FUJIFILM X-Pro1 Photographes's Guidebook

T.A.J.

FUJIFILM X-Pro1 Photographer's Guidebook


Professional tool X-Pro1

When you wrap your fingers around the grip of the FUJIFILM X-Pro1, your thumb supports the back

of the camera while your index finger rests lightly on the shutter button. Your middle finger touches the

viewfinder selector on the front of the camera and the tip of your thumb is just on the command dial

on its back. You have only to slide your thumb up a little to use the exposure compensation dial. Being

able to use most of the camera controls without changing my grip or taking my eye from the viewfinder

leaves me smiling. In the course of their development, digital cameras seem to have moved away from

the basic photographic technique of looking through the viewfinder, but looking through the X-Pro1’s

hybrid viewfinder has made me aware once again not only of the importance of framing pictures in the

viewfinder, but of the pleasures of framing pictures in the viewfinder. The X-Pro1 really communicates

the manufacturer’s drive and passion.

Yoichi Sone


GalleryPage 5

Photograph of Macau taken by Yoichi Sone with X-Pro1

The inspiration

It's just inspiration from Macau

Section The Allure of the X-Pro1 Page 17

The X-Trans CMOS Sensor

In Search of Superior Optical Performance and Ease of Use

Getting the Most from Lenses with the X Mount

Section The X-Pro1 Page 24

The Hybrid Multi Viewfinder / The Optical Viewfinder (OVF)

The Hybrid Multi Viewfinder / The Electronic Viewfinder (EVF)

The Viewfinder and the LCD Monitor

Switching Between the EVF and OVF

Display Customization

A High-Performance LCD Monitor

Manual Focus

Saving and Modifying Custom Settings

The Function (Fn) Button / The DRIVE Button/ The AE Button/

The AF Button


Section Fun with the X-Pro1 Page 35

Film Simulation Function: Reversal Films

Section Interview in Macau Page 72

Photographer Yoichi Sone’s Macau Photo Diary

Film Simulation Function: Color Neg. Film /Monochrome/

Sepia

Film Simulation Bracketing

Film Simulation: PROVIA

Film Simulation: Velvia

Film Simulation: ASTIA

Film Simulation: PRO Neg.Hi / PRO Neg.Std

Film Simulation: Monochrome

Film Simulation: Sepia

Multiple Exposure Shooting / ISO/Continuous Shooting/

White Balance /Processing RAW image on the camera

Recording HD Movies

Section VI Accessories Page 78

M mount adapter

Accessories

How to use

RAW FILE CONVERTER EX

powered by SILKYPIX®

Retouch: Color/RAW Processing for Richer Colors

Retouch: Black-and-White/RAW Processing for “Presence”:

Creating the Effect of Prints on

Monochrome Photographic Paper

Section XF Lenses Page 57

The long history of Fujinon Lens

Fujinon Interchangeable lenses

XF18mmF2 R

XF35mmF1.4 R

XF60mmF2.4 R Macro


Gallery

Photograph of Macau taken by Yoichi Sone with X-Pro1


Gallery

Yoichi Sone

The inspiration

It's just inspiration from Macau


Shooting Data

Review


This shot was taken from a room on the 14th floor. In addition to being taken through a window, this scene was shot under cloudy

skies, both of which conspire to make colors less saturated, and this motivated my decision to choose the Velvia film simulation option.

Film simulation makes for a meatier photograph than could have been achieved with a film camera, which in any case would not have

allowed me to match my film to the subject of the moment or alter ISO sensitivity at will.

Shooting Data

Review


Shooting Data

Review


When it comes to snapshots, quantity beats quality: you walk around ceaselessly and taking pictures continually until you naturally

arrive at the point where quantity has conquered quality. Having come across a group of people washing coins, I set film simulation to

Velvia and took a picture while watching. Without losing vividness, Velvia has captured facial expressions that otherwise would have

appeared flat as a result of backlighting.

Shooting Data

Review


Shooting Data

Review


A flower had fallen on the roof of this new Japanese car in the aftermath of a squall. Overall the colors were muted, so I adjusted all

color settings for maximum vividness: COLOR > HIGH, SHADOW TONE > HARD, and FILM SIMULATION > Velvia/VIVID.

Shooting Data

Review


Shooting Data

Review


When I told her I wanted to take her picture, the woman smiled shyly and turned away, but the child watched me with profound

interest and a serious gaze. This had been a cloudy, muggy, humid day, so I choose Velvia to prevent colors being washed out. The

splashes of red stretching from the left to the center of the image are rendered vividly, giving the picture a sense of unity. In my

opinion, Velvia is an excellent match for cloudy weather.

Shooting Data

Review


Shooting Data

Review


After less than a second’s eye-contact, the women were ready to reward me with wonderful expressions the moment I readied the

camera and took a picture. The method used to capture this moment was pan focus achieved by selecting manual focus and an aperture

of f/8 and leaving focus fixed at 2m. The sun was strong that day, so I chose ASTIA film simulation for gentle skin tones. I had

formerly avoided ASTIA due to a mistaken impression from my film camera days that it was a soft-toned film, and I had no idea that it

offered such excellent color reproduction.

Shooting Data

Review


Shooting Data

Review


Happening to glance down as I crossed a pedestrian overpass, I was struck by the sight of a woman looking at her cell phone. I

immediately snapped a shot with ISO raised to 6400. The reliability of the X-Pro1’s enhanced sensitivity is noteworthy. And just when

I was thinking of taking another shot, the woman left. The shot may have been the result of a one-in-a-million chance, but when I

viewed the picture in the LCD monitor, I was struck by how lovely the street corner looked.

Shooting Data

Review


Shooting Data

Review


When taking snapshots with a wide-angle lens, stop aperture down for sharp results. This piece of photographic lore has been handed

down over generations, but in fact another legitimate use for wide-angle lenses is to deliberately choose a wide aperture for dynamic

shots with a sense of immediacy. I was using an XF18mm lens, so I could have stopped aperture down to get the whole frame in focus,

but instead I went for a low angle and wide aperture to express the details of the tiles, the metallic feel of the decorations on the railing,

and my own awareness of myself as an observer. The sense of immanent movement I get from this picture even now, its ability to

suggest that kind of atmosphere, is the result of this overturning of convention.

Shooting Data

Review


Shooting Data

Review


After attaching an XF18mm lens and disabling autofocus, I embarked on the night streets with my camera set for manual focus. I left

focus fixed at 2m and set film simulation to Velvia. On leaving the narrow side streets for the main drag, I noticed a youth with the air

of a young Rambo and took his picture as I passed, shooting from the hip without the viewfinder.

Shooting Data

Review


Shooting Data

Review


The first film I ever bought was Fuji Neopan SS. Having just been turned on to photography, I spent half a year working during

the day and taking photographs at night. Even pushed to +2, SS film was unable to capture night scenes in the city, so I switched to

ISO 200 SSS film, which could be pushed to +2 for a exposure index of ISO 800. I remember taking quite a few photographs at this

setting, which when combined with a wide-angle lens was adequate for night photography. Locations look different in the daytime

than they do at night due to the difference between natural light (sunlight) and artificial light, which is due not only to the differing

natures of the two sources but also to their position, and the increase in sensitivity is needed if film speed is to fill the gap. In the film

era, ISO 800 was the point where results might start to become grainy, and, conscious as we were of the need to avoid grain, we had to

use as slow a film as possible even if it meant putting up with some camera blur. The only way to satisfy these criteria was to choose a

fast lens, making an aperture of f/2 essential for wide-angle lenses. The XF 18 mm has an aperture of f/2; the default ISO sensitivity for

the X-Pro1 is ISO 200. I hope you can appreciate the magnificence of this shot, taken with sensitivity pushed to +2.

Shooting Data

Review


Shooting Data

Review

Yoichi Sone

Yoichi Sone was born in Kawaguchi, Saitama, in 1953, and is a graduate of

Hongo Senior High School. After dropping out of the French-language program

at the Athénéé Français, he spent three semesters at the workshop of the

Moriyama Daido film school, starting in

1976. After spending time as an assistant

to commercial photographers, he struck

out on his own in 1979 and has worked as

a freelancer ever since. He is an instructor

at the Ginza Photo School and hosts the

Sonë School Workshops. He supervises the

photography coterie magazine “DRUG”.

http://ys-ode.net/


Hearing joyful voices coming from the back of a deserted street, I turned around to see three boys pass in front of me, one of them

trying to run with another on his back. I took a photo on the spot. It was but a brief event, but the sense of having shared this time

with them made me happy. One can never predict when one will be blessed with such opportunities, which might be called decisive,

but there is always some warning. The ability to detect such warnings is a test of the photographer’s sensibility.

Shooting Data

Review

Yoichi Sone

Yoichi Sone was born in Kawaguchi, Saitama, in 1953, and is a graduate of

Hongo Senior High School. After dropping out of the French-language program

at the Athénéé Français, he spent three semesters at the workshop of the

Moriyama Daido film school, starting in

1976. After spending time as an assistant

to commercial photographers, he struck

out on his own in 1979 and has worked as

a freelancer ever since. He is an instructor

at the Ginza Photo School and hosts the

Sonë School Workshops. He supervises the

photography coterie magazine “DRUG”.

http://ys-ode.net/


The Allure of the X-Pro1


The Allure of the X-Pro1



Large-Format APS-C Sensor Selected for High Image Quality

People think that the physics of image sensors implies that the

bigger they are, the closer they are to the desired image quality,

but a larger size also has implications for body design that

result in poor handling and other problems. The APS-C size was

adopted for the X-Pro1 as representing the best balance between

these competing factors. Its area is more than ten times that of

the 1/2.33-inch sensors used in most compact digital cameras; at

this size, each pixel can perform its role of reliably capturing the

light from the lens and passing it to the image engine as a highquality,

low-noise signal.

The Plusses and Minuses of Moiré and Optical Low-Pass

Filters

Digital cameras that use large sensors provide sharp images

thanks to increased pixel pitch. Unfortunately, moiré is more

likely in close-ups of cloth and in shots of other subjects featuring

regular geometric patterns. To counter this, most cameras use

optical low-pass filters, a filter placed between the lens and the

sensor to reduce the occurrence of moiré by defocusing fine

details. Optical low-pass filters prevent lenses achieving their full

potential, no matter how good their resolution.


The Allure of the X-Pro1




New Dimensions in Detail Inspired by the Design of Photographic Film

Color filters attached to the image sensor are arranged in a regular array, causing moiré due to

mutualinterference in shots of objects featuring regular patterns. At FUJIFILM our attention was drawn

to the fact that moiré does not occur in pictures taken with silver-nitrate film. Film grain is distributed

randomly, preventing interference with regular patterns. Our attempt to replicate this random distribution

is the “new color-filter array”, which is decidedly “film camera” in its inspiration. By removing the source

of moiré, we also removed the need for a low-pass filter, with the result that the X-Pro1 offers a level of

fidelity far beyond that of other image sensors with the same number of pixels.


The Allure of the X-Pro1



In Search of Superior Image Quality and Ease of Use

With its all-new lenses, lens mount, and sensor, the X-Pro1 represents

the pursuit of top image quality and ease of use unhindered by existing

concepts and standards. The design of “XF” X-system lenses is true to

the following concepts:

Optical fidelity is maintained from the center to the edges of the image

for sharp detail in every corner of the frame .

Maximum aperture is as fast as possible for greater expressive power.

Compact and easy to carry

Aperture Diaphragm Blades Designed with Image Quality in Mind

Typically, each of the blades in a multi-bladed aperture has the same

rounding, so that when aperture is stopped down, out-of-focus light

sources are blurred into polygonal shapes that make it hard to get good

bokeh. XF lenses feature a “rounded aperture” design in which the

blades are carefully adjusted to create a nearly circular aperture at all

f-stops. Molds are used for blades that, unlike blades produced by the

more common press manufacturing process, can be virtually any shape

in cross-section, minimizing flare and ghosting caused by lens-internal

reflections.


The Allure of the X-Pro1



Aperture Ring Supports 1⁄3 EV Stops for Flexible Exposure

Aperture is adjusted using a ring on the lens barrel, just as in traditional

cameras, and can be fine-tuned in increments as small as 1⁄3 EV for

photographers who pay close attention to slight differences in exposure

or depth of field. Increments are etched close together, reducing the

amount the ring must be rotated to change aperture with each stop:

for each 1⁄3 stop, the ring is rotated four degrees. Full steps are

delineated by a stronger “click” than 1⁄3 stops, a design that makes it

easy for photographers to directly feel changes to aperture through their

fingertips.

Size, Weight, and Feel All Targeted for Top Image Quality and Free

Expression

XF lenses are of course designed to deliver superlative image quality,

but more than this, with their aluminum barrels and exteriors, they have

been designed with appearance, quality, and feel in mind. The more the

camera is used, the clearer the intentions of the designers with respect

to such points as how the camera feels in the hand during framing

and focusing, and this no doubt is what makes it a true professional

photographic tool.


The Allure of the X-Pro1



Unique X Mount Newly Developed to Increase Lens Optical Fidelity

The X-Pro1 acknowledges no restraint in pursuit of high image quality.

Central to this pursuit is the “X mount”.

Take, for example, single-lens reflex cameras, which require a large

flange-back distance due to the presence of a mirror assembly between

the sensor and the lens. This makes it difficult to design wide-angle

lenses that preserve adequate optical fidelity at the edges of the frame.

In contrast, the X mount, with a flange-back distance of 17.7 mm, makes

reduced flange-back distance its first priority. In addition, a wide opening

allows the lens to be set back another 7.5 mm or so. This reduces the

lens back-focus distance, preventing loss of peripheral illumination and

ensuring high resolution right to the edges of the frame. This ingenious

mount design also allows the rear lens element to be made larger,

reducing the overall size of the lens.








Down to the Last Anti-Flex Screw, Mount Design Spares Nothing in

Pursuit of Thinness

The X mount is extremely thin, having been kept to a thickness of about

2.5 mm to reduce the flange-back distance. The number of screws used

to ensure mount strength has consequently been increased to six from

the more usual four. They are positioned to keep the both edges of each

bayonet slot in place, combining thinness and strength while maintaining

focus precision.


The Allure of the X-Pro1



New Shutter System Combines Reduced Shutter Lag with High Frame Rate

The focal-pane shutters in mirrorless cameras typically operate in the following

sequence:

1. The front curtain opens.

2. The camera captures the live view image.

3. The front curtain closes briefly when shutter button is pressed.

4. The front curtain opens to create the exposure.

5. The rear curtain closes.

6. The front and rear curtains are charged and the process repeats from Step 1.

While the X-Pro1 uses this sequence in single-frame advance mode, during burst

shooting Steps 1 to 3 are omitted after the first shot, increasing the frame rate.

Lenses’ Full Potential Realized by Electronically Transmitting All Lens Data

to the Camera

Mount control usually includes mechanical processes such as autofocus and

aperture adjustment. The ten signal pins in the X mount connect the lens drive

to the camera body, where it is controlled electronically. This simple and reliable

method makes it easy to optimize image quality. Another feature of the X mount

is that it gives the camera body access to high-level optical data from lenses of all

types. This information is used to optimize image processing for high resolution,

even illumination, and reduced chromatic aberration.


The X-Pro1


The Hybrid Multi Viewfinder



The attraction of optical viewfinders is that they provide a clear optical image with sharp bright brackets

superimposed to indicate the edges of the frame. The clear image in the viewfinder awakens the joy of

taking photographs.

Magnification lens

Prism


WIDE

LCD panel

Variable-Magnification Viewfinder

Viewfinder magnification and the size of the bright frame

change automatically to match the focal length of XF

lenses.

*35 mm [135] format equivalent

Changing Viewfinder Magnification

Viewfinder magnification can be changed by holding

the viewfinder selector up for a few seconds.

Magnification lens

Change magnification Change magnification

STANDARD



TIPS 1 TIPS 2


The Hybrid Multi Viewfinder



The attraction of optical viewfinders is that they provide a clear optical image with sharp bright brackets

superimposed to indicate the edges of the frame. The clear image in the viewfinder awakens the joy of

taking photographs.

TIPS 1

Magnification lens

Prism

Parallax Adustment


LCD panel

WIDE

Parallax correction

takes effect when

the shutter button

is pressed halfway.

Variable-Magnification Viewfinder

Viewfinder magnification

Normal

and the

OVF

size of

display

the bright frame

change automatically to match the focal length of XF

lenses.

*35 mm [135] format equivalent

Changing Viewfinder Magnification

Viewfinder magnification can be changed by holding

the viewfinder selector up for a few seconds.

OVF display adusted for parallax

Magnification lens

Change magnification Change magnification

STANDARD



TIPS 1 TIPS 2


The Hybrid Multi Viewfinder



The attraction of optical viewfinders is that they provide a clear optical image with sharp bright brackets

superimposed to indicate the edges of the frame. The clear image in the viewfinder awakens the joy of

taking photographs.

Magnification lens

Prism

TIPS 2


LCD panel

WIDE

Variable-Magnification Viewfinder

Viewfinder magnification and the size of the bright frame

change automatically to match the focal length of XF

lenses.

The OVFs Appeal

The appeal of the OVF is the sharp optical image in which

both background and foreground are in focus. This allows

you to observe the entire the scene and make the most of

every opportunity for a photograph. You can also view the

area outside the bright frame while finding for the perfect *35 mm [135] format equivalent

composition.

Changing Viewfinder Magnification

Viewfinder magnification can be changed by holding

the viewfinder selector up for a few seconds.

Magnification lens

Change magnification Change magnification

STANDARD



TIPS 1 TIPS 2


The Hybrid Multi Viewfinder

The Electronic Viewfinder (EVF)


The X-Pro1’s EVF offers 100% frame coverage; unlike other

cameras with poor frame coverage, there is no need to

worry that photographs may include objects not visible in the

viewfinder. Full frame coverage is particularly important for

macro photography, which demands precise framing. The

high-resolution, approximately 1,440k-dots, 0.47-inch display

provides clear images during both live subject preview and

post-shooting image review.

Preview the Effects of Exposure Compensation, Film Simulation, and Other Settings

The EVF lets you preview the effects of camera settings before shooting. When the exposure compensation dial is rotated to adjust exposure compensation,

for example, the effect is immediately visible. You can also accurately preview the effects of each film simulation option.

Exposure

preview


F i l m s i m u l a t i o n

preview


The Hybrid Multi Viewfinder

The Viewfinder and the LCD Monitor


In addition to its optical and electronic viewfinders (OVF and EVF), the X-Pro1

features an LCD monitor on the back of the camera (see page 30). Display selection is

performed by pressing the VIEW MODE button.

Choose a display that matches your shooting style and choice of subject.

Choosing Between the Electronic Viewfinder (EVF),

Optical Viewfinder (OVF), and LCD Monitor

Eye sensor

Press VIEW MODE

to cycle through

the displays.

LCD Monitor Only Viewfinder Only Automatic Display Selection

Choose this option when shooting movies and

on other occasions when you want to frame

pictures in the LCD monitor. It also reduces

power consumption. The viewfinder functions

as an OVF with no shooting information display.

Choose this option to frame photographs with

your eye to the viewfinder while holding the

camera securely.

For information on switching between the OVF

and EVF, see page 28.

When the eye sensor detects that you have

put your eye to the viewfinder, the LCD monitor

turns off and the OVF or EVF turns on. Display

switches back to the LCD monitor when you

take your eye from the viewfinder.


The Hybrid Multi Viewfinder

Switching Between the EVF and OVF


The X-Pro1 features a viewfinder selector that can be used to switch

instantly between the OVF and EVF displays. The selector can be

operated without taking your eye from the viewfinder, allowing you to take

advantage of the features of either display according to your photographic

objectives.

Each time the viewfinder selector is raised, the camera switches instantly between

the OVF and EVF. The selector can be operated without taking your eye from the

viewfinder, allowing you to switch displays without missing a shot. A hallmark X-Pro1

technique is to first view the area around the frame in the OVF and compose a shot,

then switch to the EVF and add polish your artistic conception with precision framing

adjustments.

NOTE

EVF

OVF


Optical viewfinder (OVF) Viewfinder selector Electronic viewfinder (EVF)


The Hybrid Multi Viewfinder

Display Customization


Choosing the Inform ation Displayed in the OVF, EVF, and LCD Monitor

At shipment, the OVF and EVF/LCD monitor are configured for full display and show information on a wide variety of settings. The X-Pro1

does, however, let you choose the items displayed. For example, if you want a simple display that lets you concentrate on framing and angle

while composing photographs, you can choose a display that features a bare minimum of shooting information.

Press MENU/OK and select "DISP.

CUSTOM SETTING" in shooting menu

Tab 4.

Select OVF or EVF/LCD.

The items that appear in the display are

indicated by check marks. Highlight items

and press MENU/OK to add or remove check

marks from the desired items.

Items

Full display Histogram hidden Most items hidden


TIPS 1 TIPS 2


The Hybrid Multi Viewfinder

Display Customization


Choosing the Inform ation Displayed in the OVF, EVF, and LCD Monitor

At shipment, the OVF and EVF/LCD monitor are configured for full display and show information on a wide variety of settings. The X-Pro1

does, however, let you choose the items displayed. For example, if you want a simple display that lets you concentrate on framing and angle

while composing photographs, you can choose a display that features a bare minimum of shooting information.

TIPS 2

Framing uideline

The “FRAMING GUIDELINE” option in Tab 4 of the shooting menu offers a choice of GRID 9, GRID

24, and HD FRAMING. The “grid” options are a very effective aid to composition when, for example,

framin photographs with the subjects arranged along a diagonal.

Press MENU/OK and select "DISP.

Select OVF or EVF/LCD.

The items that appear in the display are

CUSTOM SETTING" in shooting RID menu

RID 2

HD FRAMIINindicated by check marks. Highlight items

Tab 4.

A three-by-three grid.

A six-by-four grid.

Frame HD (16:9) and pictures press MENU/OK in to add or remove check

the crop shown marks by lines from at the desired items.

top and bottom the display.

Items

Full display Histogram hidden Most items hidden


TIPS 1 TIPS 2


The Hybrid Multi Viewfinder

Display Customization


Choosing the Inform ation Displayed in the OVF, EVF, and LCD Monitor

At shipment, the OVF and EVF/LCD monitor are configured for full display and show information on a wide variety of settings. The X-Pro1

does, however, let you choose the items displayed. For example, if you want a simple display that lets you concentrate on framing and angle

while composing photographs, you can choose a display that features a bare minimum of shooting information.

Items

Items Available for Display

Press MENU/OK and select "DISP.

CUSTOM SETTING" in shooting menu

Tab 4.

Select OVF or EVF/LCD.

The items that appear in the display are

indicated by check marks. Highlight items

and press MENU/OK to add or remove check

marks from the desired items.

Items

Full display Histogram hidden Most items hidden


TIPS 1 TIPS 2


LCD A High-Performance LCD Monitor


Special Coating on

High-Resolution

(Approximately 1,230-k dots)

Monitor Has Reflectivity

Under 0.2%

At default settings, the LCD monitor functions

as a shooting information display. Standard and

custom displays can be viewed by pressing the

DISP/BACK button.

No coating

X-Pro1

The monitor features a high-quality

anti-reflective coating. The highly

water-repellent, stain-resistant acrylic

lets you enjoy a clear image even

when you are shooting outdoors in

bright sunlight.

The DISP / BACK Button

The display in shooting and playback modes

changes each time the button is pressed.

TIPS 1 TIPS 2


LCD A High-Performance LCD Monitor


At default settings, the LCD monitor functions

as a shooting information display. Standard and

custom displays can be viewed by pressing the

DISP/BACK button.

The DISP / BACK Button

The display in shooting and playback modes

changes each time the button is pressed.

TIPS 2

No coating

Silent Mode

X-Pro1

Press and hold the DISP/BACK button to enable “SILENT

MODE”; press again to disable.


The AF-assist illuminator turns off.

All control beeps are muted.

Sound is muted during movie playback.

Note: Silent mode can not be enabled during movie playback.

Special Coating on

High-Resolution

(Approximately 1,230-k dots)

Monitor Has Reflectivity

Under 0.2%

The monitor features a high-quality

anti-reflective coating. The highly

water-repellent, stain-resistant acrylic

lets you enjoy a clear image even

when you are shooting outdoors in

bright sunlight.


TIPS 1 TIPS 2


Manual FocusMF


In manual focus mode, focus is adjusted

manually by rotating the lens focus ring. To

select manual focus mode, rotate the focus

mode selector on the front of the camera to

M. Although autofocus (AF) is adequate in

most situations, manual focus can be used

for subjects that autofocus can’t handle

or in circumstances that call for deliberate

defocusing. The designers of the XF lenses

for the X-Pro1 have paid special attention to

the “feel” of the focus ring, and we hope that

you will take the opportunity to experience

how it has been delicately tuned to be neither

too loose or too tight.

Shooting Data

Review

XF35mmF1.4 R

Program AE (F11, 1/420 sec ) 23 EV

White balance: FINE

ISO: 200

Film simulation: Velvia/VIVID


TIPS 1


Manual FocusMF


In manual focus mode, focus is adjusted

manually by rotating the lens focus ring. To

select manual focus mode, rotate the focus

mode selector on the front of the camera to

M. Although autofocus (AF) is adequate in

most situations, manual focus can be used

for subjects that autofocus can’t handle

or in circumstances that call for deliberate

defocusing. The designers of the XF lenses

for the X-Pro1 have paid special attention to

the “feel” of the focus ring, and we hope that

you will take the opportunity to experience

how it has been delicately tuned to be neither

too loose or too tight.


TIPS 1

Shooting Data

Review

While digital cameras are ready to shoot as soon as they are turned on, film cameras in the days before extensive

automation required that a certain sequence of operations be performed before pictures could be taken. Users of early

SLR cameras had to open the camera, install film and then, after finding their subject, set aperture and shutter speed,

put an eye to the viewfinder and focus, advance the film, and finally release the shutter. This process, which seemed

perfectly natural at the time, was in effect a kind of ritual that had to be performed before pictures could be taken, a

connected series of actions with a photograph as its result. A key element of this process connecting it to the choice

of subject, the genesis of any photograph, was the act of looking through the viewfinder and focusing. In contrast to

traditional rangefinder cameras with two separate optical systems operating in parallel, the X-Pro1’s hybrid electronic

viewfinder lets you experience the style of focusing used in SLR cameras, and we hope you will take advantage of this

opportunity to experience manual focus photography as it was meant to be.


Manual FocusMF


Checking Focus

Focus distance (red bar)

Depth of field (white bar)

W h i l e i n g e n e r a l f o c u s c a n b e

determined by an inspection of the

image in the viewfinder, the manual

focus indicator can also be used as

guide. Focus distance is indicated by

the red bar, while the white bar shows

the field depth. The focus distance can

be displayed in meters or feet, with

the selection made using the “FOCUS

SCALE UNITS” option in the set-up

menu.

Using Autofocus in Manual Focus Mode:

The AE-L/AF-L Button

Zooming in on the electronic viewfinder or LCD monitor

Even in manual focus mode, you can press the AE-L/AF-L button

to instantly focus using autofocus. When shooting close-ups,

for example, you can press the AE-L/AF-L button to focus on

your subject and then make precision adjustments using manual

focus. This option can also be used when the view through the

lens is zoomed in.

Note: Available in manual focus mode only.

Normal display

Zooming in


TIPS 1

Pressing the center of the command dial magnifies the view in the electronic

viewfinder or LCD monitor for precise focus. To scroll to other areas of the frame,

press the AF button and use the selector.


Manual FocusMF


The Focus Ring

Using Autofocus in Manual Focus Mode:

The AE-L/AF-L Button

TIPS 1

Focus distance (red bar)

Depth of field (white bar)

At default settings, focus distance increases when the focus

ring is rotated clockwise and decreases when the ring is rotated

Checking Focus

W h i l e i n g e n e r a l f o c u s c a n b e

determined by an inspection of the

image in the viewfinder, the manual

focus indicator can also be used as

guide. Focus distance is indicated by

the red bar, while the white bar shows

the field depth. The focus distance can

be displayed in meters or feet, with

the selection made using the “FOCUS

SCALE UNITS” option in the set-up

menu.

Zooming in on the electronic viewfinder or LCD monitor

counterclockwise. This can be reversed in the “FOCUS RING” of setup

menu.

Reduce

focus

distance

Increase

focus

distance

Increase

focus

distance

Reduce

focus

distance

Even in manual focus mode, you can press the AE-L/AF-L Default button

to instantly focus using autofocus. When shooting close-ups,

for example, you can press the AE-L/AF-L button to focus on

your subject and then make precision adjustments using manual

focus. This option can also be used when the view through the

lens is zoomed in.

Note: Available in manual focus mode only.


TIPS 1

Normal display

Rotation reversed in setup menu

Zooming in

Pressing the center of the command dial magnifies the view in the electronic

viewfinder or LCD monitor for precise focus. To scroll to other areas of the frame,

press the AF button and use the selector.


Custom Setting

Saving and Modifying Custom Settings


Options

Up to seven combinations of settings can be saved by pressing the MENU button and selecting

EDIT/SAVE CUSTOM SETTING in the shooting menu. Each combination can contain settings

for nine separate items. Create different combinations for different conditions: for example, one

combination for a soft effect and another for vivid colors.

Settings for More Vivid Colors

FILM SIMULATION: Velvia/VIVID

COLOR: HIGH (+2)

SHARPNESS: HARD (+2)

HIGHLIGHT TONE: HARD (+2)

SHADOW TONE: HARD (+2)

Once you have created a Custom Settings bank for hard

contrast and vivid colors, for example, you can recall

the settings quickly whenever required. You may find it

convenient to create a variety of settings for different results.


TIPS 1 TIPS 2 TIPS


Custom Setting

Saving and Modifying Custom Settings


Options

Up to seven combinations of settings can be saved by pressing the MENU button and selecting

EDIT/SAVE CUSTOM TIPS SETTING 1 in the shooting menu. Each combination can contain settings

for nine separate items. Create different combinations for different conditions: for example, one

combination for a soft effect and Instead another of selecting for vivid colors. Custom Settings banks

from the shooting menu, you can press the

button and use the quick menu for fast access.

Settings for More Vivid Colors

Rotate the command dial to choose from

BASIC and FILM banks SIMULATION: C1 through Velvia/VIVID C7 and press

MENU/OK to COLOR: select. HIGH (+2)

SHARPNESS: HARD (+2)

HIGHLIGHT TONE: HARD (+2)

SHADOW TONE: HARD (+2)

Once you have created a Custom Settings bank for hard

contrast and vivid colors, for example, you can recall

the settings quickly whenever required. You may find it

convenient to create a variety of settings for different results.


TIPS 1 TIPS 2 TIPS


Custom Setting

Saving and Modifying Custom Settings


TIPS 3

HIHLIHT TONE

Increase contrast in highlights or make highlight tones more muted.

Options

Options

HARD (+2)

MEDIUM HARD (+1)

STANDARD (0)

MEDIUM SOFT (1)

SOFT (2)

Note: The default option is

STANDARD

Up to seven combinations of settings can be saved by pressing the MENU button and selecting

EDIT/SAVE CUSTOM SETTING in the shooting menu. Each combination can contain settings

for nine separate items. Create different combinations for different conditions: for example, one

combination for a soft effect and another for vivid colors.

Settings for More Vivid Colors

HARD (+2)

SOFT (2)

FILM SIMULATION: Velvia/VIVID

COLOR: HIGH (+2)

SHADO TONE

SHARPNESS: HARD (+2)

Increase contrast rast in shadows or make shadow tones more muted. HIGHLIGHT TONE: HARD (+2)

SHADOW TONE: HARD (+2)

Options

HARD (+2)

MEDIUM HARD (+1)

STANDARD (0)

MEDIUM SOFT (1)

SOFT (2)

Note: The default option is

STANDARD

Once you have created a Custom Settings bank for hard

contrast and vivid colors, for example, you can recall

the settings quickly whenever required. You may find it

convenient to create a variety of settings for different results.

HARD (+2)

SOFT (2)



TIPS 1 TIPS 2 TIPS


Custom Setting

Saving and Modifying Custom Settings


TIPS 2

COLOR

This item controls saturation (color density). It can be used in combination with film simulation for a variety

of effects.

Options

Options

HIGH (+2)

MEDIUM HIGH (+1)

MEDIUM (0)

MEDIUM LOW (1)

LOW (2)

Note: The default option is

MEDIUM.

Up to seven combinations of settings can be saved by pressing the MENU button and selecting

EDIT/SAVE CUSTOM SETTING in the shooting menu. Each combination can contain settings

for nine separate items. Create different combinations for different conditions: for example, one

combination for a soft effect and another for vivid colors.

Settings for More Vivid Colors

HIGH (+2)

LOW (2)

FILM SIMULATION: Velvia/VIVID

COLOR: HIGH (+2)

SHARPNESS

SHARPNESS: HARD (+2)

This item sharpens or softens edges to make outlines stand out or lend HIGHLIGHT images a soft TONE: effect. HARD (+2)

SHADOW TONE: HARD (+2)

Options

HARD (+2)

MEDIUM HARD (+1)

STANDARD (0)

MEDIUM SOFT (1)

SOFT (2)

Note: The default option is

STANDARD

Once you have created a Custom Settings bank for hard

contrast and vivid colors, for example, you can recall

the settings quickly whenever required. You may find it

convenient to create a variety of settings for different results.

HARD (+2)

SOFT (2)



TIPS 1 TIPS 2 TIPS


The Fn Button

Assign frequently-used options to the Fn button. At

default settings, this button controls ISO sensitivity,

but it can also be used for quick access to film

simulation settings, movie recording, or RAW image

quality, among others.

Functions That Can Be Assigned to the Fn Button

Multiple exposures

Depth-of-field preview

ISO sensitivity

Self-timer

Image size

Image quality

Dynamic range

Film simulation

White balance

AF mode

Custom settings

Movie recording

RAW/JPEG toggle

Note: Fn button options

can also be displayed

by pressing and holding

the Fn button.

The DRIVE Button

Use the DRIVE button to choose from single-frame or

continuous (6 fps or 3 fps) frame advance, bracketing (AE,

ISO, film simulation, or dynamic range), panorama, or

movie recording.

The AE Button

Choose how the camera meters exposure. Your

options are MULTI, SPOT, and AVERAGE.

Rotate to the left to reduce the

size of the focus frame, right to

increase, or press the command

dial to restore

the frame to its normal size.

There are five sizes of focus

frame available.

The AF Button


Use the AF button to choose the focus point. The

EVF and LCD monitor offer a choice of 49 and the

OVF a choice of 25 focus points. Press the AF button

and use the selector to position the focus frame, or in

the EVF/LCD monitor displays rotate the command

dial to choose the frame size.


Section

Fun with the X-Pro1


Film Simulation Reversal Film


PROVIA / STANDARD Velvia / VIVID ASTIA / SOFT

Known for its natural colors true to those

seen by the naked eye. These natural

colors make it suited to any scene or

subject, from portraits to landscapes.

Known for its vivid colors and vibrant

tones, this option is well adapted to shots

of the natural world—flowers, new leaves,

autumn colors—and to photographers

whose goal is to give strong expression to

their inner vision.

Known for its quiet, reserved skin tones

and contrast, this option is a good choice

for outdoor portraits thanks to its ability

to give vivid expression to the colors of

flowering plants and the bright blues of

daylight skies. It offers photographs with

a soft, refined feel while reliably capturing

vivid colors.


Film Simulation


PRO Neg.Std PRO Neg.Hi Sepia

This option simulates the professional negative film used in studio photography and is defined

by the gentle rendering of skin tones so typical of color negative film. Thanks to its wide dynamic

range, “PRO Neg. Std” is capable of capturing the details revealed by the most carefully designed

lighting. PRO Neg. Hi is a slightly more “contrasty” option that produces vibrant images outdoors or

under flat lighting.

T h i s o p t i o n s i m u l a t e s t h e p a l e t t e o f

monochrome sepia film. Free of the artificiality

so common in other palette simulations, it is

known for its refined, calm tones, and produces

interesting results not only in snapshots but in

pictures of flowers and other plants.

Monochrome(Normal) Monochrome + Yellow filter Monochrome + Red filter Monochrome + Green filter

The defining feature of these options is the rich tone range that one would expect of Monochrome film. Choose these simulations to enjoy naturallooking

results that might almost be prints made from monochrome film stock. In addition to standard monochrome, there are color filter options at your

beck and call that can be used for a variety of effects. Choose the yellow filter for just a touch more contrast or the red filter for a whole lot more. The

green filter, which brightens greens and increases the density of reds, can be used for outdoor portrait photography. The motivation behind including

such a variety of monochrome effects is a refusal to compromise film expression on the part of FUJIFILM, which is also a film manufacturer.


Film Simulation BKTFilm Simulation Bracketing


PROVIA / STANDARD Velvia / VIVID ASTIA / SOFT

Selecting Film Simulation Bracketing

In film simulation bracketing, pressing the shutter

button creates three images, each using a different film

simulation. You can choose the simulations used and the

order in which bracketing is performed.

Press the DRIVE

button.

Choose FILM SIMULATION BKT

from the list of drive options.

Choosing Film Simulation Bracketing Settings

Press MENU/OK.

Select FILM SIMULATION BKT

in Tab 1 of the shooting menu.

Choose film simulations for

films 1–3.

TIPS


Film Simulation BKTFilm Simulation Bracketing

Other Bracketing Options

TIPS


[ ISO Bracketing ]

PROVIA / STANDARD Velvia / VIVID ASTIA / SOFT

The camera varies ISO sensitivity in the range ISO 200–ISO 6400 with each shot. The camera brackets exposure without changing

aperture or shutter speed, making this option a good choice when you need to bracket exposure without changing depth of field or when

Selecting Film Simulation Bracketing

In film simulation bracketing, pressing the shutter

you are photographing moving objects.Note: The camera varies aperture and shutter speed.

button creates three images, each using a different film

[ Options ]

simulation. You can choose the simulations used and the

order in which bracketing is performed.

Press the DRIVE

button.

[ AE Bracketing ]

Each time the shutter button is pressed, the camera takes three shots: one using the metered value for exposure, the second overexposed,

and the third underexposed.Note: The camera varies aperture and shutter speed.

[ Options ]

±1 Exposure is varied by 1 EV

with each shot.

2/3 Exposure is varied by 2/3EV

with each shot.

1/3 Exposure is varied by 1/3EV

with each shot.

±1 ISO sensitivity is varied by

1 EV.

2/3 ISO sensitivity is varied by

2/3EV.

1/3 ISO sensitivity is varied by

1/3EV.



Choose FILM SIMULATION BKT

from the list of drive options.

[ Dynamic Range Bracketing ]

Each time the shutter button is pressed, the camera takes three shots with different dynamic ranges: 100 for the first, 200 for the

second, Choosing and 400 Film for Simulation the third. Bracketing Settings





ISO sensitivity is automatically set

to ISO 800 or above; the sensitivity

previously in effect is restored when

bracketing ends.

Note: When creating JPEG copies

of RAW images, you can set ISO

sensitivity for photos taken at 200%

to ISO 400 or higher, or to ISO 800 or

higher for photos taken at 400.

[ Options ]


Press MENU/OK. Select FILM SIMULATION BKT

100 200 400

in Tab 1 of the shooting menu.


Choose film simulations for

films 1–3.


TIPS


FUJICHROME

PROVIA100F

PROVIA is the reversal film with which I am

most familiar, having used it since it first

appeared on the market under the Fujichrome

Professional brand. With its natural colors and

ability to be pushed to +2 stops, I’ve used it—

either normally or intensify, according to the

situation—in everything from outdoor portraits

through studio work to snapshots. At the time,

it was sold as an ISO 400 reversal film, and

the combination of +2 stop push-processing

and the high granularity of the ISO 400 film

gave it wide applicability, making it one of my

favorite films.


Enlarge

Yoichi Sone


FUJICHROME

PROVIA100F

PROVIA is the reversal film with which I am

most familiar, having used it since it first

appeared on the market under the Fujichrome

Professional brand. With its natural colors and

ability to be pushed to +2 stops, I’ve used it—

either normally or intensify, according to the

situation—in everything from outdoor portraits

through studio work to snapshots. At the time,

it was sold as an ISO 400 reversal film, and

the combination of +2 stop push-processing

and the high granularity of the ISO 400 film

gave it wide applicability, making it one of my

favorite films.


Enlarge

Yoichi Sone


Film Simulation PROVIA


Shooting Data

Review

XF18mmF2 RProgram AEF51/450 sec -1/3EV

WHITE ALANCE / FineISO200FILM SIMULATION / PROVIAStandard


Film Simulation PROVIA


The graffiti is certainly vivid, but it could hardly be said to

use primary colors. The woman whose attention is riveted

on whatever she holds in her hands appears to be part of

the mural. Our choice of film simulation for reproducing this

flat tone range: the all-powerful PROVIA. Frame the picture

in the electronic viewfinder and take the shot. Viewing the

result in the LCD monitor, one has the illusion of viewing a

strip of positive film through a magnifying glass. The snazzy

tints are as close as it’s possible to get to the colors seen by

the naked eye.

Shooting Data

Review


Film Simulation PROVIA


Shooting Data

Review

XF18mmF2 R Program AE(F2.5 1/1000 sec ) -1/3EV

WHITE ALANCE / Fine ISO200

FILM SIMULATION / PROVIA Standard


Film Simulation PROVIA


Our attention is held by beautiful woman with the dark

hair who is waiting for the light to change. The subtle

tones in the image dictate our choice of film simulation:

PROVIA, with its natural-looking color reproduction.

Although one would normally take a step forward to

photograph the woman, leaving the post and its lettering

out of the frame, here the photographer has deliberately

focused on the post for a shot with aperture almost as

wide as it will go—somewhere between f/2 and f/0.5. The

large depth of field of the wide-angle lens contributes to

a shot that allows us to read the mild expression on the

woman’s face.

Shooting Data

Review


Velvia100F

The Velvia entered the market with only one

speed—ISO 50—and seeing as my focus at

the time was snapshots, I had little opportunity

to use this reversal film. I nevertheless did

employ it for such subjects as landscapes,

still lifes, and architecture because of its

excellent granularity and a resolution capable

of capturing edges in the minutest details. If I

had to use it for snapshots I usually pushed it

to +1 and shot at ISO 100.

Yoichi Sone


Enlarge


Velvia100F

The Velvia entered the market with only one

speed—ISO 50—and seeing as my focus at

the time was snapshots, I had little opportunity

to use this reversal film. I nevertheless did

employ it for such subjects as landscapes,

still lifes, and architecture because of its

excellent granularity and a resolution capable

of capturing edges in the minutest details. If I

had to use it for snapshots I usually pushed it

to +1 and shot at ISO 100.

Yoichi Sone


Enlarge


Film Simulation Velvia


Shooting Data

Review

XF35mmF1.4 R Program AE(F5.6 1/340 sec ) -1/3EV

WHITE ALANCE / Fine ISO200 FILM SIMULATION / Velvia Vivid


Film Simulation Velvia


This garden in a quiet part of town was dotted with a

number of plants so shockingly pink they seemed to

hurt the eyes. The Velvia film simulation was used for

more emphatic colors. To avoid distorting the Westernstyle

building in the background, I used an XF35 mm

lens at f/5.6. I also used manual focus and took my time

framing and focusing before taking the shot.

Shooting Data

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Film Simulation

Velvia


Shooting Data

Review

XF18mmF2 R Program AE(F2 1/40 sec ) -2/3EV

WHITE ALANCE / Fine ISO200 FILM SIMULATION / Velvia Vivid


Film Simulation

Velvia


Enlarged to huge proportions with multiple additions, this

ancient high-rise made an eerie sight, so much so that

I was slightly hesitant to take the picture. Conscious of

what in film photography is known as color temperature,

I set white balance to “FINE”. Vivid Velvia film simulation

combines with the blue cast produced by the low color

temperature for a surreal shot.

Shooting Data

Review


ASTIA 100F

ASTIA’s reputation as a “soft-toned portrait

film” unfortunately meant that I didn’t use it

very often when shooting with film cameras.

When I loaded some into my KLASSE W

for this shot, however, I found that contrary

to its reputation as a soft-toned film, it lies

somewhere between PROVIA and Velvia in

terms of vividness and is extremely sharp,

making it more than adequate for everyday

snapshots.

Yoichi Sone


Enlarge


ASTIA 100F

ASTIA’s reputation as a “soft-toned portrait

film” unfortunately meant that I didn’t use it

very often when shooting with film cameras.

When I loaded some into my KLASSE W

for this shot, however, I found that contrary

to its reputation as a soft-toned film, it lies

somewhere between PROVIA and Velvia in

terms of vividness and is extremely sharp,

making it more than adequate for everyday

snapshots.

Yoichi Sone


Enlarge


Film Simulation

ASTIA


Shooting Data

Review

XF18mmF2 R Program AE(F2 1/10 sec ) -1/3EV

WHITE ALANCE / Fine ISO200 FILM SIMULATION / ASTIA SOFT


Film Simulation

ASTIA


This mural, with its highly original design, is hidden away

in a secluded area, unnoticed by passers-by on the

sidewalk below. With its lack of vivid colors, this scene is

suited to the calmer hues of ASTIA. I deliberately placed

the mural in the center of the frame to give the shot

symmetry.

Shooting Data

Review


Film Simulation

ASTIA


Shooting Data

Review

XF18mmF2 R Program AE(F5.6 1/280 sec ) -2/3EV

WHITE ALANCE / AUTO ISO6400 FILM SIMULATION / ASTIA SOFT


Film Simulation

ASTIA


The elevator lobby in the hotel I stayed at in Macau

was a space with the most magical decorations.

Although I was eager to capture them in all their

shining brilliance, I was also conscious of the night

atmosphere and choose ASTIA film simulation for

a slightly restrained feel. The gaudiness visible to

the eye has been curbed in favor of more dignified

hues.

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Film Simulation





Shooting Data

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Shooting Data

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XF18mmF1.4R Program AE(F5.6 1/150 sec ) -2/3EV

WHITE ALANCE / Fine ISO200 FILM SIMULATION / PRO Neg. Hi

XF18mmF2 R Program AE(F8 1/350 sec ) -1.3EV

WHITE ALANCE / Fine ISO200 FILM SIMULATION / PRO Neg. Std


Film Simulation





Shooting Data

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Shooting Data

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Prints from negative color film have a glossy feel and unique intensity.

The scope of expression available with digital cameras has been

increased by adding PRO Neg. Hi and PRO Neg. Std to the available

film simulation modes. Only the kind of color reproduction available

with color negative film could capture the harsh feel of the paper in

the posters on the wall. The more you experiment with film simulation,

the closer you come to the true essence of photography.

A view of Macau Tower taken through the trees at the Pena Church

on a hill in the western part of the Macau Peninsula. Although the

differences in contrast make it a difficult subject insofar as choosing

the correct exposure is concerned, the restrained tones of the PRO

Neg. Std simulation provide a high-key rendering of the Macau Tower

in the background without losing any details, and while not blocking

shadows in the vegetation in the foreground. PRO Neg. Std is suited

to portraits, shots of plants, and other subjects that call for limpid

tones.


Film Simulation





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Film Simulation





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Film Simulation

Monochrome


Monochrome(Normal)

Monochrome + Yellow filter

XF18mmF1.4R Program AE(F5.6 1/350 sec ) -2/3EV

WHITE ALANCE / Fine ISO200

FILM SIMULATION / Monochrome

XF18mmF1.4R Program AE(F1.4 1/38 sec ) -2/3EV

WHITE ALANCE / Fine ISO400

FILM SIMULATION / Monochrome + Yellow filter

Shooting Data

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Shooting Data

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Monochrome + Red filter

Monochrome + Green filter

XF18mmF2R Program AE(F8 1/400 sec ) -1/3EV

WHITE ALANCE / Fine ISO200

FILM SIMULATION / Monochrome + Red filter

XF18mmF2R Program AE(F4 1/3500 sec ) 0

WHITE ALANCE / Fine ISO200

FILM SIMULATION / Monochrome + Green filter

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Shooting Data

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Film Simulation

Monochrome


Monochrome(Normal)

Monochrome + Yellow filter

Although is the basic black-and-white film

simulation option, the grays of the asphalt and the

washed-out, neutral tones with reduced contrast

in the background give the illusion of an actual

photographic print on Baryta paper.

If I’d been asked what filter I was using back in the

days when the default photographic film was blackand-white,

I would have answered that I usually

used a yellow filter for slightly higher contrast and

firmer blacks. The circle at the center of this light

fixture and the slightly underexposed areas in the

corners provide deeper tones that look as though

they were burned in using darkroom techniques.

Shooting Data

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Shooting Data

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Monochrome + Red filter

Monochrome + Green filter

Red filters are effective in increasing the density

of blue skies and making white clouds stand out.

Although their deep color, which made it difficult to

see shadows when looking through the viewfinder,

was once a drawback, nowadays film simulations

are not displayed in color and photographers are

free take advantage of the high contrast that red

filters can provide.

Green filters capture the skin and lips of portrait

subjects in limpid shades, making portrait

photography and shots of wooden items one

of their basic uses, but they are also put to

work surprisingly frequently in landscape shots

featuring abundant green foliage. In the case of

portraits, film simulation bracketing using ASTIA,

MONOCHROME + G FILTER, and PRO Neg. Std

can produce interesting results.

Shooting Data

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Film Simulation

Monochrome


Monochrome(Normal)

Monochrome + Yellow filter

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Monochrome + Red filter

Monochrome + Green filter

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Film Simulation

Monochrome


Monochrome(Normal)

Monochrome + Yellow filter

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Monochrome + Red filter

Monochrome + Green filter

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Film Simulation

Monochrome


Monochrome(Normal)

Monochrome + Yellow filter

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Monochrome + Red filter

Monochrome + Green filter

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Film Simulation

Monochrome


Monochrome(Normal)

Monochrome + Yellow filter

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Monochrome + Red filter

Monochrome + Green filter

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Film Simulation



Shooting Data

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XF18mmF1.4 R Program AE(F4 1/4000 sec ) -2/3EV

WHITE ALANCE / Fine ISO6400 FILM SIMULATION / Sepia


Film Simulation



Sepia, a tone process applied to pictures after printing

in the early days of photography, is known for its warm

tones that awaken almost-forgotten fond, gentle, and

nostalgic memories in the corners of our hearts. The

sepia used in the X-Pro1 retains the pale, restrained

tones of the original process, making it sure to be of use

as an artistic storage device for memories of weddings,

birthdays, and other memorable events.

Shooting Data

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Multiple exposure


1. Shoot the first exposure.

Original photo

To retake the first exposure, press

the selector left.

To end multiple exposure shooting

and save only the first shot, press

DISP/BACK.

2. Shoot the second exposure.

The view through the lens will be

shown superimposed over the first

shot in the EVF, OVF, and (in the

standard and custom displays) LCD

monitor. Use the display as a guide

to composing the second shot. The

procedures for retaking or saving

the second exposure are the same

as for the first shot.

Multiple exposures bring to life a world that can be imagined but that is invisible to the naked eye. In

film cameras, multiple exposures were created by not advancing the film between shots. The results

could not be determined until the film had been developed. Waiting with anticipation for the film to be

developed was a joy in itself. The X-Pro1 makes it easy to enjoy creating multiple exposures that match

your personal vision by letting you preview the results of each multiple exposure in the viewfinder or

LCD monitor.

Note: Multiple exposure remains in effect when the camera is turned off. Cancel multiple exposure in the menus when shooting is

complete.

Original photo Another Cut NOTE


Multiple exposure


1. Shoot the first exposure.

Original photo

Another Cut

To retake the first exposure, press

the selector left.

To end multiple exposure shooting

and save only the first shot, press

DISP/BACK.

2. Shoot the second exposure.

The view through the lens will be

shown superimposed over the first

shot in the EVF, OVF, and (in the

standard and custom displays) LCD

monitor. Use the display as a guide

to composing the second shot. The

procedures for retaking or saving

the second exposure are the same

as for the first shot.

Multiple exposures bring to life a world that can be imagined but that is invisible to the naked eye. In

film cameras, multiple exposures were created by not advancing the film between shots. The results

could not be determined until the film had been developed. Waiting with anticipation for the film to be

developed was a joy in itself. The X-Pro1 makes it easy to enjoy creating multiple exposures that match

your personal vision by letting you preview the results of each multiple exposure in the viewfinder or

LCD monitor.

Note: Multiple exposure remains in effect when the camera is turned off. Cancel multiple exposure in the menus when shooting is

complete.

Original photo Another Cut NOTE


Multiple exposure


1. Shoot the first exposure.

Original photo

To retake the first exposure, press

the selector left.

NOTE

To end multiple exposure shooting

and save only the first shot, press

DISP/BACK.

2. Shoot the second exposure.

The view through the lens will be

shown superimposed over the first

shot in the EVF, OVF, and (in the

standard and custom displays) LCD

monitor. Use the display as a guide

to composing the second shot. The

procedures for retaking or saving

the second exposure are the same

as for the first shot.

Exposure can be changed between the first and

second shots.

The exposure mode can be changed between the

first and second shots.

Film simulation and other parameters can not be

changed between the first and second shots.

Multiple exposures bring to life a world that can be imagined but that is invisible to the naked eye. In

film cameras, multiple exposures were created by not advancing the film between shots. The results

could not be determined until the film had been developed. Waiting with anticipation for the film to be

developed was a joy in itself. The X-Pro1 makes it easy to enjoy creating multiple exposures that match

your personal vision by letting you preview the results of each multiple exposure in the viewfinder or

LCD monitor.

Note: Multiple exposure remains in effect when the camera is turned off. Cancel multiple exposure in the menus when shooting is

complete.

Original photo Another Cut NOTE


Multiple exposure


1. Shoot the first exposure.

Original photo

Original photo

To retake the first exposure, press

the selector left.

To end multiple exposure shooting

and save only the first shot, press

DISP/BACK.

2. Shoot the second exposure.

The view through the lens will be

shown superimposed over the first

shot in the EVF, OVF, and (in the

standard and custom displays) LCD

monitor. Use the display as a guide

to composing the second shot. The

procedures for retaking or saving

the second exposure are the same

as for the first shot.

Multiple exposures bring to life a world that can be imagined but that is invisible to the naked eye. In

film cameras, multiple exposures were created by not advancing the film between shots. The results

could not be determined until the film had been developed. Waiting with anticipation for the film to be

developed was a joy in itself. The X-Pro1 makes it easy to enjoy creating multiple exposures that match

your personal vision by letting you preview the results of each multiple exposure in the viewfinder or

LCD monitor.

Note: Multiple exposure remains in effect when the camera is turned off. Cancel multiple exposure in the menus when shooting is

complete.

Original photo Another Cut NOTE


ISOISO SensitivityISO


TIPS 1

ISO sensitivity can be adjusted in

the range ISO 100–ISO 25600,

including low- and high-gain

settings. The normal range is ISO

200–ISO 6400.

Enlarge

ISO AUTO

ISO sensitivity can be adjusted according to shooting conditions. There is little reason

to worry about noise when using the X-Pro1 in the normal range of ISO 200 to ISO

6400. Normally ISO sensitivity can be set to AUTO (6400), letting the camera choose

from ISO sensitivities between ISO 200 and ISO 6400 according to the scene. If you

don’t want ISO sensitivity to go as a high as ISO 6400, you can choose AUTO (400) or

AUTO (800) to set the maximum values for auto ISO sensitivity control to those values.

High Gain (H)

The camera offers high-gain settings equivalent to ISO sensitivities of ISO 12800 and

ISO 25600. Although noise will become more noticeable as ISO sensitivity is raised,

these settings can be extremely effective when you need to record scenes of scientific

import or in other similar situations.


Enlarge


Enlarge


Low Gain (L)

The camera also offers a low-gain setting equivalent to ISO 100. XF lenses are fast

with wide maximum apertures and large diameter openings. If aperture is opened

up to take advantage of the lenses’ beautiful soft bokeh, shutter speeds may exceed

the fastest speed supported by the exposure system (1/4000sec). Should this occur,

shutter The Top speed of can the be slowed Normal by selecting Range: an Taking ISO sensitivity Pictures of L (100). at ISO L (100) 6400 can

also be used in cases in which you want to blur subject motion by choosing as slow a

Including low- and high-gain settings, the X-Pro1 supports ISO sensitivities between ISO 100

shutter speed as possible.

and ISO 25600. The normal range is between ISO 200 and ISO 6400, and even at the upper limit

of ISO 6400, noise is barely noticeable. With a fast XF lens, you can turn the flash off and take

photos using natural light late in the evening or at night, for beautiful pictures that show the scene

as it originally appeared.

See also: ISO


Enlarge

TIPS 1 TIPS 2 NOTE Shooting Data


ISOISO SensitivityISO


ISO sensitivity can be adjusted in

the range ISO 100–ISO 25600,

including low- and high-gain

settings. The normal range is ISO

200–ISO 6400.

Enlarge


Enlarge

Noise reduction

TIPS 2

Noise in the form of randomly-spaced bright pixels or color noise is more common at

higher sensitivities. Noise reduction can be used to reduce noise for smoother images;

note, however, that noise reduction, while useful for reducing noise, also has such

side-effects as lowering the amount of detail visible in the image and reducing color

saturation in shadows. While these defects are hardly noticeable in pictures taken with

the X-Pro1, MEDIUM LOW (–1) and LOW (–2) have been included for photographers

who are sensitive to their effects in even the smallest amount.

[ Options ]

HIGH (+2)

MEDIUM HIGH (+1)

STANDARD (0)

MEDIUM LOW (–1)

LOW (–2)

Note: The default setting is STANDARD.


The Top of the Normal Range: Taking Pictures at ISO 6400

Enlarge


Including low- and high-gain settings, the X-Pro1 supports ISO sensitivities between ISO 100

and ISO 25600. The normal range is between ISO 200 and ISO 6400, and even at the upper limit

of ISO 6400, noise is barely noticeable. With a fast XF lens, you can turn the flash off and take

photos using natural light late in the evening or at night, for beautiful pictures that show the scene

as it originally appeared.

See also: ISO


Enlarge

TIPS 1 TIPS 2 NOTE Shooting Data


ISOISO SensitivityISO


ISO sensitivity can be adjusted in

the range ISO 100–ISO 25600,

including low- and high-gain

settings. The normal range is ISO

200–ISO 6400.

Enlarge


Enlarge


The Top of the Normal Range: Taking Pictures at ISO 6400

Enlarge


Including low- and high-gain settings, the X-Pro1 supports ISO sensitivities between ISO 100

and ISO 25600. The normal range is between ISO 200 and ISO 6400, and even at the upper limit

of ISO 6400, noise is barely noticeable. With a fast XF lens, you can turn the flash off and take

photos using natural light late in the evening or at night, for beautiful pictures that show the scene

as it originally appeared.

See also: ISO


XF18mmF2R Program AE(F2.5 1/110 sec ) -2/3 WHITE ALANCE / AUTO ISO6400 FILM SIMULATION / ASTIA SOFT

Enlarge

TIPS 1 TIPS 2 NOTE Shooting Data


ISOISO SensitivityISO


ISO sensitivity can be adjusted in

the range ISO 100–ISO 25600,

including low- and high-gain

settings. The normal range is ISO

200–ISO 6400.

NOTE

Enlarge


RAW Image Quality

(RAW, RAW + FINE, and RAW + NORMAL)

If a RAW option (RAW, RAW + FINE, or RAW + NORMAL) is

selected for image quality while ISO sensitivity is set to L (100), ISO

sensitivity will be raised to ISO 200. If H (12800) or H (25600) is

selected, ISO sensitivity will automatically be set to ISO 6400.

Enlarge


The Top of the Normal Range: Taking Pictures at ISO 6400

Enlarge


Including low- and high-gain settings, the X-Pro1 supports ISO sensitivities between ISO 100

and ISO 25600. The normal range is between ISO 200 and ISO 6400, and even at the upper limit

of ISO 6400, noise is barely noticeable. With a fast XF lens, you can turn the flash off and take

photos using natural light late in the evening or at night, for beautiful pictures that show the scene

as it originally appeared.

See also: ISO


Enlarge

TIPS 1 TIPS 2 NOTE Shooting Data


ISOISO SensitivityISO



ISO sensitivity can be adjusted in

the range ISO 100–ISO 25600,

including low- and high-gain

settings. The normal range is ISO

200–ISO 6400.

Enlarge


Enlarge


The Top of the Normal Range: Taking Pictures at ISO 6400

Enlarge


Including low- and high-gain settings, the X-Pro1 supports ISO sensitivities between ISO 100

and ISO 25600. The normal range is between ISO 200 and ISO 6400, and even at the upper limit

of ISO 6400, noise is barely noticeable. With a fast XF lens, you can turn the flash off and take

photos using natural light late in the evening or at night, for beautiful pictures that show the scene

as it originally appeared.

See also: ISO


Enlarge

TIPS 1 TIPS 2 NOTE Shooting Data


Continuous shooting


Select CONTINUOUS

with the DRIVE button

and choose from frame

rates of 3 and 6 fps.

Choice

Taking a series of shots of an object in motion

is of course one purpose for which continuous

shooting can be used. But continuous shooting

can also be used proactively for portraits and

snapshots. Sometimes a decisive moment can

be hiding in that sequence of shots. Children’s

expressions can change at dizzying speed, as

can the faces of people on the street: captured in

burst mode, subjects like these can offer a variety

of expressions to choose from. The X-Pro1 has a

quiet shutter and is much less intimidating than a

single-lens reflex camera. You’ll want to take all

the burst mode shots you can to find the perfect

masterpiece.


Shooting Data


White Balance


You can choose a white balance

setting from the menus. White

balance can also be selected

using the Q button or assigned

to the Fn button for quick

access.

XF18mmF2R Program AE(F6.4 1/500 sec ) +1/3 WHITE ALANCE / INCANDESCENT LIGHT ISO200

FILM SIMULATION / Velvia Vivid

Choosing a white balance that matches the light source—say the sun, or incandescent lighting—produces colors

close to those seen by the human eye. AUTO is recommended in most situations. Deliberately choosing a

setting that does not match the light source, on the other hand, alters color balance and offers the photographer

a further means of artistic expression. The photograph above was taken in sunlight but with white balance set to

INCANDESCENT LIGHT, giving the picture a blue color cast and creating a striking image.


Shooting Data Another Cut TIPS


White Balance


Another Cut

You can choose a white balance

setting from the menus. White

balance can also be selected

using the Q button or assigned

to the Fn button for quick

access.

Choosing a white balance that matches the light source—say the sun, or incandescent lighting—produces colors

close to those seen by the human eye. is recommended in most situations. Deliberately choosing a

setting that does not match the light source, on the other hand, alters color balance and offers the photographer

a further means of artistic expression. The photograph above was taken in sunlight but with white balance set to

S G, giving the picture a blue color cast and creating a striking image.


Shooting Data Another Cut TIPS


White Balance


TIPS

AUTO

Fine

Shade

Fluorescent light You (Daylight) can choose a white balance

setting from the menus. White

balance can also be selected

using the Q button or assigned

to the Fn button for quick

access.

Fluorescent light (Warm White) Fluorescent light (Cool White) Incandescent light Underwater

Choosing white balance to match the light source produces

colors close to those seen by the human eye. Other settings

can be used to give your images a color cast.

Choosing a white balance that matches the light source—say the sun, or incandescent lighting—produces colors

close to those seen by the human eye. AUTO is recommended in most situations. Deliberately choosing a

setting that does not match the light source, on the other hand, alters color balance and offers the photographer

a further means of artistic expression. The photograph above was taken in sunlight but with white balance set to

INCANDESCENT LIGHT, giving the picture a blue color cast and creating a striking image.


Shooting Data Another Cut TIPS


Processing RAW Images on the Camera


The X-Pro1 can be used to create JPEG copies of

RAW images recorded with the camera. You can

choose different values for camera settings every time

you create a JPEG copy: for example, you can adjust

film simulation for one copy and film simulation, color,

and sharpness for another. To record RAW images,

select RAW, RAW + FINE, or RAW + NORMAL for

the IMAGE QUALITY option in the shooting menu.

RAW CONVERSION: COLOR

RAW CONVERSION: FILM SIMULATION

RAW CONVERSION: SHARPNESS

RAW CONVERSION: WHITE BALANCE

Options


Processing RAW Images on the Camera


The X-Pro1 can be used to create JPEG copies of

RAW images recorded with the camera. You can

choose different values for camera settings every time

you create a JPEG copy: for example, you can adjust

film simulation for one copy and film simulation, color,

and sharpness for another. To record RAW images,

select RAW, RAW + FINE, or RAW + NORMAL for

the IMAGE QUALITY option in the shooting menu.

Options

RAW CONVERSION: COLOR

RAW CONVERSION: FILM SIMULATION

RAW CONVERSION: SHARPNESS

RAW CONVERSION: WHITE BALANCE

Options


Recording HD Movies


The X-Pro1 makes it easy to record high-definition (HD) movies.

Not only that, but our fast XF lenses lose none of their power

when used to record movies. Shoot with an XF60 mm f/2.4

Macro lens at maximum aperture to beautifully blur everything

but your main subject, or stop an XF18 mm f/2 R lens all the way

down to maximize depth of field. Film simulation can be used for

movies just as it can for still photographs.

TIPS

Press the

DRIVE button.

Select MOVIE.

Press MENU/OK

to enter standby

mode.

Press the shutter button to start

recording.

Press the shutter button again to

end recording, save the movie,

and return to standby mode.

SAMPLE MOVIE

FILM SIMULATION / Velvia FILM SIMULATION / PROVIA FILM SIMULATION / SEPIA


Recording HD Movies


The X-Pro1 makes it easy to record high-definition (HD) movies.

Not only that, but our fast XF lenses lose none of their power

when used to record movies. Shoot with an XF60 mm f/2.4

Macro lens at maximum aperture to beautifully blur everything

but your main subject, or stop an XF18 mm f/2 R lens all the way

down to maximize depth of field. Film simulation can be used for

movies just as it can for still photographs.

TIPS

TIPS

Press the

DRIVE button.

Adjusting Movie Settings

Adjust aperture and choose focus mode

(continuous AF or manual), white balance, film

simulation, and exposure compensation settings

before starting shooting. The selected settings will

be reflected in the movie. Note that continuous AF

will be used when single AF is selected for focus

mode and that aperture can not be adjusted during

recording.

Select MOVIE.

Press MENU/OK

to enter standby

mode.

Aperture

If an option other than A is selected for aperture

before shooting begins, the movie will be recorded

in aperture-priority AE mode. To blur background

details, choose a wide aperture (low f-number).

Press the shutter button to start

recording.

Press the shutter button again to

end recording, save the movie,

and return to standby mode.

SAMPLE MOVIE

FILM SIMULATION / Velvia FILM SIMULATION / PROVIA FILM SIMULATION / SEPIA


XF Lens


The long history of

Fujinon Lens


Fujinon Lens

Its history began in 1940 / The long history of Fujinon Lens


Its history began in 1940 and

continues today

Fujifilm has a long history when it comes

to photographic lens development. This

history began in 1940 with the construction

of a glass melting furnace in Odawara

factory in 1940. To further improve the

research, in 1949 Fujifilm planned and

designed the first electronic computer

system in Japan. From that time, the

company began to sell lenses for video

cameras, projectors, enlargers, and

more. After entering the color era, Fujifilm

adopted the Super Electron Beam Coating

(EBC) technology to achieve superior color

balance and transparency. Its lenses then

became well-known for their great optical

performance and high contrast. Today’s

Fujifilm XF lenses have inherited these

superior features, such as cam-driven

zoom mechanism for smooth adjustment

of high magnification lenses. The reasons

why Fujifilm lenses have been used and

appreciated through times, particularly

video camera lenses and cinema lenses

used in the broadcasting and movie

industries, probably lie in this long history.

1949 / Fuji Cristar 5cm f2

Collapsible L-mount lens. A rare

lens that is particularly difficult to

find even in secondhand markets.

1954 / Fujinon 5cm f1.2

It is said that 3 years have been

necessary to develop this largediameter

L-mount lens. Its size

perfectly fit old Barnack-type Leica

cameras to maximize brightness

without blocking the view through

the rangefinder.

1964 / FUJICAREX II

Central shutter single-lens reflex

camera.

1974 / Fujinon 65mm f5.6

Wide -angle lens for Fujifilm

medium-format G690 camera

featuring 6 - group/8 - element

configuration and a minimum

focusing distance of 1m. Popular

for its capacity of capturing sharp

images even at maximum aperture.

1980 / FUJICA AX-5

E m p l o y s a b ayo n e t F u j i c a

X-mount.

2012/ Fujinon XF Lens

An aperture achieving high brightness and

resolution in a compact design.


Fujinon Lens



The day I met the Fujinon lenses


In 1976, I joined without hesitation the third class of Daido Moriyama’s

course at the Workshop Photography School when I saw its billboard

saying “Workshop Photography School, last year of teaching”. After

graduated, I became an assistant photograph in a studio taking mainly

pictures of products to increase my photographic skills. Equipment at the

studio was mainly composed of Schneider and Rodenstock lenses for 4x5

in, but the two mentors I worked with were using more often EBC Fujinon

210mm F5.6 lenses. For people who were working there at shooting

products for advertisement, EBC Fujinon lens was synonym of “good

lens”. During the work, I was standing under the camera installed on the

product stand, and was following the instructions from my mentors. I was

in charge of moving the products, checking the configuration through

the ground glass, charging the shutter and so on. I spent a lot of time

manipulating Fujinon lenses while looking at products in front focus. I was

authorized to stay alone in the studio and take pictures after work, so I

had the opportunity to shoot a same subject with 3 different EBC Fujinon

lenses (90mm, 150mm, and 210mm). At that time, the emulsion of 4x5-

inch sheet films wasn’t stable so we were using them with gelatin filters.

But with Fujinon lenses the center of the focal plane was very sharp even

without narrowing much the aperture. In addition, colors were reproduced

vividly with remarkable color shading. I spent this period as an photograph

assistant dreaming of the time I would be able to buy my own Sinar

camera and a set of three EBC Fujinon lenses to work as a professional.

Yoichi Sone


Fujinon Lens

Its history began in 1940 /The long history of Fujinon Lens


The day I bought a Fujinon lens


During the second part of the period I spent working as an photograph

assistant, we received much more work from photographic magazines. I

was asked more often to carry out jobs in place of my mentors and began

to think about working independently as a photograph. After I resigned

from the studio, I thought I would find jobs as a product photograph

for advertisement thanks to my experience accumulated in the studio.

However I was asked for collaboration by a photographic magazine

focusing on snapshots. This is how I had to delay the achievement of my

dream of having a Sinar camera and Fujinon lenses for 10 years. Single

lens reflex (SLR) cameras were mostly used then but I was personally

interested in compact camera for their portability. As I felt a particular

attraction toward Fujifilm brand, I bought a Fuji Cardia Travel Mini Dual-P.

It was the prime of SLR cameras and photographic magazines were

displaying shoots I had taken with my Travel Mini along with pictures

taken with SLR cameras in the same issues. At that time, most people

were thinking that professionals would never use compact cameras but

the contribution made by my Travel Mini was brilliant enough. Then I could

make my dream come true. As soon as I heard about the launch of the

Tiara compact camera mounted with EBC Fujinon lens, I bought one. The

model I bought featured a single-focal 28mm lens. I was really impressed

by the shutter response and its portability and became soon fond of it.

I was really productive and sent a great deal of pictures I took with it.

Later I fell into such raptures about the newly available GA645/GA645W

that I bought two in a row. I could familiarize myself with medium-format

cameras thanks to these 2 models. Even if I worked with the GA645W

more often, I spent so much time observing different scenes though the

EBC Fujinon lens of the GA645 that it became like a part of my body. Even

after spending 35 years observing the world through a Fujinon lens, I felt a

rare joy when I could acquire a Fujifilm X-Pro1 and start using it the further

enhanced Super EBC Fujinon lens.

Yoichi Sone


Fujinon Interchangeable lenses: Fujinon XF Lens series


XF18mmF2 R











Uses glass-mold aspheric lenses at

the 5th and 7th elements. The final

element, positioned as closely to

the sensor as possible, makes the

incidence angle of light reaching

the sensor smaller, and reduces

vignetting and color shading, while

helping to keep the lens's overall

size small.

Three newly developed singlefocal

lenses

The 3 new interchangeable lenses for the

X-Pro1 are specially designed to deliver

improved center-to-edge resolution and

brightness free from chromatic aberration.

All 3 lenses are masterpieces of optical

engineering and quality, and feature all-glass

fabrication of the aspherical lens and other

lens elements, as well as treatment with

Fujinon’s original Super EBC coating. Fine

adjustment of aperture is made possible

through the 1/3-step aperture ring which let

you feel each subtle step as you operate the

ring.

XF35mmF1.4 R










XF60mmF2.4 R Macro












Large-diameter lens achieving

homogeneous resolution even at

maximum aperture that uses a

glass-molded aspheric lens at the

5th element to minimize spherical

aberration. In addition to excellent

reproduction in the focal plane, it

also achieves beautiful blur in out-offocus

areas.

Mid telephoto lens with a bright

aperture of F2.4. Uses a glass

molded aspheric lens and places an

ED (extra-low dispersion) glass lens

to prevent field curvature and reduce

chromatic aberration. This lens is not

only ideal for portraiture thanks to its

beautiful blur and high resolution,

but also delivers magnification of

0.5x for macro photography.

Lens Structure


Fujinon Interchangeable lenses: Fujinon XF Lens series

Lens Structure

XF18mmF2 R

XF18mmF2 R












Uses glass-mold aspheric lenses at

the 5th and 7th elements. The final

element, positioned as closely to

the sensor as possible, makes the

incidence angle of light reaching

the sensor smaller, and reduces

vignetting and color shading, while

helping to keep the lens's overall

size small.

Three newly developed singlefocal

lenses

XF35mmF1.4 R

The 3 new interchangeable lenses for the

X-Pro1 are specially designed to deliver

improved center-to-edge resolution and

brightness free from chromatic aberration.

All 3 lenses are masterpieces of optical

engineering and quality, and feature all-glass XF60mmF2.4 R Macro

fabrication of the aspherical lens and other

lens elements, as well as treatment with

Fujinon’s original Super EBC coating. Fine

adjustment of aperture is made possible

through the 1/3-step aperture ring which let

you feel each subtle step as you operate the

ring.

XF35mmF1.4 R










XF60mmF2.4 R Macro












Large-diameter lens achieving

homogeneous resolution even at

maximum aperture that uses a

glass-molded aspheric lens at the

5th element to minimize spherical

aberration. In addition to excellent

reproduction in the focal plane, it

also achieves beautiful blur in out-offocus

areas.

Mid telephoto lens with a bright

aperture of F2.4. Uses a glass

molded aspheric lens and places an

ED (extra-low dispersion) glass lens

to prevent field curvature and reduce

chromatic aberration. This lens is not

only ideal for portraiture thanks to its

beautiful blur and high resolution,

but also delivers magnification of

0.5x for macro photography.

Lens Structure


XF18mmF2 R

The standard at the time was 50mm lenses, but

despite that I decided to buy a camera and lenses for

28mm. Actually I based my choice on pictures I saw

in a photographic magazine. I forgot the name of that

photograph but I found his work excellent and it was

written in the description that he had used a 28mm lens.

I could appreciate this particular angle of view because

I spent myself years shooting with a 28mm lens. Even

when I was using my three Fujinon XF lenses, I first

used the XF18mmF2 R, which is 27mm (35mm format

equivalent). The compatibility with the X-Pro1 is amazing.

When setting the Hybrid Viewfinder to EVF and looking

at an indoor scene, there is almost no barrel distortion in

the straight lines of the ceiling, the walls and the doors,

even when seen from below. With single lens reflex and

compact digital cameras, wide angle distortion often

spoils the joy when looking at the viewfinder, but with

XF18mmF2 R the scene is clear with no distortion and the

enjoyment can reach its peak.

Yoichi Sone


XF18mm F2 R


Shooting Data

Review

XF18mmF2 R Program AE(F5 1/150 sec ) -2/3EV

WHITE BALANCE / FINE ISO200 FILM SIMULATION / Velvia Vivid


XF18mm F2 R


This T-shirt pattern is so elaborated! I wish I could

have a camera with the wide angle XF18mmF2 R lens

with its bright aperture to perfectly capture the beauty

of this small street covered with shadow.

Shooting Data

Review


XF18mm F2 R


XF18mmF2 R Program AE(F2 1/30 sec ) -1EV

WHITE BALANCE / AUTO ISO1000 FILM SIMULATION / Velvia Vivid


XF18mm F2 R


The atmosphere of the blue wall of the cafe on the

right and of the motorbike backlit by the sun slowly

going down. The shape of the boy going down the

street. The more I think about it, the more I want to

praise the position I’m standing at. The angle of view

of 18mm that will be perfect to shoot that scene is

really a natural way of looking at things for me.

Shooting Data

Review


XF35mmF1.4 R

The 50mm lenses, which are said to be the closest to

the human eye vision, became the “standard lenses”

during the prime of single lens reflex (SLR) cameras. Also

with cameras using rangefinders manufactured before

the SLR era, the standard for viewfinders with bright

frame was 50mm. Numerous works left by photographs

were made with 50mm lenses. We can probably say

that the characteristic of 50mm angle of view is that

all subjects can well capture with only one lens. The

maximum aperture of the XF35mmF1.4 R (35mm format

equivalent: 53mm) is F1.4, which is the standard aperture

of 50mm lenses. I have taken lots of pictures with different

apertures, but thanks to its large diameter, it gave me

an impression of remarkable sharpness with a great

resolution in the center of the focus plane surrounded by

an elegant and beautiful blur. Focusing manually is really

easy and intuitive thanks to the smooth operation of the

focusing ring. It gave me the illusion I was shooting with

my old and familiar cameras I used for years.

Yoichi Sone


XF35mmF1.4 R


Shooting Data

Review

XF35mmF1.4 R Program AE(F2.5 1/160 sec ) -2/3EV

WHITE BALANCE / FINE ISO200 FILM SIMULATION / Velvia Vivid


XF35mmF1.4 R


A standard lens that it is said to be the closest

to the human vision. It probably means that it’s a

natural angle of view, but for me it gives somehow

the feeling of a telephoto lens. It is also the angle

of view of 50mm lenses* which were mainly used

during the prime era of cameras with rangefinders.

But it is still a mysterious lens that can give good

results even if the photograph had the feeling of a

narrow angle when he shoots the scene.

*35mm format equivalent

Shooting Data

Review


XF35mmF1.4 R


XF35mmF1.4 R Program AE(F4.5 1/140 sec ) -2/3EV

WHITE BALANCE / FINE ISO200 FILM SIMULATION / PROVIA STANDARD


XF35mmF1.4 R


The XF35mmF1.4 R is hard to define. It is an

exceptional macro lens and at the same time a good

mid telephoto lens that can achieve a exceptional

range of variation from full aperture to narrow focus.

I began photography with 2mm lenses and haven’t

used 50mm lenses* so much but since I have met

the XF35mmF1.4 R (53mm), I often think that I

would have taken pictures differently if I had met

50mm lenses* earlier. And the blur is so beautiful!

*35mm format equivalent

Shooting Data

Review


XF60mmF2.4 R Macro

If you ask me what kind of lens I’m not at ease with, as

a photograph who has taken snapshots in the street

for a long time, I would say it’s mid telephoto lenses.

When I first used the XF60mmF2.4 R Macro lens (35mm

format equivalent: 91mm), I was wondering what kind of

shoot I should take. I mounted it on the X-Pro1 and was

impressed by the great feeling of the focusing ring, neither

too hard nor loose. The lens is compact so you tend to

forget it is a 91mm when holding it. Considering the size,

I started to think that I will do a great work with it and

changed my opinion on the XF60mmF2.4 R Macro lens

even before taking the first shoot. When I was actually

taking pictures with it, I didn’t focused so much on scenes

for macro shoots, but took a lot of snapshots in the street

as usual. For a 91mm and a mid telephoto lens, the scene

was compressed as if taken with a telephoto lens while

the space surrounding the subject was well rendered. I

fell in love at first sight of the results. The bright aperture

of F2.4 allowed me to shoot with confidence even shady

areas in the street.

Yoichi Sone


XF60mmF2.4 R Macro


Shooting Data

Review

XF60mmF2.4 R Macro Program AE(F2.4 1/80 sec ) -1/3EV

WHITE BALANCE / FINE ISO200 FILM SIMULATION / ASTIA SOFT


XF60mmF2.4 R Macro


The XF60mmF2.4R Macro is categorized as a

mid telephoto lens with its 91mm (35mm format

equivalent). But when viewing through the finder,

it gives the impression of a 200mm* telephoto

lens with the characteristic feeling of compression

of the focus plane surrounded by wide space.

This is a high quality lens achieving excellent

resolution at full focus in a compact design.

(*35mm format equivalent)

Shooting Data

Review


XF60mmF2.4 R Macro



Shooting Data Review Another Cut 1 Another Cut 2

XF60mmF2.4 R Macro

Aperture Priority AE(F2.4 1/1600 sec ) +1/3EV

WHITE BALANCE / FINE ISO200

FILM SIMULATION / ASTIA SOFT


XF60mmF2.4 R Macro


I tried to take portrait with maximum

aperture (F2.4) and the result was

even greater than the actual angle,

giving the impression of a telephoto

lens. It’s really an exceptional lens

that rendered a sharp and crisp focal

plane surrounded by a beautiful blur.

When I started photography, I heard

that a fashion photographer in New

York used to shoot in studio with

only one 50mm* macro lens. I think

that’s something that lens may also

achieve.

*35mm format equivalent

Shooting Data Review Another Cut 1 Another Cut 2


XF60mmF2.4 R Macro


XF60mmF2.4 R Macro

Aperture Priority AE(F2.4 1/2900 sec )

+1/3EV

WHITE BALANCE / FINE

ISO500

FILM SIMULATION / ASTIA SOFT

Shooting Data Review Another Cut 1 Another Cut 2


XF60mmF2.4 R Macro


XF60mmF2.4 R Macro

Aperture Priority AE(F2.4 1/1200 sec )

+2/3EV

WHITE BALANCE / FINE

ISO500

FILM SIMULATION /

Monochrome reen filter

Shooting Data Review Another Cut 1 Another Cut 2


Interview


Interview in Macao Part 1 mpressions of using the X-Pro1 in


Notes about using the X-Pro1 in Macao

by photographer Yoichi Sone

I was able to capture natural expressions because the X-Pro1 is not

intimidating

Even though the X-Pro1 has a very good viewfinder, I often shot using the live

view while looking at the liquid crystal display when people were in the shot. You

look at the subject’s eyes through the viewfinder when taking pictures of people.

As a result, the subject is aware of the camera and gets nervous. When you

shoot using the LCD, this doesn’t happen. It puts some separation between you

and the subject instead of you staring directly into their eyes. And this results in

softer expressions. I think the LCD is useful for taking pictures of people. The

LCD displays clear images and is easy to see even in the daytime. In addition,

you are able to capture very good expressions because the body of the X-Pro1

is not overpowering like a single lens reflex camera. The resulting pictures are

equal to or better than those of the single lens reflex camera. I was shocked by

the amazing resolution.


Interview in Macao Impressions of using the X-Pro1 in Macao


Notes about using the X-Pro1 in Macao

by photographer Yoichi Sone

The sync terminal is evidence that this is a professional camera

I think that I was able to take pictures in Macao without any problems because the

usability of the camera is so well thought out. An example is the gentle slope for the

shutter button and exposure compensation dial. The slope has an exquisite feel and

is very easy to use. I was very thankful that I was able to use the camera without

taking my eye off the finder, as you would expect from frequently using the exposure

compensation dial in particular. It is also really good to have the ability to instantly

switch the exposure mode without having to set this and the exposure mode dial

individually. Another thing that impressed me about the X-Pro1 was the sync terminal

on the side surface of the body. I think that this is evidence that the camera was

designed considering professionals shooting in the studio. There have been cameras,

even single reflex cameras, without sync terminals recently. This made me realize

again that the X-Pro1 is a professional camera used by professionals. Just imagining

the cord of a large strobe attached to the sync terminal of the X-Pro1 in a studio

makes me want to take pictures.


Interview in Macao Impressions of using the X-Pro1 in Macao


Notes about using the X-Pro1 in Macao

by photographer Yoichi Sone

The X-Pro1 is a camera that lets you appreciate photography

The time taking snapshots in Macao was divided by the use of the OVF,

EVF, and LCD. When people were in the shot, I used the LCD to reduce the

awareness of the camera and was able to capture natural expressions. Because

you can see the background outside the shooting range, the OVF is useful

for knowing what to try and capture from that background. This really made

things enjoyable I wanted to take pictures quickly without careful framing. In

the first place, it is more interesting to take photos this way. As well, sometimes

unwanted objects get into the image because framing is done so roughly, and

this can produce an unexpectedly good accent. I think that this is the true

pleasure of taking snapshots. At the same time, I also frequently used the EVF.

When there was a subject that I definitely didn’t want to have the periphery, I

used EVF with a 100% field of view ratio for framing. It was very convenient

because you can also view the shooting results. I feel that this camera lets you

appreciate photography.


Interview in Macao Impressions of using the X-Pro1 in Macao


Notes about using the X-Pro1 in Macao

by photographer Yoichi Sone

Film simulation is a function that pros can use in their work

This time I chose ASTIA setting for the X-Pro1 film simulation when shooting

and again I was very pleased by the excellent color tone. While the coloring

was vivid, the graceful color tone was very good. The film simulation function

is very well done. PROVIA and Velvia offer the same images as those taken

with standard film. No other camera manufacturer can provide this kind of

color reproduction. Fujifilm was able to develop this function because of their

history manufacturing film. It was also amazing to be able to take pictures while

changing the settings to suit various situations. This is because photographers

like me used to actually choose film and shoot in this way. In this respect, I think

film simulation is a function that professionals can use in their work. While color

shots are good, monochrome and sepia shots are amazing. The fact that it

feels like a genuine printed monochrome photo is amazing. Sepia is also good

because it has no artificiality. In addition to the standard monochrome mode,

there are also three types of proper monochrome filters. I frequently used the

Ye filter to increase the contrast slightly while shooting this time. When taking

pictures of clouds, I attached the R filter and shot while remembering the days I

shot using film. The experience was extremely meaningful for me.


Interview in Macao Part 1 Impressions of using the X-Pro1 in Macao


Notes about using the X-Pro1 in Macao

by photographer Yoichi Sone

The sharpness and beautiful “bokeh”. These three XF lens are very enjoyable

to use.

All of these lenses are really superb. While all of them are very compact, in

particular I was surprised by how small the 60mm lens is. Because the focal

plane is crisp and sharp, the smooth gradation of blur moving away from

it stands out very strongly. Like the 60mm lens, the blur of the 35mm lens

is beautiful. I realized when shooting at F1.4 that the blur around the focal

plane is not uniform but instead gently moves out of focus. This effect is very

beautiful. With snapshots, the blur around F5.6 has the stereoscopic effect that

is also very good. The XF 18mm, converted at 35mm size, is a wide angle lens

equivalent to 27mm. This angle of view is about the viewable range when one

eye is closed. I’ve always liked this angle of view and took many snapshots

using it. I feel that there are a lot of fun ways to use this lens. At maximum

aperture, you can produce photographic expressions that include both blur and

perspective because the blur is so good. By reducing to around F8, you can use

a more orthodox shooting

method to shoot in a panfocus

style. This lens makes

it fun to change the aperture

setting.


Section

Accessories


M MOUNT ADAPTER



Enjoy the individuality of old lenses

The official Fujifilm mount adapter for M mount lenses

Equipped with signal contacts and function button

Able to correct distortion, peripheral illumination, and color shading


M MOUNT ADAPTER



Fujifilm M mount adapter


High precision design

New function button

With the M mount adapter, you can install

This adapter realizes the standard

Pressing the function button on the

a wide variety of M mount lenses on the

flange back distances of lenses

side surface quickly switches on

X-Pro1 for shooting. The three-part structure

that support the M mount with high

the Mount Adapter Setting mode.

has the optimal material for each section to

precision. The contact surface

This means that when you change

provide high precision. Furthermore, the built-

with M mount lenses features the

lenses you can configure the

in electrical contacts with communication

same high quality stainless steel

lens in use easily without having

functionality and the function button to ensure

finish as that used on the X mount,

to change settings at the menu

excellent coordination with the camera body

while the contact surface with the

screen.

and smooth operation.

camera body uses an aluminum

component similar to that used


in XF lenses to provide a level of


mounting precision that only an

official product can.


M MOUNT ADAPTER





Image quality correction for lenses that

communicate with the camera through

electronic contacts

The M-mount adapter is equipped with electrical

contacts for complete communication with the

camera. Thanks to the electrical contacts, the

camera automatically switches on the “SHOOT

WITHOUT LENS” mode when the adapter is

mounted. This makes changing settings stress free,

even when using the XF lens at the same time. In

addition, the angle of view setting and display for

the Hybrid Viewfinder can be also automatically

changed if the focal length is entered ahead of

time. You can also enter the correction information

for image quality conditions for each lens ahead

of time. This is good for achieving high image

quality through advanced correction using the

image quality processing of the camera or leaving

a moderate amount of distortion to enjoy the

individual flavor of the lens.


M MOUNT ADAPTER




Shooting Data

Review


M MOUNT ADAPTER



Exchanging lenses has become easier as mirrorless digital

cameras have entered the mainstream. Installing a mount

adapter makes it possible to use old lenses such as an M

mount lens. In the digital world, new and old lenses are

now compatible. This time we did some trial shooting with

the Leitz Elmar f=5cm f:3.5, an old signature lens. The

operational feel was better than expected, and we were

able to shoot comfortably even with manual operation. I’d

like for you to try combining the X-Pro1 with an old screw

mount lens or M mount lens.

Shooting Data

Review


M MOUNT ADAPTER




Shooting Data Review After retouching


M MOUNT ADAPTER



You can shoot in monochrome using film simulation

mode without changing the contrast, highlight tone,

sharpness, or shadow tone settings. The overall tone

of the results is dull. owever, this can be eplained by

regarding the shot as being like film developed without

modification when you consider monochrome photos are

the creation of the work you imagined using darkroom

techniques.

Shooting Data Review After retouching


M MOUNT ADAPTER



Retouching JPEG images digitally starts with reducing black using level correction. This simply adds contrast to images with reduced gray tone.

ooking at the image as shot doesn’t lead to disappointment. fterwards, you only have to manipulate the contrast and brightness to move the

image closer to what you imagined and then save it.

Shooting Data Review After retouching


M MOUNT ADAPTER




Shooting Data

Review


M MOUNT ADAPTER



The Leitz Elmar f=5cm f:3.5 was manufactured from

1 to 161. While it showed a dull finish with outdoor

shooting, it provided sufficient reproducibility without

retouching for indoor subjects with distinct differences

between light and dark. I never would have imagined

that a half-century later this signature lens would make

a comeback in the digital age. There was an instant in

which I realized that photography surpasses generations

and eras and was in existence before we were.

Shooting Data

Review


Advanced accessory system


The X-Pro1 has a wide variety of accessories available to optimize its design and performance. I’d like to

introduce some products that will let you shoot in more situations and further increase your regard for the X-Pro1.


Shoe Mount Flash



A clip-on flash that can produce a variety of expressions through

manipulation of its dial

To achieve the same level of operability as the X-Pro1, this clip-on flash is

equipped with a dimmer correction dial. Its exterior is made of metal to match the

camera body. The dial was crafted from premium metal block cutouts. The flash

was designed with consideration of weight balance and the visibility of the shutter

speed dial when the flash is mounted on the camera.


Protector Filter



A protector filter to prevent the addition of color to description

performance

Since UV filtering is carried out at the camera body (by a sensor), we boldly

We used Super EBC coating to thoroughly control

ghosting and flares.

made a filter specifically designed to protect the lens that is completely colorless

and transparent so that description is not negatively affected. We used the “Super

EBC”, a multilayer coating technology, to treat the lens surface. In addition, we

processed the inner frame like that of the XF lens to thoroughly control ghosting

and flares. Naturally, this filter offers the reliability of products made in Japan.

Its thin frame design ensures no vignetting in the

corners of the image, even when used with other

filters such as a polarized light filter.


Hand Grip



A hand grip for more reliable holding

This hand grip further improves the holdability of the

X-Pro1. The grip portion is made of synthetic rubber

to provide a better hold. The hand grip offers the

optimal grip in less than optimal shooting situations,

such as when you have to shoot one handed.

The hand grip was also designed considering weight

balance when a large lens is attached. To increase

usability, attachment screws do not protrude and the

bottom surface is flat. The tripod hole is aligned with

the optical axis of the lens.


Leather Case



A genuine leather snapshot case

This high quality dedicated snapshot case is

made of genuine leather, and it become better

accustomed to your hands the longer you use

it. The two-piece snapshot design allows you

to quickly shoot without having to remove the

cover section. Just find your subject, turn the

cover section only, and then start shooting. In

consideration of stability when the camera is

placed on a surface, the case is designed to

be flat with no screws or buttons on the bottom

surface. The case includes a leather strap, a

convenient round pouch for holding small items

like lens hoods, and a long leather strap with a

full length of 136 cm.


Specifications


FUJIFILM X-Pro1

Photographer's Guidebook

Published by FUJIFILM Corporation

9-7-3 Akasaka, Minato-ku, Tokyo 107-0052

Photographs/text by

Yoichi Sone

Editing / layout by Water mill, Inc.

Design by Friends! Inc.

Production by Monolith Inc.

Additional commentary by Hideyuki Motegi and Ei Yoshimura

*Product specifications are current as of September 18, 2012. Specifications are subject to change.

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