Central Valley Corvettes Magazine - May 2017

cfosnaugh

Central Valley Corvettes of Fresno Magazine - May 2017

OFFICIAL NEWSLETTER OF CENTRAL VALLEY CORVETTES, FRESNO, CALIFORNIA (CHARTERED NOVEMBER 12, 1991)


The Central Valley Corvette Club was

chartered in 1991 for the owners of the only

real AMERICAN sports car, the awesome

CORVETTE. It's a social organization with

activities that provide enjoyment for the true

Corvette lover.

MONTHLY MEETINGS ARE HELD

AT 6.30 P.M. ON THE 3 RD TUESDAY

OF EVERY MONTH AT YOSEMITE

FALLS CAFE, 4278 W. ASHLAN AVE,

FRESNO CALIFORNIA. INTERESTED

CORVETTE ENTHUSIAST ARE

MORE THAN WELCOME TO

ATTEND THE MEETINGS AND MEET

OUR MEMBERS.

Club activities include monthly meetings,

car shows, weekend Club activities,

overnighters, picnics, road rallies, summer

cruises, holiday get-to-gathers and more!

Eligibility for membership in CVC is

defined in Article III, section 1 of the

bylaws in part as follows: "Membership in

Central Valley Corvettes shall be open to all

Corvette owners who are sponsored by a

member in good standing. Additionally, a

prospective member must, within a three

month period , attend two consecutive

meetings, participate in two club sanctioned

social activities, pay current membership

dues and initiation fees, and be approved by

two-thirds vote of membership present at a

general membership meeting by secret

ballot.

Sponsors shall be responsible for advising

prospective member of results. All members

must submit proof of personal insurance in

accordance with California State Law upon

application for membership, and all

members must be a member of the

association providing club liability insurance

for CENTRAL VALLEY CORVETTES.

A prospective member who does not have a

sponsor will be provided one by the

membership committee. Non-members may

not participate in more than three meetings

or two sanctioned activities as per CVC

Bylaws.

CVC membership dues are $67.00 plus an

initiation fee of $35.00. Membership entitles

two members at the same address voting

privileges at meetings (provided they are in

good standing) and membership rights.

Please feel free to contact the membership

chairperson, Charlotte Renna (559) 323-

0153 or any officer on the following page.


PRESIDENT

Andy Anderson

977-3387

ancon545@yahoo.com

VP-ACTIVITIES

Dick Danielsen

298-5229

redanielsenr@aol.com

VP-PUBLIC RELATIONS/ MEMBERSHIP

Charlotte Renna

323-0153

chrenna@aol.com

SECRETARY

Terry Johnson

940-0876

purplegal54@gmail.com

TREASURER

Dick Johnson

940-5719

rejohnson1142@gmail.com

PARLIAMENTARIAN

Gary Pflepsen

999-2957

pgpflep@aol.com

Mission Statement / Officers..... 2-3

A Word from our President.......... 4

Secretary’s Minutes..................... 5

Birthdays & Anniversaries............ 6

Sunshine & Clouds…………………… 7

Women & Mother’s Day…………..8-9

Corvette C7-ZR1 & C8………………10

Corvette Factory Closing…………..11

Things About Memorial Day… 12-13

CVC Activities.............................14

CVC Event Flyers...................15-21

Laughlin Run Pics………………..22-24

Clovis Rodeo Parade Pics……..25-27

From our Sponsor, Ed Dena....... 28

SERGEANT-AT-ARMS

Chuck Laningham

304-7662

laningham@hotmail.com

SUNSHINE & CLOUDS - NEWS

Debbie Garrison

875-0800

keithgar@aol.com

WEBSITE EDITOR

Charlie Fosnaugh

299-0547

fosnaugh@comcast.net

14 th


…a word from our President!

Hi Fellow Corvetter’s,

Here we go again. It goes so fast. I can

not believe another month has gone by.

Hope every one is having a good time.

We went on our first pre run for the

mystery tour and I think it is going to be

lots of fun!! Don't forget the cvc picnic

May 7th at 12:00 noon at Kroeker Ville.

Fun food and a crazy hat contest for men

and women create your special hat

50.00 gift certificate for first place and

25.00 gift certificate for second place for

men and the same for the woman.

Should be a good time. Judging will be by

the Board. See you there.

Your president,

Andy


Old Business: None

New Business:

Craig Hansen informed the club that Levi Stadium

contacted him to offer tickets to the October 14 th

49er game. He will be collecting a list of people

interested and when he finds out what team is

playing, he will let us know and the cost.

Central Valley Corvettes

General Meeting Minutes

April 18, 2017

The General Meeting was called to order by

President Andy Anderson at 6:30pm. Minutes

from the March meeting were read. Amiee

Parkin made a motion to accept the minutes as

read. Keith Garrison seconded. Dick Johnson

gave the Treasurer’s report. At this time, all bills

are paid and we are in good shape. Tonight’s

raffle brought in $190.00.

VP of Activities, Dick Danielsen went over

several upcoming events – The Laughlin Run,

Clovis Rodeo Parade, Kroekerville Picnic, Duke’s

Potluck, Tahoe Run, Ficklin Winery, Races at

Madera Speedway, and Snelling Car Show.

Andy Anderson announced the Mystery Run

has been set for September 12-15. Craig

Hansen announced the planning for the

Colorado Run in 2018 is 80% complete. Craig

gave us a day by day sketch of our 18 day trip

with NO NOTES!! For more information on any

of the above Runs look in the newsletter.

The next General meeting will be May 16 th . The next

Board meeting will be Tuesday, April 25 th at Andy

Anderson’s home. A motion to adjourn the meeting

was made by Gary Pflepsen and seconded by Make

Hayes.

Respectfully submitted by

Terry Johnson, Secretary

Raffle: Thank you to the following members

for donating raffle prizes: A&C Anderson,

Danielsen Derringer, Dukes, Fosnaugh,

Garcia, Garrahan, Garrison ,Jarvis, Parkin,

Pflepsen, Renna, Severance, Whitson,

Tjerrild, White

VP of Public Relations, Charlotte Renna stated

we are now at 90 members with our newest

members Jeff & Stephanie Engleman. Skip &

Vickie Garrison graced our meeting with their

presence. Skip Garrison served as acting Sgt at

Arms for Chuck Laningham. He collected $3.00

in badge fines. Debbie Garrison gave her

Sunshine and Clouds report.


y Charlotte Renna

Frieda Null, 5/03 – Lynne Henenfent, 5/04 – Terri Parks, 5/04 – Chuck Hall, 5/05 – Joyce

Kroeker, 5/10 – Connie Anderson, 5/13 – Dale Comer, 5/14 – Mike Hayes, 5/22 – Emily

Piercy, 5/26 – Glenn Henderson, 5/27 – Dick Danielsen, 5/28

Keith & Debbie Garrison, 5/19/92 – 25 Years

PLEASE REMEMBER TO WEAR YOUR CVC NAME BADGE TO ALL CLUB MEETINGS!

(NOW a 50₵ FINE without it)

SUPPORT YOUR CLUB RAFFLE AND BRING A RAFFLE PRIZE!

AND BE SURE AND RECOMEND OUR WEB SITE REGULARLY

AT: www.CentralValleyCorvettes.com


SUNSHINE & CLOUDS

Debbie Garrison

April. 20, 2017

We start off this month with news from Debby and Terry Anderson with news from China. Their oldest

son and his wife gave them their 6 th grandchild. A little boy named Charlie Terry Anderson born on 03/25

and weighing in at 8 lbs. 8 ozs. In China that’s a big baby! Congrats to all.

It took 3 months but our Ed Kroeker is finally home! Joyce said he has had his fill of hospitals. He’s still

weak and has difficulty walking. Home health care will be coming in 3 days a week to run him through

his paces and help with showers. She said even her cooking is better than what he has been eating

during all this time. The entire family moved the Easter festivities to Ed & Joyce’s house. Joyce said it

was wonderful to have everyone there to share the special day with them. Still going to be a journey to

get him stronger but they will be taking it one day at a time. Every day is a gift!

More good news for our dear Ruthie Danielsen, she was moved to Willow Creek Rehab and is getting

better and stronger every day. She is now able to sit up on the side of the bed. Still has a way to go but

has hopes that she will be strong enough to join us in May for the Tahoe Run. Please keep both Ed and

Ruthie in your prayers.

Roy Whitson had the lymph nodes removed from under his arm last week, is doing well and the good

news is that the cancer had not spread.

Sue Rose has pneumonia and been in bed for the last week. Sue said she is starting to feel better and

stronger every day. She did say Fred has been a very good nurse.

Our prospective member Juan Gonzalez’s daughter had a cancer scare; she has had surgery and is

feeling better. Juan is working in Washington and his wife has been in San Diego with their daughter.

Said he will see us all next month.

Freida had a medical scare earlier this month, she found a lump in her stomach, went to the doctor and

he sent her for tests and then a scan. Thankfully it was just a hernia and she will be seeing a surgeon

when she gets back from their Panama Canal Cruise.

Chuck and Linda Laningham left yesterday for a month long RV trip. They will be going through Texas to

visit friends and ending up in Georgia to see their granddaughter Janae and their 2 Great-grandchildren.

Dale and Sue Comer are leaving on a 5 week cross country car trip with Jim and Lynne Agar returning in

June. They will be traveling across the southern US through Savannah, Florida, Blue Ridge Park Way and

returning via Michigan and South Dakota. Sorry to miss all the fun activities in May.

Terry Johnson sent me a little note about the Good Luck they had on Friday 4/7. Some of our Corvette

members (the Johnsons, Hansens, Pflepsons and Susan Walker) got together at the Belmont Golf Course

for dinner and bingo. They had a lot of “Luck” at their table. They won 5 of 7 Bingo games!! Dick Johnson

won 2 prizes, walked away with $120.00 and then a free dinner and Bingo for 2 for the next time. Of

course they couldn’t understand why the crowd called “Foul”, just because the Bingo caller was our own

Gary Pflepsen. Your Sunshine Girl, Debbie G.


Women and Mother’s Day

By: Aimee Parkin

“A woman is like a tea bag – you can’t tell how strong she is until you put her in hot water.”

~Eleanor Roosevelt

Mother’s Day’s origins reside in ancient Greek and Roman mythology. The Greeks and Romans held festivals in honor of

the mother goddesses, Rhea and Cybele. Modern Mother’s Day can be traced to early Christian Festivals known as

“Mothering Sundays,” held the fourth Sunday in lent. Parishioners returned on this Sunday every year to the church in

which they were christened, or their “mother church,” for a special service.

Mother’s Day resurfaced in America during the Civil War, when Ann Reeves Jarvis started Mothers’ Day Work Clubs to

teach women in her home state, West Virginia, how to properly care for their children. Her clubs became a unifying

force during war time, and mothers continued gathering during the long Reconstruction period. This helped reunify a

torn nation and promote peace.

In 1870, Julia Ward Howe wrote a Mother’s Day Proclamation, encouraging all mothers to promote peace. Three years

later, she encouraged all mothers to set apart June 2, 1873 as a “Mother’s Peace Day.”

After Ann Reese Jarvis died in 1905, her daughter Anna Jarvis campaigned for an annual Mother’s Day holiday to

recognize the sacrifices mothers make for their children. Anna never married or had any children, but in 1908, a local

store, Wanamaker’s, sponsored a Mother’s Day in her town. She then sought to make it a national holiday. In 1914,

President Woodrow Wilson made the second Sunday in May Mother’s Day.

Since then, Mother’s Day has, like many other holidays, been subject to commercialism, materialistic marketing, and has

devolved into a day where women sit in church, hear about someone’s idea of the angel mother, get a chocolate to ease

their pain, and if they are lucky, get some swag from a guy who fell prey to a marketing ploy for diamonds, shoes, cars,

or maybe a trip. If they aren’t lucky, they buy some ice cream and call it a wash.

But the women who founded Mother’s Day wanted to promote peace, better the lives of their fellow travelers, and

celebrate each other’s accomplishments. We can do that without flowers, chocolates, a new car, or jewelry. Take a look

at some inspiring women from America’s short history.

Anne Hutchinson (1591-1643) was banished from Boston by the Puritans due to her political and religious views. She

was left to defend herself and her children against natives in New York, and she died standing for her beliefs.

Margaret Brent (1600-1699) is known as North America’s first feminist. She became one of Maryland’s largest land

owners when most women were still property. Someone had to set the precedent. Thank you, Margaret!

Anne Bradstreet (1612-1672), one of America’s first poets. Because of her, colonial America has been preserved. She

wrote in great historical detail. Fun fact – until the mid 1800’s, most women could not get literary work published unless

they used a male pseudonym, yet Anne broke the mold and saved history simultaneously.

Dorothea Dix (1802-1887) worked to alleviate misery as the Superintendent of Female Nurses during the Civil War. If

you are a nurse, thank her.

Elizabeth Blackwell (1821-1910) holds the honor of the first female medical doctor in the United States. She graduated

from Geneva College in 1849, opened a slum infirmary, and trained women in medicine. Thanks to her, the poor have

access to good medical care, and some of the world’s best doctors are women!

Ellen Swallow Richards (1842-1911) paved the way for science geeks everywhere by being the first female ever to enroll

in MIT in 1870. She is also the reason you took Home Economics. She founded the science. Thank her for your cooking,

sewing, and other domestic skills.


Grace Hopper (1906-1992) received a PHD from Yale and was an early computer programmer and a leader in software

development. Your kid learns coding in elementary school because of her.

Women shape our world. They inspire us to do more, be better, set new goals, and reach them.

(Eloise Olson, Aimee Parkin, Evan Olson)

Finally, Florence “Eloise” Bloxham Olson (1929 - ), born to poor sharecroppers in Arimo, Idaho, graduated Valedictorian

of her small high school class while helping her mother care for her five younger siblings. As a young girl, she learned to

sew, knit, crochet, cook and bake. She learned to plant a victory garden. She adored flowers, especially roses and spring

bulbs and developed a green thumb early on. She loved making jams, jellies, and canning fruits and veggies for her

family. She met her husband, Evan, while she worked as a telephone operator in Pocatello, Idaho, and they had three

children. After sending three children to college, Eloise pursued her dream. She returned to college and became a nurse.

She graduated Valedictorian again and enjoyed a career spanning two decades. She nursed geriatric patients with care

and compassion. Her final patient was her sweetheart, Evan. She now enjoys reading, knitting, cooking, canning, baking,

and spending time with her three children, her daughter-in-law, her 10 grandchildren, and 9 great-grandchildren. Her

favorite granddaughter is Aimee Parkin. This woman taught me grit, perseverance, the value of education, and that it’s

never too late to pursue a dream, set a goal, or learn a new skill. She still tries new recipes, she learned to use the

computer, the internet, and now enjoys using FaceTime. Despite setbacks and hard times, every day is a blessing to her.

During a very difficult time in my life, she handed me a small photo that she had kept in her wallet for nearly 30 years. It

was me at age 3-4. She told me that it brought tremendous joy to her and that my smile always did her heart good. She

then gave me that picture. I carry it in my wallet and think of her. I remember her strength, her sweetness, and her grit.

And I remember that because I’m hers, I can do anything.

Let’s celebrate inspiring women on Mother’s Day. Tell them why they’re inspiring. Thank them for their story, their

teachings, their mentorship, and the pathways they’ve paved. That lasts longer than flowers, jewels, or cars ever can.

Sources;

Online Highway, LLC. “Important and Famous Women in America.”

http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h1551.html#1600s

The History Channel. “Mother’s Day.”

http://www.history.com/topics/holidays/mothers-day


The mid-engine Chevy Corvette and C7-ZR1

There are two new super Vettes on the way: a crazier version of the current C7 we believe will

revive the ZR1 name and the long-rumored mid-engine Corvette. These new spy photos show the

two of them side by side undergoing testing, and they give a good look at what's the same and

what's not quite the same between them.

We'll start with the similarities. Somewhat surprisingly, they look nearly identical from the A-pillar to

the B-pillar. The mid-engine car, which might be considered a C8 or an offshoot of the C7, has what

appears to be the same A-pillar rake, windshield, roof panel, side windows, side mirrors, and even

the C7 taillights peeking out under the vinyl covers. This could just be a result of Chevy using a

current car as the basis for the mid-engine test mule, but to us it looks a lot more finished than

something normally cobbled together. That puts a lot more legitimacy behind the theory the midengine

"Zora" will be a sort of last hurrah for the C7.

And then there's what's different. The front end of the mid-engine car is of course much shorter and

the rear is extended – that's what happens when the engine swaps ends. It's a little tough to see

under all of the camouflage, but the front shortening is most evident if you compare the overhangs

and also where the front wheel is in relation to the A-pillar. On the mid-engine car, there's basically

just enough body to cover the wheels, just as it should be.

The mid-engine Vette's unique cooling needs are also made apparent here by the big slots aft of

the doors. The door skins also appear to have been resculpted to route airflow – and in this case

some nice snowballs – to those intakes.

We expect the C7 ZR1 to show up as a 2018 model, with the mid-engine C7/8 arriving a year or

two down the line. With all this awesomeness on the way, it's hard to imagine what could come after

these.

David Gluckman @ Autoblog.com


Corvette Factory Closing to Visitors

Until Late 2018

Can't have the tourists taking any Snapchats with the mid-engine C8

If "Take a tour of the Chevy Corvette factory in Bowling Green" is one of the

items on your summertime bucket list this year, you might want to fast-track

those plans for that trip down Kentucky way. Starting this June, General

Motors will be closing the Corvette factory to the public for a year and a half.

The National Corvette Museum's Katie Frassinelli told the Bowling Green Daily

News the tours are being shut down in order to give the facility a chance to

conduct extensive changes to the factory.

The Bowling Green, KY factory will offer its final tours on Friday, June 16th.

While General Motors officials reportedly refused to discuss future plans

during an April 28th conversation at the Corvette Museum, even a drunken

monkey would be liable to draw a connection between the planned plant

closure and the forthcoming mid-engine C8-generation Corvette. That future

Chevy has been spied repeatedly over the last year, clad in thick layers of

camouflage that still can't disguise the new model's engine layout.

While it remains unknown when the mid-engine Corvette will make its debut,

internal GM documents have revealed the carmaker is adding a new DOHC

V-8 to the 'Vette lineup for the 2018 model year. Should that be the powerplant

bound for the new mid-engine Corvette, it suggests the eighth-generation car

will likely arrive sometime before next fall—a timeline that aligns neatly with

the planned blackout dates at the factory.

Before that car arrives, however, Chevrolet is expected to release the trackdevouring

Corvette ZR1, a car that may pack active aerodynamics and an

uprated version of the Z06's supercharged V-8 making around 700

horsepower. Considering the ZR1 prototype apparently is capable of casually

knocking off a 7:30 'Ring lap in traffic, it seems the last of the C7s will certainly

be one to remember.

BY WILL SABEL COURTNEY APRIL 30, 2017


8 THINGS YOU MAY NOT KNOW ABOUT MEMORIAL DAY

From its Civil War origins to its modern-day traditions, find out more about America’s most solemn holiday.

1. Memorial Day and its traditions may have ancient roots.

While the first commemorative events weren’t held in the United States until the 19th century, the practice of honoring

those who have fallen in battle dates back thousands of years. The ancient Greeks and Romans held annual days of

remembrance for loved ones (including soldiers) each year, festooning their graves with flowers and holding public

festivals and feasts in their honor. In Athens, public funerals for fallen soldiers were held after each battle, with the

remains of the dead on display for public mourning before a funeral procession took them to their internment in the

Kerameikos, one of the city’s most prestigious cemeteries. One of the first known public tributes to war dead was in 431

B.C., when the Athenian general and statesman Pericles delivered a funeral oration praising the sacrifice and valor of

those killed in the Peloponnesian War—a speech that some have compared in tone to Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg

Address.

2. One of the earliest commemorations was organized by recently freed slaves.

As the Civil War neared its end, thousands of Union soldiers, held as prisoners of war, were herded into a series of

hastily assembled camps in Charleston, South Carolina. Conditions at one camp, a former racetrack near the city’s

Citadel, were so bad that more than 250 prisoners died from disease or exposure, and were buried in a mass grave

behind the track’s grandstand. Three weeks after the Confederate surrender, an unusual procession entered the former

camp: On May 1, 1865, more than 1,000 recently freed slaves, accompanied by regiments of the U.S. Colored Troops

(including the Massachusetts 54th Infantry) and a handful of white Charlestonians, gathered in the camp to consecrate a

new, proper burial site for the Union dead. The group sang hymns, gave readings and distributed flowers around the

cemetery, which they dedicated to the “Martyrs of the Race Course.”

3. The holiday’s “founder” had a long and distinguished career.

In May 1868, General John A. Logan, the commander-in-chief of the Union veterans’ group known as the Grand Army of

the Republic, issued a decree that May 30 should become a nationwide day of commemoration for the more than

620,000 soldiers killed in the recently ended Civil War. On Decoration Day, as Logan dubbed it, Americans should lay

flowers and decorate the graves of the war dead “whose bodies now lie in almost every city, village and hamlet

churchyard in the land.” According to legend, Logan chose May 30 because it was a rare day that didn’t fall on the

anniversary of a Civil War battle, though some historians believe the date was selected to ensure that flowers across the

country would be in full bloom. After the war Logan, who had served as a U.S. congressman before resigning to rejoin

the army, returned to his political career, eventually serving in both the House and Senate and was the unsuccessful

Republican candidate for vice president in 1884. When he died two years later, Logan’s body laid in state in the rotunda

of the United States Capitol, making him one of just 33 people to have received the honor. Today, Washington, D.C.’s

Logan Circle and several townships across the country are named in honor of this champion of veterans and those killed

in battle.

4. Logan probably adapted the idea from earlier events in the South.

Even before the war ended, women’s groups across much of the South were gathering informally to decorate the graves

of Confederate dead. In April 1886, the Ladies Memorial Association of Columbus, Georgia resolved to commemorate

the fallen once a year—a decision that seems to have influenced John Logan to follow suit, according to his own wife.


However, southern commemorations were rarely held on one standard day, with observations differing by state and

spread out across much of the spring and early summer. It’s a tradition that continues today: Nine southern states

officially recognize a Confederate Memorial Day, with events held on Confederate President Jefferson Davis’ birthday,

the day on which General Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson was killed, or to commemorate other symbolic events.

5. It didn’t become a federal holiday until 1971.

American’s embraced the notion of “Decoration Day” immediately. That first year, more than 27 states held some sort

of ceremony, with more than 5,000 people in attendance at a ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery. By 1890, every

former state of the Union had adopted it as an official holiday. But for more than 50 years, the holiday was used to

commemorate those killed just in the Civil War, not in any other American conflict. It wasn’t until America’s entry into

World War I that the tradition was expanded to include those killed in all wars, and Memorial Day was not officially

recognized nationwide until the 1970s, with America deeply embroiled in the Vietnam War.

6. It was a long road from Decoration Day to an official Memorial Day.

Although the term Memorial Day was used beginning in the 1880s, the holiday was officially known as Decoration Day

for more than a century, when it was changed by federal law. Four years later, the Uniform Monday Holiday Act of 1968

finally went into effect, moving Memorial Day from its traditional observance on May 30 (regardless of the day of the

week), to a set day—the last Monday in May. The move has not been without controversy, though. Veterans groups,

concerned that more Americans associate the holiday with first long weekend of the summer and not its intended

purpose to honor the nation’s war dead, continue to lobby for a return to the May 30 observances. For more than 20

years, their cause was championed by Hawaiian Senator—and decorated World War II veteran—Daniel Inouye, who

until his 2012 death reintroduced legislation in support of the change at the start of every Congressional term.

7. More than 20 towns claim to be the holiday’s “birthplace”—but only one has federal recognition.

For almost as long as there’s been a holiday, there’s been a rivalry about who celebrated it first. Boalsburg,

Pennsylvania, bases its claim on an 1864 gathering of women to mourn those recently killed at Gettysburg. In

Carbondale, Illinois, they’re certain that they were first, thanks to an 1866 parade led, in part, by John Logan who two

years later would lead the charge for an official holiday. There are even two dueling Columbus challengers (one in

Mississippi, the other in Georgia) who have battled it out for Memorial Day supremacy for decades. Only one town,

however, has received the official seal of approval from the U.S. government. In 1966, 100 years after the town of

Waterloo, New York, shuttered its businesses and took to the streets for the first of many continuous, community-wide

celebrations, President Lyndon Johnson signed legislation, recently passed by the U.S. Congress, declaring the tiny

upstate village the “official” birthplace of Memorial Day.

8. Memorial Day traditions have evolved over the years.

Despite the increasing celebration of the holiday as a summer rite of passage, there are some formal rituals still on the

books: The American flag should be hung at half-staff until noon on Memorial Day, then raised to the top of the staff.

And since 2000, when the U.S. Congress passed legislation, all Americans are encouraged to pause for a National

Moment of Remembrance at 3 p.m. local time. The federal government has also used the holiday to honor nonveterans—the

Lincoln Memorial was dedicated on Memorial Day 1922. And, while its origins have little to do with fallen

soldiers, the Indianapolis 500 has certainly become a Memorial Day tradition of its own–this year marks the 102nd time

the race will be run to coincide with the holiday.

• Author: Barbara Maranzani

• Website: http://www.history.com/news/8-things-you-may-not-know-about-memorial-day

This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only.

© 2017, A&E Television Networks, LLC. All Rights Reserved.


CVC

Activities

Schedule

WE NEED TO GET

SOME MORE RUNS BOOKED FOR 2017. PLEASE CONSIDER PUTTING ON A RUN

AND, AS I HAVE PREVIOUSLY STATED, IF YOU NEED HELP, JUST ASK!

REMEMBER, THE MORE RUNS WE DO, THE MORE FUN WE WILL HAVE! DICK

DANIELSEN

May 7 CVC Spring Picnic CVC Board

May 13 Potluck Duke’s

May 17-20 Lake Tahoe / Virginia City Lebda’s,

Henenfent’s & Danielsen’s

June 4 Ficklin Vineyards Danielsen’s

June 10 Madera Speedway Baumgarten

July 9 Snelling Car Show Renna/Peluso

Sept 12-15 President’s Mystery Run Anderson

July 2018 Colorado Rocky Mountain High Hansen’s

GENERAL MEETING ALWAYS 3 RD TUESDAY 6:30 PM

BOARD MEETING IS THE TUESDAY FOLLOWING THE

GENERAL MEETING AT 7:00PM

Dominos 2nd & 4th Thursday of the Month


SAVE THE DATE

THE SPRING CVC PICNIC WILL BE HELD AT

KROEKERVILLE ON MAY 7 TH

STARTING AT 12 NOON

JOIN WITH OTHER CVC MEMBERS AND TURN OUT

TO ENJOY A PICNIC LUNCH FEATURING CHICKEN,

SALADS, AND DRINKS. IN ADDITION, THERE WILL

BE A SEPARATE MEN’S AND WOMEN’S “CREATIVE”

HAT CONTEST AND A CONTEST TO PICK THE BEST

DESSERT (AFTER THE CONTEST, ENTERED DESSERTS

WILL BE AVAILABLE FOR MEMBERS TO EAT)

HOPE TO SEE YOU ALL THERE!


TIME TO PARTY!

WHAT: POTLUCK

WHERE: THE DUKES HOUSE, 492 W. ATHENS, CLOVIS

WHEN: SATURDAY MAY 13 AT 5:30PM

LIVE COUNTRY MUSIC WILL BE PERFORMED BY JOHN PEMBERTOM

FROM 6:00PM TO 10:00PM

THERE WILL BE A $10.00/PERSON CHARGE TO HELP COVER THE

COST OF ENTERTAINMENT

DRINKS/ALCOHOL AND PAPER GOODS WILL BE PROVIDED.

THE SIGN-UP SHEET HAS A “DISH” COLUMN FOR YOU TO INDICATE

WHAT YOU ARE BRINGING. PLEASE ENTER EITHER A MAIN DISH,

SIDE DISH, SALAD, OR DESSERT


LAKE TAHOE AND VIRGINIA CITY!

Visit Lake Tahoe and Virginia City

When: May 17, 18, 19, and 20, 2017

Where: Montbleu Resort Casino - Lake Tahoe

Run start time and meeting location yet to be determined

For room reservations: Call the Montbleu Hotel at 800-367-4554. Reservations may also be made on line.

If making reservations on line refer to code STCVC17. By phone, use the same code or Central Valley

Corvettes.

Reservations can be made anytime beginning in January.

The rate is $59.00 plus taxes on Wednesday and Thursday nights, $89.00 plus taxes on Friday night, and, if you

wish to stay over on Saturday night, the rate is $129.00 plus taxes.

A trip fee of $150.00 is due by the March meeting (if you already paid $300 a refund will be coming).

On Wednesday, May 17, we will drive to Lake Tahoe via scenic Hwy. 88, stop for lunch and check in at the

Montbleu Hotel.

On Thursday, May 18, we will take a leisurely drive to Virginia City and have lunch at the Bucket of Blood

Saloon. There will be plenty of time to shop and look around. Dinner will be on your own.

On Friday, May 19, we will cruise Lake Tahoe and visit a boat museum. Lunch and Dinner will be on your own.

On Saturday, May 20, either drive home or stay and play another night!

REMEMBER YOUR CB RADIO!

QUESTIONS? CONTACT:

MIKE/MARY LOU LEBDA: 298-7993 MIKE/LYNNE HENENFENT: 897-9417

DICK/RUTHIE DANIELSEN: 298-5229


FICKLIN VINEYARDS

SPEND AN AFTERNOON ENJOYING A GREAT

LUNCH AND SAMPLING SOME OF THE BEST

PORT IN THE U.S.!

WHEN: SUNDAY, JUNE 4 TH

WHERE: FICKLIN VINEYARDS, AVENUE 7 ½, MADERA

TIME: 11:00AM, JUNE 4 th , HERNDON & HWY. 99

(TACO BELL PARKING LOT)

PRICE IS $35 PER PERSON WHICH INCLUDES LUNCH,

A WINERY TOUR, AND PORT SAMPLING (REMEMBER WE

ARE DRIVING CORVETTES—THE DESIGNATED DRIVER

SHOULD BE SOMEWHAT JUDICIOUS WHEN SAMPLING!)

CUT OFF DATE IS MAY 16 (MAY CVC MEETING DATE). PAYMENT IS ALSO DUE BY THAT DATE.

QUESTIONS?

CONTACT DICK DANIELSEN

298-5229 redanielsenr@aol.com

Remember your CB radio!


LUCAS OIL MODIFIEDS AT THE MADERA SPEEDWAY

WHEN: SATURDAY, JUNE 10 TH

WHERE: MADERA SPEEDWAY, MADERA, CA.

TIME: MEET AT 5:00PM, HERNDON AND HWY. 99

(TACO BELL PARKING LOT)

SPEND A FUN SATURDAY EVENING AT ONE OF AMERICA’S

GREAT LITTLE SHORT TRACKS FEATURING A TOUR VISIT

BY THE LUCAS OIL MODIFIED SERIES OF THE SOUTHWEST

A SPECIAL FOOD AND DRINK OFFER IS AVAILABLE TO

CVC MEMBERS WISHING TO PARTICIPATE. YOU MAY

PURCHASE A HOT DOG, FRENCH FRIES, AND A SOFT

DRINK FOR $5.00!

QUESTIONS?

CONTACT LEE BAUMGARTEN

313-1783 delno4779@icloud.com


SNELLING CAR SHOW

SUNDAY, JULY 9 TH

RUN LEADERS WILL BE CHARLOTTE RENNA

AND BOB PELUSO

SPECIFIC DETAILS WILL BE AVAILABLE AT

AN UP-COMING MEETING


ONLY THE SHADOW KNOWS……………………

WHERE ANDY WILL BE LEADING US ON HIS

PRESIDENT’S MYSTERY RUN,

TUESDAY, SEPT. 12TH,

THRU FRIDAY, SEPT. 15TH.

STAY TUNED


CVC President, Andy Anderson

Charlie Fosnaugh

Mike Noriega

Gary Pflepsen

Skip Severance

Tom Jarvis


Scott & Aimee Parkin

Dick Danielsen

Steve & Lydia Garcia

Roy Whitson

Juan Gonzalez’ Mother, Lilia & his Daughter

Craig Derringer

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