Zane Robles- My Portfolio

zane.robles

Here is my Architecture Portfolio for professionals to view.

ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO

TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY


Table of

Contents

Undergraduate Portfolio

STUDIO IV

CONSTRUCTION II

STUDIO VI

STUDIO III

DESIGN BUILD COMP

STUDIO V

BIT-REVIT

STUDIO II

1

8

12

16

22

26

32

36

RESUME

43


STUDIO IV

FALL 2015

HOTEL & SPA

1


The context of the design begins in a situation of stress. Like

a business man relieving himself from the daily stress of life

the hotel encompasses this idea. Surrounded by a canyon

wall this foreign form is contrasting in its placement but

crumbles away to compliment it’s surroundings. Entering

from the far north of the canyon the pathway leads you to

the very tip of this rigid geometry. As you move down deeper

into the canyon spaces become more intimate descending

through programs of hotel, public, and spa. Along with this

concept are the balconies, facades, and walls that begin to

fall away, strengthening the overall project. Like a person

escaping the stressful confined daily routine of life, the

form of the structure relates with the user and expresses

the inhabitants experience in static structural arrangement.


Egress System

1st Floor

2nd Floor

3rd Floor

4th Floor

In simplification of the project, the diagram explains the major

arrangements and aspects of the design. Because of the shape

of the canyon the perfect square was rotated ninety degrees to

fill the void and give the model the appearance of its ability to

open up to the canyon and give direction at its north and south

points. The removal of portions of the model come from the

erosion process that naturally occurs in the canyon. Creation

a central void by rotation of a member opens the central

portion of the model, creating a view straight down the canyon.

1/16” = 1’

16’

32’


N

16’

1/16” = 1’

3rd Floor

Yoga

Outside

Yoga

Fitness

Outside

Massage

Outside

Massage

4th Floor

Massage

Massage

Sana

Massage

Indoor Pool

Sana

Multi-Room

Massage

Massage

32’

Lobby

Stairwell

Elevator Elevator

Lobby

Stairwell

Elevator Elevator

Bar

Pool

Lounge

Bath

Pool

Foot Massage

Waiting

Room

Bath

Bath

Mens Dressing

Rooom

Indoor Pool

Mani/ Pedi

Womens Dressing

Room

PLANS

1st Floor

Room

Room

2nd Floor

Room

Room

Room

Room

Room

Lobby

Stairwell

Room

Storage

Stairwell

Elevator Elevator

Room

Room

Room

Dining

Balcony

Room

Room

Kitchen

Break Room

Balcony

Elevator Elevator


In plan the form is expressed as a square. This geometry

balances itself with equal sides and angles

which is the expression of the design. Within the

prism is a sub-grid that follows the same pure

qualities of the overall square form.

When viewed in model and perspective

the grid and orthogonality is much more

noticeable. The rigidity of the structure is a

strong reminder of what once was before

the process of erosion took action. Again,

its placement on site is foreign and unusual

to the nature like environment. But,

being so, it does make it a focal point for

surrounding areas and draws in attention


West Canyonview Dr

1/16” = 1’

16’

32’

Zane Robles ARCH 3501 Fall 2015 - Wade

East Canyonview Dr

Room

Elevator

Room

Room

Lobby

Room

Stairwell

Room

Room

Room

Room


CONSTRUCTION II

FALL 2015

STRUCTURE

8


white mullions of the glass shell.

ROOF TO FOOTING SECTION

The dramatic view of sea and sky that greets one upon entering

is framed and intensified in the transparent skin of the rear

façade. Placed directly opposite the entry, a painted brick

fireplace pushes to the outside through the tight frame of

mullions. Suspended between the chimney and the steel

structural columns, the glazed wall creates a subtle tension that

draws the occupant across the living space to the outside. The

balustrades of the lower and upper levels are set back from the

glass, amplifying that tension.

STRUCTURAL EXPLODED AXONOMETRIC

WALL SECTION DET

As an exploded axonometric the clear

definition of the assembly of this hotel spa

structure is understood. Main structural

members are defined in color and allow for

simplified reading. The main construction

of the project is steel framing. The choice

of concrete slaps, hollow square tube

columns, wide flange beams and girders,

and other materials such as concrete shear

walls complete the structural summary of

this design.

STEEL

CONRETE

OTHER

As a camera records the moment of an event, the experience of

changing light and weather activates the crisp surfaces of the

house, while the clear glazing gathers subtle reflections of the

interior across its surface. The natural and the manmade exist as

separate, elemental experiences, yet it is impossible to separate

one from the other.

FLOOR TO WALL SECTION

STEEL SQUARE

TUBE COLUMN

INSULATION

EXTERIOR

METAL DECKING

FINISH

ROOF TO

WIDE FLANGE

EGRESS SYSTEM

1’

STEE

CONR

WIDE FLANGE

1st Floor

CONCRETE

FINISH

OTHE

6”

1 1/2” = 1’

1’

2’

CONCRETE

SLABS

WALL TO FOOTING SECTION

6”

STEEL SQUARE

TUBE COLUMN

STEEL SQUARE

TUBE COLUMN

2nd Floor

WELD

WIDE FLANGE

WIDE FLANGE

1’

WIDE FLANGE

STEEL

STEEL SQUARE

TUBE COLUMN

STEEL BASE

PLATE

ANCHOR BOLTS

NONSHRINKING

GROUT

SHEAR WALL

ASSEMBLY

CONCRETE

FOOTING

3rd Floor

CONCRETE FOOTING

3’

WALL FOOTING

3’

1/2” = 1’

1 1/2” = 1’

2’

4’

1’

2’

Primary: (Columns, Girders, Beams)

Secondary: (Footings, Shear Walls)

4th Floor

Tertiary: (Flooring, Roofing)


CONCRETE

FOOTING

WIDE FLANGE

ANCHOR

BOLTS

6”

3’

WIDE FLANGE

STEEL

SQUARE

TUBE

COLUMN

WELD

STEEL

SQUARE TUBE

COLUMN

STEEL BASE

PLATE

WIDE FLANGE

NONSHRINKING

GROUT

6”

3’

1’

STEEL

SQUARE TUBE

COLUMN

EXTERIOR

FINISH

CONCRETE

FINISH

WIDE FLANGE

INSULATION

METAL DECKING

1’

MOMENT

STEEL SQUARE TUBE TO FOOTING CONNECTION

STEEL

SQUARE TUBE

COLUMN

6”

I-BEAM INTERECTING STEEEL COLUMN

6”

STEEL BASE

PLATE

ANCHOR

BOLTS

STEEL

SQUARE TUBE

COLUMN

NONSHRINKING

GROUT

6”

STEEL PLATE

6”

CONCRETE

FOOTING

AXIS THROUGH STRUCTURE

1’

3’

3’

6’

1’

HORIZONTAL

I-BEAM

3’

3’

WELD

6”

18’

10’

WALL TO FOOTING SECTION

HOLLOW SQUARE TUBE

6”

6”

.75”

WIDE FLANGE

6”

10”

FLOOR TO WALL SECTION

3’

1”

12’

SHEAR WALL

6”

STEEL

DOWELS

WALL FITS

INTO

FOOTING

STEEL PLATE

6”

6”

CONCRETE

FOOTING

10’

2’

3’

3’

6’

1’

HORIZONTAL

I-BEAM

6”

WELD

STEEL

SQUARE TUBE

COLUMN

SHEAR WALL TO FOOTING CONNECTION

I-BEAM TO STEEL COLUMN CORNER


PRIMARY-BEAMS,COLUMNS SECONDARY - PRECAST CONCRETE SLABS TERTIARY- FOOTINGS AND SHEAR WALLS

STRUCTURAL

COMPONENTS

The understanding of primary, secondary, and tertiary members can be observed above

in the axonometric drawings above. In coordination with these are the materials and their

locations. For a simplified look color is added to locate the specific structures with ease.


Triana

STUDIO VI

FALL 2015

PUBLIC SPACE-SPAIN

ZANE ROBLES, FAITH HARDCASTLE, LEO MARTINEZ, IAN DUPONT, EDUARDO

MARTINEZ, PHYRE BURNS

iana"

e la O

ña

12

Zane Robles, Eduardo Martinez


Along Canal de la Alfonso XIII is the waterfront design

“Orillas de Triana.” It is located along the west side of

the river on Paseo Nuestra Senora de la O between Puente

de Isabel II and Puente del Cachorro. The current

shoreline defines Triana’s existing edge, giving opportunity

for a new and redeveloped boarder. By refining

and expressing the current edge through land manipulation

and waterfront design, the “edge of Triana”

becomes a vivid and exciting proposal. Its focus of the

design relies heavily on the symbolic explanation of Triana’s

proud and significant culture.


DN

DN

DN

DN

DN

DN

DN

DN

DN

DN

DN

DN

DN

DN DN DN DN DN DN DN

DN

DN

DN

DN

DN

DN

DN

DN

DN

DN

DN

DN

Calle Plaza Chapina

Flamenqueria

Calle Castilla

Hotel Ribera

de Triana

Mercado

Lola Cacerola

Castillo de

San Jorge

Canal de Alfonso XIII

Puente del Cachorro

Puente de Isabel II

0 30 m 90 m 180 m


In looking at the current conditions of the site, the most useful design tool

is the water’s edge. The river provides opportunity to unify with the water

that is otherwise limited in other parts of Seville.

For an exciting and successful path, there are three destinations along a

comfortable and inviting paseo. The comfort is achieved by the added

shading and seating, while the invitation is visual by the destinations

extending into the water to express the culture of Triana and provide

entertainment for all ages. Both of these are complimented by the intimate

relationship to the water.

As an overall idea the vision was to express the culture of Triana by land

protrusion and refine the current edge though land alteration to symbolize

Triana as a proud and unique culture. In doing so the “edge of Triana” is

refined and renewed to new physical edges.


STUDIO III

SPRING 2015

16


FOLLY DIAGRAMMING: LINES,

AREAS, POINTS

By taking a previous project, “Rodchenko model,” and

through process, two dimensional objects became a

platform for diagramming and expansion. The folly

is in the multiple translations from two dimensional

into three dimensional and repeated but iterated

differently. The purpose of lines, areas, and points derive

from an image of a portion of the “Rodchenko model”.

Diagramming without limitation and constructing a

composition develops a system from which design has a

foundation. Extruding the diagram allows for depth and

new translation of the previous. The weaving of linear

elements through masses and between planes reveals a

systematic approach that goes from a folly background

into having the characteristics of a design strategy.


There is a strong tie between sound,

body movement, and body placement.

The style of music determines the

dance technique applied. It is displayed

with gracefulness and elegance. The

proper and smooth rhythm that takes

place forms the sound, space, and body

together. The arms and legs function

most often as two separate members

in the structure of the dance. Observing

the body, the legs act as the stabilizer and

core structure to the dance sequence.

The head and arms act as visual guides

to compliment a motion or a position.

The legs that stabilize the bodies are

much heavier and appear in such a

manor. The arms appear light and free.


BALLET LUBBOCK: ANATOMY

OF DANCE

Design criteria develops from the

understanding of the members, their role in

dance sequence, and their relationship among

the body as a whole. Main spaces branch from

a core hallway which connects the entirety of

the design. To hold context important axis

align with existing surroundings. Views align

with the site in order to take advantage of visual

appeals and restrict unwanted disturbance.

2

1

3

4

N

1’=1/16”

16’

32’


28’

28’

20’

20’

16’

16’

12’

12’

28’

4’

2’

28’

4’

2’

20’

16’

North Elevation

20’

16’

East Elevation

12’

12’

4’

2’

4’

2’

North Elevation

East Elevation

28’

28’

20’

16’

12’

20’

16’

12’

4’

2’

28’

4’

2’

28’

20’

16’

12’

South Elevation

20’

16’

12’

West Elevation

28’ 4’

2’

4’

2’

20’

16’

12’

East

South

Elevation

Elevation

West Elevation

4’

2’

East Elevation

28’

20’

16’

12’

28’ 4’

2’

20’

16’

12’

West Elevation

4’

2’

West Elevation

16’ -

32’ -

48’ -

1’=1/16”


Stage Set Shop/Storage

28’

20’

16’

12’

Lobby

4’

2’

Reception Office

Section 1

28’

20’

Studio II

Company Studio

Company Studio

16’

12’

Costume/Shop and Storage

Mechanical Room

4’

2’

Section 2

28’

20’

16’

12’

Company Studio

4’

2’

Womens Restroom

Section 3

28’

20’

16’

12’

Studio I

4’

2’

1’=1/16”

16’

Section 4

32’


DESIGN BUILD

FALL 2015

FRONT-DESK

ZANE ROBLES, STEPHANIE HELMBERGER, LOGAN PATTON

22


ARCHITECTURE FRONT DESK

Designed for the TTU College of Architecture lobby, this front

desk was thought of with a modern minimal design using

complementary materials of glass and wood, with a secondary

in steel. The glazing in the design became the motion and

continuity through the design. The wood material defines the

structure and the framework for the desk. Steel, as it does

define rigidity, expresses the strong leggings which describe its

ability to stand firm. The laminated panels of plywood used for

the main top of the desk reveal the layered and sturdy system.

The overall design expresses modernity while staying connected

with academic truth.

1’-0”

3’-0”

Shelving

Hatch Drawer

5’-0”

4’-0”

Laminated Wood

1’-0”

Open Drawer

3’-8”

Drawer

Iron

Glass

2’-0”

2’-2”

2’-7”

Wind Block

Locked Drawer

Stained Wood

1’-0”

Iron

1’-0”

2’-4”


+3’-8”

+3’-8”

+2’-11”

+2’-11”

+2’-7”

+2’-7”

+2’-2”

+2’-2”

+1’-6”

+1’-6”

+10” +10”

Front Elevation

Side Elevation

Legging to Table

Connection

Hatch Drawer Laminated Wood Iron Leg

Corner

Bracket

Connection Hatch Drawer Stained Wood Glass

Shelving

Glass

Hinge

Connection

Drawer Lid

Hatch Drawer


STUDIO V

SPRING 2016

FACADE

26


6. Exteri

7. Egres

8. Come

9. Come

10. Loung

11. Office

The placement of the mid rise office building on the site of a corner street with a riverfront to the north

creates multiple points of interest. The river level layout is designed for small shops to rent and have

indoor and outdoor space accessible to the public. The experience on the street level becomes a place of

retail, accessible through full glass facades on street facing elevations. For office level design, the floors

are divided by slight elevation changes dividing the space into three sections, useful to two potential

owners with a central share space. The changes in elevation heighten lower level ceilings and allow for

more grand spaces. The beauty of the facade is the key feature in the project.

San Antonio River

1. Restro

2. Comm

3. Cafe/

4. Interio

5. Egres

12. Office

13. Offic

6.

13.

dn

5.

dn

dn

dn

3.

4.

9.

10.

12.

7.

1.

dn

dn

dn

dn

North Saint Mary's St.

2.

9.

11.

East Commerce St.

Office Plan

zane robles ARCH 3502 SP 2016 aranha

River Level

Street Level


2.

.

2.

4.

3.

Roof Level

Office 3

4.

1.

Aluminum Steel Tube Skin

Module Frame

Dimensional

Lumber Joists

2.

5.

1.

Rubber Spacer

2.

3.

4.

5.

1.

5.

Glass Panel

Aluminum Skin

Module

Concrete Pavers

Rubber Spacer

Sand Bedding

Protection Board

6.

7.

8.

Rigid Insulation 9.

Concrete Pavers

Concrete Sand Bedding Roof

Protection Steel Decking Board

Rigid Wide Insulation

Flange:

Girder

Concrete Roof

Wide Flange:

Beam Joist

Steel Decking

Drop Cieling

Components

Wide Flange:

Girder

Wide Flange:

Beam Joist

Drop Cieling

Components

6.

10.

7.

11. 8.

12.

9.

10.

13.

14.

11.

12.

13.

14.

1. Steel Tube

Frame

2.

Dimensional

Lumber Joists

3. Glass Panel

4. Aluminum Skin

Module

5.

Rubber Spacer

Concrete Pavers

Sand Bedding 7.

Protection Board

9.

Rigid Insulation 9.

13.

Concrete Roof

Steel Decking

Wide Flange:

Girder

6.

8.

10.

11.

12.

Wide Flange: 13.

Beam Joist

Drop Cieling 14.

Components

Double Glazing 15.

Mullion 16.

Floor Finish 17.

Inset Steel 18.

C Channel

Steel Angle 19.

C Channel Skin 20.

Structure

C Channel Frame 21.

Bracing

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

Construciton III: Skin

Zane Robles ARCH 3502 Spring 2016

6.

11.

7.

8.

10.

13.

11.

1.

Construciton III: Skin

Peter Raab TA Zach Sprinkle

Zane Robles ARCH 3502 Spring 2016

Peter Raab TA Zach Sprinkle

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

13.

17.

10.

13.

11.

11.

1.

14.

2.

14.

14.

19.

12.

12.

16.

16.

18.

15.

15.

12.

23.

12.

Location: San Antonio

Program: Office/Commercial

20.

16.

21.

1.

15.

16.

1.

24.

15.

4.

Roof Detail

25.

Location: San Antonio

Program: Office/Commercial

1.

1.

4.

4.

Roof Detail

Roof Detail

The facade consists of modular

aluminum framed panels which are

pre-fabricated with voids removed

from each panel. These voids are the

same size as a standard brick in order

to relate to the brick masonry context,

while introducing a modernity to the

area. The panels are layered three

panels deep for the sake of light

penetration. Through a diagrammatic

process, filled within certain voids are

fogged glazing units which diffuse

light. The three layered panels allow

for depth to be created concerning

the glass units, and therefore creates

a unique light diffusion throughout

the inner building. As light passes

through the facade, the fogged glass,

complimented with open voids,

are arranged in a diagrammatic

randomness which diffuses the light

that passes into the interior.

Beam Bracket 22.

14.

22.

Double Glazing

15.

Spandrel 23.

Spandrel Support 24.

2.

15.

25.

Mullion

16.

Steel Spanning 25.

Angle

Office 2

Office 1

Floor Finish

17.

Inset Steel

Double C Channel Glazing

18.

Mullion

Steel Angle

19.

Floor Finish

C Channel Skin

Structure

Inset Steel

C Channel

C Channel Frame

Bracing

Steel Angle

20.

21.

Beam Bracket 22.

C Channel Skin

Structure

Spandrel

23.

C Channel Frame

Spandrel Support 24.

Bracing

Steel Beam Spanning Bracket

Angle

15.

16.

17.

18.

19.

20.

21.

25.

22.

Fogged Glass 26.

Units

17.

10.

11.

27. Poured Concrete

Floor

28. Leveled Sand

29. Concrete Footing

13.

17.

30. Load Bearing

Wall

10.

31. Vertical

Reinforcement

11.

32. Footing

Reinforcement

33. Ground

13.

2.

Facade Concept

15.

In thinking of the context of downtown San Antonio

the masonry façade dominates most of the

surrounding area. It holds to the history; therefore, it

is important to maintain this contextual quality. The

18.

façade consists of modular aluminum framed panels

which are pre-fabricated with voids removed from

each panel. These voids are the same size as a

16.

standard brick in order to relate to the brick

masonry context, while introducing 19. a modernity to

the area. The panels are layered three panels deep

for the sake of light penetration. Through a

diagrammatic process, filled within certain voids are

12.

fogged glazing units which diffuse light. The three 23.

layered panels allow for depth to be created

concerning the glass units, and therefore creates a

unique light diffusion throughout the inner building. 18.

As light passes through the façade, the fogged

glass, 14. complimented with open voids, are arranged in

22.

a diagrammatic randomness which diffuses the light

that passes into the interior. 19. During the morning, the

direct light can enter the east façade in a controlled

manor by the depth of the panels and diffusion of

glazing units. Since San Antonio has a warm dry

12.

climate, this system is useful for removing direct

23.

light off the south and east façade, as well as a

similar system that covers the habitable roof. It not

only creates interior lighting conditions that are

unique, but it contains and controls the climate

through the facades design.

14.

22.

16.

Floor Detail

20.

20.

21.

24.

21.

24.

1.

1.

25.

25.

25.

Fogged

Spandrel

Glass

Units

Spandrel Support

23.

26.

24.

25.

Floor Detail

Street Level

Steel Spanning

Angle

25.

Facade Concept

31.

30.

In thinking 3. of the context of downtown San Antonio


52’

40’

28’

16’

0’

-10’


52’

40’

28’

16’

0’

-10’


BIT-REVITT

FALL 2015

RESIDENTIAL/STUDIO

32


UP

6"

6"

6"

6"

1

1 2

3

1

A-300

4

5

6

2' - 1 3/4" 6' - 4" 8' - 5 1/2" 9' - 4 3/4" 8' - 1 1/4" 10' - 0"

7

1

2

3

A-300

4

5

6

7

2' - 1 3/4" 6' - 4" 8' - 5 1/2" 9' - 4 3/4" 8' - 1 1/4" 10' - 0"

32' - 3 1/2"

44' - 5 1/2"

6' - 4" 25' - 11 1/2"

1' - 0" 5' - 10" 6" 16' - 11 1/4" 3 1/2" 7' - 8 3/4" 6"

-0' - 0 1/2"

26' - 6 3/4" 7' - 10 1/2" 10' - 0 1/4"

5 1/2" 1' - 3 3/4" 3' - 0" 8' - 6" 3' - 0" 9' - 7 3/4" 5 1/2" 7' - 7 1/4" 5 1/2"

-0' - 0 1/2"

LIBRARY PATIO

E

D

C

B

A

8' - 5 1/4" 12' - 2" 14' - 4" 10' - 0"

45' - 1 1/4"

8' - 7 1/4"

26' - 6"

10' - 0"

6" 7' - 7 1/4" 1' - 0" 11' - 2" 1' - 0" 13' - 4" 1' - 0" 9' - 0"

CONCRETE SIDEWALK

-0' - 0 1/2"

A-600 1

2

A-400

6

MECH.

STORAGE

SECOND FLOOR

6

OVERHANG

5

53 SF

156 SF TILE FLOOR

TILE FLOOR

-0' - 0 1/32"

1A 5

3 1/2"

0' - 0"

WASH ROOM

3 1/2"

TILE FLOOR

0' - 0"

7

1B

WOOD FLOOR

ENTRY

WORK ROOM 0' - 0"

1

4

4A

88 SF

236 SF

TILE FLOOR

6

83

A-500

6"

3 1/2"

2A 2B 3

9' - 11 3/4"

2

A-600 3

1

A-400

DISPLAY AREA

3 1/2" 9' - 8 3/4"

DISPLAY WALL

2

LOUNGE

227 SF

3

141 SF

WOOD FLOOR

3 1/2"

5' - 3" 8' - 1 1/4"

WOOD FLOOR

8 3/4" 3 1/2"

1' - 8"

4 3/4"

7' - 0"

4' - 9 1/2" 3 1/2"

7

1 1 R-1

57 SF

A-401

-0' - 0 1/32"

8' - 5"

Room

6"

20

47 SF

TILE FLOOR

31 31 31 31

83

DISPLAY WALL

0' - 0"

3B

CONCRETE PATIO

36

-0' - 0 1/2"

ROOF OVERHANG

3

A-400

-0' - 0 1/2"

5' - 4"

15' - 7"

-0' - 0 1/2"

STAIR RAIL

-0' - 0 1/2"

4' - 3 1/4"

-0' - 0 1/2"

SECOND FLOOR

COVERED ENTRANCE

2' - 5"

5' - 5"

7' - 8 3/4"

7 1/2"

7' - 3"

4' - 5 1/2"

1 3/4" 6' - 11 3/4"

8' - 1"

8' - 7"

12' - 1"

8' - 4"

16' - 1 1/4"

45' - 1 1/4"

8' - 5 1/4"

12' - 2"

14' - 4"

10' - 0"

E

D

C

B

A

3

A-300

3

A-300

E

D

C

B

A

8' - 5 1/4"

12' - 2"

14' - 4"

10' - 0"

44' - 11 1/4"

7 1/2" 18' - 7 1/2" 26' - 3 3/4"

5 1/2" 5' - 8 3/4" 3 1/2"

7 1/2" 4' - 1 1/4" 7 1/2" 6' - 2" 5' - 7 1/4" 9' - 1 3/4" 3 1/2" 2' - 10" 3' - 0" 3' - 0" 1' - 11 3/4" 5 1/2"

1

A-500

83

83

83

83

UP 2

A-400

83 83 83 83

15

83

LIBRARY

83

15

207 SF

14

3 1/2"

BEDROOM

12

157 SF

CLOSET

13

40 SF

3 1/2"

16

BAHTROOM

14

63 SF

3

3 1/2"

12

6 K-2

3 1/2"

A-401 5

LAUNDRY

16

67 SF

KITCHEN

17

218 SF

BALCONY

137 SF

DINING AREA

10

18

100 SF

115 SF

10B

83

4 R-2

A-401

7 1/2"

1

10A

A-400

8

LIVING ROOM

A-600 9

11

R-1

3' - 8 1/2" 3 1/2"

3 1/2" 3 1/2"

3' - 11 1/2" 5' - 6" 7 3/4"

6' - 7 1/2"

RESTROOM

9

A-401 9

HALLWAY ENTRY

49 SF

8

2 R-3

132 SF

3 1/2"

4' - 2"

K-1

35 35 35

3 1/2"

REF. DW

35

35

35

35

3

A-400

DN

5 1/2" 5' - 0 3/4" 3 1/2" 2' - 4" 5' - 0" 2' - 7" 3 1/2" 4' - 7" 5' - 0" 4' - 0 1/4" 3 1/2" 5' - 10" 5 1/2" 3' - 3 1/2" 3' - 0" 1' - 11 3/4" 5 1/2"

5' - 5 1/4" 30' - 11 1/2" 8' - 8 3/4"

45' - 1 1/2"

8' - 5 1/4" 12' - 2" 14' - 4" 10' - 0"

E

D

C

B

A

8

A-500

4' - 5" 4' - 5" 4' - 5" 5' - 6" 5' - 4 3/4" 1' - 10 1/4"

7 1/2" 7' - 6" 5 1/2" 8' - 8 1/2" 3 1/2" 1' - 10 1/2" 5' - 5 3/4" 5' - 0" 10' - 4 3/4" 5 1/2"

1' - 0" 5' - 6 3/4" 1' - 0" 3' - 3 1/4" 3' - 11 1/2" 6" 2' - 4 3/4" 4' - 0" 4' - 0" 4' - 0" 2' - 7 1/2" 6"

6' - 4" 8' - 5 1/2" 17' - 6 1/4"

32' - 3 1/2"

2' - 1 3/4" 6' - 4" 8' - 5 1/2" 9' - 4 3/4" 8' - 1 1/4" 10' - 0"

8' - 8" 35' - 11 3/4"

44' - 7"

2' - 1 3/4" 6' - 4" 8' - 5 1/2" 17' - 6" 10' - 0"

1

2

3

4

5

6

2

A-300

7

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

2

A-300

The simple material, simple design of the modern residential studio becomes a place of

Level TWO FLOOR PLAN

1

1/4" = 1'-0"

work and rest. Split into three levels, two upper residential, and one lower studio, allows

for a building of multipurpose. The materials of wood and concrete, with a wood stud

frame offer simple construction and beautiful finish. As the first design in Revit it is a

well developed project which lends the opportunity for furthering future and previous

models.


STUDIO II

FALL 2014

COTTON FIELD

36


MOTION CREATING SPACE

When motion occurs, space transforms. The creation of mobile study models allows

for existing initial space to transform into new space and develop new spacial quality

as an outcome. Through diagramming motion it reveals a new way to document

and understand space through motion. These techniques were the allowance for

designing a moving model that creates new experience of the changing spaces.

+24

Surface Setting Upper

Boundary

+23

Rotation Surface 3

(Horizontal Effects

Beneath and Upon)

+23

+19

Enclosing Bounding Thickened

Surface

Surface Setting

Upper Boundary

+19

Surface 2 Rotated

(Vertical)

Diagonal Surface

Sets Enclosure

Boundary

+18

Rotation Surface 2

(Sloped but Inhabitable)

Consistent Platform

Rotated Surface 2

(More Vertical Condition

+14

+14

+12 +12

+10

Rotation Surface 1

(Sloped and Inhabitable)

Surface 1 Rotated

Rotated Surface 3

(Diagonal Acts Below and

Above Surface Differently)

+7 1/2

+7

+7

+7

+4

Consistent Platform

Structural Pivoting Member 1

(Raises Entire Sctructure)

Scructural Pivoting Member 2

(Raises Entire Structure)

Sctructural 1 (Ending

Pivot Position Effects

Mechanic Heighth)

Sctructural 2 (Ending

Pivot Position Effects

Mechanic Heighth)

Rotated Steeped

Surface 1

(effects the use)

Consistent Platform

+1/2


1

2

N

Kitchen

1/4”= 1’ 0”

5’ 20’

10’

Rest Room in a Cotton Field

The Rest-room concept enables farmers who have an

ADA need to have access to a resting area while out on

the job. The structure is formed upon an elongated path

that bends as it ascends vertically. Through the use of

extruded paths, surface, and related space transitions,

the restroom program becomes a continuous loop.

The elongated path highlights the directional hierarchy

of the structure and its correspondence with its

situation. In observing the situational characteristics

the structure runs parallel to its surroundings. The

parallel of the cotton field on its immediate north and

a road condition to its south determine this direction.

Rest Area 2

Restroom 1

Rest Room Detail

Stair Detail

Restroom 2

Rest Area 4

1/4”= 1’ 0”

Telephone Lines

5’ 20’

10’

Section 1

Rest Area 1

+24

Storage

Storage

Storage

Storage

Rest Area 3

+19

Conceptual Diagram

+14

+9

+8

+7

+4

+3

1/4”= 1’ 0”

5’ 20’

10’

Section 2

+24

Ramp Detail

+19

+14

+9

+8

+7

Ramp Detail

Cotton Rows

+4

+3


Offset from path are the program spaces. The spatial

places being set aside from the path allow for rest

and moments to step off the continuous path. In

creating relationship between Program space and

the pathway, surfaces of solid and void react to

program space placement. Where voids are created

for entrance into space, solid surfaces are inverted

along the path. The ground to program connection

is ordered and minimal. The mass is elevated to

minimize the footprint on the soil. With less contact

Stair Detail

Rest Room as Path

Stair Detail

Rest Room as Path


RESUME

ZANE ROBLES

OBJECTIVE STATEMENT

Senior majoring in Architectural Design, hoping to influence the future of

architecture through the awarding honor of scholarship.

EDUCATION

Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas

Bachelor of Science in Architecture

Clarendon College, Pampa Texas

38 hours; General Education

COMMUNITY AND CAMPUS INVOLVEMENT

AIAS Officer: Historian

-Help organize members meetings, organize events, fundraising

Dream Center (Local Church North Campus) Saturday Outreach (Once a month)

-Outreach program, passing out food, clothes, give a message, and go to the Coronado Project (Coronado Apartments)

Saturday mornings.

Gama Beta Phi (Honor Society), Texas Tech

Alpha Lambda Delta Phi Eta Sigma (Honor Society), Texas Tech

The National Society of Collegiate Scholars (Honor Society), Texas Tech

Knights of Architecture, Texas Tech

Christians @ Tech, Texas Tech

Worship Vocalist, Co-Worship Leader

-Trinity Fellowship Church, Pampa Texas/Church On The Rock, Lubbock Texas/ Awaken College Ministry, Lubbock Texas

Rotary Interact Club, Pampa Texas

-Bi-weekly personally dedicated to collecting aluminum cans and newspapers for recycle

- Elected Vice President and later President

Pampa High School Show Choir, Pampa Texas

-Elected President

National Honor Society, Pampa Texas

-Elected Vice President

Varsity Soccer Team, Pampa Texas

-Team Captain, Received outstanding leadership award

SPRING 2017

GPA: 3.752

FALL 2011-SPRING 2013

GPA: 3.85

FALL 2016-PRESENT

SPRING 2016-PRESENT

SPRING 2014-PRESENT

SPRING 2015-PRESENT

SPRING 2015-PRESENT

FALL 2015-SPRING 2016

FALL 2013-SPRING 2015

SUMMER 2011-PRESENT

FALL 2011-SPRING 2013

SPRING 2011-SPRING 2013

FALL 2011-SPRING 2013

FALL 2012-SPRING 2013

43


EXPERIENCE

Pampa H2O Aquatic Center, General Staff, Pampa, Texas

Working with both adults and children, I developed skills for communicating with others in

different situations. Keeping the park organized and clean was another duty.

SUMMER 2013

Superb Auto Detailing, Detail Assistant, Pampa Texas

Communication with costumers and fulfilling their needs was of greatest importance. Time

management and learning to work under a timed pace was an acquired skill.

Fowler Access Controls, Field Worker, Pampa Texas

I worked hands on in the construction process of chain link and wood fence building. Learning

the construction process was of great benefit (Similar to a building process on a smaller scale). I

had to Listen to orders given by our field manager and communicate with our team to get the job

done correctly.

B’s Beds (Landscaping and Mowing Service), Maintenance Worker, Lubbock Texas

Overcoming physical exhaustion and maintaining a team effort mentality during difficult

conditions kept the work load on schedule and under control. I developed an appreciation for

hard work and maximum effort in difficult situations.

Student Recreational Sports Facility, Facilities Assistant, Lubbock Texas

While cleaning the facility, and checking out equipment, I learned to value and do every task

assigned to the best of my ability, even when no one is watching. It was a minimal effort job, but I

treated it as if it was necessary to perform as full energy. Doing the job right was most important

to me, even if no one else was.

UrbanTech, Undergraduate Assistant, Lubbock Texas

Working with TTU’s Architecture Department, at Urban Tech I’ve been able to work on master

plans of facilities such as the Lubbock Lake Landmark. Learning to design for something that

has the potential to be built has been something the educational system has not given me. I’ve

collaborated with clients, colleagues, and professors to better my process of design.

Dekker Perich Sabatini, Intern, Amarillo Texas

This has been my first true experience with an architecture firm. They’ve allowed me to design

in Revit, fix red line markups, sit in on client meetings, and visit job sites and sit in on site

collaboration. I’ve also been allowed to offer some design into recent projects as well.

WINTER 2013

SUMMER 2014

SPRING 2015-SUMMER 2015

FALL 2015-SPRING 2016

FALL 2016-PRESENT

SUMMER 2016, WINTER 2016

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