Peninsula People April 2017

cbudman

Volume XXI, Issue 9 April 2017


April 2017Peninsula 3


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PENINSULA

Volume XXI, Issue 9

April 2017

P A L O S V E R D E S P E N I N S U L A M O N T H L Y

ON THE COVER

Seed to Plate founder Nancy

LeMargie with volunteer Katie Ages

and the garden chickens.

Photo by David Fairchild

(DavidFairchildStudio.com)

PROFILES

18

26

32

38

58

63

Panther pole vaulter

by Randy Angel Jacqueline Ahrens sets a school record

and strives for still higher goals, athletically and academically.

Seed to plate

by Esther Kang Horticulturist Nancy LeMargie cultivates

crops and proud students in the school district’s program for

young special needs students.

Monterey Colonial

by Stephanie Cartozian After three decades, a family

prepares to part with a hillside home designed by H. Roy

Kelley, the architect introduced Monterey Colonial architecture

to the West Coast.

Wine alchemist

by Richard Foss Chemist Amir Afshar pursues making a

premium wine free of allergy triggering sulfides.

Heavenly kitchen

by Richard Foss Gimbap, the Korean-style rice roll, and

other Korean staples have made Rice Heaven the go-to place

for Peninsula residents craving Korean food

Bubble bath

by Stuart Chaussee Price-to-book value shows stocks at

the highest reading in history, other than the Tech Bubble. If

history is a guide future returns are likely to be below-average

or even negative.

HIGHLIGHTS

10 Vistas for Children Fashion Show

14 Cherry Blossom Festival at Botanic Garden

22 Rainmaker Software Soiree

44 Muffins and Mozart

56 Switzer’s Women of the Year

60 Home and Garden Guide

62 Hockey Heroes

64 Vista Grande Elementary benefit

65 Around and About

66 Pen High / CSCRB’s Walk to Fight Cancer

67 Peninsula Historical Society

68 Temple Beth El

DEPARTMENTS

46 Peninsula calendar

69 Home services

STAFF

EDITOR

Mark McDermott

PUBLISHER

Stephanie Cartozian

PUBLISHER EMERITUS

Mary Jane Schoenheider

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

Richard Budman

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DIRECTOR

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FRONT DESK

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Daniel Sofer (Hermosawave.net)

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8 PeninsulaApril 2017


April 2017Peninsula 9


S P O T L I G H T O N T H E H I L L

Bedecked and Bejeweled

Vistas for Children bedazzled

The 17th Annual Vistas for Children Boutique, Fashion Show and Luncheon

cast off in the Grand Ballroom at the restored Queen Mary on February

25. The theme was “Old Hollywood” and the dress was glitzy and

glamorous, with a red carpet parade of starlet models followed by a musical

show. The live auction included a Hollywood Magic Castle Seance with private

dinner for 10 guests and an eight day Lake Tahoe vacation in a luxury

log cabin. There were 350 guests and 30 vendors who sold their wares to a

generous crowd, donating a portion of their proceeds to Vistas. The fashion

show was presented by Suzanne Von Schaack, and Teri Nelson Carpenter.

Reel Muzik Werks produced the sound and staging. The evening raised over

$100,000 to help children with special needs.

1. Nadine Bobit, Pam Branam and

Cindy Percz.

2. Kim Vallee, Nadine Bobit and

Sabine Dubois.

3. Men’s fashion designer Alex

Angelino.

4. Beth Higgins and Barbara

Gabrielli.

5. Paula Denney and Elva Tamashiro.

6. Stephanie Carpenter Lokken, Teri

Carpenter, Megan and Sue Lokken.

7. Joanne and Jesse Saalberg.

PHOTOS BY TONY LABRUNO

8. Leah Bizoumis, Andrea Lewis,

Nadine Bobit, Michele Bell and

Lenore Levine.

9. Guests from Shanghai and Beijing.

10. Deborah Keshtkar, Cindy Percz,

Marcia August and Eileen Hupp.

11. Cindy Percz and Susan Brooks.

12. Ellen Smith, Allison Mayer,

Vanja Kapetanovic and Randy

Dauchot.

13. Jackie and daughter Val Geiger.

1

2 3 4

5

6

7

8

9 10

11 12

13

10 PeninsulaApril 2017


April 2017Peninsula 11


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S P O T L I G H T O N T H E H I L L

Cherry Blossom Festival

In bloom

The South Coast Botanic Garden Foundation hosted a festival on March 4 and

5 commemorating love and passion, as symbolized by the blooming cherry

trees. Music in the Garden was presented by the Peninsula Committee of the Los

Angeles Philharmonic and there were numerous wind and string instruments on

display for children to play. Guests picnicked and enjoyed lunch from the

Okamoto Kitchen Food Truck. An 8-foot clown entertained the children with

quips, bubbles and streamers and the gift shop and nursery were open for onlookers.

In Japanese culture, the short cherry blossom season symbolizes the transient

nature of life and mortality. In Chinese culture the trees are associated with

female beauty and symbolize power and strength. Visit SouthCoastBotanicGarden.org

to obtain info about upcoming events.

PHOTOS BY STEPHANIE CARTOZIAN

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2. Yuri Kantor, Jan Quaritius and

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3. Brittany, Roman, Remington

and (back) Zachary Fraser.

4. Jahnna and Sean Bythewood.

5. Amy Yu, Katelyn Yap, Joel

and Carol Foxman, Patricia, Greg

and Isabella Foxman and Clarisa

Paiz.

6. Cherry Blossom tree.

1

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14 PeninsulaApril 2017


April 2017Peninsula 15


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Peninsula High

senior pole vaulter

Jacqueline Ahrens

is set to defend her

CIF and Bay League

titles

Four years ago, Jacqueline

Ahrens was looking toward

making the frosh/soph girls

tennis team during her first year at

Peninsula High School. Setting a

school record of any sort was the

furthest thing from her mind.

Now, as a senior deciding on

which college to attend, Ahrens

can boast of not only setting a

school record but one she continues

to break as she reaches new

heights in the sport of pole vaulting.

“I had played tennis growing

up,” Ahrens said. “When my freshman

season was over, I decided to

go out for the track team. My only

exposure to pole vaulting was

watching it on television but it

looked like fun.”

At the Paramount Relays on

March 5, 2016, Ahrens broke a 17-

year-old school record with a

height of 12 feet, 3 inches topping

Leora Ward’s mark of 12-feet-2 set

in 1999.

She proceeded to have vaults of

12-feet-6 in three consecutive

meets last April before setting a

personal best 12-feet-8 to win the

Bay League championship.

Ahrens captured the CIF-Southern

Section Division 1 crown (12-

feet-3), was fourth at the

CIF-Masters Meet (12-foot-7) then

finished eighth at the CIF State

Meet (11-feet-8).

Yet it was that first record-breaking

performance that Ahrens considers

the most memorable

moment of her high school career.

“I wasn’t expecting to break the

record,” Ahrens recalled. “I was

just so focused and it was one of

those days when everything just

came together.”

Ahrens’ freshman year best

mark was a mere 7-feet-6. She

credits much of her success to

coach Greg Miguel.

“I wasn’t very good my freshman

year but he has taught me so

much,” Ahrens said. “Not just

about pole vaulting but helping me

grow as a person. Now I love pole

vaulting. It’s such a challenging

sport, both mentally and physically.”

Ahrens improved dramatically

throughout her sophomore season,

finishing second in the Bay League


Peninsula’s Jacqueline Ahrens records a personal-best 12 feet, 8 inches at the

2016 Bay League pole vault championships. Photos by Ray Vidal

and fourth in CIF-SS Division 1.

“Jacquelineʻs improvement between her freshman and sophomore year

was surprising but another biggie was her improvement from 11-feet to 13-

feet,” Miguel said. “She is so positive, focused and a joy to be around. Her

work ethic has always been great. Neither rain nor heat has kept Jacqueline

from workouts or planning and striving for her goals.”

Despite her success, the Rancho Palos Verdes resident has her sights set

on still loftier goals despite the pressure of a bullseye on her back after her

breakout season in 2016.

“I’m working extremely hard to continue that success,” Ahrens said. “I

want to be more consistent while reaching the 13-foot range. I just want to

have fun, which I’m doing as I continue to feel more comfortable. I got a

late start in the sport, while many pole vaulters have a strong background

in gymnastics.”

Ahrens began this season with two podium finishes placing third at the

California Winter State Championships (12-feet- 2.5”) and second at the

prestigious Redondo Nike Track Festival (11-feet-9).

“I’m taking things a little slow so I’m strong and jumping my best at the

end of the season,” Ahrens said. “The competition in the Bay League is so

strong that it really helps me prepare for CIF and State. My teammate Isabelle

Beaudoin is always pushing me and going up against girls like Kaitlin

Heri (Redondo) and Brigette Grau (Mira Costa) make me a better vaulter.”

Ahrens practices almost daily, while also weight lifting, running sprints

after every workout and improving her endurance and strength with longer

runs.

“The more power I have, the higher I can vault,” she explained.

Along with Miguel, Ahrens trains with Anthony Curran. A previous

coach of Miguel’s, Curran passes on a wealth of pole-vault knowledge. He

started No Limit Sports Track & Field Club in 1984 and coaches athletes

from middle school to Olympic levels.

“I began training with Coach Curran a year ago,” Ahrens said. “He has

me using bigger poles and, having instructed my high school coach, they

both have the same styles of coaching.”

Curran competed in the USA Olympic Trials (1980, 1984 and 1992) and

was the 1982 Pac-10 champion while at UCLA. He also was California High

School champion in 1977 and 1978 setting the National High School Record

in 1978 at 17′ 4 1/4″.

Ahrens is grateful to her parents Earl and Emily for their support and has

also received inspiration while attending the Reno Pole Vault Summit the

past two years, where she met Sandi Morris, a 2016 Olympic silver-medalist

and 2010 pole vault winner at the USATF Junior Olympic Track and Field

Championships.

“Hearing Sandi’s story was very motivational for me,” Ahrens said. “She

stressed the importance of finding the right fit at the right school. She taught

how to be mentally strong. It’s very challenging to have the right mindset

going into each meet.”

Ahrens’ high marks are not limited to the field. She has a weighted GPA

of over 4.8 and, with physics being her favorite subject, she is aspiring to

become either a mechanical or material science engineer.

Ahrens plans to continue competing in the pole vault at the collegiate

level, but has yet to decide where she will take her talents. She has narrowed

the selection to MIT, UCLA and UC Berkeley.

Ahrens said she wants to be accepted by a college based on her academic

performance and that her success as an athlete is an added bonus.

“We’ll see where pole vaulting takes me,” Ahrens said. “Of course, it’s

every athlete’s dream to compete in the Olympics, but that’s down the

road.”

Miguel believes the future is bright for Ahrens.

“Jacqueline’s main strength, in my opinion, is her understanding of the

sport, herself and how to manage all the activities student-athletes have

during the season and year round,” Miguel said. “She has been a great role

model, leader and captain the last two years.”

Helping Ahrens develop her leadership skills has been her nine-year involvement

with the Girl Scouts. She has been a troop leader for the past

seven years.

“It’s been a great part of my life,” Ahrens said. “I’ve really enjoyed leading

the girls in the Mariner and Backpacking Skills competitions.”

Despite her busy schedule, Ahrens recently began rock climbing.

“It’s fun and a great workout,” Ahrens said. “The facility at Hangar 18 in

Hawthorne is a fantastic place to climb. Someday I hope to climb real

rocks.” PEN

April 2017Peninsula 19


S P O T L I G H T O N T H E H I L L

Nocturnes at Night

Art Colony

The Portuguese Bend Art Colony painted live at Terranea Resort on

Wednesday evening, March 8 during the Rainmaker Software

Soiree. The artists selected a garden statue to paint and onlookers had

the unique opportunity to see the paintings evolve and to talk with the

artists. Terranea has a gallery of the Colony’s art work on display outside

the newly remodeled Catalina Kitchen.

PHOTOS BY STEPHANIE CARTOZIAN

AND STEPHEN MIRICH

1. Dan Pinkham.

2. Rick Humphreys.

3. Stephen Mirich.

1

2

3

22 PeninsulaApril 2017


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Fertile

ground

Horticulturist Nancy LeMargie

cultivates crops and proud students

in the school district’s

Seed to Plate program

for young special needs students


Seed to Plate founder Nancy LeMargie (center) with volunteers Charlie Probst, Raxiel Palma, Katie Ages, Jonathan Schmidt, and Erick Holmes.

Photos by David Fairhchild

by Esther Kang

The Seed to Plate Garden, a one-acre

menagerie tucked next to the Little

League field at Valmonte Elementary

School in Palos Verdes Estates, is much

larger than it appears upon first glance.

Beyond the fenced entrance, a hand-painted

box filled with succulents sits atop a rusted bicycle

leaning against a Great Oak Tree, opposite a

working nursery, where rows of potted plants

and more succulents sit. A few steps farther in, a

rustic rouge shed, adorned by yellow Lady Banks

Rose vines and a handmade sign reading “Home

Sweet Home,” is flanked by a brand new greenhouse

built this past fall. The greenhouse faces

the garden’s vast assortment of crops: 26 boxes

filled with seasonal vegetables, including beets,

carrots, peas, swiss chard, broccoli and kale.

In a month or two, LeMargie’s students will be

planting summer crops, everything from tomatoes,

squash and peppers to corn and strawberries.

The garden’s orchard — apples, lemons,

kumquats — will be in full bloom, as well.

On the other side of the garden is a chicken

pen, with a dozen hens roaming. The chickens

provide fertilizer and fresh eggs for the garden to

sell. Beyond the pen is an unpretentious, twolevel

amphitheater, with clay pots and plastic

chairs strewn about.

“Everybody wants a project,” garden manager

Nancy LeMargie said fondly of her 10 specialneeds

volunteers, who tend the garden five times

a week. “The greenhouse isn’t even finished, and

they’re like, ‘What’s our next project?’ They love

to have something big to think about, to plan, to

develop and build. We will never be finished

down there. Never."

Since 2001, LeMargie, a 58-year-old Gardena

resident, has been spearheading the Seed to Plate

program for special-needs students after being

tapped by Palos Verdes Peninsula Unified District’s

pupil services director Lynn Busia and

Chez Melange restaurant owners Robert Bell and

Michael Franks. Based on a similar program at a

public elementary school for low-income kids in

Berkeley, the Seed to Plate program is a leg of PV-

PUSD’s Transition to Independence program for

special needs individuals, between ages 18 and

22.

The first iteration of the garden took form in a

much smaller 3,600-square-foot space in Palos

Verdes High School’s parking lot. A few years

later, the garden moved across the street to make

way for a new building. LeMargie still uses that

garden to teach horticulture to special needs and

“regular ed” students at PVHS twice a week. She

also teaches at Peninsula High twice a week.

As for the Seed to Plate garden, it has called the

space at Valmonte Elementary home since 2013.

With the help of many gracious individuals — including

the school principal Shirley Resich and

her husband John, as well as LeMargie’s carpenter

husband Rick, volunteers from EnrichLA and

major donor Silver Spur Garden Club —

LeMargie, her students and their assistants built

the garden from ground up, starting with an extensive

irrigation system. The students sow,

weed, water and harvest the crops, which are

sold weekly to Chez Melange in Redondo Beach’s

Riviera Village.

Born to parents from farm towns in Minnesota,

LeMargie grew up in Torrance when sidewalks

were still a novelty. As a child, she was always

drawn to the outdoors — particularly the vast

fields where Del Amo Mall and Union Bank now

sit.

“In those days, the ‘60s, we could just run

around for hours,” she recalled fondly. “Our parents

would say, ‘Come home before dark.’ We

were just immersed in nature."

While she mowed the family lawn growing up,

it wasn’t until LeMargie had children that she

delved into the world of horticulture. She regularly

took her two little kids to the Lomita Public

Library, and out of curiosity, she picked up books

on gardening and horticulture.

“When my children were little, I was bored to

April 2017Peninsula 27


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death,” she said. “We had a little yard and so I started planting a couple of

things, then started reading a lot. Lots and lots of books."

LeMargie began taking classes at the Southern California Regional Occupational

Center (SCROC), which would become her second home for

the next two decades. She walked into the registration office to sign up for

the morning class, which she would attend when her kids were in school.

The class was labeled “Horticulture Special.” She found on the first day of

class that it was a course for special needs students.

“So I landed in the class, no experience with special needs people, sitting

there with my little notebook,” she recalled with a laugh. “The teacher’s

looking at me like, okay?"

She had looked into working as a groundskeeper for the City of Torrance,

where the job description called for mowing lawns, trimming bushes and

the like. But by the third day at SCROC, she set her sights on a new goal:

teaching horticulture. Within a year of taking classes there, she was promoted

to her teacher Mike Pack's assistant. A few years later, she earned

her teaching credential in horticulture and became a full-time teacher for

both special-needs and other students at SCROC and later at Palos Verdes

and Peninsula high schools.

This past year, after two decades, LeMargie left her teaching job at

SCROC. The decision was timed to the retirement of her husband Rick,

who worked there as a custodian. She’s ecstatic that she now gets to spend

more time at the Seed to Plate garden with her students. Small, everyday

moments are fleeting but remind her of the significance of the garden.

“Today, one of the students in a wheelchair smiled at me for the first

time — I’ve known him for three years,” she said, fighting tears. “It’s just

the beauty of them, of each individual.”

Most of the current volunteers have been part of this program for two to

three years now, she said. She’s observed increased self-esteem with each

responsibility she entrusts them with. On a daily basis, the students also

practice important life skills such as timeliness and cleaning up after oneself.

“Being given the responsibility of a pitch fork, it’s a lot of trust,”

LeMargie said.

Looking forward, LeMargie hopes to build a working kitchen in the garden,

where she and the students can make jam and marmalade from the

orchard and other dishes from their harvest.

“I just love the type of person who is drawn to gardening,” she said, “because

we all just click. We all are drawn there, like a beam of light on our

heads.”

Seed to Table Garden will hold its inaugural spring plant sale May 5 - 7

from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Those interested in volunteering to help pull weeds and

plant are welcome Mondays and Wednesdays 1 - 3 p.m. The garden accepts

plants, pots, garden art and funds as donations. For more information, contact

Nancy LeMargie at seedtoplate@yahoo.com. PEN

“Colors of the South Bay”

Spring Show & Sale

Brilliant cadmium, sunsets,

subtle grays of fog,

vibrant spring blooms and

blue blue oceans

Please Join Us

at our Gala Opening

Saturday, April 29th,

4:00pm to 8:00pm

Also featuring post-card sized

paintings to take home

Destination: Art

1815 W. 213th St., #135

Torrance CA 90501

localartists@destination-art.net

www.destination-art.net

310-742-3192

28 PeninsulaApril 2017


Brides and Grooms

Newly Engaged Couples

Provide your photos and we will

write your love story

To be shared in the

Peninsula magazine

Great gift idea from parents

and in-laws to share your family’s

news announcement

Also available for wedding venues

photo by Amy Theilig Photography

Call 310-372-4611 for rates and sizes

April 2017Peninsula 29


April 2017Peninsula 31


Ascent to Paradiso

by Stephanie Cartozian

This California Monterey style home was designed by H. Roy Kelley who served on the Presidential Building Commission in 1931. Photo by Peter McMenamin

An architectural, hillside landmark as pristine and inviting now as it must have been back in 1929

Somonte is a Spanish word meaning a field on the slopes of a mountain.

When the Marottas first purchased this California Monterey style

manse on Via Somonte 33 years ago, part of its appeal was its vast

openness, a feeling of ascent over paradise. The home was designed by the

revered architect H. Roy Kelley, who was appointed by Herbert Hoover in

1931 to serve on the Presidential Advisory Commission on Home Building.

Kelley, who was educated at Cornell University and settled in Los Angeles

from New York nine years prior to designing the Marotta residence, had

many other notable achievements including the design of the RAND headquarters

in Santa Monica and the Institute of Aeronautical Sciences in Los

Angeles. He is thought to have brought the ranch style of residential design

to the West. This home seems to have all the style and charm of the Monterey

Colonial architectural style, which is characterized by two stories,

continuous surrounding porches, hip roof and adobe style walls, essentially

considered to be Spanish.

Owner Alfred Marotta is an attorney specializing in defending injured

workers through workers compensation insurance. He used to work on

the opposing side as an insurance adjustor — a part time job that helped

him through law school — so he has an understanding of both halves of

the equation and the intricacies involved. He opened his own practice 30

years ago, around the same time he purchased this estate. His office is in

Norwalk by the courthouse.

“I’ve been fighting for workers all my life,” he said. “All the way up to

the Supreme Court.”

“I haven’t made a lot of money as an attorney,” he added. “My wealth

has been made because of investments, like property I owned in Hawaii

The master bedroom and most of the home have oak hardwood floors and a

style and character that is nostalgic of old Palos Verdes. Photo by Tony LaBruno

32 PeninsulaApril 2017


The living room. In the corner is an organ and other instruments the six Marotta children grew up playing. Photo by Peter McMenamin

and property from my mother and father’s

estate.”

His mission is helping injured workers

obtain the medical care they need to

return to work.

“They want to go back to work,” he

said. “They really want to work. The

perception may be different, but they

want to feel like they are contributing

to society and that they are worth something.”

Inside the residence are collected

family treasures, including a corner in

the living room dedicated to the instruments

his six children have played. Although

Marotta does not play an

instrument himself, his now grown

children have played the trombone,

flute, organ, guitar, bass, clarinet and violin.

He has five sons and one daughter

(and asks us, kiddingly, to guess which

is the spoiled one). Over the years,

The backyard view looking down on an enclosure that used to be an open patio in a different time.

Photo by Peter McMenamin

Paradiso cont. on page 35

April 2017Peninsula People 33


34 Peninsula PeopleApril 2017


Paradiso cont. from page 33

Marotta hosted high school classical

music concerts in his home. He

still marvels at students’ musical

prowess, and considers music to be

an important accompaniment to

any standard education.

Perhaps Marotta’s experience

handling properties has led him to

be such a rigorous steward of this

particular estate. The two story

villa is over 3,300 sq. ft., with 4

bedrooms and 4 bathrooms. As one

ascends the gracious stairways

leading to the covered terrace and

then to the front door, there is a

feeling of sanctuary and timelessness.

The oak, planked flooring

and exposed beam ceilings exude

warmth and hospitality. The

wrought iron stair railings have

heart shapes throughout. The oversized

archways are framed with intricate

wood carvings. The home is

as pristine and inviting now as it

must have been back in 1929. Yet,

there are modern enhancements,

like a windowed elevator that rises

from the garage to the main level.

The home’s covered terraces and

Queen’s Necklace views from

most vantage points show that the

original acquirers took their time

selecting this lot.

“The foundation goes down six

feet,” Marotta said, marveling at

the bygone craftsmanship taken to

build such a home.

Posing for a photo with his son

Gregory outside on the terrace,

Marotta is reflective. Three

decades of his family’s life transpired

in this grand setting.

“I usually sit out here and have a

glass of wine in the evenings,” he

said.

What new family traditions will

be made here in the future have

yet to be seen as the home currently

awaits its new residents.. PEN

Alfred Marotta and his son Gregory,

on the terrace of the two story villa

overlooking the coastline and city.

Photo by Tony LaBruno

April 2017Peninsula People 35


36 PeninsulaApril 2017


BlissWithout

Penalty

by Richard Foss

A

Amir Afshar in the wine cellar of his Rancho Palos Verdes home. Photo by Brad Jacobson

A Chemist Seeks To Change Winemaking

mir Afshar has spent much of his career thinking about but all over that part of the world,” he said. “My family

preservation of metal, wood, and other materials, as were grape growers for generations and before the Islamic

well as the lives of American military personnel. Revolution there was a great tradition of winemaking there.

“I am a chemical engineer and am part owner of Farmers used to sell a lot of grapes to French people who

three paint companies,” Afshar said. “We have been made wine in our town, but that business went downhill

involved in formulating paint for military uses, situations

where it has to be extremely resistant to and started growing apples… There were once 200 species

after the Shah was overthrown. They got rid of all the vines

anything that can be thrown at it — not just the of grapes in that region, and I don’t know how many are

usual corrosion but acids and chemical left.”

weapons.”

Though the French winemakers in Urmia made wine in

Those challenges would be enough to fully international styles, Afshar’s family followed an ancient tradition

that involved more luck than skill.

occupy most people, but over the past decade

Afshar has also been considering another kind “There was a traditional Persian style of winemaking that

of preservation. He is a wine lover, diagnosed was all natural — they didn’t add anything, they didn’t do

with an allergic reaction to the sulfites that anything except preserve the grape juice and let it become

are used to preserve wine, as well as dried wine,” Afshar said. “Whatever comes up, comes up, and it

fruits, shellfish and some meats. He is putting

his skills as a chemist to work to make cial winemaking, it was just for our own use. The wines

might not come out as wine sometimes. It was not commer-

wine that he, and the estimated five to did not last long, so you drank it that year like the French

eight percent of Americans who also experience

sulfite intolerance, can enjoy. The limited shelf life was partly because the wine con-

Beaujolais Nouveau.”

Wine has always been a part of tained no sulfates. The use of sulfur in winemaking goes

Amir’s life, even when he was still living

in northern Iran, near the border wineries with sulfurous smoke to drive away insects and

back to the ancient Greeks, who started fumigating their

with Azerbaijan.

pests. They discovered that wine stored in jars exposed to

“I was born in a city called Urmia the smoke lasted longer. The practice had become a science

in the far northwest of Iran that was by 1820, when pioneering food chemist Frederick Accum

famous for grapes, not only in Iran included a chapter on sulphuring wine in his book on wine-

38 PeninsulaApril 2017


making. At the time, nobody recognized

it could cause health problems

in some people.

“Every time I drank wines containing

sulfites my hands and feet

swelled, I started itching, I had

headaches,” Afshar said. “I had the

same problem when I ate dried apricots

or raisins. I didn’t touch wine

for a couple of years after I was diagnosed.

One day a friend brought

a bottle and insisted that I try it. I

told him that I couldn’t drink wine,

but he insisted — he told me it was

homemade and he thought I wouldn’t

have problems. He was right; I

drank it and felt just fine. That was

17 years ago. That was when I

started becoming interested in

home winemaking.”

Home winemaking allowed Afshar

to enjoy wine again, but not the

kind he liked most. He had come to

appreciate the developed tannins

and more complex flavor imparted

by long aging. The wines he and his

friends made were deficient in that

regard.

“Those wines were good but fragile,

and they had to be enjoyed the

same year,” he said. “After six

months my wine started changing

flavor and losing color because it

was oxidizing. I started doing a lot

of research, reading and studying

what had been done in previous

centuries. One thing they did, which

is not practical for commercial

winemakers, is to store it in silver.

They didn’t know why this works,

but it does. Silver has an antibacterial

effect. It’s not something that we

can do for wine storage on a grand

scale, but it was interesting to know

that something else worked at all.”

As Afshar started looking at the

whole winemaking process, he

came to the conclusion that many

things are done just because they’ve

always been done that way.

“Corks are not the best way to seal

a wine, it’s the worst way. Corks are

a natural product but they’re unpredictable,”

he said. “They can have

cracks and other flaws, including

pockets of bacteria that infect the

wine. People used to think of screw

caps or synthetic corks as a sign of

cheap wine. Now some excellent

wines are abandoning natural corks.

In Persia they sealed the wine with

bread dough. In other places they

used a wooden or clay plug covered

with beeswax.

“It’s the same with barrels. They

were the most convenient technology

1,000 years ago, but it isn’t the

best thing for all wines. Oak barrels

give tannins and flavors that you

want in red wine, and the oak itself

has antibacterial properties, but a

crack in the wood can let in more

oxygen than the winemaker intends.

The Greeks and Romans aged their

wines in ceramic amphorae. Modern

winemakers like me get the

same effect by aging in steel or

glass.”

Afshar’s effort to eliminate sulfites

encountered a problem: winemakers

use sulfites because they

eliminate bacteria that spoils wine.

“There are bacteria on every surface,

including the skins of the

grape,” he said. “The industry’s answer

to this is to spray the grapes

with a solution that contains sulfites.

But there is another way to do

that. I have been working on a mix

of chemicals that evaporates with

no residue left on the grape. It is like

ozone, which kills bacteria on contact

but is a gas. I am taking methods

from other areas and applying

them to winemaking.”

After eliminating sulfites in the

early stages of production, Afshar

moved on to aging.

“There are food grade antioxidants

that some people take as dietary

supplements but that aren’t

usually used for wine,” he said.

“They are not as effective as sulfites

individually, but when used in the

right balance they don’t affect the

taste or color of wine, and they

don’t cause allergic reactions. It took

me years to come up with the successful

combination.”

Though there are some non-sulfited

wines on the market already,

they are rare, usually drunk very

young, and are generally more expensive.

Though the antioxidants

that Afshar uses are more expensive

than sulfites, he is confident his new

processes will create a sulfite-free

wine that can be sold at only a modest

price premium. He is in the

process of getting licenses and trademarks

to produce his wine commercially.

“As soon as I get my approvals,

I’m ready to go commercial,” Afshar

said. “I’ll start with 100 cases. If that

sells out, 1,000. If that sells out I’ll

double it. I have people who want

to buy now because they have bad

reactions to most wines, but not

mine. They’re ready to put down

deposits now, even though I won’t

be able to have it on the market for

two years. Once I have the winery

running I may quit the paint and

coatings business because I enjoy

this a lot more. This is my future,

my family’s future. I have been

doing this for years, and it has

proven to work over and over. I

don’t see why it wouldn’t take off.” PEN

April 2017Peninsula 39


40 PeninsulaApril 2017


April 2017Peninsula 41


42 PeninsulaApril 2017


RPV Residents

Do you change your automobile oil and filter? If you do, call EDCO your trash/recycling

hauler and arrange for a free pickup. Then, place your used oil and/or filter in a tightly

sealed container or ziplock bag. EDCO will pick them up and drop off an oil recycling kit

that contains a 15-quart drip pan, empty 1-gallon container, funnel, shop rag, cardboard

floor mat and information on used oil and filter. Call EDCO at 310-540-2977 or go to

www.rpvrecycles.com.

Household Hazardous Waste/Electronic Waste Roundup

Sat. April 8th from 9:00 am to 3:00 pm

RPV Civic Center, 30940 Hawthorne Bl.

Composting Workshop (Beginners Level)

Sat. April 15th from 9:30 am to 11:30 am, Hesse Park, Fireside Room

Document Shredding/Electronic Waste Roundup/Free Mulch Giveaway

Sat. April 22nd from 8 am to 11 am

RPV Civic Center, 30940 Hawthorne Bl. (RPV Residents Only)

For Household Hazardous Waste (including Sharps disposal)

and Electronic Waste Disposal, go to:

Gaffey SAFE Center

Address: 1400 N Gaffey St, San Pedro, 90731

Phone: 800.988.6942

Open Saturdays and Sundays

from 9am to 3pm

April 2017Peninsula 43


S P O T L I G H T O N T H E H I L L

Muffins and Mozart

Celebrates composer’s life

On a rain drenched Saturday morning, February 18, St. Peter's by the

Sea hosted a family breakfast and concert at Reeves Hall. Volunteers

served up enormous platters of gourmet muffins, hot bacon and eggs,

fruit and lots of fresh Starbucks coffee. The breakfast with friends was

followed by a kid friendly performance by Pat Maki and Campus Concerts

highlighting the music and life of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Proceeds

from the fundraiser went towards supporting St. Peter's Pre-School

programs and facilities.

1. Ann Shaw and Laura Bettis.

2. Romina, Daniel and Lukas Mariani-

Simacek.

3. Hope, Dan, Holly and Abigail

Bolton.

4. Romina Mariani-Simacek, Alexis

White and Danica King.

5. Elle, Sara and Stella McKown.

6. Araceli Orozco, Carol Kollmer,

Laura Bettis and Ann Shaw.

PHOTOS BY STEPHANIE CARTOZIAN

7. Dorian Gomez, Martha Hynes M.D.,

Donna Gomez and Tom Hynes.

8. Eric, Caden, Danica, Naomi and

Kiran King.

9. Tony Gonzalez, Don Mottinger and

Bill Schurmer.

10. Dan Bolton, Pastor Paul Barrett

and Ross Bolton.

11. (Front) Elle McKown, Elisa Arai,

Mattie and Hattie Cartozian and (back)

Romina Mariani-Simacek.

12. Aislin Ard, Lily and Isla Hansen.

13. Carol Mead, Pat Maki, Anna Adkisson,

Cathy Biagini and Darren Mc-

Cann.

1

2 3 4

5

6

7

8

9 10

11 12

13

44 PeninsulaApril 2017


eventcalendar

CALENDAR OF COMMUNITY EVENTS

Compiled by Teri Marin

You can email your event to our address: penpeople@easyreadernews.com

All submissions must be sent by the 10th of each month prior to event taking place.

Saturday, March 25

Slime Snails & Slugs

Join Natural History Museum’s Jann Vendetti to become a snail and slug citizen

scientist. 11 a.m. White Point Nature Education Center & Preserve, 1600

W. Paseo del Mar in San Pedro. Free. RSVP to pvplc.org: Events & Activities/Whitepoint

Presentations or call (310) 541-7613.

Vietnam Veterans Day

Honoring Vietnam Veterans on The Battleship IOWA Museum. The Point Vicente

Chapter NSDAR, and co-hosted by The Battleship IOWA Museum. Individual

bronze lapel pin presented to all Vietnam Veteran attendees. The

ceremony, open to everyone, will also be marked with other festivities, presentations,

musical entertainment and more! 11 a.m. 250 S. Harbor Blvd.,

Berth 87, San Pedro. Pacificbattleship.com.

Sunday, March 26

Holiday Concert

Long Ago and Far Away: A Musical Odyssey. The Palos Verdes Symphonic

Band will perform. 3 p.m. Tickets are $20 (adults) and $10 (youth 18 and

younger), plus a $5 facility fee to both. Purchase tickets directly from the Norris

Box Office: (310) 544-0403 x 221 or palosverdesperformingarts.com. Norris

Theatre, 27570 Norris Center Drive, Rolling Hills Estates.

Friday, March 31

Nature & Me Storytime

Share the joy of reading with your children and introduce them to the beauty

of our natural surroundings. Geared for 2-5 years. 9:30 - 10 a.m. For more

information contact Marisa Perley at (310) 377-9584 x 238 or email mperley@pvld.org.

George F Canyon Nature Center, 27305 Palos Verdes Drive

East, Rolling Hills Estates.

Saturday, April 1

Palos Verdes Peninsula Land Conservancy

Free Family Hike at 9 a.m. Bring your family and join a naturalist guide to

46 PeninsulaApril 2017


eventcalendar

discover habitat, wildlife and more on an easy hike up George F Canyon with

amazing views of the city. 27305 Palos Verdes Dr. E, Rolling Hills. (310) 547-

0862 or RSVP at: pvplc.org, Events & Activities.

Outdoor Volunteer Day

Portuguese Bend Reserve, Rancho Palos Verdes, 9 a.m. – noon. Help restore

important wildlife habitat while looking out at a beautiful view. Sign up at

pvplc.volunteerhub.com.

Beauty of Nature film series – Seasons

An awe-inspiring tale about the “golden age of forests.” A visually stunning

film by Jacques Perrin and Jacques Cluzaud who brought us “Winged Migration.”

$10. Youth free. 5:30 p.m. at Warner Grand Theatre, 478 W. 6th

Street, San Pedro. Tickets: pvplc.org, Events & Activities.

The Step Crew

The Step Crew boasts three world-class fiddlers backed by an amazing fivepiece

ensemble plus three styles of exhilarating dance forms - Irish step, Ottawa

Valley step and percussive tap. 8 p.m. Tickets $55-$65, with a $10

discount for children 12 and under. Call the box office at (310) 544-0403 or

go to palosverdesperformingarts.com. Norris Theater, 27570 Norris Center

Drive in Rolling Hills Estates.

Saturday, April 2

Beginners Composting in RPV

Workshop with water-wise gardening information 9:30 - 11 a.m. at Hesse

Park. Discounted compost and worm bins for sale (cash or check only) after

the workshop. Open to all interested gardening enthusiasts. 29301

Hawthorne Blvd, Rancho Palos Verdes, Fireside Room. For information go to:

smartgardening.com or rpvca.gov/DocumentCenter/ View/1148.

Morten Lauridsen’s Lux Aeterna

Joanna Medawar Nachef Singers presents Morten Lauridsen’s Lux Aeterna.

The JMS Singers will feature more of Lauridsen’s music in the second half such

as: O Magnum Mysterium, Sure on This Shining Night, and Dirait On. At the

Palos Verdes Performing Arts Norris Theatre 27570 Norris Center Drive,

Rolling Hills Estate. 7:30 p.m. pre-concert talk at 6:30 p.m. For tickets visit

palosverdesperformingarts.com or call (310) 544-0403 x221.

Tuesday, April 4

Jester Phund-raiser

Join the laugh fest with stand-up comedian Ian Bagg at The Jester & Pharley

Phund’s Phun Night at the Comedy & Magic Club, 1018 Hermosa Ave., Hermosa

Beach. Proceeds from ticket sales will provide David Saltzman’s bestselling

“The Jester Has Lost His Jingle” to hospitalized children with cancer.

(310) 544-4733 to reserve your ticket.

Vinyl Windows

Replacement and New Construction

BUY ONLINE

AND SAVE BIG $$$

WWW.1STWINDOWS.COM

VINYL, ALUMINUM, WOODCLAD

Lowest Prices Up Front • No Games

Show Room 562-494-9069

CONTRACTOR REFERRAL • Fax 562-494-2069

April 2017Peninsula 47


eventcalendar

Saturday, April 8

Easter Egg Hunt

BYOB – Bring your own basket to the annual Easter Egg Hunt at the lighthouse.

Join an old-fashion egg hunt and crafts10:30 a.m., for children ages 4 to 10.

All children must be accompanied by an adult. Younger siblings are welcome

to participate, but egg prizes may not be appropriate for children under four.

Lucky egg hunters may find a golden egg which is good for a special gift. Pt.

Fermin Lighthouse, 807 Paseo del Mar, San Pedro.

Welcome Zorman

Chamber Orchestra of the South Bay concludes its 2016-17 Season with a

gala performance at the Norris Theatre at 8 pm. The featured soloist is 2011

International Tchaikovsky Competition winner violinist Itamar Zorman. 2017-

18 season will be announced and the audience will be invited to a reception

following the concert. There will be a Preview Talk by Chuck Klaus, starting at

7:15 p.m. Single tickets are $63 and will be available through the Norris Theatre

Box Office, (310) 544-0403, ext. 221. Further information on the COSB

and its future concerts can be found by visiting mycosb.org.

Cactus, Succulent show & sale

The two-day show (Saturday and Sunday) features stunning displays of exotic

and dazzling plants staged by expert growers. This is your opportunity to

recreate sculptural beauties in your own home or drought-tolerant garden.

Choose from thousands of rare and beautiful cactus and succulents and to

speak with the experts on how to display and care for them. 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

South Coast Botanic Garden, 26300 Crenshaw Blvd., Palos Verdes Peninsula.

Entry includes admission to the Garden: adults $9; seniors and students $6;

child 5-12 $4; under 5 free. Garden members free. For more information see

southcoastcss.org or the garden at (310) 544-6815.

DAVID FAIRCHILD PHOTOGRAPHY

"Its Like You’re There All Over Again"

310-316-5547 WWW.DAVIDFAIRCHILDSTUDIO.COM

Guided nature walk

Presented by the Palos Verdes Peninsula

Land Conservancy. Experience

the impressively restored 28-acre Linden

H. Chandler Preserve with its

lush oasis of riparian habitat and

home for the rare Palos Verdes blue

butterfly. Moderate walk. Free and

open to the public. 9 a.m. 916 Silver

Spur Rd. #207, Rolling Hills Estates.

(310) 541-7613 ext. 201 or sign up

at pvplc.org/_events/Nature-

WalkRSVP.asp.

Stories, Songs and More

All at the White Point Nature Education

Center, 1600 W. Paseo Del

Mar, San Pedro,10 a.m. Share the

joy of storytelling with your children

and introduce them to the beauty of

the natural surroundings. Your family

will enjoy spending time with retired

Children’s Librarian Carla Sedlacek

for stories and activities featuring nature

themes, exciting props and

songs. Free. RSVP at: pvplc.org.

5 Outstanding Musicians

The five finalists in the Peninsula

Symphony’s 2017 Edith Knox Young

Artists Competition will perform with

piano accompaniment for professional

judging. First-prize winner will

be announced at the end of the pro-

48 PeninsulaApril 2017


calendar

gram and will solo with the Symphony

at its June 18, Norris Foundation

concert. Free and open to the

public. 2 p.m. Redondo Union High

School Auditorium, 1 Sea Hawk

Way, Redondo Beach. Pensym.org.

Sunday, April 9

Mozart's Requiem Mass

Community Concert

From darkness to light, grief to hope,

Mozart's Requiem sets the traditional

prayers of the Requiem Mass to

spectacular music. St. Peter's by the

Sea Festival Choir with professional

orchestra and soloists, along with

Music Director, Dr. Mark Bennett, invite

you to our community concert at

3:30 p.m. in the Sanctuary . We

offer this concert in the hope that it

will serve as a memorial to our loved

ones. 6410 Palos Verdes Drive

South, RPV. 310.377.6882, StPetersPres.org.

Full Moon Hike

Wth the Palos Verdes Peninsula Land

Conservancy. Explore nocturnal

sights with an expert naturalist under

a full moon at the George F Canyon

Nature Preserve. Must be age 9 and

up. $12 per person. Reservations required

at pvplc.org, Events & Activities.

Tuesday, April 11

Photography Contest

Deadline for photographic entries

from amateur photographers of all

ages for the first ever Point Fermin

Photography Contest. Participation is

free; subject is the freshly painted

lighthouse. Email kristen.heather@

lacity.org for questions and/or an

entry form or pick up an entry form

at the lighthouse. Winning entries

displayed at the lighthouse during

the “Tea by the Sea” event April 29.

807 Paseo del Mar, San Pedro.

Thursday, April 13

Needle Artists

Chapter of the American Needlepoint

Guild will hold its monthly

meeting at 10 a.m. at Ports O’Call

Restaurant, 1200 Nagoya Way,

San Pedro. Tomoko Takahashi will

be lecturing on the art of Sachiko

embroidery. Call 424-224-9254 for

further information.

Robert T. Downs, Sharon A. Bryan* ** + ++, Christopher M. Moore* ** + ++, Rebecca L.T. Schroff** + ++, Jan T. Inoue*

* Certified Family Law Specialist by the State Bar of California Board of Legal Specialization;

** Certified Trusts & Estates Specialist by the State Bar of California Board of Legal Specialization;

+ Chosen to 2016 Super Lawyers; ++ Chosen to 2015, 2016 and 2017 editions of Best Lawyers of America ©

Honored by our peers for our professional excellence,

Moore, Bryan, Schroff & Inoue LLP

2016 Super Lawyers

Certified Family Law and Trusts & Estates Specialists

Complex Property • Custody • Support Issues

Personal Service • Exceptional Results

Cost Effective • Timely Resolutions

(310) 540-8855

21515 Hawthorne Blvd, Suite 490, Torrance

www.mbsllp.com | mail@mbsllp.com

April 2017Peninsula 49


Suzy Zimmerman, Agent

Insurance Lic#: OF71296

4010 Palos Verdes Dr N, Suite

103

Rolling Hills Estates, CA 90274

Bus: 310-377-9531

www.zimziminsurance.com

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714 S. Weymouth Avenue

San Pedro, CA 90732

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eventcalendar

Wednesday, April 12

The Palos Verdes Woman's Club

Luncheon speaker will present an update on the Norris Center for the Performing

Arts. Noon. Rolling Hills Country Club, 27000 Palos Verdes Drive East.

Cost of the luncheon is $32. For information, reservations call Beverly Teresinski,

310-378-1349.

Friday, April 14-23

Pippin at PV High

Palos Verdes High School Drama Department will present the musical Pippin

for eight performances. Heir to the Frankish throne, the young prince Pippin

is in search of the secret to true happiness and fulfillment. April 14-15 and 21-

22 at 7 p.m., April 15, 22-23 at 2 p.m., and April 20 at 3:30 p.m. in the

MPR at Palos Verdes High School, 600 Cloyden Road in Palos Verdes Estates.

$20 for adults; $15 for students. Tickets can be purchased at pvhsdrama.com

or at the door if seats still available. For further information, (310) 378-8471,

ext. 237.

Saturday, April 15

Poetry & Music

Surf Writers Annual Poetry and Music. Guitarist and poet, Richard Leach, performing

and reading some of his work, followed by ten local poets and a closing

performance by guitarist and poet, Ildy Lee. Free. 1:30-3:30 p.m. In the

Gallery at the Malaga Cove Library, 2400 via Campesina, Palos Verdes Estates.For

more information contact mltrvlarng@hotmail.com.

Outdoor Volunteer Day

Help restore the unique Alta Vicente Reserve canyon habitat, home to many

threatened and endangered wildlife species. 9 a.m. – noon. Alta Vicente Reserve,

30940 Hawthorne Blvd, Rancho Palos Verdes. Sign up at pvplc.volunteerhub.com.

Sunday, April 16

Easter photos, food fun

Celebrate Easter Sunday at St. Peter's by the Sea with three unique Easter

Worship Services: 8 a.m. -Contemplative

in Reeves Hall, 9:15 a.m.-Traditional

in the Sanctuary, and 11

a.m.-Informal in the Sanctuary. At

noon enjoy an egg hunt on the lawn

for the kids including a light food

faire for all. Complimentary family

photos. Childcare & Church School

at 9:15 & 11 a.m. All are welcome.

StPetersPres.org or 310-377-6882.

6410 Palos Verdes Drive South, RPV.

Wed., April 19

Birding with Wild Birds

Unlimited

Explore the birds making a home in

the restored habitat at this beautiful

preserve. Binoculars supplied for beginners.

The program is free. All

ages welcome. 8:30 a.m. White

Point Nature Preserve, 1600 W.

Paseo Del Mar, San Pedro. RSVP at:

pvplc.org, Events & Activities.

50 PeninsulaApril 2017


Thursday, April 20

South Coast Rose Society

April meeting, at South Coast Botanic Garden, 26300 Crenshaw Boulevard,

Palos Verdes Peninsula with social hour beginning at 7 p.m. Society member

Sharon Van Enoo will be speaking on how to prepare your roses for showing

at rose shows. For further information, please see

Facebook.

Friday, April 21

The Music Man

With a crash of cymbals and a blast of horns, Meredith Willson's Tony Awardwinning

musical comedy, “The Music Man,” will march into the Norris Theatre

accompanied by a full orchestra. Performances are April 21-May 7 at 8 p.m.

Fridays and Saturdays, and 2 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. Ticket prices $30-

-$65. To purchase tickets call the box office at (310) 544-0403 or go to

palosverdesperformingarts.com. The Norris Theatre is located at 27570 Norris

Center Drive in Rolling Hills Estates.

Saturday, April 22

RPV Brush Clearing

EDCO’s residential event starts for five consecutive Saturdays, each week concentration

on a different area in RPV depending on regular collection day.

Today’s brush clearing is for Monday routes. For more info go to

www.rpvca.gov/DocumentCenter/ View/9366 or www.rpvrecycles.com.

Earth Day

Celebration at White Point Nature Preserve 1600 W. Paseo Del Mar, San

Pedro, 9 a.m. - noon. Families are invited to participate by helping to beautify

the native garden and trails, taking a guided hike through the preserve, enjoy

special nature inspired art activities, and much more! Lunch and gifts sponsored

by Toyota. RSVP at: pvplc.volunteerhub.com.

Composting 101

White Point Nature Education Center & Preserve, 1600 W. Paseo Del Mar,

San Pedro April 11a.m. – Compost to a greener tomorrow with Denise Epport,

President of Trifomis Corporation. Free. RSVP to: pvplc.org: Events & Activities/White

Point Presentations or call (310) 541-7613.

Saturday, April 23

RPV’s Free Shredding &

E-Waste Roundup

EDCO and the City of RPV sponsor

a free document/paper shredding

event 8 a.m to 11 a.m. at the RPV

Civic Center (City Hall) Parking lot

located at 30940 Hawthorne Blvd.

Certified shredding trucks will shred

the material on-site. Limit of 3 storage

size boxes per household. Event

exclusive to RPV residents (EDCO

customers) only. Electronics waste

will be collected also. Free mulch

available on a self-serve, self-load,

self-haul basis, while supplies last.

Bring your shovel and cans. Limit of

2 cans per household. Please follow

the “Special Event” traffic control

plan. rpvca.gov/Document Center/View/6892,

or call EDCO at

310-540-2977.

eventcalendar

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eventcalendar

Sunday, April 23

Walk the Walk Fundraiser

Assistance League fundraiser to provide dental care, and school attire for disadvantaged

children. 8 a.m. - 1 p.m. 600 Sampson Way at 5th and Harbor,

San Pedro. Registration $20. Call 310-832-8355 x221.

Monday, April 24

Seahorse Classic

The 28th Annual Seahorse Classic, hosted by Peninsula Committee Children’s

Hospital, at Palos Verdes Country Club. All proceeds benefit the Associates

Sarcoma Program Chair at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles. Golf, gourmet

boxed lunch, dinner, silent and live auctions, and raffle. Longest drive, holein-one

opportunities and more. To register, visit seahorseclassic.com. For information

regarding sponsorship opportunities, please visit: pcch.net.

Thursday, April 27

Wings of Freedom

Western Museum of Flight Wings of Freedom ground tours and flights. The

Collings Foundation aircraft (B-24, B-25, B-17, and TF-51) will visit the museum

April 27-30. Aircraft will be open for ground tours from approximately 10

a.m. - 3 p.m. $15 for adults; $5 for children 12 and under. Flight experiences

in the bombers are available for $400 to $450 and may be booked directly

with Collings at collingsfoundation.org/flight or by calling (978) 562-9182.

No reservations needed. 3315 Airport Drive, Torrance.

Las Candalistas 2017

Spring event celebrating 50 years of giving with Out of Africa. Have a won-

52 PeninsulaApril 2017


eventcalendar

derful day of adventure and empowerment, while enjoying the gorgeous view

of the vineyard, the Pacific and Catalina Island! At Catalina View Gardens,

6001 Palos Verdes Drive South, Rancho Palos Verdes. 9:30 a.m to 3 p.m.

Lunch is served at noon. Adults $70. To make reservations: lascandalistas.org.

Information (310) 798-7499, pick up reserved tickets at the entrance.

Friday & Saturday, April 28 & 29

31st Annual Circle Garden Party

“Delectable Living, Delightful and Delicious,” a two-stop garden party behind

the gates in Rolling Hills with music and edible treats, will be held from 10

a.m. – 4 p.m. There also will be several boutiques and the popular Collectibles

estate sale.

“Mr. Australia”

New Zealand and Fiji Too!

Your So. Bay Expert for Amazing, Customized,

Independent Travel Packages “Down-under.”

For a conference or appointment:

Rick Stone, “Mr. Australia”

310-793-6013

mraustralia@verizon.net

www.MrAustralia.net

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April 2017Peninsula People 53


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Call for Showroom address

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eventcalendar

The 31st annual tour is presented by The Circle, a support group for the Palos

Verdes Art Center/Beverly G. Alpay Center for Arts Education. Tickets include

a TGIS catered lunch at the Art Center, 5504 W. Crestridge Rd., Rancho Palos

Verdes. $70 presale, $75 days of the event. Tickets may be purchased at

PVHhomesTour.org.

Saturday, April 29

Lighthouse tour and photos

Enjoy tea in a garden setting at the Pt. Fermin Lighthouse Tea by the Sea boutique.

Adults can tour the lighthouse; monitors will be stationed in each room.

Garden guides will allow for self directed tours. A boutique of local artisans

will be assembled for attendees. Winners of the Photo Contest will be on display

in the lighthouse. 10:30 a.m. - 2 p.m. Pt. Fermin Lighthouse, 807 Paseo

del Mar, San Pedro.

RPV Brush Clearing Events

EDCO’s residential event starts for five consecutive Saturdays, each week concentration

on a different area depending on regular collection day. Today’s

event is for Tuesday routes. For more info go to www.rpvca.gov/Document-

Center/View/9366 or www.rpvrecycles.com.

Outdoor Volunteer Day

Nurture seedlings and grow shrubs for habitat restoration projects. 9 a.m. –

noon. Reservation required by April 26. Sign up at pvplc.volunteerhub.com.

Calendar cont. on page 69

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As a fee-only financial planner I will be

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E-mail: aahfp@Yahoo.com

Web: www.aaheydari.com

Phone: (310)792-2090

54 Peninsula PeopleApril 2017


Timeless

Centuries ago when the world’s finest clockmakers were

hard at work, their aim was to create a mechanical marvel

that operates continuously and last forever. Imagine

a hand made complex mechanism of inter-working parts designed

to keep time accurately. Your clock is a work of art and

your job is to keep this timeless treasure healthy for the next

generation.

Your clock reminds you of its presence every time you wind

it. If the accuracy of the clock is not what it used to be, or the

chimes are not as strong or rhythmic, or maybe it just stops;

that means your clock is talking to you and telling you that its

endless life is in jeopardy.

It is imperative to maintain and service your clock regularly.

Oil gets old and dry forcing the train of gears to work twice as

hard to accomplish their goal. This results in damage that drastically

shortens the life of a fine timepiece.

Michel Medawar has been extending the lives of timepieces

for over Sixty years as his father did Sixty years before. He is

the inventor of the first talking clock in the world. He is a graduate

from Patek Philippe in Geneva, Switzerland, The Theod

Wagner Clock Co. in Wiesbaden, Germany, and the Howard

Miller Clock Co. in Zeeland, Michigan. Call him so that he may

come to your home and offer you a free estimate for servicing

your clock. Or bring your wall or mantel clock to our store to

see our showroom and receive the same complementary diagnosis.

Free Consultation

Call Now

1.800.689.1571

We are located at 810C Silver Spur Rd., in Rolling Hills Estates, Ca.

90274. Or call us at (310) 544-0052

Open 10:00 am - 6:00 pm Tuesday - Saturday

810C Silver Spur Road • Rolling Hills Estates • CA 90274

Call 310.544.0052

April 2017Peninsula 55


S P O T L I G H T O N T H E H I L L

PHOTOS BY DEIDRE DAVIDSON

South Bay Women of the Year

Awards Luncheon

Switzer Learning Center's 17th Annual South Bay Women of

the Year Awards Luncheon was held on March 10th at the

Doubletree by Hilton Hotel. The prestigious honorees are pillars

of their communities. Paula Del Vicario was honored for her

community service particularly in music. Merrietta Fong was

recognized for her civic leadership. Peggy Tremayne was recognized

for her work in education and Sue Chen was recognized

for her work in social awareness. All the honorees are actively

involved with serving the community on many levels and the

luncheon was to bring attention to their individual accomplishments.

To learn more visit www.switzercenter.org.

1. John Arensdorf, Honoree Sue Chen, Allison

Nieuwenhuis and Kenny Leung.

2. Ann Ehrenclou, Alanna Kennedy, Janet

Ceske, Carole LaCaze and Val Noguchi.

3. Robin Taub Comer, Janet Payne, Donna

Duperron, South Bay Deputy for Janice

Hahn Mark Waronek and Barbara Graham.

4. Auction art piece designed by autistic

kids in the school.

5. Executive director of Switzer Rebecca

Foo, Jann Feldman and Judith Borck.

6. Honoree Sue Chen, Executive director of

Switzer Rebecca Foo.

7. Rachel Bigley, Charlotte and Russ

Lesser, Geri Isara, Mark Matuso and Martin

Serna.

8. Mike Molina, Ruben Barajas, Executive

director of Switzer Rebecca Foo, Torrance

city councilman Mike Griffiths, Geoff Rizzo,

Torrance city council member Heidi

Ashcraft and Torrance city councilman Dr.

Milton Herring.

9. South Bay Women of the Year Peggy

Tremayne, Paula Del Vicario, Merrietta Fong

and Sue Chen.

10. Student honorees Marranda Hollis,

Carolina Resendiz, Maya Smith and

Vanessa Cazares.

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56 PeninsulaApril 2017


April 2017Peninsula 57


Heaven

a bit like

home

by Richard Foss

Rice Heaven offers Korea’s answer to home cooking

As much as I like to cook, there are times

when I open the refrigerator, rummage

through the pantry, and just can’t see

anything that looks like a meal. On another day,

inspiration might strike from that same view,

but today it just isn’t happening. My wife

comes home and I suggest a restaurant, and

what do you know, that’s the same thing she

had for lunch.

Sound familiar? On days like this we have a

go-to restaurant that serves a little of this, a little

of that, a place where we always get a good

meal and nobody’s wallet gets pinched too

tightly. Sometimes we even get everything to go

so my wife can have dinner in a bathrobe and

slippers, because there are evenings when that

is the height of luxury. It’s comfort food at its

most pure, and you probably don’t have to

think very long before you come up with the

name of the place where you go when you feel

the same way.

I think I have found the restaurant that

serves that purpose for the Korean community

on the Hill. It’s a little place called Rice

Heaven, in the shopping center at the corner of

Crenshaw and Rolling Hills Road. The place

opened in 2008 as a Japanese restaurant but

switched to a mainly Korean menu after a

change in ownership a few years later. I hadn’t

visited in some time, until recently, when I

stopped in with a friend.

The place looks like a lot of quick-serve

restaurants, the walls decorated mainly with

pictures of the food, the only hint of style some

brightly colored hanging lamps. The menu is a

list of Korean home cooking favorites, plus a

few Japanese items such as chicken or pork

katsu and both Japanese and Korean style sushi

rolls. The prices are very moderate, so on that

visit we over-ordered because we didn’t know

how large the portions were.

I was dining with someone who hadn’t tried

gimbap, the Korean-style rice roll. Though gimbap

and sushi both involve rice and other items

wrapped in seaweed, gimbap isn’t technically

sushi because sushi rice is always vinegared.

Gimbap rice usually has a dash of sesame oil

instead, and instead of fresh fish there is usually

a mix of pickled and fresh vegetables and

beef, spam, vegetables and fishcake or dried

fish. My companion doesn’t like raw fish but

was delighted with the mix of chopped beef,

58 PeninsulaApril 2017


pickled daikon, scallion and Asian

spinach. On a second visit with my

wife we sampled a roll with dried anchovy

along with the vegetables, a

new experience for her, which she

likewise enjoyed. The anchovy isn’t

the oily, salty type you get on pizza,

and it is used moderately. If you really

like a strong anchovy flavor you

might ask them to add extra, but we

thought the balance was perfect.

On that first visit we decided to

order a special item was posted on

the wall called Tteok galbi. This

turned out to be a pair of small hamburger

patties blended with mild seasoning,

grilled, and coated with a

thick, sweet soy sauce. It was a bit

too sweet for me as it was, but was

good when topped with a little of the medium-spicy kimchi that arrived at

our table along with side dishes of fried tofu and japchae noodles with vegetables.

These dishes, called banchan, are refilled as often as you like, but

on both visits we had so much food that we didn’t take advantage of that.

On the first trip we tried the Korean fried chicken, which is offered with

a spicy sauce, sweet sauce, or half and half. There were four wing pieces

in each style to the order, along with rice, cabbage salad, and the banchan,

so it was an impressive portion. We both greatly preferred the spicy chicken

to the milder one coated with sweet sesame oil.

We enjoyed the chicken while listening to our bowl of bibimbap sizzling

gently at the side of the table. Bibimbap is a rice, meat, and vegetable dish

that can be served plain or in a hot stone pot so that the rice at the bottom

gets crispy. When you mix it together there is a pleasant variety of textures.

On top of the rice was a neat arrangement of beef, spinach, mushrooms,

carrots, bean sprouts, and zucchini, topped with a fried egg and dusted with

shredded seaweed and sesame seeds. It’s a marvelously varied set of flavors,

and a fine full meal for only 10

bucks.

On my return visit with my wife

she ordered ramyun, the Korean version

of Japanese ramen, while I had

a plate of spicy squid served on a hot

platter. The squid was a Korean classic,

a big pile of seafood, grilled

onion, scallion, cabbage, and a few

jalapeno peppers in a sweet and

spicy sauce. My wife’s vegetarian

noodle soup was not quite what she

expected. She doesn’t usually like

spicy food as much as I do so she had

ordered the soup assuming it would

be mild. But the broth was at least as

spicy as my seafood dish. More surprisingly,

she liked it. It’s a very flavorful

dish with more than just heat

to recommend it. She took regular bites of the rice, tofu, and cold noodle

salad to cut the heat and surprised herself and me by finishing the whole

bowl.

Though the restaurant was almost empty when we came in, as we dined

we noticed a steady stream of customers picking up to-go orders, all of them

greeting the counter staff in Korean. Beer and wine aren’t served here. Most

customers choose soft drinks, tea, or a variety coffees from the self-serve

machine at the back of the restaurant. On one visit we brought our own

wine. If you’re thinking of doing this I recommend a rose or sparkling

white, because those go well with the spices.

Rice Heaven is an interesting little spot to get unpretentious, well-made

Korean comfort food. It was good when we had it there and would taste

just as good if you enjoy it at home in your bathrobe.

Rice Heaven is at 2937 Rolling Hills Road in Torrance. Open daily except

Sunday, 11 a.m. – 9 p.m. Parking lot, some vegetarian items. Menu at riceheaven.net.

Phone 310-257-0134. PEN

April 2017Peninsula 59


q

HOME &

GARDEN GUIDE

r

Catalina Supreme Paints offers

expert advice, competitive prices

Catalina Supreme Paints is the destination for the highest quality paints and decorating

supplies. Its Manhattan Beach location is now a distributor of Farrow &

Ball paints and both the Redondo Beach and Manhattan Beach locations carry

Benjamin Moore, Cabot Stain, Hunter Douglas window covering and wallpaper.

Catalina Supreme is known for expert advice and great service as well as very

competitive pricing.

1002 S. Pacific Coast Hwy., Redondo Beach (310) 540-4456

708 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Manhattan Beach (310) 376-2444

Catalinapaintstores.com

Kitchen Collection team creates timeless results

Jackie Balint, CKD, has been a designer in the kitchen and bath industry since

1981 and is the owner of The Kitchen Collection in Riviera Village in Redondo

Beach. She and her daughter Debra offer years of expertise in practical and per-

J. QUINN CONSTRUCTION, INC.

Custom Concrete & Masonry

• Pools, Spas, Fountains

and Waterfeatures

• Firepits and Fireplaces

• Outdoor Cook Centers

• Stone and Tile Patios

• Interlocking Pavers

• Retaining Walls

• Driveways

(310) 325-6790

www.quinnpools.com

License B, C-8, C-53 #775677

60 PeninsulaApril 2017


q

HOME &

GARDEN GUIDE

r

sonalized kitchens and baths. They work with clients and contractors to create

timeless projects, utilizing quality products and providing personal attention from

concept to completion. Jackie and Debra have worked on projects throughout the

country and have had many of their projects published. The Kitchen Collection is

a member of the National Kitchen & Bath Association and the Bath & Kitchen Buying

Group. Jackie has served on the boards of both organizations.

241 Avenida del Norte, Redondo Beach. (310) 540-4090.

TheKitchenCollection.com

Pete Fer Plumbing Heating & Air available 24/7

Pete Fer Plumbing is a complete mechanical contracting company, providing

plumbing, heating and air conditioning for new construction, remodeling, service

and repair to commercial and residential customers. They provide 24 hour service,

seven days a week through an automated emergency dispatch paging system.

Mention Peninsula People to one of their service technicians and receive $20 off

your first service call.

2020 S Mesa St, San Pedro. (310) 831-0737

Peveler’s Custom Interiors offers design and build

Peveler's Custom Interiors has been serving the South Bay and beyond for over

35 years. A full service design build construction company, their scope of work

includes additions, second floors, complete home renovations, new construction,

kitchen and bath remodeling. They manufacture their own custom cabinetry. Fully

insured, licensed and bonded, as are all of their subcontractors, Peveler’s is not

going to be the lowest price nor will it be the highest price in town. They will be

the company that provides high value for your investment.

4203 Spencer Street, Torrance. (310) 214-5049. Pevelers.com

r

4203 Spencer St., Torrance, CA 90503

(310)214-5049 • www.pevelers.com

Appointment Recommended

Showroom Hours: Monday Thru Friday 10-5

Closed Saturday and Sunday

License #381992

• Serving the South

Bay for over 35 years

• Full Service Contractor

• Complete Installation

• New Construction

• Remodeling

• Second Floors

• Additions

• Cabinets

Visit Our

Kitchen &

Bath

Showroom

April 2017Peninsula 61


S P O T L I G H T O N T H E H I L L

Ice-America Presents

Local hockey heroes

The Palos Verdes Promenade ice skating rink hosted local

LA Kings veterans on Sunday afternoon February 26. Former

Kings Marty McSorley, Ian Turnball and Vic Venasky

scrimmaged with local kids on the ice and joined in a meet

and greet, signing autographs for their fans. The afternoon

also included a Chinese auction, games, prizes, food and entertainment

with costumed superheroes, including batman

and bat woman. A portion of the proceeds will benefit the

Kings Care Foundation.

1. DJ Longnecker, Azumi Williams and Barbara

Grimner.

2. Tamalin Srisook, Julia Parton and Azumi

Williams.

3. Dylan Walsh and Amanda Perez.

4. Vic Venasky, Jake Solomon and Ian

Turnball.

5. Marty McSorley, Vic Venasky, Jake

Solomon, Azumi Williams and Ian Turnball.

6. Hockey players and fans.

PHOTOS BY STEPHANIE CARTOZIAN

7. Sophie Croucier and Alliyah Becerra.

8. The LA Kings Ice Crew and PIC Hockey

students (photo by Marta Stattmiller).

9. Geanna Culbertson, author of the

Crisanta Knight Series (photo by Marta

Stattmiller).

10. Los Angeles Ice Crew (photo by Marta

Stattmiller).

11. Marty McSorley and son in the Green

Room (photo by Marta Stattmiller).

1

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62 PeninsulaApril 2017


T

P E N I N S U L A | C H A U S S E E ’ S I N S I G H T

2017 All-Weather Portfolio

Stock valuations are at 29.2, their highest reading in history except for

the Tech Bubble in 2000. And we know how that ended.

by Stuart Chaussee

he average household income in zip code 90274 was

$188,000, according to City-Data.com’s most recent report.

57 percent of tax filers showed dividend income, which indicates

stock ownership. For zip code 90275, the average household

income was $117,000 with 47 percent reporting dividend

income. If you factor in the number of residents on the Peninsula

who have company sponsored 401ks or other retirement plans,

where dividends are sheltered and unreported, my best guess tells

me that close to 70 percent of the households in 90274 own stocks

and probably 60 percent or higher in 90275.

Given this high level of stock ownership, it’s baffling to me how

little concern there is about the level of stock valuations and the

potential for loss in the coming years. Indeed, complacency reigns

despite stock portfolios being bloated from an 8-year bull market

that has pushed valuations close to the second highest in history.

The Shiller CAPE ratio (cyclically-adjusted price-to-earnings) indicates

current stock valuations are at 29.2, essentially the highest

reading in history except for the Tech Bubble in 2000. Stocks are

now priced well above the bubble in the late 1960s (Nifty-Fifty

Bubble), beyond the stock bubble of 2007 that led to a 55 percent

collapse in stocks, and equal to the bubble that was followed by

the Great Depression in the late 1920s (stocks subsequently lost

80 percent of their value). The only period when stocks were

clearly more expensive was during the Tech Bubble of 2000 – and

we know that ended with a 50 percent haircut to major stock indices.

It’s not only the CAPE Ratio that indicates stocks are back in

bubble territory. Price-to-book value also shows stocks at the highest

reading in history, other than the Tech Bubble. And, the priceto-sales

ratio is above where it was during all prior bubbles, while

the dividend yield on the S&P 500 is still near all-time lows at 1.9

percent annually – with prices at all-time highs.

If these facts are not enough to catch your attention, I could add

that almost all psychological market indicators suggest stocks are

overdue for a correction or worse. Volatility is near all-time lows,

the level of bullishness among advisors and advisory newsletters

is also close to a record (contrarian indicator). And, of course, the

investing public has started to throw money blindly at the stock

market, afraid of missing out on the apparently easy profits. These

are all additional signs of “irrational exuberance” and as we all

know, every bubble has ended badly for investors.

I have been concerned about overvalued stock prices since late

2013, but I have reluctantly gone along for the ride with heavy

stock exposure the past three years and the ride has been enjoyable.

Actually, the 8-year bull market ride has been quite fun,

but it was much easier to justify staying fully invested in

stocks when valuations were somewhat reasonable. That’s

not the case anymore. The vast majority of my clients

(mostly Peninsula residents) are nearing retirement

or already retired and I can no

longer justify an overweight allocation

to stocks. I have recently

reduced risk and sold many

stock positions. If history is a

guide, given that we are at 2-

standard deviation levels above

long-term price trends in stocks

–- which is an acceptable definition

of a bubble –- returns going

forward are likely to be belowaverage

or even negative. Still,

you hear almost no talk about

prices being frothy or at risk of

a serious decline. Heck, we

ALLOCATION NAME SYMBOL YIELD EXPENSE RATIO

25% Vanguard Short-Term Corporate Bond Index VCSH 2.1% 0.07%

30% Vanguard Intermediate-Term Bond Index BIV 2.8% 0.09%

10% Vanguard Long-Term Bond Index BLV 4.1% 0.09%

10% Vanguard Dividend Appreciation Index VIG 2.0% 0.09%

25% Consumer Staples Select Sector SPDR XLP 2.4% 0.14%

haven’t had a bear market in eight years (we are way overdue), when

prices decline on average 30 percent and the aftermath of a bubble

could show declines of 50 percent or more. Have you calculated how

much your portfolio would decline if we entered another bear market?

It’s easy to do. Multiply the dollar amount you have in stocks

by 20 percent (minimum decline to be considered a bear market) or

30 percent (average bear market decline) and that would indicate

your dollar loss. Sure, perhaps the loss will be temporary, but my

guess is it would be painful, nevertheless. And, we never know how

long it will take for the market to recover, so “temporary” could mean

a long wait to recover from those losses.

So, what is a prudent, rational investor to do? Well, you could do

nothing and simply ride out the inevitable downturn and hope you

live long enough to see your portfolio go on to reach new highs at

some point in the future. And, no doubt it will –- you simply need

an investing time horizon that is long enough for you to wait out any

temporary decline. And, of course, you must be able to “stomach”

portfolio losses that won’t be pretty and not panic and sell. So again,

doing nothing is one option, but perhaps not that appealing to anyone

nearing retirement or already retired.

My suggestion is that if you have enjoyed this long bull market in

stocks, but are concerned about losing a significant portion of your

profits in the next bear market, then protect at least a portion of your

gains. Consider reducing risk, perhaps substantially, and rebalancing

your portfolio now. Below I’ve compiled a simple, balanced portfolio

that I have back-tested, that survived our most recent stock and real

estate bubbles and Great Recession quite well. You could consider

some combination of these low-cost holdings that fit your own risk

profile and investment objectives. The 2017 All-Weather Portfolio

had one slightly negative year in the last 10 years, showing a loss of

only -1.0 percent in 2008 while during the same year the S&P 500

declined 37 percent. In addition, the portfolio

has an annual yield

of 2.6 percent,

which provides important

cash flow

for investors in

need of income. PEN

6.2% -1.0 7.1 9.9 10.4 8.0 7.8 9.5 1.7 4.6 2.1

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017

*Hypothetical returns 2007 to present (3/10/2017)

Stuart Chaussee is

a Palos Verdes-based feeonly

registered Investment

Advisor. He is the author of

three financial books,

including the awardwinning

Advanced

Portfolio Management;

Strategies for the Affluent.

He is a former contributing

writer for TheStreet.com.

Stuart welcomes your feedback

and can be reached

through

preservingwealth.com

or e-mail him directly at

stuartchaussee@msn.com

At the time of publication,

Stuart Chaussee and/or his

clients held positions in

BIV, BLV, VIG and XLP.

Holdings can change at any

time. Under no circumstances

does the information in this

column represent investment

advice or a recommendation

to buy or sell securities.

April 2017Peninsula 63


S P O T L I G H T O N T H E H I L L

PHOTOS BY STEPHANIE CARTOZIAN

Copacabana Affair

Raises funds for school

Los Verdes Country Club hosted a fundraiser benefiting Vista Grande

Elementary School. The theme was Havana and the dress was colorful

Cuban style with chocolate cigars and model, 1950s car centerpieces.

The crowd was primarily parents coming together to support their local

school and teachers. A disc jockey played Caribbean music and taught

the crowd to salsa and the cha cha. There were tables of silent auction

items and a photo booth with costumes for dress up in front of the camera.

Parents took home bookmarks with their photos.

1. Marla and Glenn Thompson.

2. Jeff and Kristy Llamas, Carolina

and Joe Tanner.

3. Rosemarie and Michael Diehl, Ron

and Pamela Light.

4. Jeri Delatorre and Melanie

Browoleit.

5. LaRae Mardesic Bechmann and

Glenn Thompson.

6. Dina Bates and Amanda Wishner.

7. David and Kristina Brown.

8. Glenn and Marla Thompson, Erik

and Debbie Brenizer, Amanda and Mike

Wishner.

9. Kim Libby, Jennifer Cosgrove, Amy

Cochrane, Abby Cowan and Julie Sampras.

10. Caitlin Waddell-Chow, Molly Amloyan,

Sandy Horii and Jo-Ann Bellucci.

11. Trish McNamara, Cindy Chia,

Alice Shippee and Karen Kordich.

12. Matt and Dina Bates, Sara and

Jordan Floyd.

13. Kristy and Jeff Llamas.

1

2 3 4

5

6

7

8

9 10

11 12

13

64 PeninsulaApril 2017


around&about

Peninsula, South students earn Eagle Scout rankings

Troop 378 Eagle Scouts Dallas Cooper, Alex Fukunaga, Scott Mitani

and Terren Mueller.

n Boy Scout Troop 378 of the Greater Los Angeles Area Council recently

awarded the rank of Eagle Scout to Palos Verdes Peninsula High students Alex

Fukunaga and Scott Mitani, Palos Verdes High student Terren Mueller and South

High student Dallas Cooper. Cooper’s and Mueller’s Eagle projects involved trail

and shelter improvements at the George F. Canyon Nature Preserve in Rolling Hills

Estates. Fukunaga refurbished a janitorial room at the Gardena Valley Japanese

Cultural Institute in Gardena. Mitani helped build planters and an amphitheater at

the Seed to Plate nursery.

Troop 276 Eagle Scout honored

n Trevor Trumpler, a senior at

Palos Verdes Peninsula High

and member of Boy Scout

Troop 276, was awarded

the rank of Eagle Scout at an

Eagle Court of Honor on

March 4 at Hesse Park Community

Center. Trumpler is the

son of Tom and Ginger Trumpler

of Rolling Hills Estates.

His Eagle Scout community

service project was designing

and building a new

shelving unit at the Neighborhood

Church. Troop 276 is

a high adventure troop that

backpacks the trails of Southern

California mountain

ranges, Joshua Tree National

Park, and the Sierra Nevada

Mountains. The troop is

based in Palos Verdes Estates

and meets at Palos Verdes Intermediate

School. For more

about the troop visit

PalosVerdesEstates257.mytro

op.us. PEN

Eagle Scout Trevor Trumpler.

NOW

OPEN

April 2017Peninsula 65


S P O T L I G H T O N T H E H I L L

Peninsula High School

Walk to fight cancer

The Cancer Support Community of Redondo Beach (CSCRB)

was one of two beneficiaries of the 15th Annual Walk for Life

to support cancer patients on February 24 at Peninsula High School

(PVPHS). More than 1,100 students, faculty, and members of the

community took part in the walk. The $50,000 raised was divided

between the CSCRB and City of Hope. The walk began at PVPHS

Campus and finished at Highridge Park. “It is heartwarming to see

how these students work together to make a difference in the lives

of cancer patients and their loved ones — we cannot thank them

enough,” said CSCRB CEO Judith Opdahl. “The funds received

from this walk will benefit more than 165 free support programs

that are offered each month at CSCRB for those affected by cancer.”

1

PHOTOS PROVIDED BY THERESA PLAKOS

1. CSCRB’s Daniel Hovenstine MD,

George Ozawa, Mana Kimura, and

Judith Opdahl display a check representing

proceeds from the 15th

Annual “Walk for Life.”

2. CSCRB’s Daniel Hovenstine MD,

Season Pollock and Judith Opdahl.

3. Samal Senaratna, Hunter Walsh,

Marco Merola and Matthew Patman

throw purple powder to commemorate

those in the PVPHS community

touched by cancer.

4. PVPHS Choir under the direction

of Dan Doctor perform Martina

McBride’s “I’m Going to Love You

Through It” at the pre-walk ceremony.

5. Alex Fukunaga thanks supporters

and speaks to the crowd about

his recent journey with cancer.

6. Over 80 South Bay students

with family members suffering from

or lost to cancer submitted essays

about their experiences to a contest

sponsored by Cancer Support Community

Redondo Beach. CSCRB

Kids Community Group Facilitator

Sharon Feigenbaum (left) poses

with winner Rebecca Nolan, of West

Neighborhood School; finalist

Cameron Amintinat, of West Torrance

High; contest sponsor Mary

Kehrl; finalists, Julia Gazdik, of

Palos Verdes Intermediate School;

and Marissa Cueva, of Magruder

Middle School; CSCRB board president

Dr. Dan Hovenstine and

CSCRB CEO Judith Opdahl. Dr. Hovenstine

is holding a photo of finalists

Jake Milch, of Peninsula High,

who was unable to attend the ceremony

because he had a basketball

game.

2

3

4

5

6

66 PeninsulaApril 2017


S P O T L I G H T O N T H E H I L L

Palos Verdes Historical Society

Uncovers mysteries

Point Vicente Interpretive Center hosted Sweets, Secrets and Wine on February 23,

featuring stories from the Palos Verdes Historical Society Artifact Collection. The

evening began with guests viewing the historical museum pieces, enjoying wine and appetizers

and then listening to lectures by local historians Ann Hugh, Bruce Megowan and

Vicki Mack. Among the relics was a wooden stave in the shape of an old brandy barrel

that used to be a part of the PVE waterpipe system. The soiree wrapped up with light

desserts and conversation. In September 2014, the Society acquired a collection of Palos

Verdes artifacts from the original museum, which had lost its home in the Malaga Cove

School Tower in 2006. The goal of the group is to establish a new museum to preserve

and display cultural and historical relics Peninsula artifacts. To find out more visit

PalosVerdesHistoricalSociety.org.

PHOTOS BY STEPHANIE CARTOZIAN

1. Joan Kelly, Ken Dyda and

Ann Hugh.

2. Don Christy, Vicki Mack

and John Harbison.

3. Steve Young and

Charlotte Ginsburg.

4. Jack Goldberg, Aaron and

Carrie Miller.

5. Tom Steers and Diana

McIntyre.

6. Joan Kelly, Ellen Moses

and Joyce Fein.

7. Dale and Marilyn

Hoffman, Jan and Dwight

Abbott.

8. Ken Dyda standing in

front of a table of artifacts.

9. Joanie Keluche and

Marilyn Hinrichs.

10.The venue, Point Vicente

Interpretive Center.

1

2 3

4 5

6

7

8

9 10

April 2017Peninsula 67


S P O T L I G H T O N T H E H I L L

NOW SERVING YOU IN 2 LOCATIONS!

With the great goodness of Mama

in Rolling Hills Estates, we now offer

our Cafe’ - a smaller version in Malaga Cove Plaza!

Temple Beth El embarks

On ambitious social programs

When the Waterman family offered to help renovate Temple

Beth El they envisioned the temple becoming a spiritual

home, a place of lifelong learning and a place to convene like

minded organizations for community engagement. That vision is already

being realized. In January, Temple Beth El members joined the Rotary

Club of San Pedro in preparing over 10,000 meals in support of Stop

Hunger Now. They were joined by representatives from the Port of Los

Angeles, PASS Organization, Rolling Hills Preparatory School, Keystone

Elite Boys and Girls Club and Mary Star of the Sea High School.

Rabbi Charles Briskin, who has led Temple Beth El since 2005, has

striven to establish TBE as a type of Town Hall for the community. “The

space we have is conducive to bringing our neighbors together to share

our hopes, dreams and desires for the kind of community we’d like to

see strengthened around us,” he said. Temple Beth El is planning to offer

educational and advocacy programs that speak to the plight of refugees,

immigrants and the local homeless.

“In April we plan to host a workshop with the Little Company of Mary

San Pedro Hospital called 'Beginning the Conversation,' which is intended

to help families begin the important, yet sometimes difficult task

of creating an Advanced Healthcare Directive,” said Rabbi Briskin, a

member of Providence Little Company’s Mission Team..

Temple Beth El is one of five San Pedro congregations working with

Family Promise, an organization that provides temporary housing for

newly homeless families.

Temple Beth El serves the greater South Bay by providing strong Jewish

leadership; diverse educational, musical and cultural programming

and engaging worship services, all in a warm, welcoming and vibrant

social community. The Temple is fortunate to have had long-time, dedicated

clergy, dating back to Rabbi David Lieb from 1971- 2005. Today,

it is led by Rabbi Charles Briskin, Cantor Ilan Davidson (since 1995) and

Debi Rowe, its Director of Education and Programs for the past 19 years.

Specializing in Mama’s Spaghetti & Meatballs with

our newly inspired flatbreads, salads and more!

Join us for Lunch & Dinner Mon-Sat.

• Outdoor Patio Seating • Lots of Free Parking

36 Malaga Cove Plaza

Palos Verdes Estates

(310) 375-6767

815 Deep Valley Drive

Rolling Hills Estates

(310) 377-5757

www.mamaterano.com

Temple Beth El organized volunteers in preparing over 10,000 meals in January

for Stop Hunger Now.

68 PeninsulaApril 2017


Calendar cont. from page 54

eventcalendar

Sunday, April 30

Satisfy a “Suite” Tooth

Concert 3 of Peninsula Symphony’s 50th Anniversary Season will host special

guest baritone Vladimir Chernov. Doors open at 6 p.m. Pre-concert lecture by

Maestro Berkson (for members only) begins at 6:15 p.m. and the concert at

7 p.m. Concert and parking are free. Redondo Union High School Auditorium,

631 Vincent Street, Redondo Beach (PCH at Diamond). For further information

310-544-0320, music.pensym@verizon.net, or Pensym.org.

MAYDAY! - Tales of Love and other Emergencies

Celebrate the lusty month of May with delicious love stories read aloud,

around a bonfire under the stars. 7-8:30 p.m at Angels Gate Cultural Center.

Bring your own seating and dress for the outdoors. Picnics welcome. Free folding

chairs available on site. For adults and young adults. $15/couples;

$10/individual. Cash only; no reservations required. 3601 South Gaffey

Street, San Pedro. Enter from Gaffey Street at 32nd Street. For more information

visit angelsgateart.org or call 310-519-0936. PEN

Classifieds 424-269-2830

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HANDYMAN

PLASTERING

Patch Master

Plastering

Patch Plastering

Interior • Exterior

• Venetian Plastering

• Ceiling Removal

• Drywall Work

• Acoustic

Ceiling Removal

• Water & Fire Restoration

310-370-5589

Lic. # 687076 • C35-B1

PLUMBING

ROOFING

Classifieds 424-269-2830

CONCRETE

QUIXTAR

Concrete & Masonry

Residential & Commercial

310-534-9970

Lic. #935981 C8 C29

CONSTRUCTION

Call us to Discuss the

ENDLESS POSSIBILITES

Extreme

Hillside Specialist

Foundation Repair Experts

Grading & Drainage

Retaining Walls,

Fences & Decks

310-212-1234

www.LambConBuilds.com

Lic. #906371

ELECTRICAL

LYNCH

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Reserve

your space in the

next

Pub Date: April 29

Deadline:

April 14

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General

Building

Contractors

• Residential

Troubleshooting

• Remodel Specialist

Scott K. Lynch

P.V. Native

Licensed & Insured

Cell

310-930-9421

Office & Fax

310-325-1292

www.LynchElectric.us

Lic 701001

269-2830

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First Time

We like small jobs

/ Free estimates

What we do…

Plumbing,

Electrical, Drywall,

Painting & more.

Valente Marin

310-748-8249

MUSIC LESSONS

Vocal Technician

Piano Teacher

Vocalist

Jeannine McDaniel

Rancho Palos Verdes

20 year experience

All Ages

310-544-0879

310-292-6341

Jeannine_mcdaniel2001@yahoo.com

CONSTRUCTION

Unlic.

Charles Clarke

Local Owner/General Contractor

Ph: (310) 791-4150

Cell: (310) 293-9796

Fax (310) 791-0452

“Since 1990” Lic. No. 810499

Thank You South Bay for

50 Years of Patronage!

Residential • Commercial • Industrial

Plumbing 24/7 • Heating

Air Conditioning

pfplumbing.net

800-354-2705 • 310-831-0737

POOLS & SPAS

POOLS • SPAS

HARDSCAPES

New Construction

& Remodeling

Excellent References

Horusicky Construction

310-544-9384

www.Horusicky.com

Credit cards accepted

Lic #309844, Bonded, Insured

PLUMBING

MATTUCCI

PLUMBING • HEATING • COOLING

DEPENDABLE • PROFESSIONAL • AFFORDABLE

FULL SERVICE PLUMBING • COPPER REPIPES

SEWER VIDEO INSPECTION • HEATING

DRAIN & SEWER SERVICE • COOLING

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Tile Reroof and

repair specialist

310-847-7663

Family owned

business since 1978

Lic 831351

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classifieds

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ON CALL

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7 DAYS

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310.543.2001

CALIFORNIA

Lic. #770059

C-36 C-20 A

2013

April 2017Peninsula 69


72 PeninsulaApril 2017

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