DAILY №3 - The Hollywood Reporter

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DAILY №3 - The Hollywood Reporter

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EDWARD HOGG

FilmesdoTejo II

ALEXANDRA MARIA LARA

DIRECTED BY: ANDRZEJ JAKIMOWSKI

busan

CLIENT AD AREA

Trim Size:

210 mm W x 221 mm H

(8.2677” in W x 8.7008” H)

Bleed Size:

DAILY

№3

(3.175mm (.125”) added to Left, Right and Bottom)

ZJEDNOCZENIE ARTYSTÓW I RZEMIEŚLNIKÓW SP. Z O.O. IN CO-PRODUCTION WITH KMBO PRODUCTION AND FILMES DO TEJO II MULTIMEDIA LDA IN ASSOCIATION WITH FILMS

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CO-FINANCED PRODUCTION "IMAGINE" FEATURING: EDWARD HOGG AND ALEXANDRA MARIA LARA CO-PRODUCERS: MIKE DOWNEY AND SAM TAYLOR

MUSIC: TOMASZ GĄSSOWSKI PRODUCTION DESIGNER: EWA JAKIMOWSKA EDITOR: CEZARY GRZESIUK DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY: ADAM BAJERSKI

PRODUCED BY: ANDRZEJ JAKIMOWSKI, VLADIMIR KOKH AND FRANCOIS D'ARTEMARE DIRECTED BY: ANDRZEJ JAKIMOWSKI

SCREENINGS

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Monday I October 8th I 12:30 I Lotte Cinema 10 I MARKET

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october

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SCREENING

Wednesday I October 10th I 15:00 I MARKET

Lotte Cinema Charlotte

“A nicely creepy horror tale, made with a great deal of style and

appreciation of the genre ... could well appeal to savvy distributors and

Beta Cinema HC.indd 1 9/28/12 10:59 AM


IGOR & THE

CRANES’ JOURNEY

An estranged father and

son brought together by

following a young baby

crane on a migratory

journey from Russia to

Africa.

OFFICIAL SELECTION

TIFF 2012

ASIAN PREMIERE

MARKET SCREENING:

WED · OCT 10 TH · 10:30

LOTTE CHARLOTTE

TWIGSON IN

TROUBLE –

PART THREE OF

THE TRILOGY

Junior’s family moves

to the city, Twigson

becomes a father, and

Junior has not made

any real friends. Then

Twigson disappears

without a trace…

ASIAN PREMIERE

MARKET SCREENING:

WED · OCT 10 TH · 17:30

LOTTE CINEMA 2

World Sales: SOLA MEDIA GmbH · www.sola-media.com

Contact: Tania Pinto Da Cunha · Mobile: +34 618 064 613

Email: tania@sola-media.com

VICTOR AND

THE SECRET OF

CROCODILE

MANSION

Determined to uncover

the truth about his

grand-cousin’s obscure

death, Victor fi nds a

diary full of riddles and

lots of suspects who

seem eager to hinder his

investigation…

WINNER AT GIFFONI

FILM FESTIVAL 2012

ASIAN PREMIERE

MARKET SCREENING:

MON · OCT 8 TH · 10:30

LOTTE CINEMA 2

LOTTE AND THE

MOONSTONE

SECRET

One night, two strangers

creep into Gadgetville

and steal a mysterious

stone from the old

traveling dog Klaus.

Lotte and Klaus start to

unravel the mystery.

SOLA MEDIA’S

“FESTIVAL DARLING”

ASIAN PREMIERE

MARKET SCREENING:

WED · OCT 10 TH · 15:00

LOTTE CINEMA 2

ASIAN FILM MARKET – BUSAN 2012

AT THE EFP STAND #F25 (BEXCO)

Sola Media D3 100712.indd 1 9/28/12 10:59 AM


O C TO B E R 7, 2 0 1 2

B U SA N

R E V I E W S

Genghis Khan biopic An End

of Killing lacks epic sweep

Scorsese,

Ghobadi To

Reteam

By Clarence Tsui

MARTIN SCORSESE

will reteam with

Bahman Ghobadi as

executive producer for the

Kurdish-Iranian director’s

next U.S.-set film.

Titled 60 Seconds of Us, the

film will be set in New York

and in Iran, the director said

during a Busan International

Film Festival press

conference for his latest film,

Rhino Season.

Ghobadi and Scorsese,

credited as a “presenter”

on Rhino Season, are now

working on the script of the

film, which will be about “the

conflict between Iranians

and Kurds,” Ghobadi said.

He will be scouting locations

in the Kurdish regions

of southern Turkey to stand

in for Iran, where he is

deemed as persona non grata

by the Islamic Republic for

his criticisms against the

authoritarian Tehran regime.

Rhino Season, which is

screened as a gala presentation

at the BIFF, was an

Iraqi-Kurdistan-Turkish

co-production based on the

real-life story of Kurdish poet

Sadegh Kamangar, who was

arrested and jailed for 30 years

by the Iranian government.

Starring exiled Iranian

actor Behrouz Vossoughi

as the imprisoned poet and

Italian star Monica Bellucci

as his wife, Rhino Season is

Ghobadi’s first step towards

sustained collaborations

with European and American

parties. THR

Rurouni Kenshin presents a

Samurai tale with a twist

AS HOLLYWOOD LOOKS

to rehashes of recentpast

classics for the next

coin-earner, Asian producers are

also rebooting their own 1980s

and 90s fare for surefire hits.

In Hong Kong, filmmakers

are taking heart from the 560

of The Flying Swords of Dragon

Gate, Tsui Hark’s 3D interpretation

of his own 1992 hit New

Dragon Gate Inn.

Tsui is aiming to repeat

the trick with a 3D remake of

Tracks of a Snowy Forest (1960).

The Bona Film Group project

is repped by Distribution

A

SPARKLING HEIST FILM TRICKED UP

with imaginative action scenes and 10

fully developed characters who keep the

ball rolling, The Thieves is a stylish and entertaining

caper in spicy Asian sauce. Dubbed South

Korea’s answer to Ocean’s Eleven, the story does

indeed revolve around a daring casino theft and a

playful band of robbers, in this case all ace crimi-

1

Campy Don’t Cry Mommy is

gruesome but watchable

S E E T H R .COM/BUSA N

FOR FULL COV E R AG E

Remake Fever Hits Asia

Taking their cue from Hollywood reboots from the not-so-distant past,

Asian filmmakers mine recent hits for inspiration By Karen Chu and Soomee Park

Workshop in Busan. Jacob

Cheung, meanwhile, will helm

a 3D version of The Bride with

White Hair, a box office success

in 1992.

Joining in is Wong Jing,

whose shingle Mega Vision will

remake his hoodlum franchise

million-yuan gross ($89 million) CONTINUED ON PAGE 3

The Thieves’ superstar

cast and heist theme

have drawn comparisons

to Ocean’s Eleven.

The Thieves

Acrobatic action, amusing

characters and an exotic pan-Asian

setting make for an irresistable

combo in Choi Dong-hoon’s

blockbuster By Deborah Young

BUSAN

№3

REVIEW

(The Big Swindle, Tazza: The High Rollers) and

featuring a swinging A-list cast, it has topped 13

million domestic admissions to become the mostwatched

Korean film of all time. Well Go USA

will release Stateside on Oct. 12.

Apart from generating a great deal of romantic

chemistry, the glamorous cast of characters

are as fast with barbed wit as they are nimble

on their feet or, as case may be, flying through

the air, climbing up the side of a building or

dangling by wires. The fact that each of them

is memorably individualized marks a tribute

to Choi and Lee Gi-cheol’s carefully penned

screenplay, as well as the all-around acting

talent. Adding a modern note, the actresses get

equal time and respect as pros in their field,

while the strongly limbed female characters

nals. Directed by heist meister Choi Dong-hoon CONTINUED ON PAGE 5


the REPORT

Embattled Director Targets Election

Chung Ji-young says

he hopes to influence

voting by releasing his

controversial torture

film National Security

in December

By Soomee Park

THE SOUTH KOREAN

director Chung Ji-young

has not found a distributer

of his latest film National

Security. Nevertheless, he says

the film’s release date is already

set, and is planning to open it

locally in December when the

nation’s presidential election

will take place.

“I talked to many people

about the best timing to release

this film, and many agreed that

it should be before a presidential

election,” explained Chung

after the film’s premiere during

the Busan International Film

Festival. “Some worried that

the film might have an influence

on the election, but as a

filmmaker, I want the film to

influence the audience. That

would be worthwhile.”

The film, based on a memoir

by the late Korean lawmaker

Afghan Film Sector Looks to

South Korea for Guidance

Struggling filmmakers attempt to start over in post-Taliban era

By Clarence Tsui

AFGHANISTAN SHOULD LOOK TO

South Korea for inspiration in order

to revive its ailing film industry, said

three of the Central Asian country’s most

prominent filmmakers at the Busan International

Film Festival this year.

“One of the reasons we are here is to talk

with our Korean friends to see how they managed

to get out of their crisis in the 1980s,”

said film producer Ibrahim Arify, who now

heads the government-backed body, Afghan

Film, referring to the various government

incentives that propelled Korean cinema to

commercial and critical acclaim in the 1990s.

Director Siddiq Barmak, best known for

Osama (2003) and Opium War (2008), said

National Security director Chung Jiyoung,

second from left, is flanked by the

film’s stars, from left: Park Weon-sang,

Myung Gye-nam and Seo Dong-soo.

and former health and welfare

minister Kim Geun-tae,

deals with his 22 days of

imprisonment in 1985 at a

government facility in the

Seoul neighborhood of

Namyoung-dong — the Korean

title of the film — where he was

tortured by a group of KCIA

agents. He was imprisoned

on charges of violating the

country’s national security law,

more commonly known among

The Patience Stone

2

Koreans at the time as the

“anti-communist law.”

Releasing the film prior to

the election on Dec. 19 has

larger implications since the

ruling party candidate is the

daughter of Park Chung-hee,

the dictator in power during the

era in which the film is set.

Security traces how torture

can destroy a human soul by

graphically portraying the

acts of violence performed

the post-Taliban administration has called

for Afghani filmmakers to find their funding

in the private sector, which has left them

“victims of the free market.”

While providing technical assistance to

projects from local directors, Afghan Film,

established in 1968, does not have the funds

CONTINUED ON PAGE 3

A CASH-DEVOURING

on Kim. The film’s depictions

of torture are so real that the

director was prepared for audience

walkouts.

“When I was shooting the

film I said to myself that the

audiences would suffer as much

as I had suffered filming,” he

said. “Making the film was the

most painful experiences in my

30 years as a filmmaker, and I

realized why there hadn’t been

a film exclusively dealing with

the theme of torture after so

many wars and tragic moments

in world history.”

Chung, known for his outspoken

views on a number of social

issues, also courted controversy

with his previous film, Unbowed,

a true story about a demoted

college professor who fights the

nation’s judicial system.

Chung says that while

Security has yet to secure a

distributor, he and his backers

will “find a way to distribute

it ourselves.”

He added that he is motivated

to address social issues

because “people no longer

speak out about social repression

unless it directly influences

their lives.” THR

Screen Media

Picks Up

Crocodile

By Clarence Tsui

CROC WILL

open its jaws in American cinemas

soon as U.S. distributor Screen

Media secured the screening rights for the

Chinese production Million Dollar Crocodile.

Repped by Odin’s Eye Entertainment,

Li Shenglin’s film — an action comedy

about the farcical pursuit of a croc who

swallows a mobile phone containing details

of a hidden stash of money — has already

been acquired by distributors in Japan,

Thailand, India, Indonesia and Malaysia.

The film stars Taiwan’s Barbie Hsu and

mainland Chinese actor Guo Tao, and

will be let loose on audiences in the first

quarter of 2013. THR

CHUNG SUNG-JUN/GETTY IMAGES


Afghan

CONTINUED FROM 2

to invest in productions, said

Arify, who was in Busan with

Barmak and filmmaker Latif

Ahmadi, a former Afghan

Film director, for BIFF’s sixfilm

program celebrating the

work of Afghanistan’s national

film archive.

The Afghan industry’s

fortunes, of course, will

also hinge on international

co-productions — such as

Atiq Rahimi’s The Patience

Stone, a Franco-German-

Afghan title screening at

BIFF — and foreign films

shooting in the country.

Among films readying for

Afghan shoots, according to

Arify, is a Belgian feature set

in the north of the country,

and documentaries by Irish

and New Zealand directors.

While Afghan cinema was

on the rise in the 1960s and

70s, the industry slowed as

political instability set in during

the civil war in the 1990s,

and ground to a halt when the

Taliban, which deems movies

immoral, came to power.

It was during this time

that the Taliban ransacked

the film archive, destroying

more than 5,000 hours

worth of material, Ahmadi

said. The devastation of the

archive would have been

comprehensive, had eleven

staff members not managed

to hide the bulk of the institution’s

holdings behind fake

walls and in underground

passages, he added.

Recovered after the ousting

of the Taliban in 2003, the

archive now contains 8,000

hours of work, with some reels

dating back to before WWII.

Restoration is ongoing with

international partners, such as

France’s INA. THR

THR .com

To download a PDF of the

The Hollywood Reporter’s

Busan Film Festival Daily,

go to:THR.com/Busan.

Once Upon a Time in

Shanghai, starring

Philip Ng and Andy On,

is a remake of 1972’s

Boxer From Shantung.

Remakes

CONTINUED FROM 1

Young and Dangerous, which

spawned six sequels and eight

spin-offs during the 1990s and

early 2000s.

Wong said he spent years

thinking about a new angle.

Then I saw the reboot of the

Spider-Man franchise with a new

and younger cast, when the original

trilogy was still quite new. So

I just decided to remake the films

with a new cast,” he said.

Aiming for a teenage market

unfamiliar with the old

series, Wong said the new film

“improves” the original as it does

not feature explicit depictions of

underworld wrongdoings.

Mega Vision aims to sell the

project to Taiwan, Japan and

European markets. But the company

also has the mainland in

mind with a remake of the Shaw

Brothers classic, Boxer From

Shantung (1972).

Titled Once Upon a Time in

Shanghai, the remake features

the action choreography of

Yuen Woo-ping (The Matrix)

and a cast led by veteran action

hero Sammo Hung (Ip Man

2). The $10 million production

is directed by Wong Ching-po

(Revenge: A Love Story) for an

April 2013 release.

In Japan, Ken Watanabe is

set to star in a samurai makeover

of Clint Eastwood’s Unforgiven

by Korean-Japanese director

Lee Sang-Il (Hula Girls) for

TimeWarner’s Warner Entertainment

Japan.

3

Meanwhile, in South Korea,

Hur Jin-ho’s Chinese-backed

Dangerous Liaisons is a strange

case of a remake of a remake: it

follows E Jae-yong’s Untold Scandal,

the popular 2003 interpretation

of the 1988 U.S. adaptation

of the French novel, with the

story relocated from late 19th

century France to Korea during

the same era.

Opening on his home turf

on Oct 11, Hur’s film is set in

1930s Shanghai.

The original French novel is

a satire of aristocrats set in a prerevolution

era,” he said. “For me,

the idea of taking that setting

into modern Shanghai and playing

around with the similarities

of social atmosphere in those two

cultures was very charming.”

But the success of Untold Scandal

is more an exception than the

rule, as Korean remakes of film

classics have largely been failures

domestically, mainly because the

new films remain overshadowed

by the artistic and commercial

clout of the originals.

Song Hae-seong’s 2010

release A Better Tomorrow, a

Korean remake of John Woo’s

1986 Hong Kong gangster film,

features a glamorous cast but

attracted just over 1.5 million

admissions locally.

And Ghost: In Your Arms

Again, a Korean-Japanese

remake of the 1990 US hit

Ghost, came in second place in

the box office after a 305-screen

opening in Japan. In Korea, the

film bombed, selling just over

6,700 tickets. THR

RAMBLING REPORTER

KIM IS BACK

Two years have passed since

Kim Dong-ho retired from his

15-year tenure as the head of the

Busan International Film Festival,

but now he’s back in the mix

as flyers of his directorial debut,

the 24-minute Jury, appear

at the Busan Cinema Centre.

What’s strange, however, is that

the short wasn’t given a berth

at the festival itself. Jury — a

fictional film about the clashes

of personalities among members

of a festival panel — could easily

be a shoo-in entry at BIFF, where

Kim is still an honorary director.

Maybe it’s a sign of him not

wanting to cast his shadow over

what is effectively his brainchild?

FLIRTING WITH DISASTER

Zhang Ziyi appeared to do her

best to feed rumors of a feud

between herself and fellow

Dangerous Liasions star Cecilia

Cheung at the film’s press

conference. Zhang set off a

photographers’ frenzy by flirtatiously

waving to members of

the audience and taking pictures

of the press with her iPhone.

The timing was curious: She

did this all while Cheung was

earnestly telling the press she

still believed in true love despite

numerous failed romances and a

dissolved marriage.

BEACH BASH

Haeundae’s main beachfront

suddenly became a lot more

glamorous on Friday night when

Dangerous Liaisons star Jang

Dong-gun, his production crew

and bodyguards made a scene

when they rented a

tent eatery selling

grilled seafood. On

the same night,

Tang Tang Wei made

a cameo appearance, attracting

surprised fans who happened to

drop in for a late-night snack or

cheap soju. For restaurant

owners on a street otherwise full

of young college students and

neighbors, it was an unusual

scene that could only happen

during BIFF. THR


DIRECTOR Q&A

James Lee

The S.E. Asian auteur weighs in on going mainstream,

the buzz about Malaysia’s new film fest and why he’s

making his country’s first sci-fi film By Patrick Brzeski

JAMES LEE IS BEST

known on the Asian festival

circuit for his socially

astute art-house dramas, such

as his breakout My Beautiful

Washing Machine, which won

Best Asean Feature Award at

the Bangkok International Film

Festival in 2005. But in his native

Malaysia, Lee is now a massmarket

showman and a leading

purveyor of the country’s wildly

popular genre films. His slasher

film, Histeria, was one of the

biggest domestic hits of 2008

and he’s produced two or three

genre titles each year since. His

latest project, If It’s Not Now Then

When?, premiered at the BIFF on

October 5th, marking something

of a return to form. A domesticscaled

indie-drama, the film tells

the story of singularly odd family

drifting apart in Kuala Lumpur.

Lee spoke with THR about striking

a balance between pulp and

pet projects and the Malaysian

film industry’s tentative steps

onto the world stage.

If It’s Not Now Then When? tells a

story of family dissolution. Were

you trying to get at something

about contemporary Malaysian

society or is it more personal?

It’s more of a personal project

than a broad comment on the

social environment in Malaysia.

We shot it on a DSLR, with

a very small crew. It’s a small

independent project and most

of the actors are my friends. It’s

one of those projects I do once in

a while just to try making something

I really like. Most of the

time these days I’m working on

mainstream commercial movies.

So what themes were you trying

to touch upon with your portrayal

of this rather peculiar family?

The story revolves around the

passing of the father — in the

Asian context the father is still

always the head of the family.

Once he’s gone, where does it

leave the rest of the family?

Unlike in the past when family

was very important, in today’s

world, without a conventional

family structure, families can

drift apart. Especially with

everyone connected to other

people on the Internet and

pulled in different directions.

Do we still need to hold together

to be considered family? If we

live apart and don’t really have

4

integrated lives, are we really

family? That’s what I was interested

in. The characters in the

film don’t see each other much

and don’t even know if they care

about each other.

Why did you originally branch

out from art-house work to make

more mainstream fare?

I remembered reading how John

Cassavettes used to act in Hollywood

films just so he could fund

his own independent projects.

I guess I took some inspiration

from him. I also did it to challenge

myself. I was curious to

see if I could make a movie that

appealed to a big mass-market

audience. Commercial filmmaking

has a very clear objective

and in many ways I found that

more challenging than the art

house style I was used to, which

was all about exploring my own

ideas and interests. Now I prefer

to do both.

Malaysia is said to be launching it’s

own international film festival this

November. What’s the buzz among

the Malaysian film community?

The event is sponsored by the

government—[the National

Film Development Corporation

Malaysia (FINAS)]—so

it’s going to be quite big. It will

certainly benefit some of the

players in our industry. You don’t

see Malaysian films making it

out of the domestic market and

doing well abroad yet, unlike in

Thailand or Indonesia. So having

our own festival to bring in critics

and international audiences to

see more of our local cinema

will definitely help. At the same

time I worry that it might be too

soon for an international-level

Vital Stats

Nationality Malaysia

Born 1979

Film in Busan If It’s Not

Now Then When?

(A Window On Asian Cinema)

Selected Filmography

The Beautiful Washing Machine,

2004; Hysteria, 2008

Notable Awards Best Asean

Feature Award and FIPRESCI

Prize, Bangkok International Film

Festival, Washing Machine, 2005

event in Malaysia. Our industry

is still developing, and I’m not

sure it makes sense to have a big

international platform yet.

There have been periods in

your career when you’ve made

up to three movies a year, but

you’ve been quiet in 2012. Besides

If It’s Not Now, what have you

been up to?

I’ve been spending all my time

developing a sci-fi action movie,

which will be my first Englishlanguage

feature. I’m studying

special effects and developing

ideas, and I’ve been working

with some scriptwriters from

the U.S. and collaborating

with some American actors.

We’re hoping it will become a

co-production between Malaysia

and a U.S. partner.

Malaysia is known for genre films,

but not exactly sci-fi…

Yeah, our genres are low-budget

horrors, action and slap-stick

comedies. But the market is

already oversaturated and

we’re risking alienating our own

audience because at least half of

these films are very low quality.

They’re popular because they

offer local stories and humor,

which Hollywood films never

have. That’s the only way we

can compete. But this means

my commercial films will never

travel, because they won’t make

sense outside Malaysia. That’s

why I’m hoping to try something

different. We’ve never produced

a sci-fi action film locally.

So what’s your Malaysian

Sci-Fi pitch?

We were very inspired by District

9, which was shot in South

Africa on a low budget—not

the usual Sci-Fi recipe, but an

excellent film. We’d like to try

something similar, set in the

not too distant future in Malaysia.

We’ll have a modest budget,

but a local setting for the local

audience and some big ideas

and the English language for

the international market. I just

want to try something new to

break out of the local industry

and see where it goes. THR


The Thieves

CONTINUED FROM 1

mischievously hold their own

with the boys.

A small caveat: the plot

unfolds at the speed of light

and the viewer needs to be

very quick-witted to follow it,

though this isn’t Shakespeare

and missing out on a few story

points won’t diminish the fun.

It all begins when the leggy and

lovely Yenicall (Gianna Jun of

Blood: The Last Vampire) pays

a visit to her fabulously rich

fiancé with her down-to-earth

mom (Kim Hae-sook), who

demands to see his fabled art

collection rotated for display in

a Seoul museum. The minute

she’s alone, Yenicall strips out

of her Chanel down to a black

leotard and, with perfect backup

on the ground from her

young accomplice Zampano

(Kim Soo-hyun), hooks up

some wires, zooms to the 30th

floor, and nonchalantly cuts

her way through the plate glass

into a vault, Ghost Protocol-style,

while “mom” deactivates the

alarm with chewing gum.

All this takes place in the

smooth-as-silk pre-title intro, a

pretty impressive start. When

the gang meets to divvy up the

loot in the garage of ringleader

Popeye (Lee Jung-jae of The

Housemaid), he tells them a big

new caper is planned in Macau

with a band of thieves from

Hong Kong. Though they know

each other from previous jobs,

the Korean and Chinese gangs

immediately flare up over the

presence of ace Korean safecracker

Pepsi (Kim Hye-soo), a

woman who once had an affair

with the Chinese honcho, Macau

Park (Kim Yun-seok). Macau

has the insider info needed to

run the show, thus displacing

Popeye as leader of the caper.

And he doesn’t want to delve

into unfinished business with his

old flame Pepsi. Also on his side

are the aging gentleman thief

Chen (played by Johnnie To

regular Simon Yam with moving

humanity) and their own expert

safecracker, Julie (pert Angelica

5

REVIEWS

Lee) with comic back-up from

Derek Tsang and Oh Dal-soo.

They’re going after big game:

a yellow diamond called Tear

of the Sun, worth $30 million.

It’s currently the property of

a rich lady named Tiffany and

closely followed by the mysterious

— and extremely dangerous

— international fence Wei

Hong. Since it’s kept in a high

security vault inside Tiffany’s

suite in a casino, the gangs

converge in Macau and set

their incredibly complex plan

in action. Director Choi has a

magician’s touch in keeping

multiple balls in the air while

making the impossible seem

vaguely plausible. A big part of

the sleight-of-hand is the joking

tone of the dialogue and goofy

action that always seems on the

verge of cueing an entrance by

Inspector Clouseau and the

Pink Panther.

The action scenes get wilder

and wilder as the story progresses;

everyone starts searching

for the missing diamond

and romances and betrayals

get even more entangled.

While Yenicall and Popeye

play cat-and-mouse dangling

on wires in an elevator shaft,

Macau, too, ends up on wires

dodging gunfire and explosions,

while trying to stay out

of the hands of the police and

the crossfire of a SWAT team

that has been called in to quell

the mayhem. This breathless

grand finale puts a satisfying

cap on a pretty unique piece of

exotic entertainment.

Technical work always hits

the mark, with the musical

score adding tension or ironic

comment as needed. This freewheeling

approach also works

in the production design that

leaps between countries and

likes to contrast the ordinary

clutter of streets and apartments

with the unnatural shine

of the casino and luxury sets.

Open Cinema

Production Caper Film

Cast Kim Yun-seok, Kim Hyesoo,

Lee Jung-jae

Director Choi Dong-hoon

meet the

european film industry

at the Asian Film Market

October 8-11, 2012

EUROPE‘S UMBRELLA STAND F25

at BEXCO (Centum area)

www.efp-online.com

with the support of the EU ME-

DIA programme

Austria

Austrian Film Commission

Denmark

TrustNordisk

Finland

Finnish Film Foundation

France

alpha violet

Bac Films Distribution

Capricci Films

Celluloid Dreams /

Celluloid Nightmares

EuropaCorp

Films Distribution

Gaumont

Insomnia World Sales

Le Pacte

uniFrance films

Urban Distribution International

WIDE

Germany

Beta Cinema

Films Boutique

m-appeal world sales

Sola Media

Italy

Intramovies

Istituto Luce Cinecittà

Italy/United Kingdom

Fandango Portobello

Poland

Polish Film Institute

Serbia

Film Center Serbia

Sweden/ Finland

The Yellow Affair

EFP is supported by

Switzerland

Swiss Films

European Film Promotion D3 100712.indd 1 9/28/12 11:00 AM


REVIEWS

Rurouni

Kenshin

Sword and fist fights galore enliven a romantically

filmed manga about a young samurai who says

no to killing By Deborah Young

HOW MANY WAYS CAN

you say, “Killing is bad”?

Rurouni Kenshin, the

lush adaptation of Nobuhiro

Watsuki’s wildly popular manga,

finds many ways to put its nonviolence

message before the

young audiences who are likely

to adore it. Like many screen

mangas, adults will find it a little

too teenage for comfort, underlined

by the casting of young

Japanese TV stars in the lead

roles. The film, being sold by

Gaga, grossed over $25 million

for Warner Bros in Japan.

The action opens on a

ghoulish battlefield in 1868, the

Battle of Toba-Fushima, shot

through blue filters to emphasize

its other-worldliness. Amid

the dead and dying, the young

samurai Battosai (Takeru

Sato), whose face is hidden by

blood-matted hair, walks away

as Empire is declared and a

new age is birthed.

Ten years go by. The new

age has come to Japan and the

samurai have disbanded or

become sordid mercenaries.

The rapacious businessman

Kanryu, played with toothy

glee by a delightfully over-thetop

Teruyuki Kagawa, has a

private army of ex-samurai,

including a super-natural fiend

who kills just for the hell of

it. Kaoru (Emi Takei), a nice

girl who runs a fencing school

left to her by her father, challenges

the monster and is only

saved by the intervention of a

mysterious young Wanderer

— Battosai in his new guise.

He has renounced killing and

wears a sword whose blade is

on the wrong side, to honor his

pledge never to kill again. For

Kaoru and Battosai, now called

Kenshin, the sword is a way of

life, not death. But most people

living in the new age see things

differently. Forced over and

Yoo Oh-seong plays

an inept police

officer in this

campy drama.

6

over again to fight in excitingly

filmed action scenes, Kenshin

never loses his cool or his steely

moral resolve.

With his long pony-tail,

curvaceous lips and wide eyes,

Takeru plays up his resemblance

to a Japanese Michael

Jackson. Standing out less in

the film is the soap-and-water

Emi as his idealistic love interest.

Though she’s a courageous

girl who defends her father’s

memory, she is continually

thrown into an out-dated

damsel-in-distress role that

weakens her appeal. As the

vixen who wants to reform and

comes to live with them in the

fencing school, Ao never quite

gels as a character.

Choreography is fast

and furious and the sword

fights ably showcase Battosai’s

Don’t Cry, Mommy

Mom’s got plenty to cry about in a compelling

if calculated revenge thriller By Elizabeth Kerr

MANIPULATIVE, RIDDLED WITH RIDICULOUS PLOT POINTS

and frequently flirting with reveling in the gruesome

subject matter it’s ostensibly criticizing, Don’t Cry, Mommy

is, perhaps not too surprisingly, compulsively watchable. In his

feature filmmaking debut, director Kim Yong-han jumps on the

revenge thriller bandwagon, allegedly based on a true story, about

a woman that seeks bloody justice for her daughter after a brutal

gang rape. Hysterical, contradictory but genuinely moving in

parts, Don’t Cry should play well at home in Korea where controversial

and inflammatory subject matter about the ineffectiveness

of the state to protect and represent all its citizens do well, and

the feminine spin could see it garner reasonable box office regionally

in markets that found success with films like The Man From

Nowhere and I Saw the Devil.

After her divorce (clue number one that she’ll be punished

somehow) Yoo-lim (Yoo Sun, Moss) moves into a new apartment


Teruyuki Kagawa

plays a depraved

businessman

bent on profits

at all costs.

incredible skills. Sato Naoki’s

energetic score pounds out

the action scenes to a

barbarian beat.

Open Cinema

Production companies C&I

Entertainment, IMG Entertainment,

RoC Works, Swan, Warner

Bros. production

Cast Satoh Takeru , Takei Emi,

Kikkawa Koji , Aoi Yu

SELECTED AS TAIWAN’S THE ENTRY FOR

Foreign Language Oscar consideration,

Touch of the Light is the kind of sentimental

and sentimentalizing (fundamentally, it’s a

“disability is noble” film) schmaltz the Academy

usually loves and which plays extremely

well all across Asia. Fluffy and teeming with

the feel-good, transformative power of music

(and dance) all bathed in an angelic soft light,

the painfully uplifting film is a good bet for

strong box office in Asia and could appeal to

the art house circuit overseas.

At a Fame-type school for the arts in Taipei,

blind pianist Huang Yi-Siang (playing himself)

finds himself on his own for the first time in

his life. Despite his over-protective mother’s

(Lee Lieh) reluctance to leave him and return

to their idyllic village home, she’s confident in

his ability to fit in. He does eventually, finding

an outsidery crew led by the portly but

kind-hearted and tolerant Ching, and makes

a deeper connection with fast-food working

and dancer Jie (Sandrine Pinna). Jie is saddled

with a compulsive shopper for a mother and an

absentee alcoholic father, and she’s evidently

the only person in all of Taipei that would help

a blind man across a busy road. Will Siang

inspire Jie to latch on to her dancing dreams

again? Will Jie inspire Siang to overcome the

ignorance that scarred him in childhood? Do

you need to ask?

Touch of the Light hits every single beat in the

and enrolls her 17-year-old daughter, Eun-ah (Nam Bo-ra) in

a new school. Things go well for both, and the pair seems to be

getting over the trauma of their domestic upheaval. Yoo-lim is a

cool mom — you can tell because she shares potato chips, does

moisturizing face masks and plays grabby hands with Eun-ah’s

growing breasts. They’re close, and when Eun-ah makes eyes at

the school bad boy Jo-han (boy band U-KISS’ Shin Dong-ho)

she trusts her daughter to take things at her own pace. But while

Yoo-lim is out on an awkward date one evening (clue number

two), Eun-ah is suckered into an isolated meeting with Jo-han

and his thug friends and gang raped. As juvenile offenders they

go free after an apathetic excuse for a trial, and when they rape

Eun-ah a second time (because once isn’t enough), she takes her

own life. At this point, Yoo-lim straps on her Charles Bronson and

methodically tracks each of the rapists down and exacts her own

kind of justice.

It’s rare that a woman gets to be the center of the action in

revenge thrillers (Sympathy for Lady Vengeance and Princess

Aurora are the only examples that spring to mind) and so Yoo’s

believable, grieving mother is a nice change of pace. But writer

Lee Sang-hyun shoots the film in the foot by playing into too

many of the tired tropes that afflict this kind of story when it

Touch of the Light

A warm and fuzzy ‘triumph of the spirit’ film saved from shmaltz by its

appealing characters and engaging performances By Elizabeth Kerr

comes to women. Sure, perhaps in Korea a divorced mother will be

frowned upon (still true) and police investigations routinely put

victims on trial (still true anywhere in the world), but choosing

to include some of those backwards thinking details defeats the

purpose. Equally troublesome is the tacit approval of Yoo-lim’s

actions. The police and the law are portrayed as so incredibly

inept and the rapists such frothing scum any viewer will be hard

pressed not to root for her, which conflicts with the film’s underlying

message of a better form of justice for rape victims.

Don’t Cry is incredibly efficient in its storytelling and never

lingers on any one series of moments long enough to hamper

the forward narrative momentum, and Yoo is empathetic as the

furious mother. Lots of slow-motion close-ups of screaming and

crying pad out the running time in what is basically a television

movie in most parts of the world, but might be the kind of agitating

theatrical feature Asia needs.

Open Cinema

Producer Shon You-jin

Director Kim Yong-han

Cast Yoo Sun, Nam Bo-ra, Yoo Oh-seong, Shin Dong-ho

Screenwriter Lee Sang-hyun

7

Huang Yi-Siang (left) plays himself as a blind piano

prodigy in this gentle, uplifting drama.

genre: the supportive teacher, the comic relief

in the form of Siang’s crew and Jie’s boss, the

crisis of confidence — it’s all here. But none of

that makes it a bad film, just a predictable one.

It’s saved by genuinely engaging performances

and likeable characters across the board. It may

not have Cape No. 7 potential, but it should keep

Taiwan’s box office streak intact.

New Currents

Production company Jet Tone Films Ltd, Sil

Metropole, Block 2

Producer Jacky Pang, Cheung Hong-tat

Director Chang Jung-chi

Cast Huang Yu-siang, Sandrine Pinna, Lee Lieh

Screenwriter Lee Nien-hsiu

Executive producer Chan Ye-cheng, Song Dai

Director of Photography Dylan Doyle

Production Designer Ru Ron-yun


REVIEWS

An End

to Killing

The utopian story of how a saintly aged priest

presses the ruthless conqueror Genghis Khan to

embrace non-violence suffers from being less

spectacular and poetic than some rivals

By Deborah Young

ONE OF SEVERAL FILM

premieres in Busan

whose theme is non-violence,

the $12 million Mongolian-Chinese

costumer about

the last years of Genghis Khan,

An End to Killing, recounts an

astonishing historical footnote

in a style that is far from new or

surprising. Its academic style

undercuts, without entirely

eliminating, the poetry and

grand spectacle of the story,

while veteran director Wang

Ping (Gold Marriage) steers

a straight course to sending

out a heartfelt message of

peace that Western audiences

will embrace long before the

Conqueror does. The Fortissimo

title will be released in the

UK and France early next year

by Universal Pictures International

Entertainment (UPIE).

The arrow on the opening

image of a map shows the

enormous expanse of territory

Genghis Khan’s soldiers

conquered, stretching from

Mongolia all the way to Afghanistan.

An aged man in 1217, the

Khan (Tu Men) is traveling

with his troops on a punitive

mission towards the Western

limits of his empire. As they

ride suited up in heavy studded

armor, soldiers drop off their

horses like flies, victims of the

Bubonic plague that is ravaging

the land. Mortality is very near,

the emperor feels.

So he sends his dashing

envoy, General Liu, to find Qiu

Chuji (Zhou Youliang), known

as the Sage of the Eternal

Spring, and bring him back to

teach Khan a few tricks about

long life. The old Daoist priest

does indeed have some amazing

powers, but immortality is not

one of them, and he confides

to his young disciple that he

won’t live more than 300 days.

Considering the trip west will

take over a year, the boy brings

a coffin along.

Usada Asami plays

a recently widowed

factory worker.

8

Tu Men plays the

aging conqueror

Genghis Khan on

his final journey

to the West.

The road is truly long,

enlivened by a massive bandit

attack at a mountain inn where

they are overnighting, and

later another huge attack on

a mountain pass. The fighting

is realistic rather than the

magical-flying variety common

in Hong Kong and Chinese

martial arts films. Qiu’s long

journey is intercut with the

Khan’s battles, his fierce warriors

riding across the plain and

laying fiery siege to city walls. It

takes a very long time for them

to meet in the Khan’s camp.

Qiu immediately begins his

quiet, Gandhi-like campaign

Cold Bloom

to end killing and bring peace

to the land. When he saves the

Khan’s beloved wife (played

with sad dignity by Korean

actress Park Yejin) along with

another woman from a subplot,

Genghis Khan can’t help but

be impressed.

In the main roles, Tu Men

as the inscrutable autarch and

Zhou as the sage who conquers

him make a fine study in

contrasts. The Khan’s selfish

love for his young wife, and the

priest’s fondness for wine, are

good character markers. Park is

hauntingly expressive even with

minimal dialogue.

This post-tsunami drama has a strong subtext

hidden beneath a hackneyed romance

that deserves more time By Elizabeth Kerr

THE CATASTROPHIC MARCH 2011 TSUNAMI THAT DEVASTATED

the coast of Tohoku has, unsurprisingly, been the subject

of a rash of films from that country of late, but in Funahashi

Atsushi’s Cold Bloom it’s almost incidental to the story.

Married couple Shiori (Usuda Asami) and Kenji work together at

a machine parts factory in a depressed town that hasn’t recovered

its economic glory since the tsunami. The workers feel entitled

(troublemaker Suguru regularly demands a pay raise) and simultaneously

terrified for the future. The little factory seems to get

lucky when it wins an important contract and just as quickly sees

its luck turn bad when ace wire cutter Kenji is killed in an industrial


Visuals by top cinematographer

Sun Ming are naturally

spectacular, yet compared to

a film like director Lu Chan’s

modernist The Last Supper about

the birth of the Han dynasty,

for which the China Film Group

was also a co-producer, the film

is far less spectacular and poetic

in style, nor does it go into

potentially difficult political

territory like questioning the

way history is recounted. Kenji

Kawai’s score is a plus and gives

energy to the action.

A Window on Asian Cinema

Production companies

ShanDong Film Studio, China

Film Group Corp., ShanDong

WoHan Culture and Media Co.,

Radio Film and TV Administration

of ShanDong Province, SCS

Entertainment.

Cast Zhao Youliang, Men

Tu, Park Yejin , Le Geng ,Yu

Shaoqun ,Li Xiaoran, Elvis Tsui,

Nakaizumi Hideo

Director Wang Ping

Screenwriter Ran Ping

Producers Wang Ring,

Shen Wugang , Iseki Satoru,

Lee Jooick

Director of photography

Ming Sun

Editor Stanley Tam

accident involving co-worker Takumi (Miura Takahiro).

Told mostly with images and atmospherics, the film finally

devolves into a typical story of atonement when Takumi takes

it upon himself to meet the contract deadlines and teach the

widow how to love again. Funahashi, whose Nuclear Nation

chronicled the plight of evacuees from Futaba, uses the tsunami

as a catalyst for exploring the general malaise affecting modern

Japan and the collective anxiety of a people unsure of how to

reconcile their lives with shifting global realities. It’s no doubt

an interesting spin on mass rationalization, but it’s also an idea

that could have been better served by more traditional storytelling

and less bloat.

A Window on Asian Cinema

Production company Office Kitano

Producer Ichiyama Shozo

Director Funahashi Atsushi

Cast Usuda Asami, Miura Takahiro, Takahashi Yo

9

THAT NAWAPOL THAMRONGRATTANARIT’S VAGUELY

experimental 36 has a festival strategist listed in its credits

reveals all that’s needed to know about the commercial box

office potential and likely outlets for this dry, poorly lit exploration

of memory in the digital age. Unfolding in a series of — wait

for it — 36 static shots, the concept isn’t all that new: Bela Tarr’s

Werckmeister Harmonies contains just a few more in 150 minutes.

But the film’s scant running time doesn’t officially qualify it as

a feature film, which will further hinder its chances at general

release and as such 36 seems destined for a life on specialty

cable when it’s done on the

festival circuit.

Sai (Koramit Vajrasthira)

and Oom (Wanlop Rrungkamjad)

are colleagues at a

film company. She scouts

locations and he’s the art

director. We follow them

from spot to spot as they discuss

where crew bathrooms

would go, parking availability

and light sources,

and take hundreds of photos

of crumbling buildings.

There might be a glimmer

of romantic connection

36

An aggressively artistic experimental

film that is admirable in its intentions but

weak in execution By Elizabeth Kerr

The title of director Thamrongrattanarit’s

drama refers to the film’s

36 static shots.

between the two, but nothing ever comes of it. Flashing forward

a few months, Oom has aready moved on, when Sai finds that

the hard drive storing her precious photos has crashed beyond

repair. Gone with it are her pictures of Oom.

36 plays itself out like a series of photographs that happen

to have some movement within the frame, often set to the same

plinking acoustic guitar that dominates Southeast Asian indie

film scores. The scenes are disconnected and do indeed, in the

end, ironically recall flipping through a developed roll of film.

Sai and her friend Kai, tasked to help recover the data on the

computer, spend plenty of time discussing how people and

places exist when they’re out of sight. “It’s like it would never

have been there at all if the picture wasn’t here,” comments Kai

at one point, which sums up the film’s themes in one line. In

many respects 36 recalls producer Aditya Assarat’s Wonderful

Town, which won the New Currents award in 2007, in its lowimpact

tone, pacing and dolly-free direction. More significantly

it recalls Liu Jiayin’s Oxhide, the 2005 family drama from

Mainland China told in only 23 shots. The question of the way

we process and “store” images, a hoary cinema subject at best,

doesn’t really come through strong enough to make 36 a success

and short filmmaker Thamrongrattanarit is no Bela Tarr.

New Currents

Producer Aditya Assarat, Soros Sukhum, Nawapol

Thamrongrattanarit

Director Nawapol Thamrongrattanarit

Cast Koramit Vajrasthira, Wanlop Rrungkamjad, Nottapon Boonprakob,

Siriporn Kongma

Screenwriter Nawapol Thamrongrattanarit


FESTIVAL SCREENING GUIDE

TODAY

10:00 Architecture 101,

Korean Cinema Today-Panorama,

2012 / 118min / DCP

/ Color, CA; The Angels’

Share, World Cinema, 2012

/ 101min / 35mm / Color,

C4; The Castle of Purity,

Special Programs in Focus-

Arturo Ripstein: Four Stories

of Captive Minds, 1973 /

110min / 35mm / B&W,

C2; Shyamal Uncle Turns

off the Lights, A Window

on Asian Cinema, 2012 /

65min / (Digi)Beta / Color,

L7; Ernest & Celestine,

Wide Angle - Animation

Showcase, 2012 / 80min /

DCP / Color, BH; Serenade,

Wide Angle - Documentary

Competition, 2012 /

103min / DCP / Color, C7;

Berberian Sound Studio,

World Cinema, 2012 / 92min

/ 35mm / Color, M9; Cold

Bloom, A Window on Asian

Cinema, 2012 / 120min /

DCP / Color, CS; Apparition,

New Currents, 2012 /

87min / DCP / Color, B1; A

Motor Home Adventure, A

Window on Asian Cinema,

2012 / 102min / HDCAM /

Color, C3; Yuma, World

Cinema, 2012 / 113min /

DCP / Color, L4; Gangs

of Wasseypur Part 1&2,

Midnight Passion, 2012 /

320min / 35mm / Color,

MM; Dust on Our Hearts,

World Cinema, 2012 / 91min

/ DCP / Color, LC; Three

Sisters, Wide Angle - Documentary

Showcase, 2012

/ 153min / DCP / Color, L9;

Still I Strive, Wide Angle

- Documentary Showcase,

2012 / 92min / DCP / Color,

M4; Once Upon a Time,

Special Programs in Focus

Afghanistan National Film

Archive: The Rise from the

Ashes, 1969 / 127min / (Digi)

Beta / B&W, B2; B·E·D, Gala

Presentation, 2012 / 90min

/ DCP / Color, C1; The

Man Who Laughs, World

Cinema, 2012 / 93min / DCP

/ Color, L5

11:00 EunGyo, Korean

Cinema Today-Panorama,

2012 / 129min / DCP /

Color, MBT1; In Another

Country, Korean Cinema

Today-Panorama, 2012 /

89min / HDCAM / Color,

L2; Holy Motors, World

Cinema, 2012 / 116min

/ DCP / Color, M2; Love

in 42.9, Korean Cinema

Today-Vision, 2012 / 97min

/ HDCAM / Color, C5; A

Better Life Is Elsewhere,

Wide Angle - Documentary

Showcase, 2012 / 90min /

DCP / Color, L6; Cul-desac,

Poland in Close-up:

The Great Polish Masters

, 1966 / 113min / 35mm /

B&W , B3; Beasts of the

Southern Wild, World

Cinema, 2012 / 92min /

DCP / Color, SH; The Last

Time I Saw Macao, World

Cinema, 2012 / 85min / DCP

/ Color, L3; The Domino

Effect, World Cinema, 2012

/ 100min / DCP / Color, L8;

The End of Time, Wide

Angle - Documentary

Showcase, 2012 / 114min

/ HDCAM / Color, C6;

Doctor, Gala Presentation,

2012 / 97min / DCP /

Color, CB

12:30 In Darkness, Poland

in Close-up: The Great Polish

Masters, 2011 / 143min /

35mm / Color, C4

13:00 Fatal, New Currents,

2012 / 103min / HDCAM

/ Color, L5; Six Degrees

of Separation from Lilia

Cuntapay, A Window

on Asian Cinema, 2011 /

93min / DCP / Color, CS;

Polluting Paradise Wide

Angle - Documentary

Showcase, 2012 / 98min

/ 35mm / Color, M7; Salt,

World Cinem, 2011 / 114min

/ DCP / Color, M6; White

Belly, World Cinema, 2012

/ 111min / DCP / Color, B2;

Dormant Beauty, World

Cinema, 2012 / 110min /

DCP / Color, BH; Pinocchio,

Open Cinema, 2012 / 80min

/ DCP / Color, M4; Blood

Pressure, World Cinema,

2012 / 94min / HDCAM /

Color, C2; Purge World

Cinema, 2012 / 125min /

DCP / Color, LC; The Sound

of Memories, Korean Cinema

Today-Vision, 2012 /

102min / 35mm / Color, M9;

Your Time Is Up, New Currents,

2012 / 85min / DCP

/ Color, B1; Touch, Korean

Cinema Today-Panorama,

2012 / 99min / DCP / Color,

C3; Behind the Camera,

Korean Cinema Today-Panorama,

2012 / 85min / DCP /

Color, CA; Prince Daewon,

Korean Cinema Retrospective

SHIN Young-kyun, the

Masculine Icon of Korean

Cinema: From Farmhand to

King, 1968 / 120min / 35mm

/ Color, C7; An End to

Killing, A Window on Asian

Cinema, 2012 / 108min /

DCP / Color, L7

13:30 The Cremator, A

Window on Asian Cinema,

2012 / 90min / DCP / Color,

L9; Tumbleweed, Korean

Cinema Today-Panorama,

2012 / 111min / DCP / Color,

MBT2; Korean Short Film

Competition 1, Wide

Angle - Korean Short Film

Competition, L4

14:00 Life Sentence,

Special Programs in Focus-

Arturo Ripstein: Four Stories

of Captive Minds, 1979 /

95min / 35mm / B&W, M2;

Valley of Saints, A Window

on Asian Cinema, 2012 /

82min / HDCAM / Color,

CB; Marie Kroyer, World

Cinema, 2012 / 98min / DCP

/ Color, SH; Parajanov: The

Last Spring, Special Programs

in Focus The Eternal

Travelers for Freedom: Sergei

Parajanov and Mikhail

Vartanov, 1992 / 55min /

(Digi)Beta / Color+B&W,

B3; Talgat, A Window on

Asian Cinema, 2012 / 84min

/ DCP / Color, COMC; The

Pirogue, World Cinema,

2012 / 87min / DCP / Color,

L3; Penance, A Window

on Asian Cinema, 2012 /

300min / HDCAM / Color,

C5; My Name Is Negahdar

Jamali and I Make

Westerns, Wide Angle -

Documentary Showcase,

2012 / 65min / DV / Color,

L2; Shackled, A Window on

Asian Cinema, 2012 / 93min

/ DCP / Color, M1; Flower

Buds, Flash Forward, 2011

/ 91min / DCP / Color, M3;

Anxiety, Wide Angle -

Documentary Competition,

2012 / 95min / HDCAM /

Color, C6; Mai Ratima,

Korean Cinema Today-

Vision, 2012 / 123min / DCP

/ Color, L6; The Gardener,

Gala Presentation, 2012 /

87min / DCP / Color, L8

14:30 Arjun, Wide Angle -

Animation Showcase, 2012

/ 95min / DCP / Color, MBT1

16:00 The Fourth State,

Midnight Passion, 2012 /

110min / 35mm / Color, M9;

111 Girls, New Currents,

2012 / 79min / HDCAM /

Color, B1; Paradise: Love,

World Cinema, 2012 /

120min / HDCAM / Color,

MM; 3, World Cinema,

2012 / 115min / 35mm /

Color, M7; Odayaka, A

Window on Asian Cinema,

2012 / 102min / HDCAM /

Color, L5; Eden, A Window

on Asian Cinema, 2012 /

101min / HDCAM / Color,

L7; Abigail Harm, World

Cinema, 2012 / 80min /

10

Jakub Gierszal and Jakub

Kamienski play aspiring

gangsters in Polish director

Piotr Mularuk’s Yuma.

DCP / Color, M4; Beijing

Flickers, A Window on

Asian Cinema, 2012 /

96min / HDCAM / Color,

C3; Lore, World Cinema,

2011 / 104min / DCP /

Color, CS; Born to Hate...

Destined to Love, A

Window on Asian Cinema,

2012 / 131min / DCP / Color,

L9; Hello Goodbye, A

Window on Asian Cinema,

2012 / 122min / DCP /

Color, LC; Jiseul, Korean

Cinema Today-Vision, 2012

/ 108min / DCP / B&W, CA;

Like Eagle, Special Programs

in Focus Afghanistan

National Film Archive:

The Rise from the Ashes,

1965 / 80min / (Digi)Beta

/ B&W, C2; B·E·D, Gala

Presentation, 2012 / 90min

/ DCP / Color, BH; Perfect

Number, Korean Cinema

Today-Panorama, 2012 /

119min / DCP / Color, M6

16:30 Distortion, A Window

on Asian Cinema, 2012

/ 111min / 35mm / Color,

C4; Melo, Korean Cinema

Today-Vision, 2012 / 119min

/ DCP / Color, M2; State of

Emergency, Flash Forward,

2011 / 100min / (Digi)Beta

/ Color, B2; Rice, Korean

Cinema Retrospective SHIN

Young-kyun, the Masculine

Icon of Korean Cinema: From

Farmhand to King, 1963 /

124min / 35mm / B&W, C7

17:00 Nick, World Cinema,

2012 / 84min / DCP / Color,

L3; Student, A Window

on Asian Cinema, 2012 /

90min / DCP / Color, M1;

The Dancer, A Window

on Asian Cinema, 2011 /

112min / 35mm / Color, L8;

Like Someone in Love, A

Window on Asian Cinema,

2012 / 109min / DCP /

Color, SH; Dangerous Liaisons,

Gala Presentation,

2012 / 113min / HDCAM /

Color, L2; Imagine, World

Cinema, 2012 / 105min

/ 35mm / Color, COMC;

Woman’s Lake, World Cinema,

2012 / 89min / DCP /

Color, M3; Blind Chance,

Poland in Close-up: The

Great Polish Masters, 1981 /

112min / 35mm / Color, B3;

Wellang Trei, Wide Angle -

Documentary Competition,

2012 / 80min / HDCAM /

Color+B&W, C6; Azooma,

Korean Cinema Today-

Vision, 2012 / 74min / DCP /

Color, CB; The Ugly Duckling,

Korean Cinema Today-

Panorama, 2012 / 97min /

DCP / Color, MBT2; Korean

Short Film Competition 2,

Wide Angle - Korean Short

Film Competition, L4

17:30 Pilgrim Hill, World

Cinema, 2011 / 76min /

HDCAM / Color, L6

19:00 Love in the Buff, A

Window on Asian Cinema,

2012 / 112min / 35mm /

Color, M6; I.D, A Window

on Asian Cinema, 2012 /

87min / DCP / Color, M4;

Kinshasa Kids, World

Cinema, 2012 / 85min

/ HDCAM / Color, C2;

Comes a Bright Day,

World Cinema, 2011 /

91min / HDCAM / Color, C3;

Gf*Bf, A Window on Asian

Cinema, 2012 / 105min /


DCP / Color, LC; Promised

Land, Poland in Close-up:

The Great Polish Masters,

1974 / 179min / DCP /

Color, L9; Night Train,

Poland in Close-up: The

Great Polish Masters, 1959

/ 93min / DCP / B&W, M7;

Filmistaan, New Currents,

2012 / 117min / DCP / Color,

B1; Two Weddings and a

Funeral, Korean Cinema

Today-Panorama, 2012 /

106min / DCP / Color, M9;

Memories Look at Me, A

Window on Asian Cinema,

2012 / 87min / HDCAM /

Color, L7; Good Vibrations,

World Cinema, 2011

/ 97min / DCP / Color, MM;

The Weight, Korean Cinema

Today-Panorama, 2012

/ 107min / DCP / Color,

CS; El Maestro Saharaui,

Wide Angle - Documentary

Showcase, 2011 / 76min /

(Digi)Beta / Color, L5; The

Russian Novel, Korean

Cinema Today-Vision, 2012

/ 140min / DCP / Color, CA;

A Special Day, World Cinema,

2012 / 90min / DCP /

Color, BH

19:30 All Musicians Are

Bastards, Flash Forward,

2012 / 87min / DCP / Color, B2

20:00 Kill Me, World

Cinema, 2011 / 91min / DCP

/ Color, M3; The Taste of

Money, Korean Cinema

Today-Panorama, 2012 /

115min / DCP / Color, MBT2;

The Land of Hope, A Window

on Asian Cinema, 2012

/ 134min / DCP / Color, SH;

Annelie, Flash Forward,

2012 / 117min / DCP / Color,

L3; Poor Folk, A Window

on Asian Cinema, 2012 /

105min / DCP / Color, M1;

The Crack, Flash Forward,

2012 / 101min / DCP / Color,

L6; Ghost in the Shell

S.A.C. Solid State Society

3D, Special Programs in

Focus-Special Screening,

2011 / 108min / DCP

/ Color, CB; Still, World

Cinema, 2012 / 93min

/ DCP / Color, L8; Over

and Over Again, Korean

Cinema Today-Vision, 2012

/ 81min / DCP / Color, C4;

Reported Missing, World

Cinema, 2012 / 86min /

35mm / Color, M2; Full

Circle, A Window on Asian

Cinema, 2012 / 104min /

HDCAM / Color, L2; Sunshine

Boys, Korean Cinema

Today-Vision, 2012 / 83min

/ DCP / Color, COMC; Forest

Dancing, Wide Angle -

Documentary Competition,

2012 / 105min / HDCAM /

Color, C6; The Dandelions,

World Cinema, 2012

/ 90min / DCP / Color, B3;

The Thieves, Open Cinema,

2012 / 135min / DCP

/ Color, BT; Towards the

High Place, Korean Cinema

Retrospective SHIN Youngkyun,

the Masculine Icon

of Korean Cinema: From

Farmhand to King, 1977 /

101min / 35mm / Color, C7

20:30 Korean Short Film

Competition 3, Wide

Angle - Korean Short Film

Competition, L4

23:59 Midnight Passion 3,

Midnight Passion, BH

TOMORROW

10:00 Barbara, World

Cinema, 2012 / 105min /

35mm / Color, C2; Paradise:

Love, World Cinema,

2012 / 120min / HDCAM /

Color, L5; Breakaway, A

Window on Asian Cinema,

2012 / 88min / DCP / Color,

L4; Identification Marks:

None, Poland in Close-up:

The Great Polish Masters,

1964 / 71min / (Digi)Beta

/ B&W, B2; Diablo, A Window

on Asian Cinema, 2012

/ 113min / DCP / Color, M4;

Gangs of Wasseypur Part

1&2, Midnight Passion, 2012

/ 320min / 35mm / Color,

M6; Your Time Is Up, New

Currents, 2012 / 85min /

DCP / Color, C4; Here and

There, World Cinema, 2012

/ 110min / DCP / Color, M9;

National Security, Gala

Presentation, 2012 / 110min

/ HDCAM / Color, B1; The

Ugly Duckling, Korean Cinema

Today-Panorama, 2012

/ 97min / DCP / Color, CA;

Doctor, Gala Presentation,

2012 / 97min / DCP / Color,

C1; Soar into the Sun,

Special Programs in Focus-

Special Screening, 2012 /

113min / DCP / Color, CS;

Cold War, Opening night

film, 2012 / 102min / DCP

/ Color, MM; Tour of Duty,

Wide Angle - Documentary

Competition, 2012 / 150min

/ HDCAM / Color, C3

11:00 Calm at Sea, World

Cinema, 2011 / 90min /

(Digi)Beta / Color, C6;

Violeta Went to Heaven,

World Cinema, 2011 /

110min / DCP / Color, L6;

Helpless, Korean Cinema

Today-Panorama, 2012

/ 117min / DCP / Color,

C7; Nameless Gangster:

Rules of the Time, Korean

Cinema Today-Panorama,

2012 / 133min / DCP /

Color, CB; In Another

Country, Korean Cinema

Today-Panorama, 2012 /

89min / HDCAM / Color,

C5; Shadows of Forgotten

Ancestors, Special

Programs in Focus The

Eternal Travelers for Freedom:

Sergei Parajanov and

Mikhail Vartanov, 1965 /

92min / (Digi)Beta / Color,

B3; Still, World Cinema,

2012 / 93min / DCP / Color,

SH; Tumbleweed, Korean

Cinema Today-Panorama,

2012 / 111min / DCP / Color,

L3; The Weight, Korean

Cinema Today-Panorama,

2012 / 107min / DCP /

Color, MBT1

13:00 Polluting Paradise,

Wide Angle - Documentary

Showcase, 2012 / 98min

/ 35mm / Color, M7; Captive,

A Window on Asian

Cinema, 2012 / 120min /

DCP / Color, M4; Father

of a Soldier, Special Programs

in Focus-Archeology

of Cinema, 1964 / 88min

/ DCP / Color, B1; Ghost

in the Shell S.A.C. Solid

State Society 3D, Special

Programs in Focus-Special

Screening, 2011 / 108min

/ DCP / Color, BH; Over

and Over Again, Korean

Cinema Today-Vision,

2012 / 81min / DCP / Color,

MM; Lore, World Cinema,

2011 / 104min / DCP /

Color, C2; Blood Pressure,

World Cinema, 2012

/ 94min / HDCAM / Color,

L5; Two Weddings and a

11

Funeral, Korean Cinema

Today-Panorama, 2012

/ 106min / DCP / Color,

CA; Something in the

Air, World Cinema, 2011 /

122min / 35mm / Color, C3;

State of Emergency, Flash

Forward, 2011 / 100min

/ (Digi)Beta / Color, B2;

Kayan, New Currents, 2012

/ 86min / HDCAM / Color,

C4; The Thieves, Open

Cinema, 2012 / 135min /

DCP / Color, M9

13:30 Pieta, Korean Cinema

Today-Panorama, 2012

/ 104min / DCP / Color, CS

14:00 The Concubine,

Korean Cinema Today-

Panorama, 2012 / 122min /

DCP / Color, L6; 10+10, A

Window on Asian Cinema,

2011 / 114min / DCP /

Color+B&W, CB; Beautiful

2012, A Window on

Asian Cinema, 2012 /

90min / HDCAM / Color,

M2; A Royal Affair, World

Cinema, 2011 / 131min /

35mm / Color, B3; Night

of Silence, World Cinema,

2011 / 92min / DCP / Color,

COMC; The Life of Budori

Gusuko, Wide Angle -

Animation Showcase,

2012 / 106min / HDCAM

/ Color, MBT1; Antiviral,

World Cinema, 2012 /

112min / DCP / Color, L3;

Shell, World Cinema, 2012

/ 90min / DCP / Color, M3;

Night Train, Poland in

Close-up: The Great Polish

Masters, 1959 / 93min /

DCP / B&W, M1; Dormant

Beauty, World Cinema,

2012 / 110min / DCP /

Color, SH; Azooma, Korean

Cinema Today-Vision, 2012

/ 74min / DCP / Color, C5;

The Winter of the Year

was Warm, Korean Cinema

Today-Panorama, 2012 /

100min / HDCAM / Color,

C6; Spring, Spring, Korean

Cinema Retrospective SHIN

Young-kyun, the Masculine

Icon of Korean Cinema:

From Farmhand to King,

1969 / 65min / 35mm /

Color, MBT2

15:00 The Gardener, Gala

Presentation, 2012 / 87min

/ DCP / Color, C1

15:30 The Russian Novel,

Korean Cinema Today-

Vision, 2012 / 140min / DCP

/ Color, MM

16:00 Mía, World Cinema,

2011 / 105min / (Digi)Beta

/ Color, B2; Fatal, New

Currents, 2012 / 103min

/ HDCAM / Color, C3;

Shyamal Uncle Turns

off the Lights, A Window

on Asian Cinema, 2012 /

65min / (Digi)Beta / Color,

CA; 5 Broken Cameras,

Wide Angle - Documentary

Showcase, 2011 / 90min

/ (Digi)Beta / Color+B&W,

C2; The Last Sentence,

World Cinema, 2011 /

104min / DCP / B&W, M7;

The Good Lie, World Cinema,

2012 / 93min / DCP /

Color, B1; Together, New

Currents, 2012 / 114min

/ DCP / Color, M6; Dust

on Our Hearts, World

Cinema, 2012 / 91min / DCP

/ Color, L5; The Domino

Effect, World Cinema, 2012

/ 100min / DCP / Color, M4;

The Sound of Memories,

Korean Cinema Today-

Vision, 2012 / 102min /

35mm / Color, C4; Doctor,

Gala Presentation, 2012 /

97min / DCP / Color, BH

16:30 If Only Everyone,

World Cinema, 2012 / 98min

/ DCP / Color, M9; Behind

the Camera, Korean Cinema

Today-Panorama, 2012 /

85min / DCP / Color, CS

17:00 Caesar Must Die,

World Cinema, 2012 /

76min / DCP / Color+B&W,

SH; Architecture 101,

Korean Cinema Today-Panorama,

2012 / 118min / DCP

/ Color, MBT2; Student, A

Window on Asian Cinema,

2012 / 90min / DCP / Color,

CB; The Empty Home, A

Window on Asian Cinema,

2012 / 98min / DCP / Color,

M1; The Pirogue, World

Cinema, 2012 / 87min /

DCP / Color, L3; Touch of

the Light, New Currents,

2012 / 110min / DCP /

Color, COMC; Crows,

Poland in Close-up: The

Great Polish Masters, 1994

/ 63min / 35mm / Color,

B3; Beyond School, Wide

Angle - Documentary

Showcase, 2012 / 68min

/ HDCAM / Color, C6;

Beyond the Hills, World

Cinema, 2012 / 150min /

DCP / Color, M2; Embers,

Wide Angle - Documentary

Competition, 2012 / 77min

/ DCP / Color, C5; Purge,

World Cinema, 2012 /

125min / DCP / Color, L6;

Jiseul, Korean Cinema

Today-Vision, 2012 / 108min

/ DCP / B&W, M3; Touch,

Korean Cinema Today-Panorama,

2012 / 99min / DCP

/ Color ,C7 THR


BUSAN MEMORIES

2006

LAU AND THEN

Popular Hong Kong actor Andy Lau entertains the crowd

during an Open Talk session at the 11th edition of BIFF. Lau

was in Busan to support his latest film as producer, Ning Hao’s

offbeat comedy Crazy Stone, which closed the fest. This year

Lau can be seen — briefly — in the BIFF opener Cold War.

12

CHUNG SUNG-JUN/GETTY IMAGES


ON SALe dATe:

11/28

ISSUe CLOSe:

11/19

MATeRIALS:

11/21

CONTACT:

EUROPE

Alison Smith

+44 7788 591 781

alison.smith@thr.com

ASIA

Ivy Lam

+852 2880 3405

ivy.lam@thr.com

cineasia

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The Hollywood Reporter’s dedicated preview coverage will highlight the

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to miss.

With bonus distribution at CineAsia, don’t miss this opportunity to get

your brand messaging in front of the most powerful players in Asian

cinema, from owners and suppliers to film buyers and distributors.

BONUS DISTRIBUTION:

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ScreenSingapore/Asia Television Fourm (12/5-7)

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