a prohibited

substance

Methandienone

and Mesterolone

2 years

2015/16 Undisclosed (U18) Community

Rugby

Presence of

a prohibited

substance

Oxandrolone

4 years

2015/16 Tom Price;

Whitehall RFC

Community

Rugby

Refusal

to submit

to sample

collection

n/a

4 years

2014/15 Dan Lancaster;

Cleethorpes RFC

Community

Rugby

Attempted use

of a prohibited

substance

Testosterone

4 years

2013/14 Clive Peters; Community

Rugby

Possession and

Trafficking of

a prohibited

substance

Various

8 years

2012/13 Andrew Quarry;

Kendal RFC

Community

Rugby

Trafficking, Use

and Possession

of a Prohibited

Substance

Various

12 years

14 RFU Anti-Doping Report 2015-16


Research

Leeds Beckett University (formerly Leeds

Metropolitan University) and the Rugby Football

Union partnered on a research project to explore

the use of performance and image enhancing

substances in male adolescent rugby union players.

Phase one of the research entailed semi-structured

interviews with young athletes and their teachers.

Phase two of the project was a large-scale,

representative study of adolescent sportsmen

in England.

The research investigated how young athletes

compete, train and otherwise prepare for sport.

The factors that influence players’ decision-making

were not well known and the research is giving the

RFU a valuable insight into why young athletes

make certain choices about their diet, training and

rugby lifestyles.

Details of the research will be released once Leeds

Beckett University has had the opportunity to

publish it’s academic work.

Anti-Doping Programme

15


16 RFU Anti-Doping Report 2015-16


Header copy

ILLICIT DRUGS

PROGRAMME

Tutor Notes > October 2016

17


Foreword

At the end of the sixth year of the Illicit Drugs

Programme, the RFU and its partners are confident

that the programme is effectively delivering its twin

aims of protecting both the health and welfare of

players, and the image and reputation of rugby

as a game free of illicit drugs.

The programme involves the random testing of players for illicit

drugs out-of-competition, beyond that required by World Anti-

Doping Agency testing programmes. The risk of illicit drug use

in society is well recognised, especially in the 18-35 age group.

Two players failed random illicit drugs hair tests last season.

Independent specialist review established that these were both

cases involving one-off use. This is typical of the small numbers

of players who have returned a positive test result under the

programme, and no player to date has returned a second

positive test.

The players consistently support rugby’s drug-free landscape

and remain advocates for a clean game. However, the low

incidence of illicit drugs positives is no reason for complacency.

We must continue to educate, test, and support players in this

important area.

Dr Simon Kemp

Illicit Drugs Programme Medical Director

18 RFU Anti-Doping Report 2015-16


Illicit Drugs Programme in Numbers

386 75%

SAMPLES COLLECTED

FOR ANALYSIS

OF SAMPLES COLLECTED

WERE HAIR

2

FIRST

VIOLATIONS

0

ADMISSIONS

OF USE

Ilicit Drugs Programme

19


Executive Summary

••

This report provides an account of the programme activities for season 2015/16. It fulfils

the commitment made in season 2010/11 to report publicly in this area of RFU operations.

••

RFU Illicit Drugs Policy education sessions were delivered at all Aviva Premiership clubs

during the course of the season by RFU and RPA staff.

••

The RFU continued to partner with Alere Toxicology for its illicit drug testing

programme. A total of 386 tests were conducted.

••

Within the illicit drug testing programme, 75% of samples collected were hair samples,

which when analysed can detect illicit drug use for a period of between three and five

months.

••

Two positive results were returned from the testing programme and no admissions of

use were made.

20 RFU Anti-Doping Report 2015-16


Objectives

••

Concerns about the health and welfare of players, and the image and reputation of rugby

in England, led the RFU to develop an illicit drugs policy and testing programme in

partnership with Premiership Rugby and the RPA.

••

The programme is run in a way that complements the anti-doping programme, consisting

entirely of out-of-competition tests for the four most commonly found illicit drugs:

cannabis, cocaine, ecstasy and amphetamines.

IN-COMPETITION

OUT-OF-COMPETITION

PERFORMANCE

ENHANCING

ANTI-DOPING

PROGRAMME

ILLICIT DRUGS

RFU ILLICIT

DRUGS POLICY

The two equally important principal objectives of the RFU Illicit Drugs Policy are:

••

To protect the health and welfare of players

••

To protect and promote the image and reputation of rugby as a game free

of illicit drugs.

In striving to achieve these objectives, it is recognised and accepted that an integrated

approach to education, deterrence and rehabilitation is the most appropriate method of

deterring the use of illicit drugs and protecting the health and welfare of players. The

implementation and administration of this policy by the RFU will be consistent with the

achievement of these objectives.

Ilicit Drugs Programme

21


Education

Education sessions were run by the RFU in conjunction with the RPA at all Aviva

Premiership Rugby clubs, with the aim of refreshing the players’ awareness of the

programme, and to provide an introduction to any new players entering the league from

the academy system, lower level clubs or from abroad.

Education sessions were also delivered to all England representative squads.

Specialist Assessment and Treatment

Players are required to undergo a specialist assessment following a positive test result

or admission of use. They are referred to the Nightingale Hospital for expert assessment

from a consultant psychiatrist and, if necessary, follow-up treatment.

Nightingale Hospital, London, is the first acute mental health hospital to have been

formally accredited by the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP)

for its counselling and psychotherapy services.

22 RFU Anti-Doping Report 2015-16


Testing Programme

A total of 386 urine and hair samples were collected at Aviva Premiership clubs throughout the

season, with additional focus placed on identified periods of higher risk. Selection was made

from the senior playing squads and full time academy players at each club. Selection may be

conducted at random or targeted at individuals or groups of players.

In consultation with Alere Toxicology the sample collection process has been designed to

be as similar as possible to the sample collection procedure used for the anti-doping testing

programme.

Hair testing continues to be extensively utilised as part of the testing programme, now forming

the majority of sample collections. The analysis of a hair sample can detect illicit drug use over

an extended period of time, in some cases up to five months.

Season Urine Hair Total

2015/16 95 291 386

2014/15 94 351 445

2013/14 172 309 481

2012/13 60 285 345

2011/12 289 295 584

Ilicit Drugs Programme

23


Alere Toxicology

As a global leader, Alere Toxicology is committed to providing innovative solutions and exceptional

support to organisations seeking to detect and deter the abuse of drugs. They deliver cutting-edge

testing systems to a wide variety of industries, including government agencies, occupational health

clinics, family lawyers, drug treatment and rehabilitation centres, and sports organisations.

Find out more at: www.aleretoxicology.co.uk

24 RFU Anti-Doping Report 2015-16


Illicit Drugs Policy Violations

The number of violations/admissions of use during Season 2015/16 remained static from last season.

Two violations have occurred and no admissions of use lodged. Under the policy, strict confidentiality is

maintained for all admissions of use and violations where it is a first offence. The RFU will therefore, not be

reporting the detail of any cases.

A first violation of the policy is sanctioned by means of a fine. The fine is set at £5,000 for a senior

Premiership contracted player and £1,000 for an academy Premiership contracted player or other player under

the policy. A second violation of the policy will result in loss of confidentiality, a fine of an equal amount to a

first violation and a period of ineligibility set by an RFU disciplinary panel.

Season Admissions of Use Violations

2015/16 0 2

2014/15 0 2

2013/14 2 4

2012/13 0 5

2011/12 0 0

Ilicit Drugs Programme

25


26 RFU Anti-Doping Report 2015-16


CONTACT

Stephen Watkins

Anti-Doping and Illicit Drugs Programme Manager

E: StephenWatkins@rfu.com

T: 020 8831 7603

Richard Nunn

Anti-Doping and Illicit Drugs Programme Officer

E: RichardNunn@rfu.com

T: 020 8831 7604

TEAMWORK RESPECT ENJOYMENT DISCIPLINE SPORTSMANSHIP

‘England Rugby’ and the RFU Rose are trademarks of the Rugby Football Union

Similar magazines