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1 year ago

European Commission Project team DISCLAIMER

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Among the portal owners

Among the portal owners we spoke to, there was a divergence. Most of the leading portals were highly engaged in the community in these ways, for instance attending conferences and networking events with peers and sharing experiences via blogs or other mechanisms. They said that these interactions were critical to their sustainability: to adapting to new demands and developments. Struggling portals, by contrast, were often not engaged and instead felt isolated. These portals should focus on communicating more about their portals, since an active community exists that can offer support with problems. We recommend that all portals should focus on increasing the amount of knowledge sharing they do. This form of knowledge sharing is not as a replacement for internal procedures for capturing knowledge: it is essential that portals engage in both to be sustainable. 54

7. Automated metrics 7.1 Using metrics to drive improvements and demonstrate impact For an Open Data portal to be sustainable, the data accessible through it needs to be relevant, timely and usable, and there must be evidence of use and impact to argue for continued investment. In many instances, though, portal owners are not the publishers or maintainers of data on their portal. Also, the extent of the data’s re-use can be difficult to track, making it hard to measure for impact. The ways in which Open Data impact is measured can vary. A Lateral Economics report for the Open Data Institute looked at the impact of public sector data assets being published openly, as opposed to closed or shared (paid for). It found that as Open Data, public sector data assets contributed 0.5% of GDP more economic value every year. 74 Research undertaken 75 by Capgemini as part of the European Data Portal measured direct market size, number of jobs created, cost savings and efficiency gains. The research found that ‘for 2016, the direct market size of Open Data is expected to be €55.3bn for the EU 28+ and that between 2016 and 2020, the market size is expected to increase by 36.9%, to a value of €75.7bn in 2020, including inflation corrections. For the period 2016-2020, the cumulative direct market size is estimated at €325bn.’ Main recommendations to make portals more sustainable by using automated metrics: Choose metrics that help to benchmark data publisher performance, but do not rely on one metric e.g. quantity. Combine quantity metrics with data quality and engagement measures Choose metrics that help potential data users find data that is suitable for them to use. Evaluate whether the metrics chosen are meaningful or potentially misleading In measuring quality of Open Data, take into account metadata and contextual information to increase user understanding and engagement Overcome challenges in automating metrics by adopting standard language and terminology, publishing processes and metrics for data quality and re-use 74 The Open Data Institute, 2016, The economic value of open versus paid data 75 European Data Portal, 2015, Creating value through Open Data 55