Views
1 year ago

The prevalence and dynamics of social care receipt George Stoye

R125_The%20prevalence%20and%20dynamics%20of%20social%20care%20receipt

Executive Summary

Executive Summary Changes in individual circumstances are important factors associated with receipt of future care. Individuals who previously did not report any care and who report new difficulties (such as with mobility) are more likely to receive future care. Individuals who previously reported care and who stop reporting difficulties are more likely to stop receiving assistance. The loss of a partner is associated with a reduction in future receipt of informal care. Individuals who previously received informal care and who become divorced, separated or widowed between interviews are 13.7 percentage points more likely to have stopped receiving informal care at the time of the next interview (compared with a 32.8% chance among all individuals who previously received informal care). Individuals who did not previously receive informal care and who lost a partner are also 11.5 percentage points less likely to report new informal care at the time of the next interview (compared with a 28.2% chance among all individuals who did not previously receive informal care). Existing and new health conditions are associated with future receipt of care, even after controlling for specific difficulties. A range of existing diagnoses are associated with an increased probability of receiving care in future. New diagnoses are generally associated with increased receipt of future care. In some cases, this represents a shift from one form of care to another. A particularly important example is that of Alzheimer’s disease, where a new diagnosis is associated with a 22.1 percentage point increase in informal care receipt, but a 10.1 percentage point reduction in formal care receipt at the time of the next interview. © Institute for Fiscal Studies 3

The Prevalence and Dynamics of Social Care Receipt Chapter 4 This chapter examines how needs and receipt of social care for individuals of a given age have changed across birth cohorts. Life expectancy is increasing across birth cohorts, particularly for men. The latest ONS life expectancy projections indicate that compared with men born in 1915–24, men born in 1925–34 are expected to live 0.3 years longer, while men born in 1945– 54 are expected to live 1.8 years longer. For women, these differences are 0.3 and 1.5 years respectively. Women in later birth cohorts are more likely to be part of a couple at any age than women born in earlier cohorts. In 2010, 39.6% of women born in 1925–34 were in a couple. These women are 7 percentage points more likely to be in a couple at a given age than women born in 1915–24. There are no significant differences in male partnership status, as a result of the average age difference between partners. Women are more likely to receive care from a spouse in later birth cohorts. Women born in 1925–34 are 4.0 percentage points more likely to receive care from a partner at a given age than women born in 1915–24. Women born in 1935–44 are 5.8 percentage points more likely to do so than the earliest cohort. These differences are not seen for men. Men born in later birth cohorts are less likely to report difficulties with activities than earlier birth cohorts. Compared with men born in 1915–24, men born in 1925–34 are 4.7 percentage points less likely to report any difficulties with daily activities, while men born in 1935–44 are 7.3 percentage points less likely to report any difficulties. 4 © Institute for Fiscal Studies

The dynamics of social assistance benefit receipt in Britain