Grad School @ UBC - Life Sciences Institute - University of British ...

lsi.ubc.ca

Grad School @ UBC - Life Sciences Institute - University of British ...

Our research mission is to perform innovative, interdisciplinary

science focused on discovering the fundamental biological

mechanisms underlying health and disease and translating this

knowledge into new therapies. Our environment is designed to

catalyze research ideas and interests.

Facts & Figures

Membership includes 84 Principal Investigators

from 10 departments in the Faculties of

Medicine and of Science, organized into eight

interdisciplinary, interdepartmental, and themebased

research groups.

LSI research and support staff include more

than 280 graduate students, 115 postdoctoral

fellows, 55 research associates, 147 research

staff and 125 undergraduates.

Faculty members include 5 Tier 1 and 7 Tier

2 Canada Research Chairs, 10 CIHR New

Investigators and 24 Michael Smith Foundation

Salary Award winners.

LSI is home to students enrolled in 12

departmental and interdisciplinary life sciences

graduate programs, including the new program

in Cell and Developmental Biology. The LSI

Graduate Student Association organizes student

events.

The LSI is also home to the Life Sciences Postdoc

Club, which promotes the interests and careers

of emerging postgraduate research scientists.

The LSI is a UBC Senate approved Institute in the

Faculty of Medicine and Science.

Research Overview

LSI research focuses on eight major themes: blood research;

cardiovascular systems; diabetes; cell and developmental biology;

molecular epigenetics; infection, immunity and inflammation;

chemical biology; and bacterial regulatory networks.

Individual investigators study gene expression, protein structure,

cell signaling, cell-to-cell interactions, the cytoskeleton, the nervous

system, the immune system, muscle and bone development,

cancer progression and metastasis, bacterial pathogenesis, viruses,

autoimmunity, bacterial metabolism, and infectious diseases.

The LSI partners with other UBC facilities to provide state-of-the-art

Imaging, Flow Cytometry, Proteomics, tissue processing, and facilities

for using model organisms. The LSI also supports a multi-user

Stores and Shop located within the Life Sciences Centre and plans to

establish other key infrastructure.

The UBC Life Sciences Centre

The Life Sciences Institute comprises 25,000 square metres of

interdisciplinary research space inside the largest building on UBC’s

Vancouver campus, the Life Sciences Centre (LSC). Opened in 2005,

the $125-million, 52,165-sq. metre building was specifically built to

accommodate UBC’s distributed medical education program and the

Life Sciences Institute.

The Life Sciences Centre was awarded the prestigious Leadership in

Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold certification by the

United States Green Building Council for its innovative sustainability

features. The LEED certification is awarded to leading-edge buildings

that incorporate environmentally sustainable design, construction,

and operational features to reduce environmental impact.

The LSC is the largest building in Canada to achieve a LEED Gold

ranking and is among only a handful of buildings in the country to

achieve such standards.

Dr. Christian Naus

Director & Professor, UBC Life Sciences Institute

email: christian.naus@ubc.ca

web: lsi.ubc.ca

UBC Life Sciences Institute http://lsi.ubc.ca


Bacterial Adaptation & Response Networks (BARN)

The common thread among group members is the investigation of

how bacteria adapt and respond to their environment. Researchers

study diverse environments, including the human host (for

pathogenic bacteria), oceans, forests and soil, studying common

molecular mechanisms of adaptation and response.

Expertise covers a broad range of disciplines, including biochemistry,

bioinformatics, chemistry, genetics, genomics, microbial ecology,

microbial physiology, and structural biology. http://barn.lsi.ubc.ca/

Cardiovascular Research (CRG)

The Cardiovascular Research Group studies how the heart generates

and maintains its regular beat, and controls its force of contraction.

Researchers focus on how dysfunctional ion channels lead to

cardiac diseases. Expertise includes ion channel electrophysiology,

molecular biology and protein structure, and systemic effects of

cardiac disease. http://crg.lsi.ubc.ca/

Chemical Biology of Disease (CBD)

This multi-disciplinary team focuses on providing early-stage

chemical agents for the treatment of a variety of disease-related

pathologies including atherosclerosis, cancer, cardiovascular,

immunological and infectious diseases. The group is comprised of

biochemists, biophysicists, chemists, microbiologists, and molecular

biologists. http://cbd.lsi.ubc.ca/

Cell and Developmental Biology (CELL)

Research covers a wide spectrum of cell and developmental

biology, focusing on how cells integrate signals and develop into

complex multicellular organisms and tissues. An overarching goal

is to understand the mechanisms that direct cellular function and

interactions during development and to determine how these

interactions may be disturbed in a wide range of diseases, including

cancer. Major interests in the group include development of the

nervous system, formation of cellular junctions, protein trafficking

and targeting, morphogenesis, cytoskeletal rearrangements and

signal transduction. http://celldevelopment.ubc.ca/

Grad School @ UBC

UBC offers over 130 master’s and

doctoral degree programs in nearly

every academic field imaginable.

Discover more. www.grad.ubc.ca

The LSI is a superb training environment

for undergraduate, medical, graduate, and

post-graduate students, offering many

interdisciplinary research opportunities in

Science and Medicine labs. Students gain hands-on

experience in a broad range of world-class research labs using state of

the art technology, taking advantage of core infrastructure to acquire

skills that can be used in health, environment and related fields in the

global workplace.

Centre for Blood Research (CBR)

The goal of the CBR is to improve the health and well-being of

patients by performing innovative blood research. Researchers

in this Centre use a broad range of leading edge basic science,

biotechnological, engineering and clinical investigative approaches

on blood and blood-related processes to improve health.

http://www.cbr.ubc.ca/

Diabetes Research Group (DRG)

Members of the Diabetes Research Group are studying diabetes

from all angles. Their research aims to understand and treat multiple

forms of diabetes including, type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes and

conditions associated with these diseases. Diabetes scientists in

the LSI are working on projects focused on the fundamental causes

of diabetes as well as novel strategies for treatment. A wide range

of studies are ongoing, from investigations into the biochemistry of

insulin signaling to the physiology of insulin release from pancreatic

islets, and much more. http://diabetes.ubc.ca/

Infection, Inflammation & Immunity (I 3 )

This group focuses on how pathogens cause infections and how

the body’s immune system combats these infections to prevent

disease. Research focuses on how the immune system prevents

disease, how immune system dysregulation can cause disease, and

how manipulating the immune system could lead to new drugs and

vaccines for curing or preventing infectious diseases, inflammatory

and autoimmune diseases, and cancer. http://iii.lsi.ubc.ca/

Molecular Epigenetics (MEG)

This group has a common interest in studying epigenetic gene

regulation, namely how cells that have the same DNA can

specifically regulate different expression patterns and how gene

expression can be influenced without mutations in the actual

DNA sequence. The most likely epigenetic processes include DNA

modification, changes in histone modification, changes in chromatin

structure, and changes involving non-coding RNA production and

inheritance. http://meg.lsi.ubc.ca/

The University of British Columbia

UBC is a global centre for research and teaching, consistently ranked among the 40

best universities in the world. Surrounded by the beauty of the Canadian West, UBC

embraces bold new ways of thinking that attract exceptional students and faculty.

It is a place where innovative ideas are nurtured in a gloablly connected research

community, providing unparalleled opportunites to learn, discover and contribute in

one’s own way. UBC is a place of mind.


Bacterial Adaptation

& Response Networks (BARN) ...

Graduate Programs

Cell & Developmental Biology (MSc, PhD)

Biochemistry & Molecular Biology (MSc, PhD)

BioInformatics (MSc, PhD)

Microbiology & Immunology (MSc, PhD)

Zoology (MSc, PhD)

Research Strengths & Facilities

The Bacterial Adaptation and Response Networks Research Group

includes members from the departments of Biochemistry & Molecular

Biology, Microbiology & Immunology and Zoology.

This group comprises individuals with experience and expertise in a

broad range of disciplines, including:

• Bacterial Pathogenesis

• Biochemistry

• Bioinformatics

• Chemistry

• Genetics

• Genomics

• Microbial ecology

• Microbial physiology

• Structural biology

The common thread linking all of the group members is investigation

of how bacteria adapt and respond to their environments. The

environments studied are diverse, including soil and the ocean, and

the human host for pathogenic bacteria. However, there are common

molecular mechanisms of adaptation and response to these diverse

environments. Thus, group members share common research

approaches.

Understanding gained from the study of one adaptation or

response network is applicable to others. Adaptation and response

mechanisms of particular interest to this group include:

(1) genetic regulatory networks

(2) transport of molecules across membranes and cell walls

(3) horizontal gene transfer

Investigations of these fundamental mechanisms benefit from great

intellectual and infrastructural synergy. Further, these fundamental

mechanisms also occur in multicellular organisms, making bacteria

excellent experimental systems for developing broadly applicable

knowledge.

Life Sciences Institute

email: lsi.grad@ubc.ca

web: lsi.ubc.ca

web: barn.lsi.ubc.ca

Bacterial Adaptation & Response Networks http://barn.lsi.ubc.ca


...how bacteria adapt,

respond to their environments,

& cause disease.

BARN Researchers:

William Mohn: ecology of forest soil and gut microbial communities;

bacterial steroid metabolism

J. Thomas Beatty: virus-like gene transfer agents; photosynthetic

pigment-protein complexes

Franck Duong: essential process of protein transport

Lindsay Eltis: bacterial degradation of aromatic compounds and

steroids, including lignin & cholesterol

Rachel Fernandez: molecular pathogenesis of Bordetella pertussis:

biogenesis and immunomodulatory properties of the outer

membrane

Erin Gaynor: molecular pathogenesis of foodborne human

pathogens

Steve Hallam: microbial systems ecology and functional

metagenomic screens

George Mackie: the properties of the relevant enzymes and RNA

chaperones, the functional state of the mRNA and the secondary or

tertiary structure of the RNA substrate determine its fate

Michael Murphy: mechanism of iron homeostasis in pathogenic

bacteria

Rosemary Redfield: the ability of Haemophilus influenzae to take up

DNA from their surroundings

John Smit: biotechnology applications using the S-layer of

Caulobacter

Charles Thompson: regulation of bacterial gene expression

associated with tuberculosis

Grad School @ UBC

UBC offers over 130 master’s and

doctoral degree programs in nearly

every academic field imaginable.

Discover more. www.grad.ubc.ca

Recent Publications

Fogg PC, Hynes AP, Digby E, Lang AS, Beatty JT. (2011).

Characterization of a newly discovered Mu-like bacteriophage,

RcapMu, in Rhodobacter capsulatus strain SB1003.

Virology 421:211-221

Murakami T, Burian J, Yanai K, Bibb MJ, Thompson CJ. (2011). A

system for the targeted amplification of bacterial gene clusters

multiplies antibiotic yield in Streptomyces coelicolor. PNAS

108:16020-16025.

Roberts JN, Singh R, Grigg JC, Murphy ME, Bugg TD, Eltis LD.

(2011). Characterization of dye-decolorizing peroxidases from

Rhodococcus jostii RHA1. Biochemistry 50:5108-5119.

Lin AE, Krastel K, Hobb RI, Thompson SA, Cvitkovitch DG, Gaynor

EC.(2009). Atypical roles for Campylobacter jejuni amino acid

ATP binding cassette transporter components PaqP and PaqQ in

bacterial stress tolerance and pathogen-host cell dynamics.

Infect Immun. 77:4912-4924

Marr N, Novikov A, Hajjar AM, Caroff M, Fernandez RC. (2010).

Variability in the lipooligosaccharide structure and endotoxicity

among Bordetella pertussis strains.

J. Infect. Dis. 201:1897-1906.

Garrey SM, Mackie GA. (2011). Roles of the 5’-phosphate sensor

domain in RNase E. Mol Microbiol. 80:1613-1624.

Graduate Studies Admission

UBC Faculty of Graduate Studies establishes common minimum

academic requirements. One of the major requirements for LSI

graduate programs is securing a research supervisor.

Contact

Kelsey Mauch

Recruitment & Outreach Coordinator

lsi.grad@ubc.ca

website: grad.lsi.ubc.ca

The University of British Columbia

UBC is a global centre for research and teaching, consistently ranked among the 40

best universities in the world. Surrounded by the beauty of the Canadian West, UBC

embraces bold new ways of thinking that attract exceptional students and faculty.

It is a place where innovative ideas are nurtured in a gloablly connected research

community, providing unparalleled opportunites to learn, discover and contribute in

one’s own way. UBC is a place of mind.


A group of world-class,

interdisciplinary scientists are

researching cardiovascular disease,

with particular focus on arrhythmia,

atrial fibrillation and heart failure.

Graduate Programs

•Cell & Developmental Biology (MSc, PhD)

•Biochemistry & Molecular Biology (MSc, PhD)

•Pathology & Laboratory Medicine (MSc, PhD)

•Experimental Medicine (MSc, PhD)

•Zoology (MSc, PhD)

Research Strengths & Facilities

We study cardiovascular problems at multiple levels, ranging all

the way from high-resolution structures of individual proteins

(X-ray crystallography), to functional studies at the protein level

(electrophysiology), at the cellular level (cellular imaging), and the

organism level (using genetic manipulation). This allows us to get an

integrated view of disease mechanisms.

The Cardiovascular Research Group (CRG) consists of principal

investigators, post-doctoral fellows, graduate students,

undergraduates, research associates and technicians studying the

electrical and contractile activity of the heart under normal and

diseased conditions. http://crg.lsi.ubc.ca/

Our strengths are high resolution analysis of ion channel electrical

activity and structure/function relationships in proteins and intact

cells.

We blend a variety of modern and traditional techniques to

investigate cardiac diseases and their underlying mechanisms,

including;

• Protein crystallography and biochemistry

• Electron tomography and microscopy

• Multiple fluorescence platforms for 3D cellular imaging

• Molecular biology

• Transgenic models of human disease

• Stem cells

• Electrophysiology

• Mathematical modeling

We are a highly interdisciplinary group with a vibrant research

atmosphere that includes lab meetings, journal clubs and group

discussions.

We’re located in the Life Sciences Institute (LSI), a new state-of-theart

facility with an open-lab concept that encourages interactivity

both within the group and with other research groups in the LSI.

Our trainees have been awarded prestigious scholarships and travel

the world to attend international conferences. We encourage and

welcome your inquiries.

Life Sciences Institute

email: lsi.grad@ubc.ca

web: lsi.ubc.ca

web: crg.lsi.ubc.ca

Cardiovascular http://crg.lsi.ubc.ca


CRG Researchers:

The Cardiovascular Research Group is studying

how the heart generates and maintains

its regular beat, and controls its force of

contraction.

Eric Accili: is studying proteins that enable the heart to initiate its

own rhythm independently of the nervous system.

Christopher Ahern: is interested in voltage-gated sodium channels

as regulators of electrical excitability in the cells of nerve and

muscle.

David Fedida and Steven Kehl: are studying how the heart

generates, maintains and regulates electrical activity. Electrical

potential is transmitted across the heart as the cells alternately

depolarize and re-polarize, due to the coordinated action of a

multitude of intramembrane proteins. Any defects in this action can

trigger atrial fibrillation and a variety of ventricular arrhythmias.

Harley Kurata: studies regulatory mechanisms of inwardly-rectifying

potassium (Kir) channels. Current research is aimed towards

identifying novel interactors and regulators of channel function, and

investigating the detailed mechanisms of Kir channel gating and

blockade.

Edwin Moore: is studying the mechanisms which control excitationcontraction

coupling in muscle cells.

Filip van Petegem: is investigating the structure and function of

calcium-selective channels in health and disease. Current research

themes are focussed on how mutations lead to cardiac arrhythmias

and understanding protein-protein interactions through the use of

X-ray crystallography, electrophysiology, and various biophysical

methods.

Jim Johnson: is studying the in vivo role of cardiac ryanodine

receptors and calcium homeostasis in multiple cellular functions,

including apoptosis, using a combination of imaging and genetic

engineering techniques. His lab is interested in links between

diabetes and heart disease.

Grad School @ UBC

UBC offers over 130 master’s and

doctoral degree programs in nearly

every academic field imaginable.

Discover more. www.grad.ubc.ca

Recent Publications

Pless SA, Galpin JD, Niciforovic AP, Ahern CA. (2011).

Contributions of counter-charge in a potassium channel

voltage-sensor domain. Nature Chemical Biology 7:617–623.

Schulson MN, Fletcher P, Scriven DRL, Moore EDW. (2011).

Couplons in rat atria form distinct sub-groups defined by their

molecular partners. J. Cell Science 124:1167-1174.

Whitaker GM, Angoli D, Nazzari H, Shigemoto R, Accili EA.

(2007). HCN2 and HCN4 isoforms self-assemble and coassemble

with equal preference to form functional pacemaker

channels. J Biol Chem. 282:22900-22909.

Pless SA, Galpin JD, Niciforovic AP, Ahern CA. (2011).

Molecular basis for class Ib anti-arrhythmic inhibition of

cardiac sodium channels. Nature Communications 2:Article 351.

Ching-Chieh Tung, Paolo A. Lobo, Lynn Kimlicka, Filip

Van Petegem. (2010). The N-terminal disease hot spot of

ryanodine receptors forms a cytoplasmic vestibule.

Nature 468:585-588.

Graduate Studies Admission

UBC Faculty of Graduate Studies establishes common

minimum academic requirements. One of the main

requirements for LSI graduate programs is securing a research

supervisor.

Contact

Kelsey Mauch

Recruitment & Outreach Coordinator

lsi.grad@ubc.ca

website: grad.lsi.ubc.ca

The University of British Columbia

UBC is a global centre for research and teaching, consistently ranked among the 40

best universities in the world. Surrounded by the beauty of the Canadian West, UBC

embraces bold new ways of thinking that attract exceptional students and faculty.

It is a place where innovative ideas are nurtured in a gloablly connected research

community, providing unparalleled opportunites to learn, discover and contribute in

one’s own way. UBC is a place of mind.


Cellular networks

are the basis

of human health

& disease.

Our aim is to fully map these networks.

Graduate Programs

Biochemistry (MSc, PhD)

Cell & Developmental Biology (MSc, PhD)

Dental Sciences (MSc, PhD)

Microbiology & Immunology (MSc, PhD)

Neuroscience (MSc, PhD)

Zoology (MSc, PhD)

Major research themes:

1-How signals move within cells

Drs. Allan, Pante, Church, Gold, Loewen,

Matsuuchi, Bamji, Gordon

2-How signals move between between cells

Drs. Matsuuchi, Naus, O’Connor, Viau,

Weinberg, Gordon

3-How cells interact with each other

Drs. Bamji, Auld, Vogl, Naus, O’Connor,

Moukhles, Gordon

4-How cells interact with extracellular matrix

Drs. Tanentzapf, Moukhles, Moerman, Nabi,

Roskams

5-How cells move within and between tissues

Drs. Nabi, Roskelley, Richman, Roskams, Gold,

Church, Matsuuchi

6-How cellular compartments and

membranes are organized

Drs. Loewen, Auld, Nabi, Pante, Moerman

7-How stem cells develop

Drs. Roskams, Allan, Richman, Tanentzapf

8-How cells are organized into tissues

Drs. Moukhles, Roskelley, Richman, Roskams,

Vogl

9-How tissues communicate with each other

Drs. Viau, Weinberg, Roskelley, Gordon

Research Strengths & Facilities

The sequencing of the human genome has

generated a ‘parts list’ that members of the CELL

Research Group are using to construct cellular

networks that underpin tissue structure and

function. Therefore, these processes form the

basis of human health and, when dysfunctional,

human disease. The experimental tools being

used to construct these networks are cell

biology, multi-modal microscopic imaging, molecular genetics,

proteomics and bioinformatics together with cell culture, tissue

engineering, model organisms and transgenic animals.

The experiments are being carried out in a highly collaborative

multidisciplinary environment in which 21 scientists are working

with more than 80 trainees and research assistants to address

fundamental questions at the interface of science and medicine that

cannot be answered in classical, single discipline environments.

http://celldevelopment.ubc.ca/

Fundamental questions being addressed by the

group include:

• How do cells receive and translate signals that regulate tissuespecific

gene expression?

• How do cells transport their gene products to the appropriate

destination within a tissue?

• How do cells interact during the generation of specific tissues?

• How do cells respond to and integrate signals from other cells?

Specific Diseases and Processes Addressed by CELL

Research Group labs:

• Metabolic, Developmental and Reproductive Diseases:

macromolecular trafficking, membrane structure, nuclear transport,

cell-cell junctions

• Nervous System Diseases: stem cell development, neuronal pathfinding,

glial cell communication, synaptogenesis, fetal alcohol

syndrome, hormonal imprinting

• Musculoskeletal Diseases: stem cell niche development, muscle

organization, arthritis

• Cancer Metastasis: cell adhesion, migration and invasion; colon,

brain, lymphoid, thyroid, breast and ovarian cancer progression

Life Sciences Institute

email: lsi.grad@ubc.ca

web: lsi.ubc.ca

web: celldevelopment.ubc.ca

Cell & Developmental Biology http://celldevelopment.ubc.ca


RECENT PUBLICATIONS:

Xie X. and Auld V. (2011). Integrins are necessary for the

development and maintenance of the glial layers in the

Drosophila peripheral nerve. Development 138:3813-3822.

Veverytsa L, Allan DW. (2011). Retrograde BMP signaling

controls Drosophila behavior through regulation of a peptide

hormone battery. Development 138:3147-57.

Tapia L, Milnerwood A, Guo A, Mills F, Yoshida E, Vasuta C,

Mackenzie IR, Raymond L, Cynader M, Jia W, Bamji SX. (2011).

Progranulin deficiency decreases gross neural connectivity but

enhances transmission at individual synapses. J Neuroscience

31:11126-32.

Freeman SA, Lei V, Dang-Lawson M, Mizuno K, Roskelley CD,

Gold MR. (2011). Cofilin-Mediated F-Actin Severing Is Regulated

by the Rap GTPase and Controls the Cytoskeletal Dynamics That

Drive Lymphocyte Spreading and BCR Microcluster Formation. J

Immunology 187: 5887-5900.

Naus CC, Laird DW. (2010). Implications and challenges of

connexin connections in cancer. Nature Reviews Cancer 10:435-

441.

Machtaler S, Dang-Lawson M, Choi K, Jang C, Naus CC,

Matsuuchi L. (2011). The gap junction protein Cx43 regulates

B-lymphocyte spreading and adhesion. J Cell Sci. 124:2611-21.

Young BP, Shin JJ, Orij R, Chao JT, Li SC, Guan XL, Khong A, Jan E,

Wenk, MR, Prinz WA, Smits GJ, Loewen CJ. (2010). Phosphatidic

acid is a pHbiosensor that links membrane biogenesis to

metabolism. Science 329: 1085-1058.

Warner A, Qadota H, Benian GM, Vogl AW, Moerman DG.

(2011). The Caenorhabditis elegans paxillin orthologue, PXL-1, is

required for pharyngeal muscle contraction and for viability. Mol

Biol Cell 22:2551-63.

Noël G, Stevenson S, Moukhles H. (2011). A high throughput

screen identifies chemical modulators of the laminin-induced

clustering of dystroglycan and aquaporin-4 in primary astrocytes.

PLoS One 6:e17559.

Shankar J, Messenberg A, Chan J, Underhill TM, Foster LJ, Nabi

IR. (2010). Pseudopodial actin dynamics control epithelialmesenchymal

transition in metastatic cancer cells. Cancer

Research 70: 3780-3790.

Grad School @ UBC

UBC offers over 130 master’s and

doctoral degree programs in nearly

every academic field imaginable.

Discover more. www.grad.ubc.ca

Our goal is to understand the mechanisms that direct

cellular function and interactions during development and

to determine how these interactions may be disturbed in a

wide range of diseases.

Mingorance-Le Meur A, O’Connor TP. (2009). Neurite consolidation

is an active process requiring constant repression of protrusive

activity. EMBO J. 28:248-260.

Cohen S, Marr AK, Garcin P, Panté N. (2011). Nuclear envelope

disruption involving host caspases plays a role in the parvovirus

replication cycle. J Virol. 85:4863-74.

Petit A, Sanders AD, Kennedy TE, Tetzlaff W, Glattfelder KJ, Dalley

RA, Puchalski RB, Jones AR, Roskams AJ. (2011). Adult spinal

cord radial glia display a unique progenitor phenotype. PLoS One

6:e24538.

Gordon MD, Scott K. (2009). Motor control in a Drosophila taste

circuit. Neuron 61:373-384.

Ellis SJ, Pines M, Fairchild MJ, Tanentzapf G.J. (2011). In vivo

functional analysis reveals specific roles for the integrin-binding

sites of talin. Cell Sci. 124:1844-56.

Hill MN, McLaughlin RJ, Bingham B, Shrestha L, Lee TT, Gray JM,

Hillard CJ, Gorzalka BB, Viau V. (2010). Endogenous cannabinoid

signaling isessential for stress adaptation. PNAS 107: 9406-9411.

Young JS, Guttman JA, Vaid KS, Vogl AW. (2009). Cortactin

(CTTN), N-WASP (WASL), and clathrin (CLTC) are present at

podosome-like tubulobulbar complexes in the rat testis. Biol. Reprod.

80:153-161.

Hellemans KG, Verma P, Yoon E, Yu WK, Young AH, Weinberg

J. (2010). Prenatal alcohol exposure and chronic mild stress

differentially alter depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors in male

and female offspring. Alcohol Clin. Exp. Res. 34:633-645.

Graduate Studies Admission

UBC Faculty of Graduate Studies establishes common

minimum academic requirements. One of the major academic

requirements for LSI graduate programs is having a research

supervisor.

Contact

Kelsey Mauch

Recruitment & Outreach Coordinator

lsi.grad@ubc.ca

website: grad.lsi.ubc.ca

The University of British Columbia

UBC is a global centre for research and teaching, consistently ranked among the 40

best universities in the world. Surrounded by the beauty of the Canadian West, UBC

embraces bold new ways of thinking that attract exceptional students and faculty.

It is a place where innovative ideas are nurtured in a gloablly connected research

community, providing unparalleled opportunites to learn, discover and contribute in

one’s own way. UBC is a place of mind.


In pursuit of health through research

on blood and blood related processes.

Areas of Research

Developing safe blood products and blood

substitutes to meet increasing transfusion

demands

Designing novel approaches to prevent excess

bleeding and blood clotting

Discovering new knowledge about the role

of iron and other metals in the blood with

therapeutic applications

Developing techniques to fight difficult-to-treat

infections and inflammation

Discovering blood biomarkers for early detection

of disease

Exploring the multicultural issues that impact on

health care delivery for blood-related diseases

Research Strengths & Facilities

The Centre for Blood Research (CBR) at the University of British

Columbia (UBC) was established in response to this appeal for

advanced blood research. With over 40 multidisciplinary research

groups, the CBR is the largest centre of its kind in the world. Scientists

at the CBR are working together, using a broad range of leadingedge

approaches to study blood and blood-related processes to

improve health. Because impairments in blood and the circulation of

blood are a feature of all diseases, including cancer, diabetes, heart

disease, neurologic conditions, inflammation, infections, bleeding

and thrombosis, the knowledge gained and advances made by CBR

scientists will benefit the health and well-being of individuals all

around the world. http://www.cbr.ubc.ca/

Training the Next Generation

Because impairments in blood and the circulation of the blood

contribute to all diseases and the use of blood products underlies the

treatment of many disorders, training in blood, blood transfusions and

blood-related diseases must be approached from an interdisciplinary

perspective. To achieve the goal of training tomorrow’s researchers

in blood, blood transfusion, and blood-related diseases, CBR trainees

must complete a rigorous interdisciplinary program led by CBR

mentors and partners. The program accepts undergraduate,

graduate, post-doctoral and clinical trainees, and includes the

following core components:

• Advanced courses in blood protein biochemistry

• Cross-pillar technical and academic scientific workshops

• Career development workshops on bioethics, intellectual property

marketing in science, learning and study methods, laymanship and

grant writing

• Weekly seminars from international and local experts in

biomedical, engineering and clinical aspects of blood

• Local, national and international scientific conferences for

trainees to present their work, exchange ideas and meet others in

overlapping fields

• A mentoring program

Centre for Blood Research

email: brandy.jones@ubc.ca

web: cbr.ubc.ca

Centre for Blood Research http://cbr.ubc.ca


The CBR offers a rich learning environment for

students, with over 40 primary researchers from 13

departments across 6 faculties. All of these researchers

act as mentors to train the next generation of researchers and

practitioners in blood, blood transfusion, and blood-related

diseases.

Medical Breakthrough by CBR Scientists

2008 / Dr. Elisabeth Maurer’s research leads to the

commercialization of ThromboLUX, an innovative technology that

tests platelet samples to determine their quality for transfusion.

2008 / Dr. Natalie Strynadka discovers the 3-dimensional crystal

structure of difficult to treat bacteria, offering insights into how they

become resistant to antibiotics and providing important information

for the strategic design of critically needed drugs to fight infections.

2008 / Drs. Don Brooks, Jay Kizhakkedathu, Dana Devine and

Maria Issa make major progress in creating functional blood product

substitutes, helping to meet the rapidly increasing demand for blood

transfusions with synthetic alternatives.

2009 / Dr. Agnes Lee establishes a dedicated Vancouver Coastal

Health Thrombosis Program at Vancouver General Hospital to

diagnose and treat abnormal blood.

2010 / Dr. Aly Karsan and collaborators uncover the molecular

mechanisms to explain the clinical features of one of the most

common blood cancers, providing new insights that may lead to

better treatments.

Grad School @ UBC

UBC offers over 130 master’s and

doctoral degree programs in nearly

every academic field imaginable.

Discover more. www.grad.ubc.ca

Training Overview

The CBR is committed to sustaining the future of bloodrelated

research. All investigators mentor, supervise and teach

young scientists and clinicians through a range of integrated

training and education programs that foster a new generation

of innovative scientists and clinicians. CBR training programs

comprise formal courses, workshops, seminars, conferences

and mentorship programs with senior CBR scientists. The

training program capitalizes on the CBR’s unique clustering of

basic and clinician scientists, social scientists and engineers.

The interdisciplinary nature of CBR training and education

provides a multitude of opportunities for undergraduate,

graduate and post-graduate students and clinical trainees to

perform high quality research and to build their knowledge in

a stimulating academic environment. Past trainees have coauthored

over 375 peer-reviewed articles and work in industry

and research positions across Canada, the United States,

Europe and Australia.

Graduate Studies Admission

UBC Faculty of Graduate Studies establishes common

minimum academic requirements. One of the major academic

requirements for LSI graduate programs is having a research

supervisor.

Contact

Kelsey Mauch

Recruitment & Outreach Coordinator

lsi.grad@ubc.ca

website: grad.lsi.ubc.ca

The University of British Columbia

UBC is a global centre for research and teaching, consistently ranked among the 40

best universities in the world. Surrounded by the beauty of the Canadian West, UBC

embraces bold new ways of thinking that attract exceptional students and faculty.

It is a place where innovative ideas are nurtured in a gloablly connected research

community, providing unparalleled opportunites to learn, discover and contribute in

one’s own way. UBC is a place of mind.


Providing early-stage chemical agents for

the treatment of a variety of disease-related

pathologies including atherosclerosis, cancer,

cardiovascular, immune and infectious diseases.

Graduate Programs

Biochemistry (MSc, PhD)

Cell & Developmental Biology (MSc, PhD)

Chemistry (MSc, PhD)

Earth & Ocean Sciences (MSc, PhD)

MIcrobiology & Immunology (MSc, PhD)

Zoology (MSc, PhD)

Research Strengths & Facilities

The objectives of this multi-disciplinary team comprising biochemists,

biophysicists, chemists, microbiologists, and molecular biologists is

to collaborate on:

1. Identification of potential drug targets

2. Assembly of natural product and synthetic libraries

3. Developing novel high-throughput screening for chemical

inhibitors and modulators

4. Analysis of biochemical and structural aspects of

compound-target interactions

5. Pharmacologic and genetic studies

6. Elucidation of drug resistance mechanisms

These objectives will lead to the discovery of early-stage chemical

agents for the treatment of a variety of diseases including

atherosclerosis, cancer as well as cardiovascular, immune and

infectious diseases. http://cbd.lsi.ubc.ca/

The Biological Screening Unit in the Life Sciences Institute (LSI)

houses high-throughput robotic systems essential to screen libraries

of pure chemicals and of natural extracts, including devices to

dispense cells, reagents, and small molecules into multi-well plates,

and a suite of instruments for the automated detection of biological

activity through a range of in vivo and in vitro assays. Researchers in

this group as well as others in the LSI collaborate with the Centre for

Drug Research and Development (CDRD) that will soon be housed in

the Pharmaceutical Sciences building adjacent to the LSI. The Drug

Discovery and Target Identification (DDTI) researchers will use the

Chemistry Unit, located in the nearby Department of Chemistry,

to generate chemical libraries with equipment for the automated

combinatorial synthesis of peptides and organic molecules. This unit

is responsible for the isolation and identification of active chemicals,

as well as for the synthesis and optimization of active second

generation chemicals for subsequent biological studies. The Target

Identification Unit will be in the Michael Smith Building. It houses

mass spectrometers and other proteomic instrumentation needed to

carry out the identification of proteins whose activities are modulated

by the chemicals and to study the effects of these chemicals at the

molecular, cellular, and organismal levels. The LSI also houses the

X-ray crystallographic and NMR spectroscopic equipment needed

for structural characterization of chemicals bound to their target

proteins.

Life Sciences Institute

email: lsi.grad@ubc.ca

web: lsi.ubc.ca

web: cbd.lsi.ubc.ca

Chemical Biology of Disease http://cbd.lsi.ubc.ca


Research leading to the discovery of early-stage

therapeutic agents for the treatment of

disease pathologies

CBD Researchers:

Raymond Andersen: using high throughput screening of marine

sponge sediments and terrestrial actinomycete isolates, we

have identified natural products of novelty with a wide variety of

biological activities.

Gary Brayer: our laboratory is pursuing both mechanism-based

and chemical library screening-based strategies to develop

therapeutics for diabetes, obesity and prostate cancer. Special

attention is directed towards elucidating the protein structurefunction

relationships present in inhibitory complexes and using

these to enhance the efficacy of putative therapeutics.

Dieter Bromme: our studies of proteases implicated in

atherosclerosis, bone and joint and autoimmune diseases have

led to the identification of several promising low molecular

weight inhibitors with novel binding sites.

Peter Cullis: we have designed and are in the process of

optimizing liposomal nanoparticle based delivery systems that

will allow siRNA to be used therapeutically in vivo.

Julian Davies: the world of biologically-active small molecules

includes products of all living organisms (the Parvome). What

are their roles? We are studying the cell-cell signaling functions

of microbial products by the use of reporter systems. In addition,

the laboratory has projects directed towards antibiotic discovery

and on the analysis of antibiotic resistance mechanisms and

their genetic organization.

Lindsay Eltis: we discovered a cholesterol degradation pathway

in M. tuberculosis and are providing new insights into how these

cholesterol-degrading enzymes function. Collaboratively, we

have established that M. tuberculosis metabolizes cholesterol

during infection and that this metabolism is critical during the

early stages of infection, contributing to the dissemination of the

pathogen in the host.

Lawrence McIntosh: using NMR spectroscopy, new mechanisms

for the regulation of ETS transcription factors by “beadon-a-string”

sumoylation and the “rheostatic” effects of

multi-site phosphorylation on DNA-binding auto-inhibition

were elucidated. This may provide a new approach to the

understanding and treatment of ETS-related cancers.

Grad School @ UBC

UBC offers over 130 master’s and

doctoral degree programs in nearly

every academic field imaginable.

Discover more. www.grad.ubc.ca

Robert Molday: using a wide variety of biochemical, molecular and

cell biology techniques, we are studying mechanisms responsible

for a number of retinal degenerative diseases that are leading

causes of vision loss. These include X-linked retinoschisis, retinitis

pigmentosa, Stargardt macular degeneration and others. The

information obtained from these studies is being used to develop

novel gene and drug based treatments in animal models for these

diseases.

Masayuki Numata: organellar pH is tightly regulated within a

narrow range, which plays a vital role in various physiological

processes. Our research group has identified novel binding proteins

to organellar membrane type sodium hydrogen exhangers that

contribute to organellar pH homeostasis. Characterization of these

binding proteins will lead to a better understanding of these illdefined

ion transporter functions in different cell types.

Michel Roberge: we are using high throughput screening methods

with both natural product and CombiChem Libraries in collaboration

with a number of other groups in areas of cancer chemical biology,

cancer cell invasion and metastasis, mitotic progression, autophagy

and drug discovery associated with these disease processes.

Natalie Strynadka: high-resolution methods are being used to

analyse the detailed structures of enzymes responsible for antibiotic

resistance in bacteria.

Graduate Studies Admission

UBC Faculty of Graduate Studies establishes common

minimum academic requirements. One of the major academic

requirements for LSI graduate programs is having a research

supervisor.

Contact

Kelsey Mauch

Recruitment & Outreach Coordinator

lsi.grad@ubc.ca

website: grad.lsi.ubc.ca

The University of British Columbia

UBC is a global centre for research and teaching, consistently ranked among the 40

best universities in the world. Surrounded by the beauty of the Canadian West, UBC

embraces bold new ways of thinking that attract exceptional students and faculty.

It is a place where innovative ideas are nurtured in a gloablly connected research

community, providing unparalleled opportunites to learn, discover and contribute in

one’s own way. UBC is a place of mind.


Diabetes is clearly one of the most

important medical problems of our time. We

in the UBC Diabetes Research Group are trying to understand the

causes of this disease well enough to design rational therapies to

defeat it.

Graduate Programs

Cell & Developmental Biology (MSc, PhD)

Biochemistry & Molecular Biology (MSc, PhD)

Pathology & Laboratory Medicine (MSc, PhD)

Experimental Medicine (MSc, PhD)

Zoology (MSc, PhD)

Research Strengths & Facilities

Our Mission: To conduct world-class multi-disciplinary research

aimed at curing Diabetes Mellitus.

Members of the Diabetes Research Group are attacking diabetes

from multiple angles. Our research aims to understand and treat

multiple forms of diabetes including, type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes

and conditions associated with these diseases.

Our scientists are working on projects focused on the fundemental

causes of diabetes as well as novel strategies for treatment. A

wide range of studies are ongoing, from investigations into the

biochemistry of insulin signalling to the physiology of insulin release

from pancreatic islets and much more. http://diabetes.ubc.ca/

Why study Diabetes?

Diabetes is a devastating disease that affects more than 2 million

Canadians and over 350 million people worldwide. Diabetes costs

Canada an estimated $9 billion annually and the incidence of diabetes

is increasing dramatically. Because of its chronic nature, the financial

burden of diabetes approaches that of all cancers combined. It is

estimated someone dies of diabetes every 7 seconds.

There are several forms of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, previously known

as juvenile diabetes, occurs when the body’s own immune system

destroys the insulin secreting pancreatic beta-cells. Type 1 diabetes is

the most severe form of the disease and requires multiple daily insulin

injections for survival. Even with excellent glucose control, patients

are at significant risk for developing debilitating complications. Type 2

diabetes, formally known as adult-onset diabetes, occurs when there

are insufficient functional insulin-producing pancreatic beta-cells

for the body’s needs. Type 2 diabetes is commonly associated with

obesity. There are other forms of diabetes caused by rare mutations

in important genes. In all forms of diabetes, the exact causes remain

unclear, and better treatments are urgently needed.

Life Sciences Institute

email: lsi.grad@ubc.ca

web: lsi.ubc.ca

web: diabetes.ubc.ca

Diabetes Research Group http://diabetes.ubc.ca


More than 9 million Canadians live

with diabetes or pre-diabetes.

DRG Researchers

Roger Brownsey: we aim to understand the molecular mechanisms

by which hormones bring about changes in cell metabolism and

function. Our work is especially concentrated on the mechanism

of insulin action on fatty acid synthesis and on the key lipogenic

enzyme acetyl-CoA carboxylase.

Susanne Clee: we use genetics as a tool to gain insight into novel

pathways promoting obesity and diabetes. Genetic factors largely

determine which individuals will develop obesity and/or diabetes

in the context of a lifestyle of diets high in fat and carbohydrate and

reduced exercise.

Eric Jan: translational regulation of proteins is fundamental for

proper gene expression and cellular functions. Loss of these

translational controls can lead to misexpression of proteins that

contribute to cellular stress and diseases such as diabetes and

cancer. Our laboratory is interested in elucidating these translational

control mechanisms during cellular stress.

Jim Johnson: the Laboratory of Molecular Signalling in Diabetes is

focused on understanding the causes of type 1 and type 2 diabetes at

a molecular level. Our studies are guided by the discovery of genes

and associated gene networks linked to diabetes risk and by known

risk factors that predispose individuals to diabetes.

Timothy Kieffer: the Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Medicine

is working to develop novel and innovative therapeutic approaches

for diabetes. Our research typically involves sophisticated molecular

techniques and studies at the cellular and physiological level. We

believe that gene and cell based therapies may be the medicine of

the future.

Christopher McIntosh: our work focuses on intestinal hormones

involved in the regulation of pancreatic islet function and fat

metabolism and the consequences of their altered function in

obesity and diabetes.

Calvin Yip: our research focuses on investigating the molecular

architecture and function of protein complexes with an emphasis on

complexes involved in insulin signalling.

Grad School @ UBC

UBC offers over 130 master’s and

doctoral degree programs in nearly

every academic field imaginable.

Discover more. www.grad.ubc.ca

Recent Publications

Lee KTY, Karunakaran S, Ho MM, Clee SM. (2011). PWD/PhJ and WSB/

EiJ Mice Are Resistant to Diet-Induced Obesity But Have Abnormal Insulin

Secretion. Endocrinology. 152:3005–3017.

Khong A, Jan E. (2011). Modulation of stress granules and P bodies during

dicistrovirus infection. J. Virol. 85:1439-1451.

Yip CK, Murata K, Walz T, Sabatini DM, Kang SA. (2010). Structure of the

human mTOR complex I and its implications for rapamycin inhibition. Mol

Cell. 38:768-774.

Chu KY, Lin Y, Hendel A, Kulpa JE, Brownsey RW, Johnson JD. (2010). ATPcitrate

lyase reduction mediates palmitate-induced apoptosis in pancreatic

beta cells. J Biol Chem. 285:32606-32615.

Jeffrey KD, Alejandro EU, Luciani DS, Kalynyak TB, Hu X, Li H, Lin Y,

Townsend RR, Polonsky KS, Johnson JD. (2008). Carboxypeptidase E

mediates palmitate-induced beta-cell ER-stress and apoptosis. PNAS.

105:8452-8457.

Covey SD, Wideman RD, McDonald C, Unniappan S, Huynh F, Asadi A, Speck

M, Webber T, Chua SC, Kieffer TJ. (2006). The pancreatic beta cell is a key

site for mediating the effects of leptin on glucose homeostasis. Cell Metab.

4:291-302.

Kim SJ, Doudet DJ, Studenov AR, Nian C, Ruth TJ, Gambhir SS, McIntosh CH.

(2006). Quantitative micro positron emission tomography (PET) imaging for

the in vivo determination of pancreatic islet graft survival.

Nat Med. 12:1423-1428.

Graduate Studies Admission

UBC Faculty of Graduate Studies establishes common

minimum academic requirements (grad.ubc.ca). One of the

main requirements for LSI graduate programs is securing a

research supervisor.

Contact

Kelsey Mauch

Recruitment & Outreach Coordinator

lsi.grad@ubc.ca

website: grad.lsi.ubc.ca

The University of British Columbia

UBC is a global centre for research and teaching, consistently ranked among the 40

best universities in the world. Surrounded by the beauty of the Canadian West, UBC

embraces bold new ways of thinking that attract exceptional students and faculty.

It is a place where innovative ideas are nurtured in a gloablly connected research

community, providing unparalleled opportunites to learn, discover and contribute in

one’s own way. UBC is a place of mind.


The Infection, Inflammation and

Immunity (I 3 ) Research group in the LSI

focuses on how micro-organisms cause

infections and how the body’s immune

system combats these infections to

prevent disease.

Graduate Programs

•Cell & Developmental Biology (MSc, PhD)

•Biochemistry & Molecular Biology (MSc, PhD)

•BioInformatics (MSc, PhD)

•Microbiology & Immunology (MSc, PhD)

•Pathology & Laboratory Medicine (MSc, PhD)

•Experimental Medicine (MSc, PhD)

•Zoology (MSc, PhD)

Infection,

Inflammation

& Immunity

Research

Group

Research Strengths & Facilities

Both newly emerged pathogens (e.g. H5N1 pandemic flu, West Nile

Virus) and pathogens making a comeback in immuno compromised

persons (e.g. tuberculosis) represent major threats to human health.

At the same time, disease caused by uncontrolled or inappropriate

immune responses are now a leading health problem in the developed

world. This includes chronic diseases such as type 1 diabetes (T1D),

multiple sclerosis (MS), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), arthritis,

asthma, atherosclerosis, and immune cell cancers.

Many cancers also silence or subvert the immune system, suggesting

that modulating the immune system could provide new cancer

treatments.

Together, these diseases are a significant cause of deaths and cost the

health care systems billions of dollars for patient care. Although the

underlying causes of these diseases are diverse, they are linked by a

common theme, inappropriate or insufficient immune function.

To improve human health and reduce the suffering caused by these

diseases, the 70 trainees, technicians, and faculty members who

comprise the I 3 Research Group are dedicated to understanding:

• How the immune system functions to prevent disease

• How immune deregulation can cause disease

• How targeting pathogens and manipulating the immune

system could lead to new drugs and vaccines for curing

or preventing infectious diseases, inflammatory and

autoimmune diseases, and cancer

Life Sciences Institute

email: lsi.grad@ubc.ca

web: lsi.ubc.ca

web: iii.lsi.ubc.ca

Infection, Inf ammation & Immunity http://iii.lsi.ubc.ca


Understanding fundamental

mechanisms of the body’s immune

response against pathogens and during inflammation

is the focus of I 3 research.

Diseases studied by I 3 labs:

Infectious diseases: West Nile Virus, Hepatitis C, pandemic flu, HIV,

tuberculosis, Epstein-Barr virus, Coxsackievirus, Dengue Fever Virus.

Inflammatory diseases: colitis, inflammatory bowel disease,

arthritis, atherosclerosis.

Autoimmune diseases: Type 1 diabetes, Multiple Sclerosis,

Autoimmune myocarditis.

Immune cell cancers: T and B cell lymphomas, multiple myeloma.

Metastatic cancers: Melanomas, breast and ovarian cancer.

Major research themes:

• How pathogens cause infections, manipulate host cells, and evade

the immune system -Drs. Jean, Thompson, Harder, Horwitz.

• How immune cells respond to pathogens and tumor cells; How

immune responses to pathogens and tumors can be enhanced – Drs.

Johnson, Gold, Abraham, Harder, Matsuuchi.

• How immune cells travel to sites of infection; How cells move and

how these processes influence immune cell trafficking and tumor cell

metastasis – Drs. Gold, Roskelley, Weeks.

• How immune cells cause and resolve inflammation; How immune

dysfunction leads to autoimmune and inflammatory diseases – Drs.

Horwitz, Harder, Gold, Johnson.

• How immune cells are transformed into leukemias and lymphomas

– Dr. Abraham.

Research approaches:

• In vitro and in vivo models of disease

• Model organisms

• Multi-color flow cytometry

• Confocal microscopy and live cell imaging

• Proteomics, genomics and systems biology

• Cell and molecular biology

Grad School @ UBC

UBC offers over 130 master’s and

doctoral degree programs in nearly

every academic field imaginable.

Discover more. www.grad.ubc.ca

Recent Publications

Murakami T, Burian J, Yanai K, Bibb MJ, Thompson CJ. (2011). A

system for the targeted amplification of bacterial gene clusters

multiplies antibiotic yield in Streptomyces coelicolor. PNAS.

108:16020-16025.

Casiraghi, C., Dorovini-Zis, K., and Horwitz, M.S. (2011).

Epstein-Barr virus infection of human brain microvessel

endothelial cells: A novel role in Multiple Sclerosis. Journal of

Neuroimmunology 230:173-177.

Machtaler S, Dang-Lawson M, Choi K, Jang C, Naus CC,

Matsuuchi L. (2011). The gap junction protein Cx43 regulates

B-lymphocyte spreading and adhesion. J Cell Sci. 124:2611-2621.

Osborne LC, Patton DT, Seo JH, Abraham N. (2011). Elevated

IL-7 availability does not account for T cell proliferation in

moderate lymphopenia. J Immunol. 186:1981-1988.

Ruffell B, Poon GF, Lee SS, Brown KL, Tjew SL, Cooper J,

Johnson P. (2011). Differential use of chondroitin sulfate to

regulate hyaluronan binding by receptor CD44 in Inflammatory

and Interleukin 4-activated Macrophages.

J Biol Chem. 286:19179-19190.

Graduate Studies Admission

UBC Faculty of Graduate Studies establishes common minimum

academic requirements. One of the major requirements for LSI

graduate programs is securing a research supervisor.

Contact

Kelsey Mauch

Recruitment & Outreach Coordinator

lsi.grad@ubc.ca

website: grad.lsi.ubc.ca

The University of British Columbia

UBC is a global centre for research and teaching, consistently ranked among the 40

best universities in the world. Surrounded by the beauty of the Canadian West, UBC

embraces bold new ways of thinking that attract exceptional students and faculty.

It is a place where innovative ideas are nurtured in a gloablly connected research

community, providing unparalleled opportunites to learn, discover and contribute in

one’s own way. UBC is a place of mind.


Did you know that there are memories in your genes?

Did you know that some of your gene expression

patterns were established before you were born and

will be stably maintained for the rest of your life?

This is only a fraction of what

we have learned from the study of epigenetics.

Graduate Programs

•Biochemistry & Molecular Biology (MSc, PhD)

•Cell & Developmental Biology (MSc, PhD)

•Genome Sciences & Technology (MSc, PhD)

•Medical Genetics (MSc, PhD)

•Zoology (MSc, PhD)

Research Strengths & Facilities

What is Epigenetics?

The human genome contains approximately 23,000 proteincoding

genes, unique subsets of which are expressed in different

cell types. Cells are able to pass their gene expression patterns to

daughter cells, and since all cells have the same DNA, the means

of passing differences in expression patterns must lie outside the

DNA sequence. The study of heritable changes in gene expression

is known as epigenetics. The most likely mediators of epigenetic

processes include DNA methylation, histone post-translational

modifications and non-coding RNA. Epigenetics is a high profile

field of research, which has been made a priority for study by both

the CIHR (Canadian Epigenetics, Environment and Health Research

Consortium) and the NIH (Roadmap Epigenomics Project).

Who We Are

The Molecular Epigenetics Group (MEG) at the University of

British Columbia includes over 40 full-time researchers, including

approximately 25 graduate students pursuing MSc or PhD degrees in

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical Genetics, or Zoology.

MEG researchers use yeast, Drosophila, mammalian cell lines and

mice to address fundamental questions about the roles of DNA

modification and chromatin structure in gene regulation during

development. We are equipped with state of the art facilities in the

Life Sciences Institute at UBC and our students learn bioinformatics,

ChIP-SEQ, gene expression analysis, protein purification, embryonic

stem cell-based technologies, mass spectrometric protein

identification, and yeast, fly and mammalian molecular genetics.

MEG hosts alternating weeks of ‘Wing Talks’ and ‘Chromatin Club’

(a series of presentations and discussions of current literature). We

also host a more formal epigenetics seminar series known as the

‘Waddington Lectures’ and an annual retreat. http://meg.lsi.ubc.ca/

Life Sciences Institute

email: lsi.grad@ubc.ca

web: lsi.ubc.ca

web: meg.lsi.ubc.ca

Molecular Epigenetics http://meg.lsi.ubc.ca


Did you know that many cancers

are caused not by DNA mutation, but by changes in how DNA is packaged?

Did you know that changes in chromatin structure accompany aging?

This is only a fraction of what

we have learned from the study of epigenetics.

Faculty and Research Focus

Hugh Brock: the role of non-coding RNAs in the epigenetic regulation of

the Hox genes in Drosophila, and the function of Polycomb group proteins

in cell cycle control and silencing during development.

Carolyn Brown: the mechanism of human X chromosome inactivation,

including how the non-protein coding XIST RNA can associate with

the entire chromosome, resulting in establishment of facultative

heterochromatin and gene silencing.

Thomas Grigliatti: the molecular function of non-histone

chromatin proteins in gene silencing in Drosophila, and the use of

pharmacogenomics to unravel the basis of complex disorders.

LeAnn Howe: the establishment and maintenance of transcriptionally

active chromatin in budding yeast, including the roles played by

chromatin-remodelling machines and the post-translational modification

of histones.

Louis Lefebvre: the phenomenon of genomic imprinting, an epigenetic

system guiding the monoallelic, parent-of-origin dependent expression

of specific genes in mammals, including the role of non-coding RNA in

regulating the imprinting of gene clusters.

Matthew Lorincz: the interplay between transcription, DNA methylation

and histone modifications in the silencing of exogenous and endogenous

retroviruses in cells.

Ivan Sadowski: how chromatin regulates the maintenance of the latent

pool of HIV infected cells, and how environmental signals regulate

transcription, including the stress response genes in yeast and HIV in

infected T cells.

Catherine Van Raamsdonk: the use of pigmentation mutants to discover

new genes that control melanocyte proliferation and survival, and how

boundaries are set during mammalian development.

Grad School @ UBC

UBC offers over 130 master’s and

doctoral degree programs in nearly

every academic field imaginable.

Discover more. www.grad.ubc.ca

Recent Publications

Fisher CL, Pineault N, Brookes C, Helgason CD, Ohta H,

Bodner C, Hess JL, R. Humphries K, Brock HW. (2010).

Loss-of-function Additional sex combs like 1 mutations disrupt

hematopoiesis but do not cause severe myelodysplasia or

leukemia. Blood 115:38-46.

Oh-McGinnis R, Bogutz AB, Lefebvre L. (2011). Partial loss of

Ascl2 function affects all three layers of the mature placenta

and causes intrauterine growth restriction. Developmental

Biology 351:277-286.

Catherine D. Van Raamsdonk et al. (2010). Mutations in

GNA11 in Uveal Melanoma. New England Journal of Medicine

363:2256-2257.

Matsui T, Leung D, Miyashita H, Maksakova IA, Miyachi H,

Kimura H, Tachibana1 M, Lorincz MC, Shinkai Y. (2010).

Proviral silencing in embryonic stem cells requires the histone

methyltransferase ESET. Nature 464:927-931.

Graduate Studies Admission

UBC Faculty of Graduate Studies establishes common

minimum academic requirements. One of the major admission

requirements for LSI graduate programs is securing a research

supervisor.

Contact

Kelsey Mauch

Recruitment & Outreach Coordinator

lsi.grad@ubc.ca

website: grad.lsi.ubc.ca

The University of British Columbia

UBC is a global centre for research and teaching, consistently ranked among the 40

best universities in the world. Surrounded by the beauty of the Canadian West, UBC

embraces bold new ways of thinking that attract exceptional students and faculty.

It is a place where innovative ideas are nurtured in a gloablly connected research

community, providing unparalleled opportunites to learn, discover and contribute in

one’s own way. UBC is a place of mind.


The Life Sciences Institute (LSI) is dedicated to

discovering the fundamental biological mechanisms

underlying health and disease and translating this

knowledge into new therapies. Our environment is

designed to catalyze novel research ideas and interests

with a goal to facilitate partnerships and innovative

initiatives.

Graduate Programs

Biochemistry & Molecular

Biology (MSc, PhD)

BioInformatics (MSc, PhD)

Cell & Developmental

Biology (MSc, PhD)

Chemistry (MSc, PhD)

Craniofacial Science (MSc, PhD)

Experimental Medicine (MSc, PhD)

Genome Sciences & Technology (MSc, PhD)

Medical Genetics (MSc, PhD)

Microbiology & Immunology (MSc, PhD)

Neuroscience (MSc, PhD)

Pathology & Laboratory Medicine (MSc, PhD)

Zoology (MSc, PhD)

Research Strengths & Facilities

Over 84 faculty members’ labs, from life sciences

departments in Medicine and Science.

Conducting vibrant, biomedical-based research on diabetes,

cardiovascular disease, immune responses, infectious disease, cancer,

developmental disorders, bacterial regulation, neuroscience, structural

biology, molecular epigenetics & environmental microbiology.

The LSI also focuses on fundamental basic research in the biomedical

sciences aimed at identifying, characterizing and understanding the

molecular mechanisms that govern gene expression, protein structurefunction,

and how key cellular and developmental processes go awry in

human disease.

Facilities on-site in the Life Sciences Institute:

• Flow Cytometry

• Tissue Processing

• Transmission Electron Microscopy

• Imaging

• Advanced Structural Biology for Re-emerging Infectious Diseases

(ASTRID)

• Proteomics

• C. elegans Knockout Facility

• Drosophila Genetics Lab

Facilities on-site in the Life Sciences Centre:

• Centre for Disease Modeling

• Facility for Infectious Disease and Epidemic Research (FINDER)

Life Sciences Institute

email: lsi.grad@ubc.ca

web: lsi.ubc.ca

Life Sciences Institute http://lsi.ubc.ca


The interdisciplinarity of the LSI is reflected in the

mandate of its Research Groups, which foster the

sharing of research ideas, expertise, resources

and joint efforts in the programs that train graduate and

undergraduate students. Officially opened in 2005, it is the largest

UBC research unit to be jointly governed by the Faculties of Medicine

and Science.

LSI Research Groups

Bacterial Adaptation & Response Networks (BARN)

How bacteria adapt and respond to their environment.

http://barn.lsi.ubc.ca/

Cardiovascular (CGR)

How the heart generates and maintains its regular beat, and controls

its force of contraction. http://crg.lsi.ubc.ca/

Cell & Developmental Biology (CELL)

How cells integrate signals and develop into complex multicellular

organisms and tissues. http://celldevelopment.ubc.ca/

Chemical Biology of Disease (CBD)

The discovery of biologically active chemicals with applications in

basic science and in medicine. http://cbd.lsi.ubc.ca/

Diabetes (DRG)

To conduct world-class multi-disciplinary research aimed at curing

Diabetes. http://diabetes.ubc.ca/

Infection, Inflammation & Immunity (I3 )

How pathogens cause infections and how the body’s immune system

combats these infections to prevent disease. http://iii.lsi.ubc.ca/

Molecular Epigenetics (MEG)

How DNA modification, histone modification, changes in chromatin

structure, and changes involving non-coding RNA production and

inheritance effect gene expression. http://meg.lsi.ubc.ca/

Centre for Blood Research (CBR)

To improve the health and well-being of patients by performing

innovative research in blood and blood-related processes.

http://www.cbr.ubc.ca/

Grad School @ UBC

UBC offers over 130 master’s and

doctoral degree programs in nearly

every academic field imaginable.

Discover more. www.grad.ubc.ca

Graduate Studies Admission

UBC Faculty of Graduate Studies establishes common

minimum academic requirements. One of the major

requirements for LSI graduate programs is having a research

supervisor. For assistance in finding a research supervisor

please contact Kelsey Mauch.

Postdoctoral Fellowships

The LSI is home to over 100 PDFs who form the core of the

UBC Postdoctoral Association. The LSI also offers visiting

scientist and trainee awards.

Contact

LSI Research Centres

Centre for Blood

Research

Kelsey Mauch

LSI Recruitment & Outreach Coordinator

lsi.grad@ubc.ca

website: grad.lsi.ubc.ca

The University of British Columbia

UBC is a global centre for research and teaching, consistently ranked among the 40

best universities in the world. Surrounded by the beauty of the Canadian West, UBC

embraces bold new ways of thinking that attract exceptional students and faculty.

It is a place where innovative ideas are nurtured in a gloablly connected research

community, providing unparalleled opportunites to learn, discover and contribute in

one’s own way. UBC is a place of mind.


Research Facilities

We offer top-notch facilities in many areas of

contemporary biochemistry and molecular biology,

located at several sites across the UBC campus and

affiliated institutes:

Life Science Institute: http://lsi.ubc.ca/

Michael Smith Labs: http://www.msl.ubc.ca/

BC Cancer Agency: http://www.bccrc.ca/

Centre for High-Throughput Biology:

http://www.chibi.ubc.ca/

Brain Research Centre: http://www.brain.ubc.ca/

Centre for Blood Research:

http://www.cbr.ubc.ca/

Our goal is to enable our graduates to become highly

qualified, independent and creative researchers, who will

contribute to the international scientific community.

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Retreat.

Organized by grad students to present their projects.

Held in Whistler, BC. June 2011.

Centre for Molecular Medicine and Therapeutics:

http://www.cmmt.ubc.ca

Research Strengths & Facilities

Our graduate program offers training in 35 research groups

with interests in many areas of contemporary biochemistry

and molecular biology.

The aims of graduate student research projects are to

advance our understanding of fundamental problems in

biology and to apply that knowledge to the understanding

and treatment of human disease. To achieve these goals,

our laboratories are well funded and equipped with the very

best cutting-edge equipment and resources.

This highly interactive approach to research builds on our

strong links within the Life Sciences Institute - and beyond,

to the Michael Smith Laboratories, the Genome Sciences

Centre, the BC Cancer Research Centre, the Centre for

High Throughput Biology, the Centre for Drug Research and

Development and the Centre for Macular Research.

As a graduate student in our program you will benefit from

support and mentorship of your own lab colleagues as

well as the outstanding groups of undergraduate, graduate

and post-doctoral trainees throughout the department. In

addition to specific research projects and associated course

work, interactions between groups and laboratories form

the focus of weekly seminars, monthly poster sessions, our

annual retreat and other social events.

To learn more about specific research projects simply check

the on-line links to the home pages of individual faculty

members, accessible from www.biochem.ubc.ca.

Biochemistry & Molecular Biology

email: ubcbioc-g-graduate@mail.ubc.ca

web: http://www.biochem.ubc.ca

Biochemistry & Molecular Biology www.biochem.ubc.ca


Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology maintains

a vibrant and collaborative environment for multi-disciplinary

research in areas bridging chemistry and biology.

Research Areas

• Vibrant, collaborative, multi-disciplinary, bridging fundamental problems

in chemistry and biology

• Structural biology and molecular biophysics

• Signal transduction

• Gene expression, chromatin structure, and the regulation of transcription

and translation

• Protein trafficking and secretion

• Membrane biology

• Enzymology

• Proteomics and degradomics

• Chemical biology and drug discovery

• Disease mechanisms related to vision, diabetes, cancer, and bacterial

pathogenicity

• Computational biology

Biochemistry Quick Facts

* 29 Faculty Members and 11 Associate Members

* 20 administrative and research staff

* 66 Graduate students

* 35 Post Doctoral Fellows

* Trainees and scientists from around the world

* Activities from skiing/snowboarding at Whistler to

sailing/wind-surfing in English Bay

* Lots to choose from within an hour drive

* International cuisine, local wines and beers, excellent sushi

(our grads say “Best in Canada”)

* Unsurpassed record of excellence with 2 Nobel Laureates:

Michael Smith and Gobind Khorana

* Home to 5 Canada Research Chairs and other national and

international award winners

*“Tuum Est” - It is up to you and you can change the world

Grad School @ UBC

UBC offers over 130 master’s and

doctoral degree programs in nearly

every academic field imaginable.

Discover more. www.grad.ubc.ca

Graduate Admissions

UBC Faculty of Graduate Studies establishes common

minimum academic requirements: www.grad.ubc.ca. We

offer MSc and PhD programs, which prepare you for a career

in research. In your application let us know what interests

you and we will provide the environment.

Financial Support

Financial support for grads comes from one or more of

four basic sources: merit-based studentships, teaching and

research assistantships, need-based awards and research

grants. Based on our current enrolment of 66 grads, 45%

hold a major studentship (NSERC, CIHR, MSFHR, and 4YF)

and all others are supported by research grants.

Contact

Doris Metcalf

Graduate Program Coordinator

ubcbioc-g-graduate@mail.ubc.ca

The University of British Columbia

Departmen

Molecular Bio

"Charges in the hy

UBC is a global centre for research and teaching, consistently ranked among the 40

best universities in the world. Surrounded by the beauty of the Canadian West, UBC

embraces bold new ways of thinking that attract exceptional students and faculty.

It is a place where innovative ideas are nurtured in a gloablly connected research

community, providing unparalleled opportunites to learn, discover and contribute in

one’s own way. UBC is a place of mind.

Dr. Bertr


Advanced study and research in

cell & developmental biology with

flexibility to accommodate the

diverse backgrounds of today’s

students.

Areas of Research

Biotechnology

Cancer

Cell Communication

Cell Signaling

Diabetes

Inflammation

BioInformatics

Molecular Biology

Proteomics

Neurodevelopment

Transcriptomics

and many more....

Program Strengths

• Faculty from 18 departments and research centres throughout

Vancouver

• Cutting edge research facilities; Life Sciences Institute, Brain

Research Centre, Biomedical Research Centre, Michael Smith

Labs, Child & Family Research Institute, BC Cancer Research

Centre, Centre for Molecular Medicine and Therapeutics

• Currently 80 students from diverse backgrounds

• Fosters connections between research and learning

• Independent and collaborative research

• Prepares students for careers in academia and biotechnology

• Training in communication and critical thinking abilities

• A novel, interactive and team-taught suite of courses focus

on the contemporary scientific fundamentals of cell and

developmental biology

Cell & Developmental Biology

email: alan.jay@ubc.ca

web: cell.ubc.ca

Cell & Developmental Biology http://cell.ubc.ca


The Graduate Program in Cell & Developmental

Biology aims to enhance linkages and facilitate

research interactions between the larger community of cell and

developmental biologists in British Columbia, both in academia and in other

sectors by acting as a common forum for scholarly exchange in cell and

developmental biology through its seminar series, research retreats and other

educational activities.

Program Admission Requirements

Master’s Applicants

Normally, applicants for a master’s degree program must hold the

academic equivalent of a four-year bachelor’s degree from UBC

including one of the following:

•A minimum overall average in the B+ range (76% at UBC) in

third- and fourth-year courses.

•Academic standing with at least 12 credits of third- or fourth-year

courses in the A grade range (80% or higher at UBC) in the field of

study.

Doctoral Applicants

Applicants for the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) must have

completed one of the following requirements prior to admission:

1. A master’s degree (or equivalent) from an approved institution

with clear evidence of research ability or potential, or

2. A bachelor’s degree with one year of study in a master’s program

with 12 credits of first class average, of which 9 credits must be at

the 500-level or above and at least 9 credits must be of first class

standing.

Also:

• In exceptional cases, applicants who hold a bachelor’s degree

with an overall average in the A grade range and who demonstrate

advanced research ability may be granted direct admission to

a doctoral degree program on recommendation of the admitting

graduate program and approval of the Dean of the Faculty of

Graduate Studies. Students entering directly from a bachelor’s

degree must, during the first year of study, complete 12 credits

with a first class average, of which at least 9 credits must be at

the 500-level or above and at least 9 credits must be of first class

standing, to maintain registration as a doctoral student.

Grad School @ UBC

UBC offers over 130 master’s and

doctoral degree programs in nearly

every academic field imaginable.

Discover more. www.grad.ubc.ca

External Award Funding

High success rate in competitive student fellowship competitions.

2010-2011 34 awards $680,000

2009-2010 28 awards $515,000

2008-2009 14 awards total $211,000

Teaching Assistantships & Research Assistantships also available

Admission to Graduate Studies at UBC

Acceptance into the M.Sc. and Ph.D. programs is dependent

upon:

a) acceptance by a Faculty member willing to act as the

student’s research supervisor in the Graduate Program in

Cell & Developmental Biology;

b) meeting the requirements of the Cell & Developmental

Biology Graduate Program, and;

c) meeting the current admission requirements of The

Faculty of Graduate Studies. www.grad.ubc.ca

Contact

Alan Jay

Senior Program Assistant

alan.jay@ubc.ca

website: cell.ubc.ca

The University of British Columbia

UBC is a global centre for research and teaching, consistently ranked among the 40

best universities in the world. Surrounded by the beauty of the Canadian West, UBC

embraces bold new ways of thinking that attract exceptional students and faculty.

It is a place where innovative ideas are nurtured in a gloablly connected research

community, providing unparalleled opportunites to learn, discover and contribute in

one’s own way. UBC is a place of mind.


The mission of the Department of

Medical Genetics is to achieve excellence

in medical genetics teaching,

research, and patient care.

Areas of Research Interests

Chromosome Structure & Transmission

Epigenetics, Gene Regulation and Signal

Transduction

Developmental Genetics

Neurogenetics and Birth Defects

Genomics & Bioinformatics

Genetic Epidemiology & Human Gene Mapping

Immunogenetics

Pharmacogenomics

Proteomics

Psychiatric Genetics

Stem Cells & Gene Therapy

Ethics & Policy

Research Strengths & Facilities

The Medical Genetics Graduate Program consists of ~45 faculty that

use cutting edge genetic, epigenetic, genomic, and bioinformatic

methodologies to gain insight into diseases such as cancer, diabetes,

obesity, neurodegenerative and neurological disorders, and other

genetic diseases.

Individual labs conduct clinical and/or translational research, and

basic experimental research engaging a wide variety of approaches

using model organisms such as mice, flies (D. melanogaster), worms

(C. elegans), and yeast (S. cerevisiae).

Research is highly interactive and often involves local, national,

and/or international collaborations, further enriching the research

experience.

Prospective students with interests in the above areas of research

have an opportunity to pursue world class research in labs affiliated

with the Medical Genetics Graduate Program.

Research Facilities

BC Cancer Agency - Deeley Research Center

Biomedical Research Centre

Brain Research Centre

Centre for Applied Ethics

Centre for Molecular Medicine and Therapeutics

Child and Family Research Institute

Children’s and Women’s Health Centre of BC

Genome Sciences Centre

Life Sciences Institute

Michael Smith Laboratories

Networks of Centres of Excellence

Terry Fox Laboratory

Medical Genetics Graduate Program

Faculty of Medicine

email: medical.genetics@ubc.ca

web: medgen.ubc.ca

Medical Genetics http://medgen.ubc.ca


We seek to maintain the highest quality of

research training and teaching activities

and prepare graduate students in Medical Genetics with a broad

foundation in ethical and practical research, public speaking, and

academic journal and thesis-writing while contributing to the scientific

advance of genetic medicine.

Funding Support

The recommended minimum yearly stipend for all full time Medical

Genetics graduate students is $22,000.

Entrance awards (GSI) are given to the highest-ranked incoming

students.

Four Year Fellowships are awarded to the highest ranked current PhD

students.

Teaching Assistantships are also available.

Fast Facts

UBC is ranked the top university in Canada for Life Sciences

UBC offers internationally recognized degrees

• Clinical and basic research collaborations in Medical Genetics

• Average time for completion of MSc degree is 2-3 years

• Average time for completion of PhD degree is 5-6 years

• National Geographic named Vancouver one of the Top 10 Beach

Cities in the World

• Vancouver’s North Shore is considered one of the early birthplaces

of freestyle mountain biking

• Goal to earn the title of becoming the greenest city by 2020.

• Host city of the 2010 Olympic & Paralympic Winter Games

• More than 200 diverse parks including Vancouver’s most famous

park, Stanley Park, one of the largest urban parks in the worldq

Grad School @ UBC

UBC offers over 130 master’s and

doctoral degree programs in nearly

every academic field imaginable.

Discover more. www.grad.ubc.ca

Graduate Studies Admission

Relevant four-year Bachelor’s degree; and / or a Master’s

degree

First class grades in upper level genetics, biochemistry and

statistics (biometrics)

Research experience

Excellent references

Following successful acceptance to this Program, applicants

must secure a supervisor in Medical Genetics

The on-line application form for September 2012 opens

November 1, 2011

Contact

Cheryl Bishop

Graduate Program Assistant

medical.genetics@ubc.ca

website: medgen.ubc.ca

The University of British Columbia

UBC Point Grey Campus

UBC is a global centre for research and teaching, consistently ranked among the 40

best universities in the world. Surrounded by the beauty of the Canadian West, UBC

embraces bold new ways of thinking that attract exceptional students and faculty.

It is a place where innovative ideas are nurtured in a gloablly connected research

community, providing unparalleled opportunites to learn, discover and contribute in

one’s own way. UBC is a place of mind.


The Department of Microbiology & Immunology at

UBC strives to be a leader in research and

teaching in the areas of immunology, virology, host-pathogen

interactions, microbial physiology, and environmental

microbiology. M&I faculty are leaders in their fields,

and we provide our trainees with a supportive atmosphere

in which they can carry out highly competitive research

in modern facilities.

Fast Facts

UBC Life Sciences ranked number 1 in Canada

•The minimum stipend for graduates students

in M&I is $21,000/yr

•9 out of 10 Christmases are green in

Vancouver

•PhD students within M&I have their tuition

covered

•9 major ski resorts less than 5 hours away

•M&I has 94 graduate students from 20

different countries

UBC is ranked among the top 22 universities

in the world

•A Masters Degree takes 2-3 years and a PhD

5-6 years

•Active Microbiology & Immunology Graduate

Society (MIGS)

•Teaching assistantship opportunities available

•The majority of M&I labs are located within

the Life Sciences Centre or the Michael Smith

Labs on the UBC Point Grey Campus

Research Strengths & Facilities

Our faculty, graduate students, post-doctoral fellows, technicians, and

undergraduate research assistants work together in a collaborative

research environment to address key questions that impact human

health as well as global environmental processes.

Our research goals include:

• Overcoming the growing problem of antibiotic-resistant bacteria

by developing new vaccines and by developing new types of antibacterial

drugs that target processes critical for bacterial growth,

survival, and infection

• Developing new approaches for combating food-borne bacterial

infections

• Understanding viral infection and replication mechanisms in order

to develop new anti-viral drugs for preventing and treating pandemic

flu, West Nile Virus, Hepatitis C Virus, HIV, and other viral diseases

• Uncovering the origins of inflammatory bowel diseases

• Understanding how viral infections may trigger autoimmune

diseases

• Mobilizing the immune system to attack cancer cells and to combat

viral and bacterial infections

• Understanding how blood cell cancers arise and developing

strategies for limiting the dissemination of these cancers throughout

the body

• Understanding how microbial communities and their interconnected

metabolic pathways influence global nutrient cycles and global

climate

• Using microbes to convert forest biomass into energy and

economically useful products

• Identifying markers of microbial biodiversity and nutrient cycling

that will lead to improved, environmentally sustainable forestry

practices

To carry out this research, our faculty and trainees make use

of cutting-edge facilities for flow cytometry, structural biology,

microscopy, proteomics and genomics as well as the Facility for

Infectious Disease and Epidemic Research (FINDER).

Microbiology & Immunology

email: micbgrad@interchange.ubc.ca

web: www.microbiology.ubc.ca

Microbiology & Immunology www.microbiology.ubc.ca


The M&I philosophy is to discover and disseminate

knowledge, to foster a positive relationship

with lab members, and to encourage and inspire

bright young scientific minds to harness

their creative inspirations and focus

them with the scientific method.

Faculty & Research Areas:

Microbiology

Tom Beatty: the gene transfer agent; photosynthetic pigment-protein

complexes

Julian Davies: antibiotic resistance mode of action and natural function

Lindsay Eltis: bacterial degradation of aromatic compounds and steroids,

including lignin & cholesterol

Steven Hallam: microbial systems ecology and functional metagenomic

screens

Bill Mohn: ecology of forest soil and gut microbial communities; bacterial

steroid metabolism

Michael Murphy: mechanism of iron homeostasis in pathogenic bacteria

John Smit: biotechnology applications using the S-layer of Caulobacter

Curtis Suttle: virus diversity and the role of viruses in aquatic systems

Immunology

Ninan Abraham: cytokine IL-7 in T and B cell development and cancer

Michael Gold: B cell activation, cytoskeletal regulation, and tumor

metastasis

Ken Harder: understanding the role of phagocytes in intestinal

inflammation and cancer

Marc Horwitz: virus infections, interventions and autoimmune and

infectious disease

Wilf Jefferies: antigen presentation and immunotherapies

Pauline Johnson: regulation of immune responses by CD44 and CD45

Georgia Perona-Wright: cytokine control of infection

Gerry Weeks: the role of RAS subfamily in dictyostelium

Pathogenesis

Rachel Fernandez: molecular pathogenesis of Bordetella pertussis:

biogenesis & immunomodulation of the outer membrane

Brett Finlay: molecular mechanisms of bacterial infectious disease

Erin Gaynor: molecular pathogenesis of foodborne human pathogens

Robert Hancock: peptide immunomodulators, genomics, antibiotic uptake

& resistance, biofilms

Martin Hirst: epigenetic modification and its relevance to human disease

Francois Jean: developing novel antiviral therapeutics against human

pathogenic viruses

Jim Kronstad: fungal biology: pathogenesis, morphogenesis, functional

genomics, proteomics

Charles Thompson: regulation of bacterial gene expression associated with

tuberculosis

Grad School @ UBC

UBC offers over 130 master’s and

doctoral degree programs in nearly

every academic field imaginable.

Discover more. www.grad.ubc.ca

Infection,

Inflammation

& Immunity

Research

Group

Bacterial

Adaptation

& Response

Networks

Research

Group

Graduate Studies Admission

UBC Faculty of Graduate Studies has common minimum

academic requirements. The Department of Microbiology &

Immunology requires:

• applicants to secure a research supervisor

• minimum undergraduate grades of 76% or higher or

equivalent

• 3 reference letters

• GRE/TOEFL exam scores may be required

Postdoctoral Fellows

UBC Microbiology & Immunology is home to over 50 talented

PDFs from all over the world. Our talented alumni go on to

positions in academia, industry and medicine.

Contact

Darlene Birkenhead

Graduate Program Coordinator

micbgrad@interchange.ubc.ca

website: www.microbiology.ubc.ca

The University of British Columbia

UBC is a global centre for research and teaching, consistently ranked among the 40

best universities in the world. Surrounded by the beauty of the Canadian West, UBC

embraces bold new ways of thinking that attract exceptional students and faculty.

It is a place where innovative ideas are nurtured in a gloablly connected research

community, providing unparalleled opportunites to learn, discover and contribute in

one’s own way. UBC is a place of mind.


The Department of Zoology at UBC is renowned

for its research in a variety of modern biological

sciences, including ecology, evolution,

comparative physiology, neurobiology, and

cell & developmental biology.

Research Strengths

From DNA, to proteins, to cells, to organ systems, to whole organisms and to communities, the

Department of Zoology offers a variety of opportunities to study life sciences. While the program

topics are wide-ranging, the graduate program itself has existed for more then 30 years and has wellestablished

procedures that guide students through MSc or PhD degrees. Courses are tailored to each

of the sub-disciplines and the lab facilities for all subgroups are ‘state-of-the-art’.

Areas of Research Interests

Epigenetics & Gene Regulation

Cell & Developmental Biology

Neurobiology & Spinal Cord Research

Genomics & Evolutionary Genetics

Comparative Physiology

Marine Biology

Adaptive Response to the Environment

Biodiversity & Systematics

Evolution Theory

Field Ecology & Ecological Theory

Conservation Biology

Research Facilities

Bamfield Marine Sciences Centre

The Biodiversity Research Centre

Beaty Biodiversity Museum

Blusson Spinal Cord Centre

C. elegans Genetics Facility

Experimental Ponds

Life Sciences Institute

Malcolm Knapp Research Forest

Marine/Freshwater Aquatic Facilities

UBC BioImaging Facility

Zoology Computing Unit

Researchers in the Cell Biology subgroup are located in the Life

Sciences Institute. This extraordinary facility offers open floor plan

labs organized in thematic Research Groups (RG). We are members

of 3 Research Groups: Cell & Developmental Biology, Infection,

Inflammation and Immunity, and the Bacterial Adaptation and

Response Networks. LSI researchers use model systems to study

fundamental principles in cell and developmental biology. The LSI has

cutting-edge research infrastructure established in partnership with

departments and LSI research groups.

Researchers in International Collaboration on Repair Discoveries

(ICORD) are located within the Blusson Spinal Cord Centre. ICORD

research extends from cellular to community level projects that

address questions concerning the promotion of improved functional

outcomes and quality of life for people with spinal cord injury.

The Comparative Physiology subgroup is located in newly

refurbished laboratories in the Biological Sciences building. These

outstanding facilities are also based on the open lab concept. The

mission of this group focuses on understanding the ability of complex

organisms to adapt to extreme environments and how this influences

fundamental biochemical and physiological processes.

The Ecology and Evolution subgroup is located in the new Biodiversity

Research Centre (BRC). The mission of this group is to understand

and conserve the diversity of life on earth through research,

education, and outreach. Specifically we strive to understand the

spectrum of biological diversity, its evolution, and its preservation

through research at all levels, from genes to ecosystems. The BRC is

also home to the NSERC-CREATE Biodiversity Research: Integrative

Training & Education (BRITE) training program. Funding is available

for biodiversity scientists at all levels, undergraduate, graduate, and

post-doctoral. The BRC includes the Beaty Biodiversity Museum,

which contains over 2 million specimens of plants, insects, fishes,

birds and mammals displayed in a 20,000 sq ft exhibit, along with

teaching labs and the largest blue whale skeleton on display in

Canada.

Department of Zoology

email: gradsec@zoology.ubc.ca

web: www.zoology.ubc.ca

Zoology http://www.zoology.ubc.ca


Zoology at UBC...

From gene regulation, cell & developmental biology

to physiology, field ecology and evolution.

A diverse menu of choices for graduate study in the life sciences.

Cell and Developmental Biology

Investigates the molecular and genetic bases of development and

cellular function.

LSI:

Ninan Abraham

Vanessa Auld

Hugh Brock

Michael Gordon

Thomas Grigliatti

Linda Matsuuchi

Don Moerman

Nelly Pante

Rosemary Redfield

Jane Roskams

ICORD:

Matt Ramer

John Steeves

Wolfram Tetzlaff

Comparative Physiology

Investigates many aspects of animal physiology from a

comparative perspective, particularly those mechanisms

underlying adaptive responses to environmental constraints.

Douglas Altshuler

Robert Blake

Colin Brauner

David Close

Tony Farrell

William Milsom

Grad School @ UBC

UBC offers over 130 master’s and

doctoral degree programs in nearly

every academic field imaginable.

Discover more. www.grad.ubc.ca

Jeffrey Richards

Patricia Schulte

Robert Shadwick

Graduate Studies Admission

UBC Faculty of Graduate Studies establishes common

minimum academic requirements (www.grad.ubc.ca). There

are four stages to admission to the Zoology Graduate Program

at UBC:

• find and contact a potential supervisor

• review by the Zoology Graduate Committee

• acceptance by a supervisor

• final approval and offer of admission from the UBC

Faculty of Graduate Studies

Contact

Alice Liou

Graduate Program Coordinator

gradsec@zoology.ubc.ca

The University of British Columbia

Ecology and Evolution

Ecology blends field ecology and natural history with

ecological theory and conservation biology. Evolution

encompasses evolutionary ecology, evolutionary genetics,

conservation genetics, theory, and systematics.

Leticia Avilés

Martin Adamson

Amy Angert

Jedediah Brodie

Gregory Crutsinger

Michael Doebeli

Christopher Harley

Darren Irwin

Jill Jankowski

Brian Leander

Wayne Maddison

Sarah (Sally) Otto

Mary O’Connor

Daniel Pauly

Tony Pitcher

Dolph Schluter

Diane Srivastava

Eric (Rick) Taylor

Michael Whitlock

UBC is a global centre for research and teaching, consistently ranked among the 40

best universities in the world. Surrounded by the beauty of the Canadian West, UBC

embraces bold new ways of thinking that attract exceptional students and faculty.

It is a place where innovative ideas are nurtured in a gloablly connected research

community, providing unparalleled opportunites to learn, discover and contribute in

one’s own way. UBC is a place of mind.

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