1 year ago




HEALTH & WELLNESS ABORIGINAL HEALTH | KIMBERLEY BLACK, RD 3125 Island Highway, Campbell River, BC 250.286.0752 • BOAT SHOW PRICING UNTIL MARCH 31! Now in stock! Proudly producing fresh salmon and creating jobs in coastal communities heart health: CAN YOU HAVE BACON AND EAT IT TOO? Recent media attention has been focused on saturated fat and how it may not be as bad for your health as once thought. Saturated fat is found in animal products including dairy products, meat, poultry and certain shellfish. Some conclusions made from research on saturated fat conducted in the1960s are being questioned. In particular, experts are questioning whether or not saturated fat can be so strongly blamed for heart disease. Is this latest trend reason to adopt a diet high in saturated fat? There is some evidence that certain building blocks of saturated fat known as fatty acids may have beneficial effects on blood cholesterol, but others are clearly linked to increased bad cholesterol, known as LDL, and increased risk of heart disease. Since you don’t find single fatty acids in food, current evidence continues to support limiting saturated fat in the diet. New fad diets that promote unrestricted intake of foods high in saturated fat represent a shift from one extreme to another. Fat plays many important roles in the body, including aiding brain development, regulating the inflammatory process, cushioning organs and regulating temperature. The key to getting the fat you need is to focus on replacing saturated fat with plant-based unsaturated fat. Eating bacon on a Saturday and choosing butter over margarine on your toast is well within reasonable limits, but the majority of fat in your diet should come from plant-based sources including fish (salmon, herring, sardines, ooligan and trout), vegetable oils, nuts and seeds. Don’t be afraid of fat, but instead choose unsaturated fats more often, avoid high fat processed foods, and on occasion give yourself permission to eat high fat foods, guilt free, simply for enjoyment! Kimberley Black is a Registered Dietitian. NORTH ISLAND COMPASS | ISSUE 8

HEALTH & WELLNESS ON THE NORTH ISLAND healthcare NAVIGATING the system Advance Care Planning WENDY JOHNSTONE It does not do to leave a live dragon out of your calculations, if you live near him. J.R.R. Tolkien, The Hobbit This quote reminds me of my mom. No, she wasn’t a dragon, well, not literally anyway. Figuratively, she did, however, drill the importance of planning for potential dragon attacks. Mom is one of those people who loves to plan. So, it would make complete sense that she would appreciate and value the importance of advance care planning, right? Nope! Despite having a gerontologist for a daughter and an equal in her passion for planning, Mom is reluctant to engage in discussions on advance care planning. She’s not alone. And neither are you. About 50% of all Canadians have never talked to family and friends about what they’d want if they were ill and couldn’t speak for themselves. Advance care planning isn’t just for seniors or those facing a critical illness. It’s for everyone. Yes, even if you are young and healthy! Legislation in BC allows us to choose the type of care we want if we can’t speak for ourselves. We can appoint someone to be our voice when we can’t speak. We can have someone make sure our values and beliefs about care and death are respected. Advance care planning is a process of thinking about and sharing your wishes for future health and personal care. It can help you tell others what would be important if you were ill and unable to communicate. After thinking and sharing, the next part of advance care planning is writing down your instructions and wishes for future health care. Appointing someone to be a substitute decision maker is part of your plan. An advance care plan can also include a representation agreement, an advance health care directive and an enduring Power of Attorney. And although talking about our demise and death isn’t always top of mind or something to bring up at the next big social event, it’s important to consider that the topic of advance care planning is just as much about living as it is about dying. Yes, it may be a little uncomfortable at first. Few regret the initial discomfort that comes with the first conversation. For many, it can be a relief to have a place to express and document our preferences. To have an opportunity to have a say in the kind of care we’d want for ourselves if we couldn’t speak is a gift—to ourselves and to the people who care about us. And remember, it is never too early to start the conversations—but it can be too late! The best place to start is Death cafes are an emerging concept where people gather to have a cup of coffee and support each other in talking about death and, ultimately, living. Wendy Johnstone is the founder of Keystone Eldercare Solutions. With a Master's Degree in Gerontology and close to 20 years experience, Wendy is passionate about supporting seniors and caregivers. WWW.NORTHISLANDCOMPASS.CA | 27

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