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lives just like

lives just like ours—until their world was torn apart and turned upside down. Each artefact that we discover, whether in a film, a painting, a poem, a testimony, a museum, or our grandparents’ dresser drawer, helps us to know how individuals just like us responded to that cataclysm, how they lived each difficult day. HOLOCAUST EDUCATION IN PEDAGOGY, HISTORY, AND PRACTICE 26 Preserving artefacts, as archivists worldwide have done, is a crucial act of memory. Displaying and sharing them—in synagogues, schools, Holocaust centres, and museums—is a brilliant act of memory and a commitment that we, the last witnesses to the witnesses, make to the next generation. As Wiesel (1970/2011) has written, “The past is in the present, but the future is still in our hands. . . . And what is memory if not a noble and necessary response to and against indifference?” (pp. ix–x). Painting, filming, and narrating these objects, as in Patz’s video, perpetuates and makes permanent that act of memory. Consider, then, the use of artefacts as a way to help your students learn about the people who endured the Holocaust. Without survivors in our world, we will be bereft. We may, though, find comfort in the knowledge that when they themselves can no longer testify, their possessions, the fragments left behind, can speak for them. References Berenbaum, M. (2006). The world must know: The history of the Holocaust as told in the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum (2nd ed.). Washington, D.C.: Johns Hopkins University Press and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum Brooks, A. (1995). The ring. In K. Shawn (Ed.), In the aftermath of the Holocaust: Three generations speak. Englewood, NJ: The Moriah School. Genn, M. H. (1995). Flowers in the ghetto. In K. Shawn (Ed.), In the aftermath of the Holocaust: Three generations speak. Gotfryd, B. (2008). An encounter in Linz. In K. Shawn & K. Goldfrad (Eds.), The call of memory: Learning about the Holocaust through narrative: An anthology. Teaneck, NJ: Ben Yehuda Press. Herz, S. (2014). Along the tracks. In Marked: Poems of the Holocaust. New York: NYQ Books. Herz, S. (2014). Found in a crumpled torn envelope on the tracks to Auschwitz. In Marked: Poems of the Holocaust. Herz, S. (2014). Waiting. In Marked: Poems of the Holocaust. Herz, S. (2014). Whatever you can carry. In Marked: Poems of the Holocaust. Lebovic, M. (2015, April 7). British forensics expert shapes the future of Holocaust research. The Times of Israel. Retrieved from http://www.timesofisrael.com/ Nomberg-Przytyk, S. (2008). The camp blanket. In K. Shawn & K. Goldfrad (Eds.), The call of memory: Learning about the Holocaust through narrative: An anthology. Teaneck, NJ: Ben Yehuda Press. Patz, N. (Producer). (2015). The artifacts drawings. Baltimore, MD: Goucher College.

Rogers, J. (2013, February 2). Holocaust holograms of aging survivors will allow their stories to be retold, remembered [Web log post]. Retrieved from http://www.huffingtonpost. com/2013/02/02/holocaust-holograms-survivorsusc_n_2606718.html. Shalev, A. (2015). Liberty, life, and the legacy of Holocaust survivors. Martyrdom & resistance, 41(3), 2–3. Wiesel, E. (2011). The watch. (L. Edelman & E. Wiesel, Trans.). In K. Shawn & K. Goldfrad (Eds.), The call of memory: Learning about the Holocaust through narrative: An anthology. Teaneck, NY: Ben Yehuda Press. (Original work published 1970 in One Generation After, New York: Schocken Books). Endnotes 1 See Carson Phillips and Martin Hagmayr’s “Incorporating Apps Into Holocaust Education” and Paula Cowan’s “A Selective, Annotated Guide to Holocaust Websites” in the Spring 2015 issue of Yeshiva University’s PRISM: An Interdisciplinary Journal for Holocaust Educators (K. Shawn, Ed.) online at http://yu.edu/ azrieli/faculty/prism-journal/ for reviews of the best and most current such educational apps and sites. 2 The Goucher College Library website (http://www.goucher. edu/the-library/about-the-library/friends-of-the-library/ friends-of-the-library-programs/2014-2015-programs/ artifacts-drawings-exhibit/artifacts-drawings-lesson-plans) features 10 classroom-ready lesson plans for using artefacts in grades 7–12. 27 HOLOCAUST EDUCATION IN PEDAGOGY, HISTORY, AND PRACTICE

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