The Developer's Digest, September - October 2015 Issue

kpdadevelopers

SEPTEMBER – OCTOBER 2015 ISSUE

Overview of the Kenyan Housing

and Real Estate Market

IN

THIS

ISSUE

Focus on Policy

KPDA Directory of Members

KPDA Partnerships


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Page 3:

Page 8:

From the Secretariat

Focus on Policy

Overview on KPDA

Activities

Page 10: KPDA Member Profile

Page 17: KPDA Partnerships

Page 23: Industry Experts

Page 26: Directory of KPDA

Members

Palkesh Shah

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Margaret Kibe

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Kenneth Luusa

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KPDA SECRETARIAT

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Nelly Oneya - Finance and Administrative Assistant

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The Secretariat address is :

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Road, Nairobi | Tel: + 254 737 530 290 | 0705 277787

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Kenya Property Developers Association... Development brings Development!


FROM THE SECRETARIAT

Dear Readers,

I welcome you all to review another

informative issue of the KPDA

newsletter, The Developer’s Digest. First

things first, our family has now grown

to 87 members! Even though that is

just an additional 5 members from the

time of publishing the last issue of this

publication, it is no mean feat!

I encourage you all to spread the word

that KPDA is the policy advocate for

every property development player in

Kenya and if you are not a member, you

are missing out!

Our ‘Focus on Policy’ article in this issues

addresses an overview of the Kenyan

housing and real estate market in Kenya.

There are interesting statistics featured

in that article that can help you make

informed business investment decisions.

One of our members, Kenya Building

Society recently rebranded to HF

Development & Investment Ltd.

Hongera! An article on HFDI is also

included in this issue.

As part of our ‘Member Profiles’ in this

issue, we have covered Cytonn Real

Estate, Strauss Energy Ltd and Tatu City

Ltd. We are always proud to show off

members of our family.

Unfortunately in this issue, we are

unable to publish the report on the

NCC Building Permitting Approvals

data but we do hope to give you an

updated report in the final issue of The

Developer’s Digest this year.

Speaking of the last issue for the year

2015, I am pleased to announce that

we will be having a hard copy of our

newsletter! Look out for this exciting

copy that will be produced before we

break for our December holidays.

Finally, I would like to invite all our

members and partners to attend our End

KPDA wishes to welcome our newest members:

• Mabati Rolling Mills Limited

• Falcon Development Limited

• Elm Ridge Limited

• Mugumo Developments Limited

• Buy Rent Kenya Limited

KENYA PROPERTY DEVELOPERS ASSOCIATION

of Year Corporate Networking Koroga

Event which will be held on Friday, 20th

November 2015 at the Goan Gymkhana

Club in Parklands.

For those of you who have attended any

of our Korogas you know that we do not

disappoint. I guarantee that we will be

pulling out all the stops for this last one

for the year!

Please feel free to contact us at the

secretariat and give us your feedback

on how we can better serve you. You

can reach us through our telephone

numbers 0737 530 290 or 0705 277 787

or through my email admin@kpda.

or.ke.

“Since we cannot change reality, let

us change the eyes which see reality,”

happy November!

Elizabeth

Welcome to the KPDA Family!

Advocacy that champions the interests of the

industry to both the public sector and the wider

private sector to ensure a better business

environment for the property industry;

Information on the latest issues affecting the

industry, via regular publications, newsletters,

media reports and research;

Networking events, putting members in touch with

industry leaders and potential clients;

Networking events, putting members in touch with

industry leaders and potential clients;

Marketing opportunities for member companies

with discounts offered to various advertising

platforms;

Discounted rate at both KPDA events and events

organized by international and regional

organizations in the building and construction

industry;

Access to emerging markets and exposure to joint

venture opportunities.

While KPDA membership is open only to

companies, the benefits of membership extend to

all staff in member companies.

The Kenya Property Developers Association was established in Nairobi in 2006

as the representative body of the residential, commercial and industrial

property development sector in Kenya. It is an emerging Business Member

Organisation which works in proactive partnership with policy-makers,

financiers and citizens to ensure that the property development industry

grows rapidly but in an organized, efficient, economical and ethical manner.

Our current membership stands at 85 members.

The Association’s strategic objectives include working with the Government

and other stakeholders to promote policies that stimulate the property sector;

contributing to excellence in building through promotion of world-class

ethical standards and educational programs; compiling focused research and

analysis to inform investment decisions, policy analysis and public education;

developing new financing mechanisms to help low and middle income

Kenyan families own homes; providing a forum where property investors can

share expertise and build business contacts; and harmonising development

activities with citizen concerns, like neighbourhood associations and

environmental preservation groups.

WHY JOIN THE KPDA FAMILY?

Access to

potential

investors

Working

closely with

government

institutions

Increase

your business

profit

KPDA

MEMBERS

Working

closely with

regulatory

authorities

Strategic

partnerships to

ease land

processes

Opportunities

for forming joint

ventures with

national and

international

industry players

Development brings

development! Become a part of

this formidable family!

Let KPDA become your partner in advocacy,

education, information, research and

helping develop your business.

1

Kenya Property Developers Association... Development brings Development!

For more information, kindly contact

our KPDA secretariat on

0737 530 290 or 0705 277 787 or

by Email: admin@kpda.or.ke.

KENYA PROPERTY DEVELOPERS ASSOCIATION

Fatima Flats, Suite B4 Marcus Garvey Road

Off Argwings Kodhek, Kilimani Area

P. O. Box 76154 – 00508 Nairobi, Kenya

Telephone: +254 737 530290/0705 277787

Email: admin@kpda.or.ke Website: www.kpda.or.ke


FOCUS ON POLICY

OVERVIEW OF THE KENYAN HOUSING

AND REAL ESTATE MARKET

INTRODUCTION

Real estate is coming of age across

emerging markets. Infrastructure

development, young demographics and

strong economic fundamentals have

fuelled the rapid growth of property

sectors and the result is increased

interest from global property investors.

According to Hass Consult, values in

Kenya´s residential property market

continue to rise, amidst robust economic

growth and a sharp increase in the

population of middle-class and expats.

Residential property values in Kenya

have skyrocketed a stunning 357% from

2000 to Q3 2014.

BRIEF HISTORY OF HOUSING

AND REAL ESTATE IN KENYA

The Africa Development Bank Group

describes the African continent’s middle

class as having reached 34.3% of the

population in 2010. In Kenya it now

encompasses more than 44.9% of the

population. This phenomenon has been

accompanied by rapid urbanisation

and strong growth in consumption

expenditure; housing demands

therefore, are not idle to these changes.

Across the continent, housing is more

often divided in between the formalbuilt

types (housing units built by

developers on serviced land, with

property titles and informal–built types

(housing built by individuals often in an

incremental manner, on land which is

not always serviced and where titles are

not always available).

Beyond affordability, housing has

always been a contentious issue in

Africa as a whole. Closely linked to land

rights, associated with basic needs of

the population, its public good nature

and universal reach has given grounds

to government intervention under the

form of social housing projects.

It is important for the private sector to

understand what it can do – on its own

to satisfy housing needs and in particular

to expand supply of housing to middle

and low income earners.

STATISTICS

• During the year to end-Q3 2014,

the Hass Composite Property Sales

Index, a measure of asking sales

prices of residential properties,

rose by 4.7%, a sharp improvement

from meagre y-o-y increases of

0.05% in Q2 2014, 1.7% in Q1 2014,

and 0.3% in Q4 2013, based on a

report released by Hass Consult

Ltd. Quarter-on-quarter, residential

property prices increased 3.1% in

Q3 2014.

The Hass index is based on 4, 000

to 6, 000 properties tracked across

Kenya, which are collected from

multiple estate agencies and all

publicly available house sales,

including in property magazines,

property websites and the national

media.

The average value of a property

in the country surged to KES25.6

million (US$283,000) in September

2014, from KES7.1 million

(US$78,482) in December 2000,

according to Hass Consult.

The average price for a 1-3 bedroom

residential property is currently

KES11.8 million (US$130,435). On

the other hand, the average price for

a 4-6 bedroom residential property

is KES36.5 million (USS403, 463).

BY PROPERTY TYPE:

The average asking price for

detached houses increased

3.3% y-o-y to KES36.3 million

(US$400,788) in Q3 2014. Prices for

detached houses also rose by 3.2%

during the latest quarter.

The average asking price for semidetached

houses surged 8.4% y-o-y

to KES20.9 million (US$230,756)

in Q3 2014. Semi-detached house

prices increased 2.4% q-o-q in Q3

2014.

The average asking price for

apartments stood at KES13.1

million (US$144,637) in Q3 2014, up

6% y-o-y and 3.6% q-o-q.

• In Kenya, most property purchases

are cash-based transactions.

Because of this, the mortgage

market remains underdeveloped.

• In September of 2014, the Kenya

National Bureau of Statistics revised

the country’s GDP for 2013 from KES

3.8 trillion to KES 4.76 trillion. As a

result, the growth rate in 2013 was

revised from 4.7% to 5.7% leading

to a 25% increase in the value of the

Kenya economy.

• However, in the Q3 of 2014, the

economy expanded by 5.5% year

on year down from 6.2% in the

corresponding period in 2013.

This boost has been attributed

to an increase in construction,

manufacturing and insurance

activities (Central Bank of Kenya,

2014).

THE REAL ESTATE MARKET

Kenya’s lucrative real estate sector has

rapidly expanded to become the fourth

biggest contributor to the country’s

wealth.

The updated national accounts, show

that the contribution of the real estate

sector to Kenya’s gross domestic product

(GDP) has been revised 10.6 per cent in

2014 which is more than double from

the previous estimate of 4.9 per cent in

2013.

Growth over the past 10 years saw the

real estate industry dislodge the retail

sector as the fourth largest contributor

to the economy even as traditional

sectors such as agriculture, wholesale

and financial services continued to

diminish.

Kenya’s GDP — the market value of

all goods and services that a country

produces in a year — is expected to grow

by a fifth to reach Sh4.5 trillion ($51.3

billion) from an estimated Sh3.8 trillion

in 2013 with the release of fresh data.

Analysts expect the new data to dictate

future investment decisions, projecting

that banks and businesses are most

likely to put their money in the property

market in pursuit of higher returns from

increased activity and growth in the

sector over the past decade.

It cannot be ignored that there has

also been a tremendous increase in

developing shopping malls, interest

REAL ESTATE DEVELOPMENT IN KENYA - PRICE CHANGES OVER TIME

Develop -

ment

name

Number

of

Units

Year of

completion

WHAT DOES BUILDING A

HOUSE COST?

Dwellings can be built in many

configurations, from detached houses

to high-rising apartments. Each of the

housing types has special requirements

in terms of special planning and

implications on building costs.

For developers, the choice of the

building solutions is determinant when

it comes to the targeted market. For

instance, high-end products tend to be

built on more expensive land.

House type

Off-plan

prices (USD)

Prices on

completion

(USD) -

or p re-sale

prices for

unfinished

houses

Through surveys on various developers,

as well as through historical data

supplied by Shelter Afrique, it appears

that the typical cost structure for a single

unit across housing typologies in Kenya

is roughly as follows:

1. 60% of a unit’s cost in construction

(of which 70% in materials and 30%

in labour),

2. 10% in infrastructure, 10% in

professional fees (architects,

engineers, required public permits

etc.)

3. 5% in financing and

4. 5% contingency.

FOCUS ON POLICY

from international food chain brands as

well as increase in the development of

upmarket prime residential property.

According to the Knight Frank Kenya

Market Update for the 2nd half of 2014,

there has also been a slow up-take of

office space in 2014 compared to 2013.

The amount of office space released into

the market in 2014 declined by circa 30%

from 1.5 Million Ft² in 2013 to 1.1 Million

Ft² in 2014. Although this is expected to

change in coming years.

Off plan vs.

Completion

price

change

Cur rent

prices

(USD)

Off

plan vs.

cur rent

price

change

A 20 2005 3 bed 59 880 95 808 60% 179 641 200%

B 15 2007 5 bed 155 689 203 593 31% 455 090 192%

C 40 2007 2 bed 29 940 33 533 12% 77 844 160%

2007 3 bed 35 928 41 916 17% 89 820 150%

D 200 2012 3 bed 89 222 113 772 28% 113 772 28%

2012 4 bed 111 377 143 713 29% 143 713 29%

E 48 2013 1 bed 89 820 143 713 60% 101 796 13%

2013 2 bed 107 784 179 641 67% 119

760

Source: Shelter Afrique Information to the authors 2012, AfDB Informal Survey of Developers 2012.

11%

Such a breakdown is based on prevailing

market preferences from buyers: cement

built, 1 to 3 bedroom houses (detached

or semi-detached) of 80 m2 to 100 m2.

With regards to construction materials,

all basic hard supplies such as steel,

cement, or plaster are produced locally,

although production does not always

meet local demand. Fittings such as tiles,

kitchenware and so forth are usually

imported. Building costs per square

meter data gathered from the Institute

of Quantity Surveyors of Kenya are

presented in the below table:

3

Kenya Property Developers Association... Development brings Development!

Kenya Property Developers Association... Development brings Development!

4


FOCUS ON POLICY

FOCUS ON POLICY

BUILDING COST PER M 2 (USD)

High class single units

(maisonettes)

High class high rise

flats

Central region

(incl. Nai robi)

Coastal region

(incl. Mombasa)

Weste r n Region

Unweighted average

ac ross regions

479 515 515 503

539 515 515 523

Low cost, low rise flats 371 335 335 347

Low cost, high rise

flats

Site and service

scheme

419 407 407 411

204 228 228 220

Rates are general rates for building works excluding site works. Care should be taken

in using the prices without considering elements such as location, specification of

building materials, wall to floor ratio, floor to ceiling heights, site topograph y, type

of joinery fittings and quality of electrical and mechanical installations. Data

gathe red from the Institute of Quantity Surveyors of Kenya for December 2011. Table

initially in Kenyan Shillings. Exchange rate used: KSH 83.5 to the USD.

150 companies (of which financial

institutions (lenders and investors),

property developers, building material

suppliers etc.) invest in housing finance

across the region. Most notable is the

increase in private equity funds (CAHF

2012:4).

WHERE ARE HOUSES BUILT?

Land regulation and property titles

are at the cornerstone of housing. In

Kenya, land and property regulations

have been inherited from colonial times

REAL ESTATE DEVELOPERS PROFILE 2012

Avg Years of experience of

established developers

and involve a rather complex tenure

mechanism framed in many difference

laws.

Provisions in the 2010 constitution

regarding equal access to land (in

particular articles 60 to 68) seek to

bring in clarity the matter. Regulatory

stability and intelligibility are required

for property market development.

Indeed, in order to attract the private

sector in housing, and in particular in the

middle to low market segments, relaxed

and straightforward land regulation

are needed (Hoek-Smit 2011).

One indication of the complexity and

multiplicity of regulation is highlighted

by the number of days required to

register property as shown in the

previous table. Compared to other

East and Southern African countries,

registering property is not only

cumbersome, but also lengthy and

expensive.

KEN YA UGANDA TANZANIA ZAMBIA

4-7 0-3 5-8 7-10

Based on these, a low cost, low rise flat of

50m2 in Nairobi can amount to roughly

USD 18,000 just in building costs, which

as noted in the above table would

represent 60% of total costs. Adding

40% to that amount to account for other

development costs would bring the

price up to USD 26,000 - excluding the

developer’s margin.

For a low-cost, high-rise flat in Nairobi

costs would amount to USD 29, 000

(excluding developer’s margins), while

high-end maisonettes would cost USD

33, 500.

The figures highlight that it is difficult

from a cost perspective for the private

sector to deliver units at a charge that

would match incomes of most of the

population. They also point out that

housing types can matter, as well as

whether housing is formal or informal.

WHO CAN FINANCE WHAT?

Access to finance constraints in housing

can be seen both from the supply and

the demand side. On the supply-side

lays access to finance shortcomings for

developers. In other words, how can

developers access the funding required

to put houses into the market? On the

demand side lay issues related to access

to finance for households in order to

purchase houses. In order words, how

can houses put in the market be bought?

FINANCING HOUSING

SUPPLY

From a developer’s perspective,

the lack of equity finance in the

residential housing sector has been a

critical constraint contributing to the

insufficient, or often times inadequate,

housing stock in several countries across

the continent.

Housing developments with too low

equity make it difficult to access debt

finance for construction, resulting in no

margins for delays or in cost overruns.

This limits the development of housing

projects delivered to market, resulting

in higher priced housing stock and

threatening the capital introduced by

the developer in the first place.

Excessive debt leveraging of real estate

developments also obliges developers

to engage into high levels of pre-sales

in order to have a cash flow that allows

for loan repayments over the course of

construction. This can compromise any

depo- sit finance from initial purchasers

who invest in pre-sales and induces cash

flow risks to the developers as well as

foregone income since they would tend

to sell at a lower price than if they did at

the end of construction.

Shelter Afrique estimates that over half

of their non-performing loans can be

attributed to insufficient developer

equity, which lengthens construction

time and increases the cost of finance.

Financiers across the region are

beginning to realize that equity

financing for developments is in short

supply, and that it can offer interesting

returns when compared against market

housing uptake and prices practiced in

the market.

As a consequence, an increasing number

of investors are entering the market.

According to CAHF (2012), a review

of investors in the Southern African

Development Community region and

Ghana, Kenya and Nigeria shows over

Median Annual Tur nover (USD) 2 million 300,000 3 million 5 million

Number of employees


FOCUS ON POLICY

FOCUS ON POLICY

Beyond this consideration, the

implication of low/slow local

government action to support real

estate developments is that off-site

infrastructure becomes an even scarcer

service which acquires a higher value,

ultimately paid for by buyers.

CHALLENGES FACING THE

HOUSING AND REAL ESTATE

MARKET

1. Finance:

a. Providing Affordable Housing

Through surveys on various developers,

as well as through historical data

supplied by Shelter Afrique, it appears

that the typical cost structure for a single

unit across housing typologies in Kenya

is roughly as follows:

1. 60% of a unit’s cost in

construction (of which 70% in

materials and 30% in labour),

2. 10% in infrastructure, 10% in

professional fees (architects,

engineers, required public

permits etc.)

3. 5% in financing and

4. 5% contingency

The above highlights why it is difficult

from a cost perspective, for the private

sector to deliver units at a charge that

would match incomes of most of the

population. They also point out that

housing types can matter, as well as

whether housing is formal or informal.

b. Access to Finance

1. Lack of equity finance in the

residential housing sector

2. Housing developments with

too low equity make it difficult

to access debt finance for

construction, resulting in no

margins for delays or in cost

overruns.

3. Excessive debt leveraging of real

estate developments also obliges

developers to engage into high

levels of pre-sales in order to have

a cash flow that allows for loan

repayments over the course of

construction.

2. Land

1. Issuance of title deeds

2. Availability and affordability

3. Tenure

3. Policy

1. Lack of relaxed and straightforward

land regulation

2. Lack of harmonized legislation

3. Lack of trunk infrastructure

provision by government and

local authorities

4. Processes

1. One indication of the complexity

and multiplicity of regulation

is highlighted by the number

of days required to register

property. Registering property

is not only cumbersome, but also

lengthy and expensive.

2. Beyond property registration and

tenure, one of the most important

aspects for property development

is trunk infrastructure provision.

The development of such

infrastructure is highly linked to

price since as developers buy land

and service it with infrastructure,

land prices rise immensely and

the increment is passed on to the

buyers.

Currently the registration process

involves all of the following players:

1. Ministry of Land, Housing and

Urban Development

2. The National Construction

Authority

3. County Government

4. National Environment and

Management Authority

5. Kenya Urban Roads Authority

6. Water Resource Management

Authority

7. Kenya Power and Lighting

Company Ltd

8. Relevant Financial Institution

9. Relevant Advocate Firm

OPPORTUNITIES IN THE

HOUSING SECTOR KENYA

The discovery of minerals and expansion

of infrastructure (transport and

telecommunication) e.g. Lamu Port

Southern Sudan Ethiopia Transport

(LAPSSET Project).

Growing population with an ever

increasing housing deficit therefore

availing a huge unfilled demand-supply

gap

Kenya is projected as East Africa’s

economic hub, with a projected Gross

Domestic Product of 5.7 percent in

2014 according to the Kenya National

Bureau of Statistics, creating more

opportunities for the real estate sector.

The property market will remain strong,

with increased demand for high-end

property segments holding steady to

meet the international standards for

the ever-growing expat community and

middle class.

With demand for real estate in Nairobi

sending property prices soaring on

the back of rapid urbanisation, nearby

counties are also seeing an uptick in

activity as developers look to channel

funds into satellite cities and commuter

towns.

CONCLUSIONS AND

RECOMMENDATIONS

1. With regards to demand and

supply, findings suggest that

there is a large formal housing

deficit fueling price hikes in

Kenya. An increase in housing

supply is paramount in order

to extend home ownership. At

prevailing rates, affordability

remains a key constraint. In

conjunction with public sector

policies, improving stakeholder

capacity to ease the supply

and demand side constraints is

paramount.

2. In terms of building solutions,

it was noted that key structural

attributes and characteristics

of dwellings on which building

costs are based can have impact

on pricing. With this in mind,

considering the type of housing

that the market demands and

the related costs, it is difficult

for the private sector to supply

low-income segments of the

population.

REAL ESTATE DEVELOPERS PROFILE 2012

Table 4 Property Registration 2012

Days to

register

property

Cost to register property

(% of p roperty value)

Procedu res requi red to

register property (number)

Kenya 73 4,30 9

South Africa 23 5,90 6

Tanzania 68 4,40 8

Uganda 52 1,90 12

Zambia 40 8,20 5

Source: Doing Business database, World Bank 2012.

3. Linked to it is the ability of

developers to benefit from

economies of scale as they

invest in developments. Only

a handful of them can afford

to invest into medium to large

scale developments of 20 units

and above. Not only do they

lack technical capacity, but they

also face difficulties in accessing

finance, in particular equity.

4. Yet even if developers were able

to lower their costs by investing

in alternative housing solutions,

(and assuming that such a

decrease would be passed on

to potential consumers) the

question remains as to whether

buyers have the ability to access

the finance required to buy a

house.

Presently, the mortgage market

is still relatively underdeveloped.

In that context, people tend to

turn towards home improvement

lending rather than home

purchase, which is smaller in size

and easier to pay back.

5. Finally, the importance of

efficient land registration and

regulation for land acquisition

and improvement (in particular in

relation to off-site infrastructure

and land servicing such as

the development of trunk

infrastructure, water & sanitation,

etc.) was highlighted as being

particularly central for the

development of housing markets.

Stemming from these considerations,

policy recommendations include:

• Use of alternative building

solutions: the market needs to

be educated to accept different

building solutions which are more

suitable cost-wise to reaching

medium/lower income segments.

For instance greater investments

into pre-fabricated houses can

be more cost effective, and

drastically reduce construction

time.

• Local government support:

to allow for the effective supply

of off-site infrastructure and

land servicing (i.e. development

of trunk infrastructure, water

& sanitation, etc.) needed to

support real estate development.

• Adequate funding system to

facilitate mortgage provision:

the banking system is still not in

a position to offer the long- term

finance that the housing sector

needed. Beyond the provision of

long-term mortgages, alternative

financing schemes such as

“lease-to-own” arrangements in

partnership with local financial

institutions could be deployed for

instance.

• Local bank capacity building:

to strengthen mortgage

underwriting skills and instigate

competition in the sector. This

should also include microfinance

providers with tailored products

for the housing sector, in

particular given the role that such

institutions can have with regards

to home improvements loans. A

key challenge is the banking of

those in the informal sector.

• Equity provision for developers:

this will limit excessive debt

leveraging of real estate

developments. Private equity

funds can be an interesting

avenue to be pursued.

• Technical assistance: to both

developers and contractors to

increase their capacity to deliver

housing units in larger quantities

so as to benefit from economies

of scale.

Kenya Property Developers Association... Development brings Development!

Kenya Property Developers Association... Development brings Development!

7

8


9

OVERVIEW ON KPDA ACTIVITIES

THE KPDA CEO BREAKFAST FORUM

TUESDAY, 25 TH AUGUST 2015 AT

THE NAIROBI SERENA HOTEL

THEME: ‘INFRASTRUCTURE IN PROPERTY

DEVELOPMENT; ACHIEVING VISION 2030’

On Tuesday, 25th August 2015 KPDA

held a CEO Breakfast Forum at the

Nairobi Serena Hotel, the fourth of

its kind to be held in 2015. The forum

was attended by almost ninety (90)

individuals in positions of senior

management who are key sector

players, including private and public

developers, real estate managers,

manufacturers as well as representatives

from regulatory authorities.

The event was opened by Eng.

LEFT: The event was also attended by the Principal Secretary for the Ministry of Land, Housing and Urban

Development, Arch. M. El Maawy. RIGHT: Eng. Shiribwa delivering the key note address.

RIGHT TOP: Guests registering to attend the forum.

RIGHT BOTTOM: The plenary session.

THE PANEL LEFT TO RIGHT: Dr. Ben Chumo, Managing Director

of the Kenya Power and Lighting Company Limited. Ruth

Maina, Project Manager – Urban Energy Unit of the UN Habitat.

Elizabeth Chege, Chairperson of the Kenya Green Building

Society.

Mwamzali Shiribwa, Senior Principal

Superintending Engineer of the Ministry

of Energy and Petroleum. Eng. Shiribwa

was representing the Principal Secretary

who was unavailable to come and open

the event.

We would like to express our

sincerest thanks to all who

attended this forum; the speakers,

panelists, the guests as well as our

lovely MC, Anne Muchiri. Together

we had a very successful forum!

Special Thanks to All Our Events

Sponsors:

• Kenya Power and Lighting

Company

• Bamburi Cement Ltd

• Chloride Exide Ltd

• Mabati Rolling Mills Ltd

• Rexe Roofing Products Ltd

Kenya Property Developers Association... Development brings Development!

HF Development & Investment Limited

(HFDI) is a fully owned subsidiary and

the real estate development arm of The

HF Group which seeks to spearhead the

supply of quality and affordable housing

to urban populations in Kenya.

HFDI has embarked on an aggressive

strategy aimed at addressing the acute

demand for affordable housing in

Kenya and the wider African region.

HFDI is looking to open up new real

estate development frontiers, locally

& regionally, across various customer

segments with part emphasis on

alternative building technology so

as to ensure continuous delivery of

quality, affordable environmentally

sensitive and customer specific real

estate.

Formed in 1963 as Kenya Building

Society Limited (KBSL), HFDI has

contributed to the national housing

grid, having constructed well

known estates such as Buru Buru

and Komarock Estates in Nairobi

and Fahari Estate in Mombasa.

ABOUT HF DEVELOPMENT

& INVESTMENT LTD

On 9th May 2012, HFDI made a return

to Komarock after a 13-year hiatus

with the ground breaking of Komarock

Estate Phase 5A which was completed

in 2013 comprising 162 units fully

sold and occupied. The company then

commenced on another project in the

area, Komarock Phase 5B in October

2014 with 115 units expected to be

completed by October 2015.

As part of its affordable housing

strategy the company has embarked

on the development of Komarock

Phase 5C dubbed Komarock Heights

consisting of 1,272 quality, spacious

and affordable apartments offering

first-class community amenities. The

project, commissioned by His Excellency

President Uhuru Kenyatta on 16th

September 2015 is the largest untaken

by HFDI in recent years. It sits on a 28

acre piece of land of which 5 acres will

be set aside for a public school.

The project is modelled on a modern

gated community concept where

residents will access common facilities

such as lifts, backup generator for

common areas; solar heating system;

masonry perimeter wall for the entire

development; backup borehole water;

an underground water tank; landscaped

areas and a children’s play area.

Komarock Heights residents will have

easy access to a commercial centre;

K-Mall, currently under construction

that will provide for retail convenience.

K-Mall will comprise a supermarket,

shops, food court, banks, clinic, sanitary

facilities, coffee house, a bar and

restaurant, offices, a storage area and

a playground. It will also have a total of

215 parking spaces.

In addition, as part of its Corporate Social

Responsibility, HFDI has earmarked 5

KPDA MEMBER PROFILE

acres of the land at Komarock Heights

for the construction of a public school in

response to the needs of the residents of

the area.

STRATEGY

HFDI has set ambitious targets for 2020.

HFDI’s goal is to penetrate the niche

market of affordable housing and low

cost housing with an aim of developing

10,000 units per annum.

Other strategic initiatives include

creation of land banks for future

housing developments, site and service

schemes, own developments and

joint ventures with land owners.

HFDI will create affordable

scaled developments aimed at

providing real estate deals for

Kenyans.

HFDI has successfully completed

two joint venture projects with

land owners:

• Precious Garden: project

entails development of 328

one, two and three bedroomed

apartments on a parcel of land

measuring approximately 10 acres

located approximately 350 m off

Naivasha road. HFDI has completed

phase one which is fully sold out

and is currently developing the

second phase.

• Kahawa Downs Limited:

project entails development of

220 affordable mid-market two

and three bedroomed apartments,

on a parcel of land measuring

5.25 acres. The project is located

in Kahawa approximately 20

kilometres from the City Centre and

about 300 meters from the Thika

Superhighway.

10


Kenya Property Developers Association... Development brings Development!

Kenya Property Developers Association... Development brings Development!

11

12


KPDA MEMBER PROFILE

KPDA MEMBER PROFILE

Cytonn Real Estate

3rd Floor, Liaison House,

State House Avenue,

P. O. Box 20695 - 00200

Nairobi, Kenya

+254 (0)20 4400420

www.cytonn.com

Powering Africa. Lighting Up the World

FUNDRAISING FOR REAL ESTATE

DEVELOPMENT, BY CYTONN REAL ESTATE

According to a report by Bain &

Company, “A World Awash with Capital”,

global capital for investments had

grown to approximately USD 600 trillion,

tripling, over the past two decades. In

short there is an abundance of capital

in the world. However, the geographic

distribution of capital is not even, with

most of the global capital located in the

developed world.

While the developed world has most

of the global capital, they, ironically,

also have the lowest economic growth;

hence they have to look elsewhere

for returns. According to the World

Economic Outlook report by IMF,

advanced economies such as United

States, Eurozone, United Kingdom

among others, are expected to have an

average growth rate of 2.4% in 2015.

This is in stark contrast to Sub-Saharan

Africa (“SSA”) region where the growth

rate is expected to be at an average of

over 5% in 2015, despite commodity

reliance challenges facing most of these

countries. Consequently, for investors

looking for attractive returns, they

have to look into emerging and frontier

markets such as SSA.

If the investors in the developed world

have to look into SSA to get attractive

investment opportunities, why then do

real estate developers in Kenya struggle

to get capital? Yet real estate in Kenya

offers between 25 to 30% annualized

returns. It does not seem to make sense.

With an abundance of capital in the

west, but no returns, one would think

that it would then be fairly easy for

developers to raise capital, but that has

not been the case.

We think that if developers address the

following areas, it will improve their

ability to raise capital:

1. Institutionalize development: Most

developers are either centered on

an individual or a family, with very

little governance structures. Global

institutional investors, given their

distant locations and given the

risks of real estate, will not back a

developer without the requisite

corporate governance structures.

2. Structuring real estate into

investment instruments that are

focused on target returns. Most

developers sell real estate as brick

and mortar, rather than structuring

the real estate into investment

returns. Global investors are not

interested in brick & mortar, but

in investment returns. Developers

should be able to convert their real

estate in investment instruments.

3. Coupling fundraising and

development: given the very risky

nature of development, investors

tend to want the fundraising

function working alongside the

development function in order

to ensure that the development

process is very sensitive and

responsive to return expectations.

This explains why Centum

Investments created Athena

Properties. Cytonn Investments

created Cytonn Real Estate,

and most likely the reason why

Britam Investments attempted a

tie up with Acorn Properties. All

are examples of coupling up an

investment / fundraising platform

and a development platform.

4. Professionalized development,

through efforts such as doing

market research, documenting

a business case supporting the

development rationale, investing

in sales & marketing, employing

professional development and

project management experts,

and having strong investment

committees approve development

prior to commencement.

To stay relevant, it is essential that

developers either address these four

issues to be able to raise funds, or

partner with an institution that has

addressed these issues.

Cytonn’s ability to raise funds from

global investors, with Taaleritedas of

Finland as the anchor investor, has been

very successfully largely because of

addressing these four factors.

Capital is abundant; you just have to

know how to access it.

Kenya Property Developers Association... Development brings Development!

Global Challenge Cup

People's choice Winner.

Energy Category

13

14


Kenya Property Developers Association

Fatima Flats, Suite B4

Marcus Garvey Road

Off Argwings Kodhek, Kilimani Area

P. O. Box 76154 – 00508 Nairobi, Kenya

Telephone: +254 737 530290/0705 277787

Email: admin@kpda.or.ke

Website: www.kpda.or.ke

PRESS RELEASE: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

• Controlled mixed - use mixed-income

urban development

• Ideal Location - 3KM from Northern &

Eastern Bypass Junction and 5KM from

Thika Highway at Exit 11

• Spacious and Secure environment

Industrial: Starting from $60 per sqm

Live, Work and Play at Tatu City

Residential: Quarter acre starting from Kshs 8M

and half acre starting from Kshs 12.5M

The Kenya Property Developers Association has been striving to engage with the National

Construction Authority to create a better business environment for our members as we comply

with the country’s laws.

KPDA is proud to inform our members that that they can now make payments towards the NCA

Construction Levy in instalments. We have also been granted a specific Liaison Officer to handle

queries raised by our members.

Kindly note that only KPDA members in good standing will get the full contacts of the NCA KPDA

Liaison Officer.

We continue to advocate for a revision to the levy and will keep you posted on any progress we

make.

For more information, kindly contact the secretariat on 0737 530 290 or 0705 277 787 to confirm

on your membership status.

Tel: 020 513 1000, 0708 555 555| Email: sales@tatucity.com |www.tatucity.com

15

Kenya Property Developers Association... Development brings Development!

Development Brings Development


KPDA PARTNERSHIP

UPPERHILL AND THE FUTURE

Looking to Reach your target goal

and maximize on your sales?

Properly planned and managed cities

hold the key to human development

in a safer environment. Upperhill

plays a crucial role in the economic

development of not only Kenya but

East Africa. Therefore setting up of the

Upper Hill District Association (UHDA)

was a means to ensure that authorities

responded by providing services that

commensurate the developments and

investments in Upperhill.

The need to have associations

especially for communities was

recently echoed by the Nairobi

City County (NCC) Governor

when he met with the UHDA

executive committee members.

The NCC has now published a

Community and Neighbourhood

Associations Engagement Act of

2015. Associations should utilize

the opportunity of the new law to closely

work with the County government for

satisfactory service delivery.

In the next 5 years, Upperhill will be

home to some of the tallest buildings in

the country with the UAP Tower already

challenging developers to surpass its

33 storey building. Achieving greater

heights will be the theme for the area as

we strive to be the financial hub of East

and Central Africa.

Now would be the best time to invest

and move to Upperhill with the average

asking price being KES 120 per sq. ft.

for grade A offices. More so, we are

pressurizing the authorities to fast track

the completion of the roads project that

will give Upperhill a new face.

Kenya Urban Roads Authority (KURA)

are coming up with new exits/entrances

for Upperhill while National Transport

and Safety Authority (NTSA) are working

at means to mitigate traffic jams in

the area.

For more on UHDA,

kindly contact:

Upper Hill District Association (UHDA)

Eagle Africa Centre, 6th Floor,

Longonot Rd

Tel: +254 739 584 765

Email: upperhill@uhda.or.ke

Website: www.uhda.or.ke

Kenya Property Developers Association... Development brings Development!

17


INDUSTRY EXPERTS

HOUSING PRICE INDEX

JULY 2015 ISSUE 03

Highlights

1House Price Index represents a

softening of house prices in the second

quarter signalling stabilisation of the

overall house price movements

Apartment prices appear to be moving

more than those of bungalows 2

and maisonettes. This confirms the fact

that the rising middle class is preferring

apartment to bungalows and maisonettes

as they are relatively more affordable.

3similarly, consistent with Quarter

1 of 2015, the demand for houses

on offer was influenced by the location

of the house (therefore the kind of social

amenities available), a preference for gated

communities (implying the importance

of convenience and security), and the

characteristics that will be appealing to the

increasingly discerning households

4there is a negative relationship in

price movements between bungalows

and the apartment prices across all

the regions. This confirms the possibilities

of redevelopment of old bungalows into

apartments as we cited in the earlier index

release.

House price movements

The second quarter of 2015 represented a

softening of house prices as manifested

by their increase being a marginal 0.2

percent compared to the previous quarter’s

2.75 percent increase (Figure 1). In essence,

this signals the somewhat stabilisation of the

overall house prices in line with the demandsupply

dynamics. In particular it is a reflection of

demand adjustment for a given level of supply

of housing units across all market segments,

therefore is in line with the overall economic

conditions.

Figure 1: Overall Price Change (%)

3.0

2.0

1.0

0

2.18%

Q4_2014

2.75%

Q1_2015

Q2_2015

Kenya Property Developers Association... Development brings Development!

0.20%

The slowdown in the overall economic growth

from 5.7 percent in 2013 to 5.3 percent in 2014,

and consequently expectations that the projected

resumption of robust growth may not be realised

is filtering into demand for houses, especially in

the low and middle income segment. Further,

the clear signs of emerging macroeconomic

instability as reflected in the exchange rate

volatility and inflationary pressure have

Moving Base Index

106.0

104.0

102.0

necessitated the tightening of monetary policy

and therefore a shift of expectations towards a

high interest rates regime. This has apparently

shaped the decision making of households

seeking to take mortgages towards home

acquisition. Indeed the financial performance of

key mortgage lenders reflect stable earnings for

the first half of the year, confirming the influence

of demand on the softening of house prices.

The Evolution of the KBA Housing Price Index

(KBA-HPI), whose computation is based on the

Laspeyers Index methodology (see Technical

Note), since the first quarter of 2013 is shown in

Table 1 and Figure 2.

Table 1: Price Movement Series

Period

Q-on-Q With Q1_13

Index* as Fixed Base

Q1-2013 100.00 100.00

Q2-2013 101.42 101.42

Q3-2013 103.25 101.46

Q4-2014 100.66 101.63

Q1-2014 101.86 102.13

Q2-2014 103.45 102.29

Q3-2014 101.87 102.44

Q4-2015 102.18 102.71

Q1-2015 104.99 102.97

Q2-2015 105.01 103.88

* Index with a moving base

Figure 2: KBA–House Price Index

100.0 100.0

Q1_13 Q2_13 Q3_13 Q4_13 Q1_14 Q2_14 Q3_14 Q1_15 Q2_15

Quarter-on-Quarter Index (Left)

Index with Q1_2013 as Fixed Base (Right)

104.5

103.5

102.5

101.5

Fixed Base Index

19

20


INDUSTRY EXPERTS

INDUSTRY EXPERTS

KBA HOUSING PRICE INDEX JULY 2015

JULY 2015 KBA HOUSING PRICE INDEX

Index

Index

Drivers of the price changes

The determination of the qualitative and

quantitative parameters that drive the house price

changes is based on the estimation of a hedonic

function. The estimates of the hedonic function for

Quarter 2 of 2015 are given in Table 2 while for

comparison purposes those for Quarter 1 of 2015

are given in Table 3.

The estimates indicates a revealed preference

of houses as influenced by their size as can

be inferred from the plinth area, number of

bedrooms, whether the house has a backyard

Sub - regional Indices

The index with Q1_2013 as the fixed base

indicates (Table 4) that apartment prices appear

to be moving more than those of bungalows

and maisonettes. This confirms the fact that the

rising middle class is preferring apartment to

bungalows and maisonettes as they are relatively

more affordable among the three housing types.

On a regional basis we however note that the

prices for Region 2 and Region 3 are moving

faster compared to prices in Region 1 on quarterly

basis 1 . This on account of the fact that in Regions

2 and 3, the crude average price is on upper level

(beyond KES 25 Million for Region 3 and between

10 Million to 19 Million for Region 2) which could

be a pointer to for skewed market in favour of

such regions driven by effective demand.

The index based on moving base (Table 5)

reveals a similar trend. Apartment prices seem to

be changing faster across all the regions compared

to maisonettes and bungalows. Comparing all

the regions, prices for Regions 2 and 3seem to

be in a general upward trend, confirming the

1 See The definition of sub-regions on page 5

and to a lesser extent whether a house has

domestic staff quarters. This is consistent with

what was observed in Quarter 1 of 2015.

Similarly, consistent with Quarter 1 of 2015, the

demand for houses on offer was influenced by

the location of the house (therefore the kind

of social amenities available), a preference for

gated communities (implying the importance

of convenience and security), and the

characteristics that will be appealing to the

increasingly discerning households.

Apartment prices changed faster across

the regions than maisonettes and

bungalows.

skewed market in favour of areas in Regions

2 and 3. Further looking at both the moving

base and the fixed base sub regional indices,

it’s clear that there is a negative relationship

in price movements between bungalows and

the apartment prices across all the regions. This

confirms the possibilities of redevelopment of old

bungalows into apartments as we cited in the

earlier index release.

Technical Note

The index follows a Laspeyers index

method. In this method, the index

is computed by getting the ratio the

estimated current quarter price from the

hedonic method multiplied the weights

of the preceding quarter to the price of

the preceding quarter multiplied by the

respective weights of that quarter.

The weights of the quantitative variables

are obtained by getting their respective

mean values. For the dummy variables

however, their weights are computed as

the proportions of the number of houses

possessing a certain attribute to the

total number of houses. Thus the index

is computed by the formular:

Where; is the shadow price from

the estimated hedonic function for the

current quarter;

is the shadow prices from the

estimated hedonic function for the

preceding quarter;

and are the weights of the respective

variables for the preceding quarter.

Table 2:

Housing Price Index Quarter 2_2015

Source SS df MS

Model 778.397411 19 40.9682848

Residual 163.459877 1529 0.106906395

Total 941.857289 1548 0.608434941

LN VALUE Coef Std. Err. t - stats P>|t| [95% Conf. Interval]

LN AREA 0.2714414 0.0143168 18.96 0.000 0.2433587 0.2995241

Bedrooms 0.1374258 0.0230495 5.96 0.000 0.0922137 0.1826378

Bathrooms 0.0564309 0.025917 2.18 0.030 0.005594 0.1072676

Age -0.1169339 0.0135849 -8.61 0.000 -0.1435809 -0.0902869

Floors -0.0906218 0.0093981 -9.64 0.000 -0.1090563 -0.0721872

Location 0.0822811 0.0034404 23.92 0.000 0.0755327 0.0890294

Backyard -1.800684 0.1141361 -15.78 0.000 -2.024564 -1.576804

Balcony 0.398455 0.0386545 10.31 0.000 0.3226336 0.4742763

Dsq -0.0822993 0.0312342 -2.63 0.409 -0.1435657 -0.0210329

Gymn 0.4789688 0.070293 6.81 0.000 0.341088 0.6168496

Spool 0.362732 0.0549305 6.60 0.000 0.254985 0.4704791

Socialammenities 0.1356015 0.0238121 5.69 0.000 0.0888937 0.1823092

Garageparking 0.6958917 0.0304572 22.85 0.000 0.6361493 0.7556341

Masterensuite 0.2534526 0.0289325 8.76 0.000 0.196701 0.3102043

Separatedining 0.0405952 0.0588494 0.69 0.490 0.074839 0.1560293

Gatedcommunity 0.9606869 0.067051 14.33 0.000 0.8291653 1.092209

Borehole 0.2260852 0.0393166 5.75 0.000 0.1489652 0.3032053

Guestrm 0.0622523 0.1664845 0.37 0.709 -0.2643099 0.3888145

Jaccuzi 0.0464504 0.068501 0.68 0.498 -0.0879155 0.1808162

Constant 12.96218 0.1020273 127.05 0.000 12.76205 13.16231

Housing Price Index

Quarter 2, 2015

+105.01

Number of obs = 1549

F( 19, 1529) = 383.22

Prob > F = 0.0000

R-squared = 0.8264

Adj R-squared = 0.8243

Root MSE = 0.32697

2

Kenya Property Developers Association... Development brings Development!

Kenya Property Developers Association... Development brings Development!

21

3

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INDUSTRY EXPERTS

INDUSTRY EXPERTS

KBA HOUSING PRICE INDEX JULY 2015

JULY 2015 KBA HOUSING PRICE INDEX

Index

Index

Table 3:

Housing Price Index Quarter 1 _2015

Table 4: Inter Quarter Index (Moving Base) – 2013 - 2015

Region 1 Region 2 Region 3

Apartments Bungalows Maisonettes Apartments Bungalows Maisonettes Apartments Bungalows Maisonettes

SS (Model) = 474.31577

SS (Residual) = 40.720436

MS (Model) = 21.559808

MS (Residual) = 0 .05128

df (Model) = 22

df (Residual) = 794

Prob > F = 0.0000

obs = 817

R-squared = 0.9209

Adj R-squared = 0.9187

Q1-2013 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100

Q2-2013 100.063 100.04 100.60 100.05 100.61 100.10 100.01 100.93 100.03

Q3-2013 99.67 100.40 99.40 102.44 100.99 100.49 98.56 105.20 102.09

Q4-2013 100.74 102.82 99.38 101.80 100.82 98.81 103.75 103.95 100.32

LN VALUE Coef Std. Err. t - stats P>|t| [95% Conf. Interval]

LN Area 0.0436 0.0507 0.86 0.3910 -0.0560 0.1431

Bedrooms 0.1247 0.0228 5.48 0.0000 0.0800 0.1694

Bathrooms -0.2129 0.0450 -4.73 0.0000 -0.3012 -0.1245

Type -0.0079 0.0440 -0.18 0.8580 -0.0943 0.0786

Age -0.2982 0.1821 -1.64 0.1020 -0.6556 0.0592

DQ_1 0.1861 0.1139 1.63 0.0000 0.7626 1.2097

Q1-2014 100.45 99.38 99.67 101.63 100.91 100.91 97.70 102.58 102.58

Q2-2014 100.50 99.67 99.54 100.75 101.75 101.27 96.70 102.74 103.32

Q3-2014 99.41 100.31 100.33 100.63 101.27 99.91 98.90 102.98 100.56

Q4-2014 97.48 99.29 105.21 97.82 101.98 99.61 104.54 104.36 100.62

Q1-2015 95.20 101.54 100.95 98.67 102.01 100.25 104.67 104.92 100.71

Q2-2015 102.92 102.78 100.53 101.11 102.05 100.77 105.23 104.91 102.51

FIXED BASE INDEX (Q1-2013) – 2013 - 2015

Location 0.0136 0.0094 1.45 0.1470 -0.0048 0.0320

Region 1 Region 2 Region 3

Floors 0.0935 0.0166 5.62 0.0000 0.0609 0.1261

Back-yard -0.5335 0.1781 -3.00 0.0030 -0.8831 -0.1838

Balcony -0.8108 0.1153 -7.03 0.0000 -1.0371 -0.5844

Detached S quarters 0.7534 0.0726 10.38 0.0000 0.6109 0.8959

Apartments Bungalows Maisonettes Apartments Bungalows Maisonettes Apartments Bungalows Maisonettes

Q1-2013 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100

Q2-2013 100.06 100.04 100.60 100.05 100.61 100.11 100.01 100.93 100.03

Q3-2013 99.02 99.67 99.67 100.09 102.44 102.44 99.65 104.13 98.10

Q4-2013 99.86 100.74 100.74 98.88 101.53 101.80 100.32 103.45 103.45

Gymn -0.4471 0.1603 -2.79 0.0050 -0.7619 -0.1328

Q1-2014 99.57 100.55 100.55 99.41 101.46 101.01 100.24 102.20 100.11

Swimming pool 0.7755 0.0976 7.94 0.0000 0.5838 0.9671

Social ammenities 0.7637 0.0747 10.22 0.0000 0.9104 0.6170

Garage parking 0.2289 0.1415 1.62 0.1060 -0.0488 0.5067

Master en-suite 0.0569 0.0618 0.92 0.3580 0.0645 0.1783

Separate dining 0.5519 0.1108 4.98 0.0000 0.3344 0.7694

Q2-2014 99.62 100.34 97.76 100.98 102.07 101.39 100.82 102.18 101.47

Q3-2014 99.94 100.04 97.88 100.51 101.06 104.15 99.19 102.29 99.74

Q4-2014 99.74 100.52 98.93 100.48 100.19 102.15 100.07 104.09 99.41

Q1-2015 95.39 101.32 100.19 100.13 100.741 101.67 100.05 104.52 99.50

Q2-2015 99.41 102.95 101.41 101.90 100.81 100.01 103.23 104.70 100.95

Gated Community -0.2268 0.1321 -1.72 0.0860 -0.4860 0.0324

Guest room 0.0333 0.1675 0.20 0.8430 -0.2955 0.3620

THE DEFINITION OF THE SUB-REGIONS

Jaccuzi 1.5442 0.2466 6.26 0.0000 1.0601 2.0283

Elevator 0.0358 0.0960 0.37 0.7090 -0.1525 0.2242

Back-up generator 0.1223 0.1598 0.77 0.4440 -0.1914 0.4360

Wooden floor 0.7613 0.2672 2.85 0.0050 0.2367 1.2858

Constant 15.8070 0.3440 45.95 0.0000 15.1317 16.4822

Housing Price Index

Quarter 1, 2015

+104.99

© Kenya Bankers Association Centre for Research on Financial Markets and Policy®

REGION 1

Athi River, Mlolongo, Mavoko, Nakuru, Ngong,

Ruaka, Syokimau, Embakasi, Kahawa Wendani.

Thika, Mtwapa, Utange, South C, Kitengela,

Kiembeni, Nyeri, Likoni, Eldoret, Ruiru, kilifi.Thika

road (Kasarani, Roysambu, Ruaraka).

REGION 2

Thindigua (Kiambu Road), Kiambu, South B,

Kabete, Komarock, Imara Daima, Membley, Buruburu,

Rongai, Waiyaki Way (Uthiru, Kinoo, Kikuyu,

Regen), Mbagathi road, Ngong Road, Langata.

REGION 3

Kileleshwa, kilimani, Lavington, Westlands,

Spring Valley, Riverside, Milimani (Kisumu),

Milimani (Nakuru), Runda, Karen, Garden Estate,

Parklands, Ridge Ways, Muthaiga, Loresho,

Kitsuru, Adam Arcade, Nyali, Mountainview

5

4

Kenya Property Developers Association... Development brings Development!

Kenya Property Developers Association... Development brings Development!

23

24


DIRECTORY OF KPDA MEMBERS

KENYA PROPERTY DEVELOPERS ASSOCIATION

LIKE

FACEBOOK

Kenya Property

Developers Association

PREMIUM MEMBERS

MINISTRY OF LAND, HOUSING AND

URBAN DEVELOPMENT

(Government Agency)

1st Ngong Avenue

P. O. Box 30450-00100

NAIROBI.

Tel: 020-2718050

Website: www.ardhi.go.ke

HF DEVELOPMENT AND INVESTMENT LIMITED

(Property Developer)

Rehani House, Junction of Kenyatta Avenue and

Koinange Street P. O. Box 30088 - 0100 GPO NAIROBI.

Tel: 020-3262129/ 3262390

Email: customer.service@housing.co.ke

Website: www.housing.co.ke

PANDA DEVELOPMENT COMPANY LTD

(Property Developer)

Aberdare Hills Golf Resort, Naivasha

P. O. Box 46235 - 00100 NAIROBI.

Tel: +254 7160590 643/ 0723-030721/ 0717-705975

Website: www.aberdarehills.com

Follow

MABATI ROLLING MILLS LIMITED

(Manufacturer/Supplier)

Mombasa Road between KAPA

and Nation Media Group

P. O. Box 271 - 00204 ATHI RIVER.

Tel: 020 6427, 000 0722 205 164, 0733622068

Email: info@mabati.com / Website: www.mabati.com

BAMBURI CEMENT LTD

(Building Materials Manufacturer)

6th Floor, Kenya Re Towers, Upperhill

P. O. Box 10921 - 00100 NAIROBI.

Tel: 020-2892529/ 0717-581 420

Website: www.lafarge.co.ke

BRITAM

(Insurance and Asset Management Firm)

Britam Centre, Junction of Mara

and Ragati Road, Upperhill

P. O. Box 30375 - 00100 NAIROBI.

Tel: 0703-094 000 / 020-2833000

Website: www.britam.co.ke

TWITTER

@DevBringsDev

TWEET

COLLABORATIONS ENGINEERING SOLUTIONS

& PRODUCTS (Engineering Firm)

ABC Bank Building, Dar es Salaam Rd, Industrial Area

P. O. Box 7607, 00100 NAIROBI.

Tel: 0713-944 769 / 0715-281 537

Website: www.cespkenya.com

SAVANNAH CEMENT LIMITED

(Building materials manufacturer)

Athi River, Off Namanga Rod

P. O. Box 27910 - 00100 NAIROBI.

Tel: 020 - 5146600 / 0725999035/6

Website: www.savannahcement.com

FUSION CAPITAL

(Financing and Private Equity)

ACK Garden House, Block A,

Ist Ngong Avenue,

P. O. Box 47538-00100 NAIROBI.

Tel: +254 (20) 2710149 /53 /55

Website: www.fusioncapitalafrica.com

Share

MMC AFRICA

LAW

Comment

(Law Firm)

MMC Arches Spring Valley Crescent,

off Peponi Road

P.O. Box 75362 - 00200

Tel: 020 2167301/0720 585785/0734 333339

Email: info@wakili.com

Website: www.wakili.com

SURAYA PROPERTY GROUP LTD

(Property Developer)

Suraya Studio, Shanzulink, Off Lower Kabete Rd.

P. O. Box 76069-00508 NAIROBI.

Tel: 0202664511 / 0712219106

Website: www.suraya.co.ke

NEWMATIC AFRICA LIMITED

(Home Kitchen Appliances)

1st Floor, The Park Office Suites, Parklands Rd.

P.O. Box 528-00202 NAIROBI

Tel: 0711112744 / 0737391011

Website: www.newmaticafrica.com

IMARAN REAL ESTATE LTD

(Property Developer)

3rd floor, Imperial Court, Westlands Road

P.O. Box 46402-00100 NAIROBI.

Tel: 0203744593/0737151566

Website: www.IMARANGROUP.com

Like, Share and follow our pages on social media to get:

Invitation to our events and forums

Information trending in the property industry and so much more!

CORPORATE MEMBERS

PHATISA GROUP/PAN AFRICAN

HOUSING FUND

(Real estate private equity fund)

7th Floor, Longonot Place, Kijabe Street, NAIROBI.

Tel: 0700-152 324 / 020-2327657.

Website: www.phatisa.com

TILISI DEVELOPMENTS LIMITED

(Property Developer)

4th Floor, Maksons Plaza, Parklands Road

P. O. Box 39542 – 00623 NAIROBI.

Tel: 0734-244 713

Website: www.coralpropertykenya.com

KARIBU HOMES

(Consulting firm)

30 Kyuna Crescent. P. O. Box 40063 - 00100 NAIROBI.

Tel: 0722-837 800/0705-151 515 /020 4440661/2/3

Website: www.karibuhomes.com

(Law Firm)

ALN House, Eldama Ravine Gardens ,

Off Eldama Ravine Road

P. O. Box 200 - 00606 NAIROBI.

Tel: 020 3640000 /0703-032 000

Website: www.africalegalnetwork.com

Kenya Property Developers Association... Development brings Development!

25 26


DIRECTORY OF KPDA MEMBERS

DIRECTORY OF KPDA MEMBERS

KINGS DEVELOPERS LTD

(Real estate developers)

Royal ICT Business Park, Mombasa Road

P. O. Box 18215 - 00500 NAIROBI.

Tel: 020-2044619/20

Website: www.kingsdevelopers.com

QUESTWORKS LTD

(Design Building Firm)

Block C, First Floor, Suite 10,

Crawford Business Park, State House Road

P. O. Box 18724 - 00500 NAIROBI.

Tel: 0712-227 388 / 0724-583 351

Website: www.questworks.co.ke

LIMOJADE MANAGEMENT LTD

(Property developer)

4th Floor, Soin Arcade, Westlands Road, Westlands

P. O. Box 5322 - 00506 NAIROBI.

Tel: 0722-512 381 /020-2690804/5 / 0700-326 762

Website: www.limojade-management.com

VISHWA DEVELOPERS LTD

(Property Developer)

DG Oasis, South C, Muhoho Road, South C

P. O. Box 76268 - 00508 NAIROBI.

Tel: 0722-206 971

SUPERIOR HOMES KENYA

(Unique lifestyle development firm)

Greenpark Estate (past Top Tank)

Athi River, Mombasa Road

P. O. Box 15992 - 00100 NAIROBI.

Tel: 020-3579100/1 / 0724-253 267

Website: www.superiorhomes.co.ke

MENTOR GROUP LIMITED

(Real Estate Consultancy and

Project Management)

Rhapta Road, New Rehema Building, 6th Floor, Westlands

P. O. Box 66331 – 00800 NAIROBI.

Tel: 020-3744903/4 /2324991/ 0722-955 014

Website: www.mentorgroup.co.ke

PEDIMENT

DEVELOPERS

(Property Developer)

Century Apartments,

Rose Avenue - Ngong Road

P. O. Box 15509 NAIROBI.

Tel: 0722-984 191

MENTOR MANAGEMENT LIMITED (MML)

(Construction, Project & Development Management Firm)

2nd Floor, The Courtyard,

General Mathenge Drive, Westlands

P. O. Box 62899 - 00200 NAIROBI.

Tel: 020-2324991/3744903/4 / 0706-579 790

Website: www.mentor-ea.com

OPTIVEN LIMITED (Real estate company)

Barclays Plaza Loita Street 14th Floor Wing A

P. O. Box 623 - 00600 NAIROBI.

Tel: 0706-618 141 / 0716-605 410.

Website: www.optiven.co.ke

BAHATI RIDGE DEVELOPMENT LTD

(Property developer)

Off Gatanga Road, Thika. P. O. Box 47739 - 00100 NAIROBI.

Tel: 0717-049 644 / 0737-149 644 / 020-815 5380

Website: www.bahatiridge.co.ke

TATU CITY LTD

(Urban developer)

Off Ruiru, Kiambu Rd, Ruiru

P. O. Box 2739 - 00621 NAIROBI.

Tel: 020-5131000 / 0708-555 555.

Website: www.tatucity.com

MANRIK GROUP

(Real Estate Firm)

Off Raphta Road

P. O. Box 45403 - 00100 NAIROBI.

Tel: 020-4442100/2

DAYKIO PLANTATIONS LIMITED

(Real Estate Firm)

4th floor, Hughes Building,

Banda street wing, Muindi Mbingu Street

P. O. Box 50992-00100NAIROBI.

Tel: +254 0718 180 064 / +254 0725 306 291

/ +254 020 2215 472 Website: www.daykio.com

BLUELINE PROPERTIES LTD

(Property Developer)

Wendy Court Unit 10, David Osieli Road, Westlands

P. O. Box 18689 - 00500 NAIROBI.

Tel: 0722-446 055/020-4441195

Website: www.blueline.co.ke

NATUREVILLE HOMES

(Real Estate Developer)

Lenana Road, next to the

Nigeria High Commission

P. O. Box 47369 - 00100 NAIROBI

Tel: 0722-888 271

Website: www.natureville.net

STEEL AFRICA LIMITED

(Building Materials Manufacturer)

Empress Office Suites, 3rd Floor,

Ring Road Parklands

P. O. Box 62337- 00200 NAIROBI.

Tel: 0726-859 613 / 020-2122043/4

KOTO HOUSING KENYA

(Housing and building firm)

Koto House (Formely the People Printing House),

Mombasa Road (Mlolongo, Machakos County)

P. O. Box 52494 - 00200 NAIROBI.

Tel: 0789-808-991

Website: www.kotohousingkenya.co.ke

NANYUKI MALL LTD

(Shopping mall)

Kenyatta Highway, Nanyuki

P. O. Box 42093 - 00100 NAIROBI

Tel: 0735/720-510 000/

0721-486 365/020-2726870

Website: www.nanyuki.com

COUNTY HOME DEVELOPERS LTD

/RUNDA VIEW LTD

(Property Developer)

New Muthaiga Shopping Mall 2nd Floor,

Office 9,, Thigiri Ridge Road off Peponi Road

P. O. Box 14283 - 00800 NAIROBI.

Tel: 0702-523 116 / 0722-670 320

AMS PROPERTIES LTD

(Property Developer)

Eden Square, 6th Floor, Block 1, Westlands Road

P. O. Box 10713 - 00100 NAIROBI

Tel: 020 3660000/ 0722-828 501/ 0733-612 241

/ 0737-267267/ 0715-267 267

Website: www.amsproperties.co.ke

URBAN NIRVANA

PROPERTY

SOLUTIONS LTD

(Real Estate Managers)

Rhapta Road, Opposite Liza Apartments

P. O. Box 44342 – 00100 NAIROBI.

Tel: 0728-762 370

TRIDENT ESTATES LIMITED

(Real Estate Developer)

Fortis Tower - 10th floor,Woodvale Grove westlands

P. O. Box 17592 - 00500 NAIROBI

Tel: 0737-040 992/ 0700-002 222

Website: www.tridentestates.co.ke

BROLL KENYA

(Property Development)

Fedha Plaza, Mezzanine Floor,

Junction of Parklands and Mpaka Road, Westlands

P. O. Box 52727 - 00100 NAIROBI

Tel: 0712-668 448/020-374 3066/0736-922 999

Website: www.broll.co.ke

CORAL PROPERTY INTERNATIONAL LTD

(Property consultants)

Peponi Plaza, Office No: B-0, Peponi Road

P.O. Box 38568 – 00623 NAIROBI

Tel: 0722-513 301

Website: www.coralpropertykenya.com

OAK PARK PROPERTIES LTD

(Property Developer)

Muthangari Road, House No. 46

P. O. Box 10104 - 00100 NAIROBI.

Tel: 0734-342 326

Website: www.oakparkltd.com

PARAGON ARCHITECTS (Design and architectural firm)

1st Floor.33 Fricker Road.

Illovo Boulevard Sandton 2196

Johannesburg South Africa

P. O. Box 2621 Houghton 2041SOUTH AFRICA.

Tel: +271-14823781.

Website: www.paragon.co.za

SJR PROPERTIES LTD / SKY MANAGEMENT

(Property developer)

Off Enterprise Road, Road C

P. O. Box 38027 - 00623 NAIROBI.

Tel: 0722-259344

Website: www.sjr-properties.com

MY SPACE PROPERTIES LTD

(Real estate developer)

Mombasa Trade Centre (Southern Wing), 5th Floor

P. O. Box 2405 - 80100 MOMBASA.

Tel: 0722-442 077/0734-555 556

Website: www.myspace.co.ke

CYTONN INVESTMENTS LTD

Advisory and investment firm

3rd Floor Liaison House, State House Avenue

P. O. Box 20695 – 00200 NAIROBI.

Tel: 020 - 4400420 / 0714 830 744.

Website: www.cytonn.com

ELM RIDGE LIMITED

(Property Developer)

Muthangari Drive/off Waiyaki Way, Westlands

P. O. Box 14279 – 00800 NAIROBI.

Tel: 020 4441473/0722 205 651/0733 068 500

Email: erl@gathkenya.com

SCION REAL ESTATE

(Advisory and Investment Firm)

Block A, 1st Floor, Regnum Center

Methodist Ministries Center

Oloitoktok Road, Valley Arcade

P. O. Box 10075 – 00100 NAIROBI.

Tel: 020-3862333 or 020-2329412

Cell: 0733-271 198

E-mail: admin@scionreal.com

Website: www.scionreal.com

CAMELOT CONSULTANTS/LANTANA HOMES LTD

(Consulting Firm)

Brookview Apartment, Elgeyo Marakwet Road

P.O. Box 14533 – 00800 NAIROBI.

Tel: 0721/734 - 322 322 / 020-3872161

KZANAKA LIMITED

(Property Developer)

Cooper Centre, Kaptagat Road off Waiyaki Way

P. O. Box 40596 – 00100 NAIROBI.

Tel: 0736-514 852

Website: www.coopers.co.ke

CHIGWELL HOLDINGS LIMITED

(Property developer)

Maksons Plaza, 4th Floor Parklands Rd,

Westlands (Next to Victoria Courts)

P. O. Box 39542 – 00623NAIROBI.

Tel: 0733-608 053/0733-603 982

ACORN GROUP LIMITED

(Real estate development)

2nd Floor, Acorn House, James Gichuru Rd, Lavington, Nairobi

P. O. Box 13759-00100 NAIROBI.

Tel: 020-2592671 or 020-2592672.

Website: www.acorngroupafrica.com

KNIGHT FRANK KENYA LIMITED

(Commercial and Residential Property Managers)

Lions Place, Ground Floor, Waiyaki Way

Dropping Zone: No. 65 Revlon Plaza

P. O. Box 39773- 00623 NAIROBI.

Tel: 020-4239000/4440174-6

Website: www.knightfrank.co.ke

AXIS REAL ESTATE LIMITED

(Property agents and valuers)

The Rahimtulla Tower | No 8, Upper Hill Road

P. O. Box 10730-00100 GPO NAIROBI.

Tel: 020-2724848/0722-203 032

Website: www.axisre.co.ke

NDATANI

ENTERPRISES

COMPANY LIMITED

(Property Developer)

10th Floor, Afya Centre, Tom Mboya Street

P. O. Box 9422 – 00300 NAIROBI.

Tel: 0722 515121/0726713487

/ 0716653011/0716653013

Website: www.ndatani.com

CORAL PROPERTY CONSULTANTS LTD

(Property Developers)

1st Floor, Rockwall Bldg Silos Rd-Nyali Rd

Junction Mkomani Nyali P.O Box 81300 - 80100 MOMBASA.

Tel: 254414470860 / 254414470861 /0721883505

Website: www.coralpropertykenya.com /

www.xanadukenya.com

JABEZ PROPERTIES

(Property Developer)

Namanga Road Estate, Off Namanga Road,

Near Export Processing Zone (EPZ)

P.O. Box 23059 – 00604 NAIROBI.

Tel: 0722788578 / 0738788578

Website: www.jabezproperties.co.ke

Kenya Property Developers Association... Development brings Development!

Kenya Property Developers Association... Development brings Development!

27

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DIRECTORY OF KPDA MEMBERS

FEDHA (MANAGEMENT) LTD

(Property Management)

17th Floor Eco Bank Towers

Muindi Mbingu Street

P. O. Box 45625 - 00100 NAIROBI.

Tel: 0735-922999/020 222 2442/222 3776

Website: www.fedhagroup.co.ke

SICHANGI PARTNERS

(Law Firm)

Hill Plaza, 10th floor Community

P. O. Box 33223-00600 NAIROBI.

Tel: 020-4440062/020 2733646 /49/ 50;

0202332543; 0712328896

Website: www.sichangi.com

MWANZONI LTD

(Real Estate & Construction Project/

Programme management firm)

84 Riverside Drive, Westlands

P. O. Box 14611 - 00800 NAIROBI.

Tel: 0775396313 / 0205226828 /0725872006

Website: www.mwanzoni.com

ASPENN GLOBAL MOBILITY

CONSULTANTS - KENYA

(Real Estate Consultant)

Ridor Plaza off Magadi Road

P. O. Box 1928 - 00502 NAIROBI.

Tel: 020 2177522 / 0706578646 / 0733775583

Website: www.aspennglobal.com

JAMBO

HOLDINGS

LIMITED

(Property Developer)

Jambo Holdings Ltd premises Opp

St Mary’’s School, Rhapta Rd

P. O. Box 30292-00100 NAIROBI.

Tel: +254-722577129

LORDSHIP AFRICA (Property Developer)

Bishop´s Gardens Court, 4th Ngong

Avenue, Community Area

P. O. Box 47655 – 00100 NAIROBI.

Tel: 020 2726473/ 0717444345

Website: www.lordshipafrica.com

HOME AFRIKA LIMITED

(Property Developer)

Morningside Park, Ngong Road, near Adams Arcade

P. O. Box 6254 - 00100 NAIROBI.

Tel: 0714-766015 / 722517611

/ +2540202772000

Website: www.homeafrika.com

MARLBOROUGH

PROPERTIES

LIMITED

(Real Estate Developer)

Occidental Building 1st Floor One Touch,

Door 2A 2A (past Soin Arcade)

P. O. Box 71854 - 00100 NAIROBI.

Tel: 0721160900; +44 7801865666

FALCON DEVELOPMENT LIMITED

(Property Developer)

Blue Violets Plaza, 5th Floor, Suite 505

Kindaruma Road, Kilimani Area

P. O. Box 1219 – 00100 NAIROBI.

Tel: 020 5286036/0719 762 060

Email: enquiry@falcondev.co.ke

Website: www.falcondev.co.ke

KARUME

HOLDINGS

LIMITED

(Property Developer)

3rd Floor, Cianda House, Koinange Street

P. O. Box 30594 - 00100 NAIROBI.

Tel: 0772099340

LASER PROPERTY SERVICES LIMITED

(Property Developer)

2nd Floor, CPF House, Haile Selassie Avenue

P. O. Box 28938 - 00200 NAIROBI.

Tel: 02046901 - 5

Website: www.laser.or.ke

UNITY HOMES LIMITED

(Property Developer)

Shanzu Gardens

PO Box 933-00621 NAIROBI.

Tel: +254 707 662 250

Website: www.unityhomes.co.ke

HASS CONSULT LIMITED

(Real Estate Developer)

First Floor ABC place Waiyaki Way

P. O. Box 14090- 00800 NAIROBI.

Tel: 0722 204765 / 0733629786

+254 204446914

Website: www.hassconsult.co.ke

CENTURY CITY PROPERTY LIMITED

(Property Developer)

3rd Floor VM Tower, The village Market, Limuru Rd

P. O. Box 19 - 00621 NAIROBI.

Tel: 020 -7122017 / 0701 066 144

Website: www.centurycitykenya.com

MURIMI & CO.

ADVOCATES

(Law Firm)

2nd Floor, Electricity House

Harambee Avenue

P. O. Box 54052 - 00200 NAIROBI.

Tel: 020 – 2227701

EDIFICE LIMITED

(Real Estate Developer)

6th Floor, Fortis Towers, Woodvale Groove,Westlands

P. O. Box 12645-00400 NAIROBI.

Tel: 0737 676767/ 254203741218 /0722-706114

Website: www.edifice.co.ke

IJENGA VENTURES LTD

(Real Rstate Developer)

Kwifra Estates No.B4 Roses Brookside Drive

P. O. Box 2384-00606 NAIROBI.

Tel: 0708909879

Website: www.ijenga.com

SPARTAN DEVELOPERS LIMITED

(Property Developer)

2nd Floor, Jumuia Place, Lenana Rd

P. O. Box 53927-00200 NAIROBI.

Tel: +254 0722491978

Website: www.spartandevelopers.com

MURIU MUNGAI

& COMPANY

ADVOCATES

(Law firm)

MMC Arches Spring Valley Crescent, off Peponi Road

P.O. Box75362-00200 NAIROBI.

Tel: 0202167301/0720585785/0734333339

Email: info@wakili.com

Website: www.wakili.com

MUGUMO DEVELOPMENTS LIMITED

(Property Developer)

Office Suites, 1st Floor

Parklands Road

P. O. Box 45922 – 00100 NAIROBI.

Tel: 0707 488 907

Email: png@nebange.com

MEREKA &

COMPANY

ADVOCATES

(Law firm)

Ukulima Co-op House, 7th Floor

P.O. Box 41620-00100 NAIROBI.

Tel: 2228315/6/7 / 0721393752

Email: merekawakili@gmail.com

3861067 /0720535674/0724256200

PDM (KENYA) LTD

(Real Estate Developer)

12th Floor, IPS Building Kimathi Street

P. O. Box 58470 - 00200 NAIROBI.

Tel: 020-316122/2226311

Website: www.pdmholdings.com

ROZANA

PROPERTIES

LIMITED

(Property Developer)

Ndemi Road, Kilimani

P.O Box 3291 - 00100 NAIROBI

Tel: 3861067 /0720535674/0724256200

Website: www.rozanaproperties.co.ke

DUNHILL CONSULTING LTD

(Property Developer)

Hevea Court, Eldama Ravine Road, Westlands

P. O. Box 1400 - 00606 NAIROBI.

Tel: 0720911136/0786386445/0732043845

Website: www.dunhillconsulting.com

BUY RENT KENYA LIMITED

(Property Portal)

14 Riverside Drive, 5th Floor, Grosvenor Blg

P.O BOX 580777-00200 NAIROBI

Tel: 0202307051

Website: www.buyrentkenya.com

ASSOCIATE MEMBERS

RATEMO & COMPANY ADVOCATES

(Law Firm)

Suraj Plaza, 3rd Floor, Limuru Road,

Next to Nairobi Transit Hotel

P. O. Box 25858-00100 NAIROBI.

Tel: 0202172321 / 0722979081 / 0736708999

Website: www.ratemo.co.ke

STRAUSS ENERGY LIMITED

(Manufacturing/Suppliers of BIPV roofing tiles)

Climate Innovation Centre,

3rd Floor Strathmore Business School

P.O. Box 15028-0100 NAIROBI.

Tel: 02044009938/0733448438

Website: www.straussenergy.com

MOHAMMED MUIGAI ADVOCATES

(Law Firm)

K-Rep Centre, 4th Floor, Wood Avenue, Kilimani

P. O. Box 61323 - 00200 NAIROBI.

Tel: 020 2397401/2/3 / 0722851018

Website: www.mohammedmuigai.com

ARM CEMENT LIMITED

(Building materials manufacturer)

Rhino House, Chiromo Road

P. O. Box 41908 - 00100 NAIROBI.

Tel: 0735701204 / 020 269 2978 / 0733636456

Website: www.armcement.com

MEHTA ELECTRICALS LIMITED

(Electrical Contractors)

The Cresent 1, Off Parklands Road

P. O. Box 39977 - 00623 NAIROBI.

Tel: 020 3750519/20 / 0720605040

/ 0722848486 / 0733620144

Website: www.mehta.co.ke

REMINDER

Under the KPDA Code of Conduct, every developer must:

1. Be legally registered, used registered accounts and have a fixed

address

2. Observe the law, including the Building Code at all times

3. Be fair and honest when dealing with home buyers

4. Not conceal any important fact that he or she knows about property

5. Engage only registered, insured and experienced professionals

6. Warrant a safe and structurally sound home as provided by law

7. Refrain from fraudulent and corrupt practices

8. Protect the environment as provided by law

9. Continuously educate him or herself on the latest technologies and

practices

10. Practice only fair competition with other developers

11. Alert the Association to unethical conduct by other developers

To read the KPDA Code of Ethics, kindly visit our website www.kpda.or.ke

We would like to notify all our members that we are

currently issuing annual membership certificates.

Kindly contact the secretariat to collect your copy.

Thank you.

Kenya Property Developers Association... Development brings Development!

Kenya Property Developers Association... Development brings Development!

29

30


A WORD FROM UN HABITAT

A WORD FROM UN HABITAT

UN-HABITAT GREEN BUILDING CHARTER

GREEN BUILDING TECHNOLOGY AND ROOFING SOLUTIONS

ECO-BUILDING: THE LOW HANGING FRUIT OF

SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AND CLIMATE

CHANGE MITIGATION

Human beings spend more time in

buildings than in any other place.

Buildings account for more than 50%

of electricity use, which is higher than

any other sector. Rapid urbanization is

associated with the increasing housing

demand, resulting in an increased

demand for electricity, gas, charcoal

and oil.

UN-Habitat and UNEP headquarters at

Gigiri, Nairobi: an Energy Plus Building.

Unfortunately, energy demand in East

Africa exceeds the supply several fold.

New buildings in sub-Saharan Africa

consume much more energy than

necessary due to their poor design that

is not integrated in the local climatic

context. Glazed walls which are a symbol

of modern architecture, consume more

energy, which is needed to cool down

the indoor space from the greenhouse

effect created by the transparent glass.

A poorly designed building associated

with the wrong use of building material

also consumes more energy than

necessary. It is cheaper to save one

kilowatt-hour of energy through energy

efficiency practices than to generate the

equivalent one kilowatt-hour of energy.

Energy efficiency and conservation

measures in buildings are the cheapest

solutions to address both the energy

crisis and climate change.

UN-Habitat and UNEP headquarters at Gigiri, Nairobi: an Energy Plus Building.

What is Green Building?

A green building known also as Ecobuilding

or sustainable building, is

a shelter that protects its occupant

from the adverse condition of the

environment while making use of

passive elements to ensure visual

and thermal comfort and minimizing

carbon emission. Green building

design, construction, operation

and maintenance, assumes the

healthiest possible environment while

representing the most efficient and

least disruptive use of resources like

land, water, energy and material.

Green building strategies maximize

both economic and environmental

performance. Green construction

elements/solutions such as proper

orientation, natural ventilation and

lighting, solar protection, use of locally

available material, rain water harvesting

etc. can be integrated into buildings

design.

What is Greenwash?

There are a lot of Greenwash in the

building sector. Just painting a building

with a green color does not transform

the building into a truly ecological

product. Greenwash uses cosmetic

approaches and does not have green

standards that are driven by real

environmental and social progress but

by purely profit interest.

What is a Zero Energy Building?

This is a building that consumes

the same amount of energy that it

generates through renewable energy

technologies mainly solar energy. The

carbon footprint of these buildings is

zero. They are also called “zero carbon”

buildings.. There are also called selfsufficient

buildings.

What is an Energy Plus Building?

This building produces more energy

than it consumes. This is the example of

the new offices of the United Nation at

Nairobi. The roof of the building are all

fitted with solar PV.

What is the real cost of a green

building?

Very often, a green building or ecobuilding

is considered more expensive

than a business as usual building.

The truth is that the additional cost

can vary from zero to 30%. A proper

orientation of the building does not

require additional cost; Proper sizing of

the windows to allow the penetration

of more light while protecting against

direct solar radiation may not require

additional cost.

The use of locally available building

material may also reduce the cost of

the building. In general, the additional

cost is that of renewable energy

technologies, such as solar water

heaters, solar-PV and energy saving

appliances. The other reason why an

eco-building incurs additional cost is

because there are very few specialized

architects. It is worth mentioning that

the operation cost of a green building

is very low. The environmental benefits

are enormous as their carbon footprint

is small.

When designing a green building,

emphasis must be placed on indoor

environmental quality. It is important

to ensure that the building is properly

ventilated, has adequate natural

lighting and properly protected from

solar radiation and noise pollution.

Eco-building increases occupant

productivity as it provides better

comfort and healthy in-door condition.

By applying sustainable building

strategies during the planning and

design processes, the following benefits

are felt immediately:

• Energy consumption in new

buildings ≥educe by up to 70%;

• Energy savings in existing

buildings ≥educe by up to 30%;

• Improve thermal and visual

comfort;

• Promote resource - water, land,

material- efficiency;

• Reduce wastages; Lower operating

costs;

• Improved productivity of building

occupants;

• Improved health of building

occupants.

Adopting eco-building design not

only save energy, money and the

environment but also promote green

economy and mitigate climate change.

A Proposed Charter for Sustainable

Building Design in Tropical Countries

Here are 20 important points to consider

when designing and implementing a

green building:

1. Site selection: Retrofit existing poor

buildings and give preference to

brownfield sites over undeveloped

green fields.

2. Building footprint: Conform to the

permitted ground cover age and should

ideally cove≥ not more than 60%.

3. Building orientation: Design the long

axis of the building to be along East-

West to minimize direct solar radiation

penetration in the building and reduce

heat gain.

4. Building form/shape: Design

according to climatic zone. For hot

and humid region, use narrow plan to

maximize natural light, cross-ventilation

and minimize heat gain. For hot and arid

regions, use courtyard and compact

forms to retain cold air in the building

and minimize heat gain.

5. Allocation of spaces within the

building: Services e.g. toilets, staircases,

lifts, lobbies, kitchens etc. to be located

Kenya Property Developers Association... Development brings Development!

Kenya Property Developers Association... Development brings Development!

31

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A WORD FROM UN HABITAT

Proudly Sponsored By:

on the East and West facing walls to act

as buffer zones against heat gain but

benefiting from daylighting.

6. Openings: Window sizing to be

designed according to prevailing climatic

conditions, and placement preferably on

North and South walls; windows to wall

ratio should not exceed 40%. Gazing

walls to be avoided, unless using special

treated glass.

7. Daylighting: design buildings according

to climatic region, with openings on

North and South walls, narrow plans to

maximize daylighting, use clerestories &

light shelves in deep spaces; staircases,

toilets, & kitchens to be day-lit.

8. Solar protection: use sun shading

devices e.g. roof over- hangs, vertical &

horizontal shading elements, balconies,

screens, & vegetation (green walls) to

minimize heat gain.

9. Natural ventilation: Ensue that both

cross-and vertical ventilation are provided

by the openings. Make use of roof vents

and openings, thermal chimneys and

clerestory windows.

10. Cooling: Integrate passive cooling

systems by designing water bodies and

features for evaporative cooling in hot

and arid regions. Ensure that buildings

using air conditioning appliances are well

insulated to limit heat gain and reduce

energy demand.

11. Heating: Suitable for highland regions

where passive heat gains through direct

solar radiations are welcome in the

building during the cold seasons. Design

passive solar heating strategies to ensure

maximum sun penetration during cold

seasons.

12. Building envelope and materials:

Always consider the carbon footprint

content while choosing building

materials. Give preferences to locally

available building material that are more

appropriate with low energy content.

Consider recyclable and re-usable

materials with low toxic emissions.

13. External finishes: Make use of lightcolored

materials on external facades and

roofs to reflect excessed solar radiation,

while also incorporating green and living

walls, vertical gardens provided with

vegetation that grows on the facades.

14. Renewable energy: Integrate solar

energy (thermal and electricity) such as

photovoltaic and solar water heaters;

wind energy, biogas and other available

renewable energy systems into the

building design.

15. Water conservation and efficiency:

Design rainwater harvesting systems.

Recycle grey water, and use water efficient

appliances and water-saving fixtures.

16. Storm-water management: Provide

appropriate drainage technique to

mitigate storm water run-off and facilitate

replenishment of water table through

rainwater infiltration.

17. Sanitation: In the absence of

municipal sewage system, design on-site

waste water treatment with production of

biogas, compost and re-used of water for

irrigation.

18. Waste management: Design

provisions for waste separation and onsite

sorting and systems that encourage

the 3R actions: Reduce, Recycle and

Reuse.

19. Landscaping: Design soft landscaping

(greening site) with indigenous plants

that require minimal irrigation and hard

landscaping with paving materials that

allow rainwater permeability.

20. Energy-efficient appliances and Energy

demand management: Incorporate

energy saving appliances in the building

design. Make use of energy-saving bulbs,

light level sensors, occupancy & motion

sensors. Encourage behavior change.

Ensure that energy demand management

principles are given top priorities by the

building occupants.

This article was prepared by KPDA’s partner - UN-Habitat’s

Urban Energy Unit - under the programme “Promoting

Energy Efficiency in Buildings in East Africa.” The programme

aims at mainstreaming energy efficiency (EE) measures into

housing policies, building codes, and building practices in

East Africa and to achieve considerable avoidance of GHG

emissions as a result of improved building practices.

UN-Habitat is also offering free technical advice on

upcoming projects and designs to ensure that they are

sustainable and affordable.

For further information on other climatic zones, go to

http://www.eebea.org/ For further information on the

technical advice, contact ruth.maina@unhabitat.org

Promoting Energy Efficiency

in Buildings in East Africa

UN-Habitat in collaboration with UNEP, the

Global Environment Facility (GEF) and the

Governments of Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda,

Rwanda and Burundi are implementing a

programme on promoting energy efficiency in

buildings in East Africa. The aim is to mainstream

energy efficiency measures into housing

policies, building codes, housing finance and

building practices in East Africa and to achieve

considerable avoidance of greenhouse gas

emissions as a result of improved building

practices.

The project is developed around five

components namely:

1 - Establishment of energy efficiency data and

benchmarks in the building sector;

2 - Integration of energy and resource efficiency

measure into building codes and regulations;

3 - Awareness raising and capacity building

in energy efficiency and best practices in the

building sector;

4 - Facilitation of the establishment of

appropriate financial mechanism for the

implementation of energy efficiency measures

in buildings;

5 - Provision of technical advice on green

building criteria is ongoing to mass housing

project and real estate and property developers.

To date several tools and awareness materials

have been developed and are available at

the project website: www.eebea.org. A

comprehensive handbook on “Sustainable

Building Design for Tropical Countries” with

practical examples on eco-building design, best

practices and instruments for evaluating and

design sustainable building in East Africa has

been published and can be downloaded for free

at: http://unhabitat. org/books/sustainablebuilding-design-

for-tropical-climates/

For more information about the program please

visit: www.unhabitat.org or contact

Dr. Vincent Kitio

Chief, Urban Energy Unit, UN-Habitat

Vincent.kitio@unhabitat.org

souleymane.diawara@unhabitat.org

Invitation to the End of Year KPDA

Corporate Networking KOROGA Event, Friday 20 th November

2015

An interactive, informal session allowing for members,

partners and friends of KPDA to network and socialise!

Where: GOAN GYMKHANA CLUB (Located along Ngara Road – off

Kipande Road, Parklands, Nairobi)

When: Friday, 20 th November 2015

Time:

6.00pm onwards

TICKETS FOR THE KOROGA

Members Kshs. 1, 500

Non Members Kshs. 2, 500

Kindly RSVP with payment by latest Friday, 13 th November 2015. Contact

the secretariat on 0737 530 290 or 0705 277787 to make your

reservation.

Proudly Sponsored By:

Kenya Property Developers Association... Development brings Development!

Kenya Property Developers Association... Development brings Development!

33

34


EVENTS CALENDAR

DATE LOCATION EVENTS

10 TH YEAR ANNIVERSARY

2016

WEDNESDAY, 17 TH

FEBRUARY 2016 Nairobi Serena Hotel NEMA CEO Breakfast Forum (7.00am – 9.30am)

FRIDAY, 26 TH

FEBRUARY 2016

Nairobi

Release of KPDA E-Newsletter

January – February 2016: Issue 01,2016

WEDNESDAY, 16 TH

MARCH 2015

Nairobi

KPDA Members Welcoming

Cocktail (6.00pm to 9.00pm)

FRIDAY, 1 ST

APRIL 2016

Goan Gymkhana Nairobi

KPDA Annual General Meeting

(5.00pm – 6.30pm)

KPDA Koroga (6.30pm onwards)

FRIDAY, 1 ST

APRIL 2016

Nairobi

Release of KPDA E-Newsletter

March – April 2016: Issue 02, 2015

FRIDAY, 29 TH

APRIL 2016

Nairobi

Serena Hotel

KPLC Lunch and Learn Members’ Only

Meeting (12.00noon – 2.30pm)

TUESDAY, 11 TH

MAY 2016

Nairobi

Serena Hotel

CEO Breakfast Forum

(7.00am – 9.30am)

TUESDAY, 28 TH

JUNE 2016

Nairobi

Release of KPDA E-Newsletter

May – June 2016: Issue 03,2015

THURSDAY, 30 TH

JUNE 2016

Nairobi Serena Hotel

Proposed KPDA Affordable Housing

Seminar and Site Visit (8.00am – 4.00pm)

TUESDAY, 26 TH

JULY 2016

Nairobi Serena Hotel

Leads and Needs Meeting

(12.00noon – 2.30pm)

TUESDAY, 23 RD

AUGUST 2016

Nairobi Serena Hotel

Release of KPDA E-Newsletter

July - August 2016: Issue 04, 2016

FRIDAY, 9 TH

SEPTEMBER 2016

Goan Gymkhana Club,

Parklands

KPDA Corporate Networking

Koroga Event (6.30pm onwards)

TUESDAY, 27 TH

SEPTEMBER 2016

Nairobi Serena

Hotel

Leads and Needs

Members Meeting

FRIDAY, 28 TH

OCTOBER 2016

Nairobi

KPDA Property Awards

(6.00pm – 10.30pm

FRIDAY, 28 TH

OCTOBER 2016

Nairobi

Release of KPDA E-Newsletter

September - October 2016: Issue 04, 2016

EVENTS

FRIDAY, 25 TH

NOVEMBER 2016

FRIDAY, 2 ND

DECEMBER 2016

Goan Gymkhana Club,

Parklands

Nairobi

End of Year KPDA Corporate

Networking Koroga Event

(6.30pm onwards)

Release of KPDA E-Newsletter

November - December 2016

Issue 06, 2016

Kenya Property Developers Association... Development brings Development!


KENYA PROPERTY DEVELOPERS ASSOCIATION

The Developer’s

Digest

A KPDA PUBLICATION

MEDIA PACK 2015/2016

The Developer’s Digest is a bi-monthly

e-newsletter supported and published

by the Kenya Property Developers

Association and designed by Insync

MEDIA Limited. It targets the various

players in the property industry in

Kenya and highlights a wide spectre

of issues affecting our members, other

professionals, manufacturers and both

private and public sector players in the

industry. We seek to encourage positive

dialogue and development.

The Developer’s Digest is filled with

current industry news, updates on the

Association’s ongoing activities, views,

interesting facts and specialty advertising

messages.

It is a free downloadable Mobile App

onto any mobile device.

We at The Developer’s Digest will work

with you to create the most effective

multi-platform advertising strategy that

will ensure you reach your targeted

consumer every direction they look. After

all, the distance between you and your

consumer, is no longer a straight line.

If you take up advertising with The

Developer’s Digest , we are also willing to

offer you an opportunity for you to have

interactive banner advertisements on our

website.

Kindly contact the Secretariat on 0737

530290 or 0705 277787 or by email

admin@kpda.or.ke.

ADVERTISING RATES

Quarter (1/4) page: Kshs. 15, 000

Third (1/3) page: Kshs. 20, 000

Half (1/2) page: Kshs. 30, 000

Full page: Kshs. 60, 000

DIGITAL INPUT/MECHANICAL

REQUIREMENTS — BANNERS

300dpi resolution; colour calibration RGB;

not larger than 20 MB; jpg format OR pdf

PRESS QUALITY format with outlined text.

NOTE: PDF/X 1-A or Adobe® Acrobat® distilled

PDFs. PDFs exported from Photoshop are

discouraged and can lead to less than

desirable results.

WHY ADVERTISE THROUGH THE

DEVELOPER’S DIGEST?

We have a readership of over 1, 300

people who are drawn from our

membership, partners as well as industry

affiliates both locally and regionally.

We offer a unique, flexible, converged

media mix that helps advertisers

communicate their message effectively.

This includes our website, e-newsletter,

social media platforms and focused

events (such as our training and

networking forums as well as our social

interactive sessions).

We keep track of our readership and are

sensitive to emerging issues in the industry.

It is a free and interactive online

publication.

DIGITAL INPUT/MECHANICAL REQUIREMENTS — ADVERTS

SIZE WIDTH DEPTH

1/4 page (horizontal) 184.5mm 65mm

1/4 page (vertical) 90mm 125.5mm

1/3 page (horizontal) 210mm 90mm

1/3 page (vertical) 68mm 270mm

1/2 page (horizontal) 210mm 139mm

1/2 page (vertical) 105mm 265mm

Full page (theme colour) 210mm 247mm

Full page 210mm 297mm

ADVERTS SUBMISSION:

The adverts should be submitted as Adobe PDF files with the above

specific measurements for the desired advert and NOT a flat image PDF

exported from Photoshop.

ONLINE ADVERTISING TERMS & CONDITIONS:

Payment is due within 15 days from when an invoice is issued. Banner ads may be pulled if account

balances are not paid by the due date. As space is limited, banner ads are sold on a first come, first

served basis. All advertising is accepted subject to the publisher’s approval upon determination

that the products or service advertised are in keeping with The Developer’s Digest’s philosophy.

Kenya Property Developers Association... Development brings Development!

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