2016 Annual Report

dcrpublishing

2016 ANNUAL REPORT

One Community, Four Villages: Country Club | Desert Camp | Desert Parks | Silverleaf


DC RANCH BRAND PROMISE: LIVING CONNECTED

DC Ranch seamlessly connects people to the beauty of both the created

environment and the natural Sonoran Desert.

Residents feel a sense of community, connecting with each other in friendship

and common interest. It is a thoughtfully crafted community designed with

unprecedented attention to detail.

DC Ranch has a distinctive governance structure with ample resources that exist

to ensure a legacy of an amenity-rich and active way of life.

The highest standards and a convenient north Scottsdale location establish

DC Ranch as a nationally desirable place to live with an exceptional quality of

life and premium home values.

2016 LEADERSHIP

Community Council Board

Pat Simpson - President

Marc Blonstein - Vice President

Mark Eberle - Secretary/Treasurer

Ron Belmont

Melinda Gulick

Bud Kern

Jill Edwards Resnick

Ranch Association Board

Fred Green - President

Susan Grace - Vice President

Tom Headley - Secretary

Mike Esparza - Treasurer

John Henrickson

Stephen Koven

Don Matheson

Covenant Commission

Melinda Gulick - President

Debbie Beardsley - Vice President

Jim Hoselton

Dan Kovacevic

Steve Loken

Community Council

Chris Irish, Executive Director

Ranch Association

Andy Andrews, Executive Director

(through July 2016)

Covenant Commission

Jan Baratta, Sr. Design Review Manager

2


2016 HIGHLIGHTS

DC Ranch: Present and Future

The strength of any community lies in its foresight to plan for the future.

DC Ranch embarked on a strategic planning initiative to chart the community’s

course for the next three to five years.

The process began with a brand management study in late 2015 to assess the

current reputation and perception of DC Ranch among residents, stakeholders,

and the public at large. Findings indicated that residents identified strongly with

the brand; efforts to further enhance the brand were undertaken in 2016.

Resident and security surveys provided snapshots of the community’s

evolving demographics, interests, and satisfaction levels with programs,

leadership and services.

The DCR 2020 Strategic Plan, the final phase of the project, will be a road

map to remain on the forefront of security and technology, capital projects, and

community life initiatives that create value for homeowners and stakeholders.

Information collected from interactive resident and stakeholder focus groups

will be used to identify multi-year priorities and policies to address future

challenges and opportunities, with a goal of maintaining the community’s

desirability and premium home values.

Standards for Homes, Conduct and Landscape

The legacy of DC Ranch is evident in the look and feel of the community.

DC Ranch Standards were reviewed and simplified, providing homeowners with

an easily accessible guide covering maintenance of homes and landscapes, as

well as general expectations for neighborhood interaction.

3


prizes at Spooky Carnival:

4,300 Jurassic Ranch

860

700

"Golden Ticket" registrations at

Eggstravaganza: Willy Wonka

pancakes at PJs and Pancakes:

Holiday in Whoville

spectators at three

1,400 Starlight Concerts

220

swimmers at Back

to School Bash

kids, parents and grandparents

at Prickly Pumpkin Patch

97

246

residents reserved the

community centers for

private parties

4


COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

Six new Arts and Education offerings extended programing to 945 children and

adults

• Fall Break Camp: Mad Science

• Sunday Shakespeare on the Lawn

• Creative Arts Workshop

• Kids Cuisine

• Musical Theatre Dance

• Kids Corral

“The JunGirl Book” World Premiere

The Homestead Playhouse staged the world premiere of “The JunGirl Book” in

April with 26 young cast members and nearly 600 audience members.

Fitness classes

Overall enrollment in fitness classes increased 112%. Yoga classes were

expanded to 4 days a week and moved to a larger space at The Homestead

Community Center.

Overall, 15,000 participants enjoyed 50 programs and events including:

• Eggstravaganza: Willy Wonka

• Back to School Bash

• Ghosts in the Garden

• Prickly Pumpkin Patch

• Spooky Carnival: Jurassic Ranch

• Turkey Trot

• Community Campout

• PJs and Pancakes

New Resident Welcome Program

174 WELCOME BASKETS 83 NEW RESIDENTS

delivered by Neighborhood

Voting Members (NVMs)

• Fitness classes

• Social clubs

• The Homestead Playhouse

• Garden events

• Foodie Fusion

• Trailblazer Breakfast

• Food Truck Night

• Youth activities

attended 'Round the

Ranch Sunset Tours

5


6


COMMUNITY IMPROVEMENTS

Landscape, maintenance and operations teams worked to maximize resources,

maintain assets, and increase value and overall resident satisfaction.

Saving water and electricity

Extensive water audits in neighborhood parks increased water distribution

efficiency and reduced total water consumption, yielding significant savings

despite record heat.

The Ranch took advantage of a rebate program to switch from incandescent to

LED bulbs that use a fraction of the electricity.

Improvements in neighborhoods and community centers

36 DC RANCH DIRECTIONAL

SIGNS updated on roadways

12 FLORIBUNDA ROSES

and climbing roses

planted in Ethel's Garden

16 ANACACHO ORCHID TREES

planted in Ethel's Garden

200 TREES

replaced*

4,000 PLANTS

installed in

common areas*

40 NEW SAGUAROS

planted in DC Ranch

80,000 SQ. FT.

OF SOD replaced

NEW GATE installed

at south entrance

in Arcadia

7 NEIGHBORHOODS

10 LIVE OAKS 5 ELECTRONIC SPEED

SEALCOATED – 94,079

planted in Desert

square yards of roadway

Parks Estates

SIGNS installed to

raise awareness

about speeding

Desert Camp

• Renovated men’s and women’s

locker rooms

• Built new family bathroom and

shower

• Expanded toddler pool deck

• Upgraded mist system

• Replaced window coverings and

cabana drapes

• Extended lobby hours

• Installed rammed earth path

and retaining wall connecting

front sidewalk to basketball

court and play area

The Homestead

• Replaced lobby furniture

• Installed pet water fountain

*in addition to neighborhood-specific projects

7


STRATEGIC PARTNERS

DC Ranch partners with organizations whose missions align with the

community’s values. Our partners help us “live” values such as philanthropy,

wellness, family, environmental stewardship, and connection to the larger

community. Together we make a difference.

8


COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS

Giving back to the community

Helping others in the community brings meaning and fulfillment to our lives.

DC Ranch residents made generous contributions in 2016.

552 SCHOOL SUPPLIES

donated at the Back

to School Bash for

Navajo Elementary

214 TURKEYS/GOBBLE

GRAMS collected at the

Turkey Trot for United

Food Bank

3,030 WATER BOTTLES

for home-bound

Scottsdale seniors

500 HOPE TOTES for

Phoenix Rescue Mission

200 VOLUNTEER HOURS

at five DC Ranch events

44 PAIRS OF PJs donated by

DC Ranch Women's Club to

the Pajama Program

600 VOLUNTEER HOURS

in the Community Garden

Tour de Scottsdale

To date, DC Ranch has helped raise more than $500,000 for the McDowell

Sonoran Conservancy via registrations, donations, and sponsorships of the Tour

de Scottsdale. The 13 th annual ride was held in 2016:

1,663 RIDERS in the

70- and 30-mile events

87 VOLUNTEERS

over three days

7 DC RANCH MERCHANT

sponsors

Run for Ryan House

The final Run for Ryan House at DC Ranch in 2016 capped 12 years of wonderful

experiences.

$30,180

RAISED in 2016 to benefit

Ryan House through registrations,

donations, and sponsorships

1,030 RUNNERS in

the Half Marathon,

10K, and 5K events

102 VOLUNTEERS

over two days

In 2017, Ryan House will host the Run at a new location closer to its Phoenix

campus.

9


10


REAL ESTATE AND CONSTRUCTION

2016 DC Ranch home sales and valuation

Total home/land sales: $358.6 million

Total number of home/land sales: 246

Average sale price: $1.4 million

Highest home sale: $11.1 million

Village

Average

sales price

2016 DC Ranch custom home overview

DC Ranch was designed with a total

of 721 custom home lots.

Lots built or

under construction

Country Club 91%

The Parks 91%

Arcadia 74%

Horseshoe 64%

Upper Canyon 51%

Homes

Sold

Desert Parks $635,872 64

Desert Camp $770,888 65

Country Club $1,563,671 35

Silverleaf $3,249,506 45

30 homes completed construction

in 2016 vs. 26 in 2015.

Country Club 4

The Parks 2

Arcadia 9

Horseshoe 8

Upper Canyon 7

25 new construction starts in

2016 vs. 30 in 2015.

Country Club 4

The Parks 1

Arcadia 8

Horseshoe 5

Upper Canyon 7

Of the 721 custom home lots in

DC Ranch, 532 (74%) are built or

under construction; 189 (26%) are

currently vacant land. Of these, 61

had some level of active design work

in progress in 2016.

Market Street Villas completes Desert Camp build out

Camelot Homes built the last home in their Villas project, completing the

buildout of Desert Camp Village.

Silverleaf projects

The Village at Silverleaf began construction on six homes next to the Silverleaf

clubhouse; the project will include 19 total homes. The Sterling condominiums’

new owners, DMB and the New Home Company, redesigned the project to 72

units vs. the original 221. Construction is expected to begin in 2017.

11


RESIDENT DEMOGRAPHICS

The 2016 Resident Survey results take stock of where the community stands

today. The survey, conducted every three years, was distributed to more than

3,000 households, and over 700 households responded.

Years Lived in DC Ranch

Number of People in Household

Less than 2 years

17%

17+ years

6%

2-5 years

29%

1 person

13%

3 people

9%

5+ people

5%

2 people

57%

11-16 years

22%

6-10 years

25%

4 people

14%

Adults and Children

Ages 6-11

8%

Ages 0-5

5%

Ages 24-34

3%

Ages 19-23

3%

Ages 50-64

30%

Resident Population

51% Female

49% Male

Ages 12-18

9%

75% Ages 24-65+

25% Ages 0-23

69% have no children

in the household, up

from 63% in 2013.

12

Ages 35-49

17%

Ages 65+

25%


Top three reasons residents love DC Ranch

• Proximity to shopping/dining options, golf courses, etc.

• Architecture of homes and buildings

• Amenities (community centers, fitness center, parks, etc.)

Residents' favorite activities and amenities

• Paths and trails

• Fitness classes

• Welcome program for new residents

• Adult activities, clubs and programs

• Community service opportunities

FINANCIAL INFORMATION

The Community Council and Ranch Association ended 2016 in a strong financial

position. Council’s revenue and expenses both came in at $4 million. The

Association’s year-end had a planned deficit due to the final year of a six-year

operating credit. Master Ranch and neighborhood expenses were slightly under

budget at $7.2 million. The annual outside audit of 2016 financials will be

conducted in April.

The Community Council’s reserve fund is 86% funded, and the Ranch

Association master reserve fund is at 125%. Both are considered “strong” by

industry standards, meaning there is very little risk of residents having a special

assessment for major repairs and/or replacements.

A Capital Improvement Fund was established by the Council in 2016.

Contributions will be made each year to pay for future community projects.

The following pages provide details on where revenues came from and how they

were expended for both the Community Council and Ranch Association.

13


COMMUNITY COUNCIL 2016 REVENUE

Events & Program

Registration

6%

Management &

Other Fees

3%

$4,017,000

Assessments

47%

Transfer/Benefit Fees

44%

RANCH ASSOCIATION 2016 REVENUE

Management &

Other Fees

8%

Gate

Transponders

3%

$6,877,000

Neighborhood

Assessments

53%

Master Assessment

36%

14

All figures are unaudited. Annual audit will be conducted in April 2017.


COMMUNITY COUNCIL 2016 EXPENSES

Financial Operations

9%

Maintenance &

Landscape

8%

Ranch Office,

Insurance & Legal

4%

$3,949,000

Events, Programming

& Activities

23%

Communications

10%

Reserve & Capital Fund

18%

Administrative

11%

Community Center Operations

17%

RANCH ASSOCIATION 2016 EXPENSES

Administrative

11%

Utilities

8%

Taxes, Insurance,

Depreciation & Legal

3%

Security

27%

$7,190,000

Maintenance

12%

Reserve Fund

17%

Landscape

22%

The Ranch Association had a planned deficit due to the final year of a six-year operating credit.

15

More magazines by this user