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Inside

JULY/

AUGUST

2016

VOLUME 1 | NO. 9

FEATURES

8 Piolo Pascual: Balancing Act

Finding the right time to workout

amidst his plans, dreams and

hectic schedule

30 Healthy Pizza

These versatile, non-traditional

pies will fill you up without making

you doughy.

34 Rock Hard Challenge

Part 1

This year’s RHC is all about getting

the best results with a simple,

straightforward routine.

42 Fight of His Life

Captain America Civil War’s Frank

Grillo is a 50-year- old training and

acting machine.

47 Heart-Stopper

Janet Layug is a registered

nurse and a mom who is looking

to capture her first Bikini O title.

50 Game of Thrones

New Zealander Joe Naufahu went

from king of the rugby pitch to king

of the Dothraki tribe in the sixth

season of HBO’s hit show.

ON THE COVER

PIOLO PASCUAL

Photograph courtesy of

Under Armour Philippines

34

Rock Hard

Challenge Part 1

SECTIONS

13 EDGE

Michael Jai White fights five dudes;

MLB’s best pitcher does Pilates; an

undefeated wrestling champ born

without shins; 10 things you didn’t

know about protein

18 TRAIN

Get a superhero core with one exercise;

a circuit that’ll spike your metabolic

rate; an easy fix to a reader’s

near-perfect chest routine; why you

should use cable-row attachments.

24 EAT

A healthier way to eat soft-shell crab;

vitamin C–rich pea pods; 15-minute

breakfast frittata; five ways to eat

parmesan cheese.

55 ASK

Our experts answer your

questions about tattoo

stretching, deload days,

cramping, and blisters.

IN EVERY

ISSUE

4 NEWS

29 SUPP OF THE MONTH

59 LAST WORD

30

Healthy

Pizza


PHILIPPINES

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NEWS FITNESS & HEALTH

OF SLEEP

Not catching seven to nine hours

of z’s per night? You might be at

a higher risk for workplace injuries.

U. of British Columbia

researchers looked at more than

1,200 sleep-clinic patients and

found that those with sleep

apnea were twice as likely to get

injured at work, with most mishaps—trips,

falls, burns—stemming

from the (tired) employee

not paying attention.

MORE BRAIN, LESS PAIN

MENTAL

MOVES

n Lower-back pain is a real pain in the neck for 31 million

Americans, costing sufferers in search of relief more than

$50 billion per year. One potential cure? Heightened awareness.

A study published in the Journal of the American

Medical Association found that mindfulness-based

stress reduction—which includes yoga, meditation, and

cognitive behavioral therapy, a technique for identifying

and managing pain—was shown to improve pain in 61%

of subjects after six months. CBT helped reduce

pain by 45%. Of those who received traditional

back-pain remedies, like meds and heat pads,

only 25% of them felt better.

Regular physical activity is tops for

improving a host of ailments and preventing

future health problems. But new

research out of UCLA reports that

almost any type of aerobic exercise—

from cutting a rug on the dance floor

and exercising a green thumb to walking

on a treadmill and riding a stationary

bike—can actually improve brain volume

and slash the risk of developing

Alzheimer’s disease by 50%.

LOSE 11

POUNDS ON

YOUR WAY

TO WORK

How? Keep the car in the

driveway and bike, walk, or

even rollerblade to the

office, says a recent study

published in the Lancet

Diabetes & Endocrinology. U.K.

researchers sifted through

data from more than 150,000

people enrolled in a huge U.K.

Biobank observational study of

about 500,000 individuals aged

40 to 69; they found a strong

association for reduced body

mass and percentage of body

fat in adults who commuted by

bike compared with those who

drove and a weight difference

of about 11 pounds. Those who

walked to work or used public

transportation also had lower

body mass than drivers.

KEVIN VAN AELST; CORBIS; VADYM DROBOT/ALAMY

4 MUSCLE & FITNESS JULY/AUGUST 2016


FROM THE EDITOR

EMAIL US AT

editorial@ivmdi.com

Discovery and

Motivation

EVER SINCE I CAME across

high intensity interval training (HIIT)

my drive to design exciting fitness

programs either for my clients or

for myself seems endless. For me

this valuable discovery widened

my creativity to integrate different

forms of exercises into a sound

program.

With the limitless options of

personalized programs that can be

created and tried through HIIT,

working out becomes more than

just a routine. It becomes a fitness

experience with personal flavor.

In designing a program (whether

for yourself or for others), I believe

that you always have to consider

the type of activities that support

the interest of the participant of

the program. Adding this characteristic

to the workout motivates

him (the participant) to go through

the fitness experience and enjoy it.

For instance, I incorporate punch

bag training or focused pad

training (aside from resistance and

anaerobic training) to clients who

are also into martial arts.

Similarly, being a Capoeirista

(Capoeira practitioner) I incorporate

Capoeira and/or gymnastic

moves (of varying intensities ) in

my own program to keep myself

from getting bored when working

out.

Discovering new approaches in

working out is one way of keeping

yourself motivated to pursue your

fitness goals. Moreover, this will

keep you from outgrowing your

fitness program.

Avoid settling down for whatever

workout program you are doing at the

moment. Always aim to tweak or to

add something new to your existing list

of exercises. Make sure that these

optional changes will challenge your

fitness level and will still make it fun

and safe to do.

For this issue, find out what HIIT

does to Piolo Pascual ( Cover feature-

Balancing Act) and the variety of

fitness endeavors which he passionately

finds time to go through. Also

check out what keeps Cubs righthander

Jake Arrieta fit while out of the

playing field (Edge – Sports).

If you’re looking for variety in

workout intensity, we have The 2016

Rock Hard Challenge Part 1 (Program

Feature) , and Frank Grillo’s Boxing

workout (Program Feature) among

other featured programs.

Also Browse through relevant

questions on fitness as all these get

clearly addressed in ASK (regular

section). Lastly, US Muscle and Fitness

Editor in Chief Shawn Perine explains

the importance of real fitness (Last

Word – Get Healthy Now).

I have been emphasizing this almost

in every issue but once again the ball

is in your court. Check these all out

and find out which discovery (be it on

progam or in nutrition) best suits your

lifestyle.

To a Better, Healthier,

Stronger, and Motivated You

Ferdinand Manabat

Editor in Chief

JULY/AUGUST 2016 MUSCLE & FITNESS 5


NEWS NUTRITION

BLESS YOUR

HEART

Heart disease has been a health

scourge for decades, but we

may be seeing a downward

trend. A study published in the

journal Circulation reveals that

deaths from heart disease in the

U.S. have fallen by about 62%

since 1973, with counties in

the Northeast showing the

strongest decline (down to just

4%) in 2010.

The South, however, which

has higher levels of obesity

and smoking, experienced an

increase—1973 saw a 24%

rate, but in 2010 that jumped up

to 38%.

JEERS

An updated analysis in the

Journal of Alcohol and Drug

Studies poured a frosty brew

on the notion that consuming

alcohol in moderation can

contribute to better health.

Researchers scoured 87

previous studies and found

that many of the people

who were abstaining from

alcohol were already in

poor health. With the bias

corrected, moderate

drinkers (up to two drinks

a day) ended up with no

health or longevity advantage,

unlike occasional

drinkers (one drink a

week) who were shown

to live the longest.

NICE GENES

Scientists at Cornell University

have shown how food can influence

health. They compared the genes of

the vegetarians of Pune, India, with

the genes of meat eaters from Kansas

and found that the veggies had a higher

percentage of a mutation that makes

vegetarians more susceptible to

inflammation if they don’t get a balanced

omega-6 and omega-3 diet. If these

plant eaters switch to a predominantly

meat-based diet, they will then see

more cases of disease.

WHAT A PAIN

Opioid prescription drugs like

oxycodone and morphine have

become some of the most

abused drugs in America. In an

effort to curb addiction and

reduce the number of deaths

attributed to the powerful

drugs per year—2010 CDC data

claim it’s 16,651—the FDA has

announced new labeling guidelines

aimed at educating prescribers

and patients about the

high risk of opioid abuse.

FOUR SIGNS OF THE FAT-CALYPSE

An Oregon State U. study of 4,745 subjects determined that only

a measly 2.7% of Americans meet the four-part criteria for having

a healthy lifestyle—good diet, plenty of exercise, lower body

fat, and no smoking. The upside? Almost 90% met at least one of

the four benchmarks, and one out of four is…well, it’s still not

very good.

RF/CORBIS (2); COREY JENKINS/CORBIS; PLAINVIEW/GETTY IMAGES

6 MUSCLE & FITNESS JULY/AUGUST 2016


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8 MUSCLE & FITNESS JULY/AUGUST 2016

BAL


ANCING ACT

BY FERDINAND MANABAT ///

PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF UNDER ARMOUR PHILIPPINES

I live my life

the way

I wanted to

live

The pinnacle of success showbiz icon

Piolo Pascual has reached still shines

as bright as ever even as nearly two

decades have passed. This may look effortless,

but the road to his achievement

demanded ambition, drive, faith, and

commitment to all components vital for

his status in the entertainment industry.

He believes that whatever happens

along his destination was meant to

prepare him closer to reach his goals in life. For

him, having the right perspective is the best way to

roll with the punches while coping with whatever

circumstance he gets himself into.

“I lived my life the way I wanted to live. There

are some regrets and some bumps here and there

but I had become who I am because of what I did

and because of what I went through. So everything

has its reasons, everything has its purpose, on why

things happen. If there are things that I have wanted

to do at 20, I was able to do it. At 20, I was in the

States. I had the same hunger I have right now. To

be successful and to just standout. I was always positive.

Maybe there were things that I did wrong but I

would not have had it any other way.” Said Piolo.

Seemingly feeding his hunger for success through

box office hits in his movies and in his concerts, his

top rating soaps, a long list of product endorsements

and worthy causes (like PETA), Piolo aims to

go further on areas he hasn’t tried.

“You know, given this platform, I got into producing

movies and I’m just itching to do something else

like probably do a mini-series like how they do it in

the states. But it’s just different because of course


PIOLO PASCUAL

our culture here is very… They like Soaps. So I’m not

sure if we’ll be able to do that. Well I’m still active but

it’s what I always wanted to do. Not to saturate the market

because I’ve been doing soaps half my life and I’m

just thinking of diversifying in the sense of probably doing

other things aside from soaps. Actually, I don’t know

if it’s going to materialize but I have done some coffee

table books and ABS CBN Publishing, Inc. is pitching for

another concept for a book but I was thinking of doing

something that involves health and fitness. These are the

things I have in my head that I want to be able to do and

to share to my supporters and to the fitness industry.”

He explained.

Not new in the field of health and fitness, Piolo is also

acknowledged as a fitness celebrity within the same

level of status as most of our contemporary athletes. In

fact, he endorses popular sports brands as well as fitness

events (like fun runs or full marathons) alongside well

known athletes. As if training for a race or for an event,

Piolo’s fitness regimen is comparable to what most seasoned

athletes go through.

“I try to differentiate my program because I’ve been

working out since I was a kid. Lately, I got into high

intensity interval training (HIIT) through my best

friend. We try to… look small. You want to look lean.

The trend nowadays is not really getting buffed or

bulked up. So I try to diversify in terms of my exercise

programs so I also include cardio workouts. I

join a lot of triathlon events (swimming, biking and

running). On the side, I also play badminton.” Said

Piolo.

He believes that staying fit and healthy should be

part of being good in his profession as well as other

professions. Moreover, as essential as being healthy

for ones job, Piolo is also firm in keeping in shape to

complement his being an (effective) actor.

“ You have to take care of yourself, your body and

your appearance... It’s all about wanting to look

your best for the camera. You have to present

yourself the best way possible since looking your

best comes with the package in this business (show

business). So that’s why I got into it (HIIT). Of

course I try to get enough sleep for recovery. I have

to look good all the time because it’s an unspoken

rule that aside from being an effective actor, people

are expecting me to look good even when I take off

10 MUSCLE & FITNESS JULY/AUGUST 2016


if you’ve been working out

a lot you have to listen to

your body as much as it

would listen to you.

my shirt. Also, It’s not just coming to the set, prepared

for my scene. I also have to be physically, mentally,

and emotionally prepared. To sum it up, It is all about

knowing my responsibilities as a person, as an actor,

and as a celebrity because I always want to be able to

present myself the best way possible. ” He elaborates.

Aside from looking tight, lean and fit, Piolo prefers the

HIIT program because of the adjustability of its features

in terms of the his age, physical capabilities, and

level of his fitness, among other considerations.

“HIIT For me, works so well because it’s like being in

a sauna (afterwards) and that there’s a time element

which I can finish quickly and efficiently. And even if

I don’t have to lift heavy but do more exercises under

each program, I get to improve my agility which is

excellent especially now that I’m getting old. If you’ve

been working out a lot, you have to listen to your body

as much as it would listen to you. I have to know when

I have to adjust my program to make it still effective. So

I change my program every couple of months so that I

won’t get used to doing the same thing over and over. “

Said Piolo.

He gets to condition his agility and mobility when

he explores his bodyweight exercises (which are

his favorites) in his HIIT program. Moreover, he

feels that combining free weights and bodyweight

exercises activates more muscles which increases

his calorie output. With this approach in exercise,

Piolo believes that his body responds better when it

comes to getting leaning.

Not only does he pay attention on how his body

reacts to his fitness regimen, Piolo also knows what

works for him when it comes to his food intake.

“I don’t have a diet. I eat a lot. I eat almost everything.

That’s the reason why I work out more. I try

to work up a sweat (through exercise) as often as I

can get rid of the unwanted calories that I took in.

I don’t want to deprive myself. I know what my

body can take and what time I can take it during the

day. Of course, I try to be aware of the appropriate

eating habit for my lifestyle. Basically, I don’t need

to eat as much at night. I lessen my intake of carbs

and focus on food that has nutrients and vitamins.

Sometimes I splurge on sweets. I have a sweet tooth

so it’s harder for me. So I just try to balance it out by

exercising longer.” He explained.


PIOLO PASCUAL

Although Piolo compensates added exercise for

giving in to his sweet tooth cravings, he still considers

rest and recovery equally important in maintaining

his healthy physical and mental condition.

“So when my body tells me to also rest and sleep

because I know that my mind won’t function well at

work when I lack rest, I have to relax and invest this

for my healthy recovery. However, in some occasions,

I go out, drink, and stay up late. To make up

for this, I make sure that I am able to sleep 6 hours

so that I can work out the next day. Otherwise, I

don’t work out at all and just sleep it off.” Said Piolo.

Aside from making sure that he sleeps enough from

a late night of work or “going out”, Piolo starts his

day with 2 scoops of his pre-workout supplement.

This supplement assures him of the added energy he

needs throughout his day.

An important note that he considers in making

his fitness program work for him is organizing his

schedule. For him, properly planning his day is important

so that he gets to work out often.

“While I believe that I shouldn’t have an off- season

on keeping in shape, I always include workout in the

morning as part of my daily routine. I don’t want

making this

schedule work

for you gives

you no reason

not to stay in

shape

to start the day feeling

sluggish. So I try not

to (as much as possible)

have an off

season because it’s

hard to get back

on your regular

program if you stop

exercising for a

while. It’s important

to balance everything

in life including exercise.

You just have to properly

organize exercise in your daily schedule to make it

part of your lifestyle. Making this schedule work

for you gives you no reason not to stay in shape. ”

He said.

His drive to excel and to strike a balance between

his life in fitness to that in show business

reflects the type of values he would want his followers

and the people close to him to remember

him by when he decides to retire.

“Your work ethic, attitude, personality and your

character will always be remembered because it

will speak a lot about what you did with your life.

For me, If I were no longer active in show business,

I would want to be remembered as dedicated,

professional, and responsible in all the things that

I have accomplished without seeking acknowledgement,

affirmation or attention. The feeling of

satisfaction in this regard is much more rewarding

for me than being remembered for the things that I

have accomplished.” Ended Piolo.

HIIT WORKOUT

Do each exercise for 1 minute then allow 15

seconds transition time before performing

the next exercise. Rest for 2 minutes after

completing all 10 exercises then repeat.

(do everything for 2-3 sets)

Push Ups

Sprints (Treadmill)

Pull ups

Jumping Jacks

Walking Lunges (with dumbells)

Tuck Jumps

Dips

Lateral hops

Bicep curls

Burpees

©2014 WARNER BROS ENTERTAINMENT INC

12 MUSCLE & FITNESS JULY/AUGUST 2016


INSPIRATION

Meet the undefeated HS wrestler

born without shins, p.15.

10 THINGS…

…you didn’t know about

protein, p.16.

WATCH

Summer-

Slam

COURTESY WWE, INC

AUG. 21

WORLD WRESTLING

Entertainment returns to the

Barclays Center in Brooklyn, NY,

for SummerSlam, one of the

company’s cornerstone pay-perviews.

Last year featured highprofile

guests such as former Daily

Show host Jon Stewart and Arrow

star Stephen Amell, as well as

some of WWE’s top Superstars—

John Cena, the Undertaker, and

current heavyweight champ

Roman Reigns—all competing in the

squared circle. For their ’16 return

to the Big Apple, you can bet your

(Rock) bottom dollar that WWE will

pull out all of the stops to entertain

a notoriously restless and vocal

New York City crowd.

A few burning questions diehards

want to know: Will the Shield

reunite? Will Bray Wyatt finally win

his first championship? Who will

Brock Lesnar take to Suplex City?

Expect no punches to be

pulled—well, unintentionally—in

what’s sure to be one of the

most exciting PPVs of the year.

The action starts at 8 p.m. EST

on the WWE Network.


EDGE SPORTS

Changeup

Cubs righthander JAKE ARRIETA went from struggling pitcher

to Cy Young winner by practicing Pilates. BY MARK BARROSO

ARRIETA’s

dominance in

2015 included

a record-low

0.75 ERA after

the All‐Star

break.

CHICAGO CUBS PITCHER

Jake Arrieta dominated in 2015,

winning 22 games, on his way to

receiving the National League Cy

Young Award. Outstanding as Arrieta’s

performance was, Cubs fans still

sadly remember last season for the

way it ended: in a sweep at the gloves,

er, hands of the New York Mets in the

National League Championship Series.

That tends to happen when your team

hasn’t won a World Series since 1908.

So what does the league’s best pitcher

do to help bolster the championship

aspirations of baseball’s most cursed

franchise? Shake Weight routines?

Jazzercise? Nope. Pilates, of course.

“I feel like a student, always trying to

put my body in different positions to

replicate the way I perform,” says

that Pilates helped kick-start the Texas

native’s career. However, a dedication

to functional range conditioning,

weight training, cardio training,

massage therapy, and a healthy diet

relying heavily on pregame smoothies

didn’t hold him back, either.

Arrieta now expects to play in the

Cubs’ first World Series since 1945.

“The added experiences for our

young players and the new players

we acquired are going to pay huge

dividends for us.”

Well, that and habitual Pilates.

ARRIETA’S PILATES

WORKOUT

Designed by Arrieta’s Pilates instructor Liza Edebor,

the workout is done while you stand on a Pilates

box. You can use a low box or a mat. Use light

dumbbells for No. 1–3. For No. 4–8, Arrieta uses a

Pilates spring wall, but a resistance band anchored

to a fixed object works, too.

Arrieta, who pitched his second

career no-hitter in April.

Pilates is similar to yoga in that it

uses low-impact exercises to improve

muscle endurance, strength, flexibility,

and conditioning. The workout first

gained attention among pro athletes

when Tiger Woods and Jason Kidd

started doing it in the early-2000s.

Considering the intense focus

involved, Pilates lends itself perfectly

to the skill set required to fire a

98 mph fastball across home plate.

The 6'4", 225-pound Arrieta started

doing Pilates in 2014 and now practices

year-round, six to seven days a

week with each session lasting 1½ to

two hours.

“The impact on your joints is very

minimal,” says Arrieta. “I can do Pilates

and come back the next day and get a

solid workout in.”

Before discovering Pilates, Arrieta,

30, had never won more than 10

games in a season. So it’s fair to say

EXERCISE SETS REPS

1. Standing Dumbbell

Abs Twist with Squat*

3 15

each leg

2. Standing DB Press 3 15

3. Biceps Curl 3 15

4. Lateral Box Stepover** 3 40

5. Reverse Lunge with

Biceps Curl

6. Jump Squat to

Box Jump***

7. Reverse

Diagonal Lunge

4 20

each leg

4 20

4 20

each leg

8. Plank to Pike 3 15

9. Single-leg Pike to

Elbow Touch****

3 10

*Hold DBs at chest so elbows flare out. Squat below box,

then back up, bringing one elbow to opposite knee.

**Row band as you step down with left foot while right

foot is on box. Squat. Switch legs, so right foot is on floor

and left foot is on box. Squat while pulling band.

***Row the band as you do a squat, jump and land with

each leg on one side of box (so you’re straddling the box).

Jump back onto box so feet are narrow again.

****Bring lower knee to same side elbow in plank, then

raise to single-leg pike position.

ROBERT BECK/SPORTS ILLUSTRATED/GETTY IMAGES


EDGE INSPIRATION

E-MAIL US people who inspire you:

editors@muscleandfitness.com

STEPHEN SCHUMACHER/COURTESY OF PELHAM HIGH ATHLETICS; ERIC SCHULTZ/AL.COM VIA AP

No Limits

High school wrestler and double-amputee HASAAN

HAWTHORNE capped off an undefeated senior

season with a 37-0 record. BY WILLIE CORNBLATT

HASAAN HAWTHORNE’S

wrestling journey came full circle after

a 7-3 victory on a wrestling mat in

Huntsville, AL. The soft-spoken

Hawthorne, 18, grappled his way to

a perfect 37-0 record as a senior at

Pelham High School, winning the Class

6A, 145-pound AHSAA State Wrestling

Championship.

Even more impressive—he did it with

no legs.

Hawthorne was born without shins

as a result of a rare condition called

tibial hemimelia. His parents had a

decision to make: have their son’s legs

severed at the knees or subject him to

multiple invasive surgeries and a risk

of being wheelchair bound. When

Hawthorne was 4 months old, his

parents made their choice.

“We decided to have his legs

amputated after a lot

of thinking, second

opinions, [and]

research,” explains

Hawthorne’s mother,

Felecia.

Equipped with

prosthetic legs,

Hawthorne developed a

love of sports and competition

early on—as well as a disdain

for losing.

“He’d race in everything,” says

NEXT

MATCH

Hawthorne wants

to wrestle

communications

in college and pursue

a career as a sports

commentator.

his father, Demond. “Everything

was a competition.”

Hawthorne played football and

baseball, swam, and ran track, but

discovering wrestling in the sixth

grade was a game changer.

“He fell in love with the physical

nature of it and said, ‘I think this can

be my sport, where I’m competitive for

a long time and really compete against

able-bodied people,’ ” Demond recalls.

Wrestling prep typically involves a lot

of running and cardio work, which

Hawthorne admits created an issue.

To keep his wind up he would drill,

spar, and hit the weights while his

teammates ran stairs.

Although Hawthorne’s efforts to

excel were lauded by most, he wasn’t

spared from haters.

“In one particular situation,” Demond

remembers, “one of the parents or

coaches was saying he was a

one-trick pony and could only do

one particular move, and that really

fueled [Hawthorne], so he took it out

on the kid.”

The doubters were put to rest as the

W’s continued to pile up, and it

became clear that Hawthorne was the

real deal. As his whirlwind season

came to an epic conclusion, the

low-key teen continued to remain

humble, motivated, and hesitant to

boast about his accomplishments.

However, he did acknowledge how

gratifying winning the title was—

especially after battling back from a

pair of shoulder surgeries the

summer before his senior

season. Pre-surgery, his

one-rep max on the

bench press was

upward of 240

pounds.

“I just have a

God-given ability and

the strength that He

already blessed me with,”

Hawthorne says. “All we’re doing is

just adding on to that. And trying to

get better every day.”

JULY/AUGUST 2016 MUSCLE & FITNESS 15


EDGE 10 THINGS…

…YOU DIDN’T KNOW ABOUT

Protein

BY TAL PINCHEVSKY

HISTORY REWRITTEN

1 | Back in 1890 the USDA recommended

working men consume 110 grams of protein

per day, the Journal of Nutrition reported.

Today each person needs a different

amount of protein based on gender, height,

weight, and activity level. According to the

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,

a healthy adult male should consume

roughly 56 grams of protein a day.

TAKE IT EASY

2 | Protein is crucial to keeping the

gains coming, but don’t go overboard.

Eating too much protein in middle age

could lead to kidney damage, and you can

become more than four times as likely to

die of cancer. That is comparable to the

effect of smoking.

ENOUGH SWEAT-CUSES

3 | The “meat sweats” have not been

medically proven. The closest theory is the

thermic effect of food, which the American

Journal of Clinical Nutrition defines as “the

increase in metabolic rate after ingestion

of a meal.”

VEGAN POWER

4 | Two years after giving up animal

proteins, German vegan bodybuilder Patrik

Baboumian set a world record in yoke

walk by carrying a 550kg yoke at the 2013

Toronto Veg Food Fest.

WHAT’S SUPP!

5 | Protein supplements rake in $7 billion

a year, according to Euromonitor.

BREAKFAST BLUNDER

6 | In 2015 General Mills was sued by

the Center for Science in the Public Interest

over its Cheerios Protein cereal. General

Mills was accused of using misleading

marketing to tout the amount of protein in

the cereal.

CHIRP, CHIRP, CHIRP

7 | Insects, particularly crickets, are

an excellent source of protein. A 2013 UN

report suggested more people incorporate

entomophagy (scarfing down insects) into

their diet to combat world hunger.

SHAKE IT UP

8 | Steve Sorensen, a software executive,

grew tired of drinking lumpy protein

shakes. So he created a prototype bottle

containing a wire whisk that would eventually

evolve into the BlenderBall.

BEEFING UP

9 | The average American eats 80.6

pounds of beef every year.

DON’T HAVE A COW

A 6 ounce portion of

grilled porterhouse

STEAK has 48 grams

of protein, but it

also delivers 18g of

fat, seven of them saturated. A cup

of cooked LENTILS has 18g of PROTEIN

and less than 1g of fat.

TIM HILL/CORBIS; GETTY IMAGES

16 MUSCLE & FITNESS JULY/AUGUST 2016


ABS & CORE

Get a superhero back and core

with one simple move, p20

BODY WEIGHT

A full-body circuit that’ll tax

major muscle and torch fat, p21.

RATE MY WORKOUT

Minor tweaks will have a major impact

on one reader’s chest routine, p22.

INSTANT MUSCLE

An in-depth guide to using

cable-row attachments, p23.

BUILD MUSCLE, BURN FAT, PERFORM BETTER

Crossing

Over

After a decade of CrossFit,

CHRIS POWELL retransformed

himself into a physique competitor.

BY ANDREW GUTMAN

FIND OUT HOW


TRAIN PHYSIQUE

CHRIS POWELL, THE

celebrity trainer from ABC’s Extreme

Weight Loss, can’t say no to a

challenge. After his friend dared him

to try “Fran”—a thruster and pullup

WOD with a 21-15-9 descending rep

scheme—Powell became obsessed

and has trained for and competed

in CrossFit competitions

since 2008, even

attending the 2015 East

Coast Championships

where he (happily)

placed dead last.

But the 38-year-old

husband with four kids

and a busy schedule isn’t

a professional athlete, and

CrossFit—as much as Powell

loves and respects the sport—just

wasn’t cutting it anymore.

“I was like, OK, how else can I

improve myself? I want to bring my

waist in; I want boulder shoulders; I

want bi’s and tri’s. There’s a beauty to

sculpting your body, and it’s a whole

new sense of empowerment and

control,” reflects Powell. So when

two clients—Josh and Kelli from

Season 5—challenged him and his

wife, Heidi (also a trainer on the

show), to train for a physique show,

Powell accepted and went all-out.

WATCH

See Powell in

action on Extreme

Weight Loss in

syndication on

TLC and OWN.

After years of menacing WODs,

Olympic lifts, and countless kipping

pullups, Powell gravitated to an oldfashioned

arm pump. He’s stronger

than ever, too, deadlifting 549 pounds

and back-squatting 435 pounds at a

body weight of 180 pounds. The diet,

however, is a different story.

While he and Heidi have

always lived a healthy

lifestyle, very few people

can drop their body fat

to the low single digits

on just three clean

meals per day; it takes

an extra level of precision.

Chris follows a

restricted, carb-cycling diet

with a low-carb, high-fat day

(2,300 calories) and then a high-carb,

low-fat day (4,030 calories). He’s

careful to execute his more taxing

workouts on his high-carb days, so

the extra calories are put to use.

Since taking a dose of his own

medicine, the transformation

specialist sports newly capped

shoulders, a full chest, and a Google

Map of veins that trickle down his

arms. It was a physique worthy of

the overall title in the master’s

division of the 2015 NPC Warrior

Classic in Colorado last August, with

Heidi taking third place in the Novice

Bikini division.

A big obstacle for Powell was

shifting his mindset from the trainer

everyone leans on to putting himself

first in order to compete. Luckily, he

had a teammate to lean on.

“I’m blessed that my wife is on

board with me and we’re [competing]

together, because that way, we can

trade off [responsibilities],” says

Powell, who, with a chuckle, admits

that competing has done more than

just strengthen their emotional bond.

“Her transformation has been

freaking mind-blowing over the last

seven months…it’s awesome…it’s

definitely been good for the love life.”

Powell’s next challenge: Exit the

amateurs. With plans to enter two

upcoming pro qualifiers, don’t be

surprised if you see him in board

shorts, front and center, on an IFBB

stage come fall.

READ UP

Powell covers his

diet in his newest

book, Extreme

Transformation:

Lifelong Weight

Loss in 21 Days.

PETER LUEDERS JULY/AUGUST 2016 MUSCLE & FITNESS 19


TRAIN ABS AND CORE

GET MORE training tips and diet

advice by following Sean on Twitter:

@seanhyson

Super Core

Your new exercise hero trains abs and lower

back without any equipment.

BY SEAN HYSON, C.S.C.S.

HOW TO DO IT

SUPERMAN

LIE ON YOUR CHEST ON

the floor with your arms and

legs extended.

RAISE YOUR TORSO OFF

the floor while simultaneously

lifting your legs. Squeeze

your glutes as you come up and

press your hips into the floor.

Retract your shoulder blades—

you should look like you’re flying.

WHEN YOU DON’T HAVE

a back-extension bench (or it’s

occupied), you can sub in the

superman. It works the glutes,

abs, and spinal erectors for a

core blast you can get anywhere,

anytime. It’s also great for rehab

if your back hurts.

TAKE

FLIGHT

Perform this move

for moderate reps

(eight to 15), or

hold the top

position for

time.

20 MUSCLE & FITNESS JULY/AUGUST 2016

PER BERNAL


TRAIN BODY WEIGHT

GET MORE For more

body-weight routines, go to

muscleandfitness.com/body_weight

Metabolic Monster

Give your metabolism

a major boost with

this 15-minute circuit.

WHAT IT IS

A 15-minute, four-exercise

circuit. Between burpees

on the TRX for 30 seconds

and double-unders—two

rotations of the rope in one

jump—the first half of this

circuit will set a grueling

pace. You’ll hit your lower

body with squats and then

fry your upper body and core

with bear crawls.

QUICK

TIP

With the TRX at

midcalf level,

place one foot

into one or both

foot cradles.

WHY IT WORKS

You won’t find any isolation

movements in this circuit,

since each exercise targets

just about every muscle

and the 30-second duration

will have you (and the floor)

doused with sweat. While 15

minutes doesn’t sound like a

lot of time, this workout will

have your body burning more

calories than traditional

cardio…that is, if you can

make it all the way through.

THE WORKOUT

EXERCISE

TRX Burpee

Double-under

TRX Squat

Bear Crawl

DURATION

30 sec.

30 sec.

30 sec.

30 sec.

ANDY McDERMOTT is a

personal trainer in L.A. Visit his website:

mcdermottfamilyfitness.com

IAN SPANIER JULY/AUGUST 2016 MUSCLE & FITNESS 21


TRAIN RATE MY WORKOUT

LET US HELP

Submit your workout for review at

muscleandfitness.com/ratemyworkout

Chest

Made

Easy

Rick H. from

Pleasanton, CA,

sent us his workout

to review. Here’s

what we advised.

BY SEAN HYSON, C.S.C.S.

RICK’S

OLD WORKOUT

EXERCISE SETS REPS

Bench Press 3 6

Incline Dumbbell Press 4 8–12

Dip 3 AMAP*

Dumbbell Flye 2 15

M&F RATING: A-

*AMAP: As many reps as possible.

OUR ADVICE

Your exercises, sets, and reps are all

well-chosen, so we have to assume

the problem is recovery. Always

leave a rep or two “in the tank” on

every set. Your chest will grow faster

with good technique and no lost time

due to injury.

HOLD

BACK

When you avoid

training to failure

on exercises like

dips it actually

helps you make

progress.

RICK’S

NEW WORKOUT

EXERCISE SETS REPS

Bench Press 1* 6

Incline Dumbbell Press 10 8–12

Dip 3 10-15

Dumbbell Flye 2 15

*Take as many sets as needed to work up to 1 set of 6 reps

using a load you could lift for 8 reps.

22 MUSCLE & FITNESS JULY/AUGUST 2016

PER BERNAL


TRAIN INSTANT MUSCLE

The

Bar Is

Open

Find the right cable

attachments to

meet your goals.

BY SEAN HYSON, C.S.C.S.

NICE GRIP

The lat bar offers

a grip that is both

wrist- and elbowfriendly.

GUYS TEND TO BASE

their workout on whatever equipment

is available to them at the

time. If the cable row machine

has a V-bar handle attachment

on it, that’s what they’ll use for

Attach a lat

bar to the

cable of a seated

row station. Grasp

it outside shoulder

width (above).

Row the

bar to your

sternum, driving

your elbows back

and pushing your

chest forward.

rows. But different attachments

offer different advantages, and

you should choose one based

on your goals and needs. See

sidebar (right) for a list of

handles and their uses.

HOW TO DO IT:

LAT BAR SEATED CABLE ROW

DID YOU KNOW?

Cable rows with

a lat bar allow a

greater range of

motion and more

lat recruitment.

GET A HANDLE ON:

ATTACHMENTS

EQUIPMENT

Pulldown bar with

opposing handles

V-bar

Angled bar

(upside-down V)

Rope handle

USE

Emphasize the biceps and

forearms

Emphasize midback and

biceps on rows, lower lats

on pulldowns

Heavier pushdowns and

less wrist strain than

straight bar

More range of motion on

pushdowns, extensions,

and curls

PER BERNAL JULY/AUGUST 2016 MUSCLE & FITNESS 23


15-MINUTE FEAST

Flavor meets convenience with this

EAT

easy-to-make frittata, p27.

WHAT’S IN THE FRIDGE THIS MONTH

1 FOOD, 5 WAYS

Tickle your taste buds with low-cal,

high-protein parmesan, p28.

Get

Baked

Oven-bake soft-shell crabs for better flavor and less fat.

BY THERESA GAMBACORTA

RENEE COMET/STOCKFOOD

BEFORE YOU SINK YOUR

teeth into a soft whole-wheat bun

lathered in tartar sauce this

summer, with Old Bay–seasoned

crispy-fried soft-shell crab legs

poking out, remember there’s a

healthier, more physique-friendly

alternative to cooking this succulent

blue crustacean.

At only 100 calories and 20 grams

of protein per 4 ounces, blue crabs

are extremely low in fat and

provide a versatile, seasonal

source of sweet and briny protein

that also supply you with a boost

of omega-3 fatty acids, the

minerals zinc and selenium, and

vitamin B.

While frying soft-shell crabs is

typical, baking them—with a

homemade spice mix—significantly

SOFT-SHELL CRAB RECIPE


EAT SOFT-SHELL CRABS

reduces saturated fat and lets the

crab flavor shine through.

The blue crab, Callinectes

sapidus (from the Greek meaning

“savory beautiful swimmer”), is the

main species linked to the culinary

term soft-shell crab. The Chesapeake

Bay in Virginia is home to

more than 550 million blue crabs,

CHEW

ON THIS

A 4-ounce blue

crab has 20

grams of

protein and only

100 calories.

which are often considered the

best in the country. But half of all

blue crabs harvested come from

Maryland, where colder waters

mean sweeter meat.

Beginning in early April, when

blue crab season starts, the

premolt (or peeler stage) of a blue

crab begins when the crab hides in

brackish waters to avoid predators

(aka us). Instead of eating, they

rapidly absorb water to make their

soft tissues swell to bust open

their shell. Crabbers look for the

telltale white line on a crab’s

paddle leg to turn from white to

pink to red as it nears closer to

molting. Crabs in this stage are

caught and then held in peeler

pots. The molting takes anywhere

from one to three hours as they

embark on a laborious wiggle out

of their shell. The crabs are then

removed from the water to prevent

the hardening of their parchmentpaper-like

soft shell.

Expect to dish out about eight

bucks apiece for soft-shell crabs.

When purchasing them, make sure

their legs and claws are intact and

that their shells give easily when

pressed. Aside from the face, apron,

and gills, all other parts of the crab

are edible. Beware that they are

highly perishable and will keep in your

refrigerator for only one to two days.

Reduce carbs by ditching the bun

and adding the crabmeat to a

salad. To boost fiber intake, pair

with a farro and tomato salad.

OVEN-BAKED

SOFT-SHELL CRABS

MAKES 2 SERVINGS

tsp chili powder

½ tsp celery salt

tsp ground black pepper

½ tsp smoked paprika

½ tsp dry mustard

½ tsp white pepper

4 large soft-shell crabs, cleaned

1 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil

1 tbsp butter, melted

1. Preheat oven to 500°F.

2. Mix all spices together and season

crabs on both sides with spice mix. Place

on a baking sheet.

3. Combine oil and melted butter and

brush over crabs. Bake crabs in oven eight

to 10 minutes.

NUTRITION PER SERVING

356 47g 2g 17g

CALORIES PROTEIN CARBS FAT

RITA MAAS/GETTY IMAGES

JULY/AUGUST 2016 MUSCLE & FITNESS 25


EAT FOOD OF THE MONTH

ABOUT THE COOK Jennifer

Iserloh is the co-author of the Amazon

best-selling book Fifty Shades of Kale

CHEW

ON THIS

Often considered

a Chinese vegetable,

snow peas originated

in the Mediterranean

and were grown

in Europe in the

19th century.

SRIRACHA ORANGE

SNOW PEAS

SERVES 4

Snow Day

Crunch on vitamin C–rich pea pods to

add texture and nutrition to salads and stir-fries.

BY JENNIFER ISERLOH

4 garlic cloves, minced

2 tbsp grass-fed butter or olive oil

2 medium oranges, zested, and

sectioned

½ tsp salt

1/4 tsp freshly ground black pepper

2 tbsp Sriracha

1 lb fresh snow peas, stems and

strands removed

WHILE YOU’RE POOLSIDE

enjoying the warm weather, keep

in mind that June’s forecast calls

for snow, in the produce world,

that is. Just one cup of snow peas

gives you more than 100% of your

RDA for vitamin C along with a

healthy dose of vitamin A and fiber.

Snow peas are high in non-heme,

plant-based iron and taste great

with other iron-rich foods like

lentils, beans, and grass-fed beef.

When shopping for snow peas,

select pods that have smooth,

uniform skin and are free of

dark spots or scratches. Hearty

snow peas will last in the crisper

drawer for about a week. Pods

should be eaten whole; just remove

the strand that runs down the top

of the pod. Hold a small pairing

knife against the top of the stem,

pull down, and discard the stem

and strand.

1. Combine garlic, butter or olive oil,

orange zest, salt, and pepper in a small

bowl. Mash well with the back of a spoon.

2. Heat a large skillet over high heat. Add

snow peas and butter/olive oil mixture at

once. Cook three to four minutes, stirring

often, until peas are coated in the mixture

and they begin to soften. Turn heat off and

stir in Sriracha. Top with orange sections.

NUTRITION PER SERVING

151 5g 18g 7g

CALORIES PROTEIN CARBS FAT

ENVISION/CORBIS

26 MUSCLE & FITNESS JULY/AUGUST 2016


EAT 15-MINUTE FEAST

GET MORE

recipes and nutrition tips at

muscleandfitness.com/nutrition

CHEW

ON THIS

Often referred to

as an Italian omelet,

the frittata’s origins

may have roots in

Mesopotamia, Persia,

Spain, Northern

Africa, France,

and England.

All-in-One

Breakfast

Get your day off to a healthy start with a morning meal

that’s tasty, nutritious, and easy to prepare. BY MIKE MANNAI

FOOD STYLING BY SUSAN OTTAVIANO

SUMMER

FRITTATA

MAKES 4 SERVINGS

6 large eggs

6 large egg whites

Salt and pepper

Olive oil to coat pan

6–8 spears asparagus sliced into

1-inch pieces

8 mushrooms, quartered

1/4 cup sun-dried tomatoes, sliced

1 baked sweet potato, cold and cubed

without skin

1. Preheat oven to 450°F.

2. Mix eggs in a bowl with a pinch of salt

and pepper.

3. Lightly drizzle pan with olive oil and

heat on medium.

4. Add asparagus and mushrooms; sauté.

5. Add sun-dried tomatoes and

potato; mix.

6. Pour in eggs and heat until edges set.

7. Transfer pan to oven until center of

frittata has set (about 12 minutes).

NUTRITION PER SERVING

240 19g 12g 14g

CALORIES PROTEIN CARBS FAT

BRIAN KLUTCH JULY/AUGUST 2016 MUSCLE & FITNESS 27


EAT 1 FOOD, 5 WAYS

3

MAKE SOME

PARMESAN

FLAX CRISPS

Preheat oven to 400°F. Spray a

baking sheet with cooking spray.

Combine ½ cup grated parmesan in

a small bowl with 1 tbsp ground flax,

1 tsp dried herbs of your choice (such

as basil), and tsp ground black

pepper. Spoon the mixture by

tablespoonfuls, 2 inches apart, onto a

baking sheet. Bake 6 to 8 minutes, or

until crisp and golden. Remove from

baking sheet using a thin spatula.

How Cheesy 5 BAKE A

Superfoods paired with low-cal, high-protein

parmesan cheese can feed your gains and

tickle your taste buds. BY JENNIFER ISERLOH

1

FLAVOR UP SOME

HEALTHY “RICE”

Place 2 cups cauliflower in a food

processor and pulse, 10 to 12 times,

to form shreds that resemble rice.

Heat a medium skillet over medium

heat and add 2 tsp olive oil. Add

“rice,” 2 tbsp chopped parsley, 1/4 tsp

garlic salt, and tsp ground black

pepper. Cook 3 to 4 minutes, or until

rice starts to brown. Turn heat off

and stir in 1/4 cup grated parmesan.

2

BROIL UP A

FAST GRATIN

Spread 1/4 cup plain 2% Greek yogurt

in the center of an 8-by-8-inch

baking dish. Layer 1 cup quartered

artichoke hearts over yogurt.

Sprinkle with 1 tbsp drained capers,

1 tbsp chia seeds, and 1/4 cup grated

parmesan, then dust with 1/4 tsp

paprika. Place under the broiler for

3 to 4 minutes, or until cheese is

melted and starts to brown.

4

SNACK ON

JALAPENO-

PARMESAN POPPERS

Spray a baking sheet with cooking

spray. Cut 4 jalapeños in half

lengthwise and remove seeds. Put

peppers on baking sheet and place

under broiler for 3 minutes, turning

1 to 2 times to soften. Remove from

broiler and preheat oven to 400°F.

Put peppers skin-side down on

baking sheet and top each with a

slice of chicken sausage or 1 tbsp

shredded rotisserie chicken, then

sprinkle each with 1 tbsp grated

parmesan. Bake 15 to 20 minutes, or

until cheese is golden.

BREADLESS

SHRIMP PARMESAN

Preheat oven to 400°F. Spray a small

ovenproof skillet with cooking spray.

Sprinkle 1/4 lb peeled, deveined shrimp

with ½ tsp dried oregano, tsp salt,

and tsp ground black pepper. Place

skillet over medium-high heat and

add shrimp and 1 cup broccoli

florets. Cook 2 to 3 minutes, turning

1 to 2 times until shrimp starts to turn

pink and broccoli starts to turn dark

green. Add ½ cup jarred marinara

sauce, stir, then sprinkle with 3 tbsp

grated parmesan. Put skillet in oven

and bake 4 to 5 minutes, or until

shrimp is cooked through and cheese

is golden.

GETTY IMAGES


EAT SUPP OF THE MONTH

Perfect Protein

Rivalus’ revolutionary

filtration process

makes Native Pro100

an ideal supp for

serious lifters.

THE SCOOP

One serving

of Native

Pro100 has

30g of

protein and

1g of sugar.

WHEN IT COMES TO

transforming your physique,

nutrition is more than half the battle.

And whether you want to shred up

or turn your chicken legs into

sequoias, protein is a key factor in

the ongoing quest for gains.

Whether it’s day or night, preworkout,

post-workout, or sometime

in between, protein shakes are

a staple and should be given a

place in your diet. They’re low in

calories, fat, and carbohydrates,

and they’re convenient.

But to see quality results you need

to rely on the best sources of

protein. Native Pro100 by Rivalus is

an elite whey protein isolate with

30 grams of protein per serving. It’s

extracted from the milk of grass-fed

cows, which is filtrated using lower

heat. This ensures a cleaner, more

natural, bioavailable protein that isn’t

as denatured and maintains more of

the “native” benefits from the whey

protein molecules. So after a

grueling workout, your muscles will

receive the very best as they

recover and grow.

NATIVE PRO100

A FAST-ACTING PROTEIN PERFECT FOR UNRIVALED RESULTS.

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JULY/AUGUST 2016 MUSCLE & FITNESS 29


IN

KNEAD

OF PIZZA

> WHETHER YOU WANT YOUR

SLICE HIGH IN PROTEIN OR LOW

IN FAT, FULL-ON VEGAN OR

FEWER CARBS, THESE HEALTHY

HANDMADE PIES ARE ALL

DESIGNED TO MEET YOUR

NUTRITIOUS NEEDS.

BY SUZANNE LENZER /// PHOTOGRAPHS BY

TRAVIS RATHBONE

BROCCOLI RABE

WITH SWEET

SAUSAGE

& AN EGG

S E R V E S 2

Sea salt

½ bunch broccoli rabe

3 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil

2 links sweet Italian sausage, casings

removed

1 tsp fennel seeds, roughly crushed

1 ball pizza dough, thawed if frozen

About 3 oz fresh mozzarella cheese, torn

into bite-size pieces

1 large egg

Freshly ground pepper

1. Heat oven to 550°. Bring a large pot of

salted water to a boil. Add the broccoli

rabe, stir, and cook until the water returns

to a boil, the rabe is bright green, and the

stems are barely tender. Drain and run

under cold water to stop the cooking. Let

cool and then squeeze to remove any

excess liquid.

2. Meanwhile, heat 1 tablespoon olive oil

over medium-high heat. Add the sausage

and fennel seeds, reduce the heat to

medium, and cook, using a wooden spoon

to break it up, until well browned, 5–7

minutes. Remove from heat.

3. Shape the pizza crust as directed in

the master recipe (see page 102). Brush

1 tablespoon oil over the crust and

scatter the mozzarella over the top.

Drape the broccoli rabe randomly over

the pie and add the sausage.

4. Transfer the pizza to the oven and

bake until the crust is nicely browned

and the cheese has melted, 6–10

minutes.

5. Heat the remaining 1 tablespoon oil in

a skillet over medium heat. Fry the egg

until the white is just set but the yolk is

still loose, 3–4 minutes. To serve, top

the pizza with the egg and a sprinkle of

sea salt and pepper.

CHEAT PIZZA

ON TRADITIONAL

THE MACROS

MASTER CRUST

607 33g 30g 40g

CALORIES PROTEIN CARBS FAT

CHEF’S TIP:

Puree leftover blanched

broccoli rabe with a bit of olive oil,

a handful of pistachios, and a good

grating of fresh parmesan for a

tasty twist on pesto. Smear

it on your next pizza instead of

jarred red sauce.

30 MUSCLE & FITNESS JULY/AUGUST 2016


2–3 thin slices prosciutto, torn into pieces

Handful of fresh basil leaves, torn

CHEF’S TIP:

Use those hard-earned muscles

to squeeze out as much liquid as

you can from the zucchini for a

crisper (and low-carb, glutenfree)

crust.

ZUCCHINI-CRUSTED

PIZZA WITH PROSCIUT-

TO & BASIL

SERVES 4

LOW-CARB &

GLUTEN-FREE

PIZZA

5 medium zucchini, grated Sea salt

1 cup almond flour, plus more as needed

½ cup freshly grated parmesan cheese

1 egg, lightly beaten

Freshly ground pepper

1 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil

1 Roma tomato, thinly sliced

3 oz fresh mozzarella, torn into bite-size

pieces

1. Place zucchini in a strainer, sprinkle with

salt, and toss. Place strainer over a large

bowl or in the sink and let zucchini drain for

about 20 minutes.

2. Heat the oven to 400°. Squeeze as much

liquid from zucchini as possible and mix it

together with almond flour, parmesan, and

egg in a large bowl.

The mixture should hold together. If it’s too

wet, add more almond flour a tablespoon at a

time. Season with salt and pepper.

3. Oil a 13-inch round pizza pan and spread

zucchini mix out to fit pan; use a spatula to

press the crust down and compact it.

Transfer crust to oven and bake for 12–15

minutes or until it begins to color on the

edges. Remove pizza from oven and raise

oven heat to 450°–500°. Top with tomato

slices, mozzarella, and prosciutto and return

pizza to oven until cheese melts. Remove

from oven, top with basil, and serve.

THE MACROS

478 29g 18g 31g

CALORIES PROTEIN CARBS FAT

POLENTA PIZZA

WITH GARLICKY

MUSHROOMS

& THYME

SERVES 4

2 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, plus more

for the pan

1 cup whole milk

3 cups chicken stock, plus more

if needed

1½ cups polenta (not instant)

1/4 cup freshly grated parmesan cheese,

plus more for serving

Sea salt and freshly ground pepper

3 cups mixed mushrooms, trimmed and

sliced

4–6 garlic cloves, peeled and smashed

4–5 sprigs of fresh thyme

1. Oil a 13- or 14-inch round pizza pan.

2. In a large saucepan, combine milk and

stock; bring to a boil. Slowly add polenta,

stirring constantly to avoid lumps. Once

polenta has been added, reduce heat to low

and continue to stir until very thick and grain

is tender, 20–30 minutes. If mixture absorbs

liquid too quickly, add more stock ½ cup at a

time; continue stirring.

3. When polenta is very thick—it should pull

away from pan edges when mixed—add

parmesan, salt, and pepper. Stir to combine

well. Remove from heat; pour into

prepared baking sheet; use a spatula to

smooth the top. Cover with plastic wrap

and chill until fully set, about 1 hour.

4. Heat the oven to 400°. Put remaining

2 tablespoons olive oil in a medium pot

set over medium-high heat. When oil is

hot, add mushrooms and garlic and sauté

until mushrooms just begin to soften,

about 3 minutes. Sprinkle with salt and

pepper. Add thyme, cover pot, and

transfer it to oven to roast for 6 to 8

LOW-FAT &

GLUTEN-FREE

PIZZA

CHEF’S TIP:

Keep polenta lump-free by

“raining in the grain”—

gradually sprinkle in the

polenta while whisking the

liquid for a smooth crust.

minutes or until mushrooms are cooked

through and garlic is very soft and fragrant.

5. Scatter roasted mushrooms over set

polenta; bake until crust edges just begin to

color, 8–10 minutes. Remove from oven,

sprinkle with more thyme, and serve.

THE MACROS

358 11g 56g 12g

CALORIES PROTEIN CARBS FAT

GREGORY SUJKOWSKI/NOUN PROJECT (PIZZA ICON)

FOOD & PROP STYLING BY SUZANNE LENZER

JULY/AUGUST 2016 MUSCLE & FITNESS 31


PIZZA CRUST

CRISPY

POTATO WITH

ONION JAM

AND THYME

SERVES 4

2 tbsp olive oil

1 Vidalia or other sweet onion, very

thinly sliced

Sea salt and freshly ground pepper

1 medium Yukon Gold potato

1 ball pizza dough, thawed if frozen

3–4 sprigs fresh thyme, leaves removed

1. Heat oven to 500°. Pour oil in a medium

saucepan over medium-high heat. When

oil is hot, add onion and sprinkle with salt

and pepper. Reduce heat to medium and

cook, stirring frequently, until onions

begin to color, about 10 minutes. If pan

seems dry, add an extra drizzle of oil.

CHEF’S TIP:

If you have a mandoline, save time

by slicing the potatoes on the

thinnest setting and skip

boiling them: When paper-thin,

they’ll cook fully in the oven.

VEGAN PIZZA

ON TRADITIONAL

MASTER CRUST

2. When onions are golden brown on the

edges or even beginning to stick to pan,

add a 1/4 cup or so of water; stir and

continue to cook until the liquid evaporates

and onions are very tender and

have melded together in a tangle, another

5–10 minutes.

3. If not using a mandoline to slice potato

very thin, put a medium saucepan of

salted water on to boil. Slice potato and

add to water when it begins to boil. Cook

until water just returns to a boil—the

slices should be tender but not thoroughly

cooked through—drain potatoes and set

aside to cool.

MASTER CRUST RECIPE:

5-INGREDIENT PIZZA DOUGH

2¾ cups bread flour

2½ tsp active dry yeast (1 packet)

2 tsp sea salt

1 cup warm water

¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil, divided

2–3 tbsp medium or coarse cornmeal

1. Put flour, yeast, and salt in a food processor.

With the machine running, pour

oil through the feed tube, then slowly add

water. Process until dough forms into

a rough ball and rides around the processor,

2–3 minutes. The finished dough

should be soft, slightly sticky, and elastic.

If too dry, add a bit more water; if too wet,

add a tablespoon or so more flour.

2. Lay a 12-inch-long piece of plastic wrap

on a clean work surface. Work dough into

an 8-by-6 rectangle on the plastic. Press

fingers into top of dough, making indentations.

Fold the left third of the dough over

and repeat indentations. Fold the right

third over and make indentations again.

Cover folded dough with plastic wrap and

let rise for 20 minutes.

3. Cut dough in half, form each piece into a

neat ball, wrap tightly in plastic wrap, and

transfer to freezer. Thaw dough in refrigerator

the morning before you make pizza.

4. Bring dough to room temperature,

15–20 minutes. Put a pizza stone in oven

and preheat to 500°. (If you don’t have

a stone, oil a rimmed baking sheet and

set aside.) Dust a peel or a greased baking

sheet with cornmeal. Working with

dough in your hands, gently stretch it into

a circle, pressing your fist into the center

of dough and pulling at the edges with

your other hand. With both hands, stretch

dough, being careful not to tear it. In a circular

motion, pull the thicker edges of

dough outward, letting gravity help. Continue

to stretch dough until it’s even in

thickness (the edges will be thicker) and

you have your desired size. Lay it on peel

or baking sheet.

5. Top pizza as desired and either slide

it off peel and onto your heated stone or

place baking sheet in oven. Cook pizza for

6–10 minutes or until crust is golden and

cheese is bubbling.

4. Prepare crust as directed in the

master recipe (see above). Spread onions

evenly on crust using the back of a spoon

or a rubber spatula and being careful not

to tear dough. Top onions with potato

slices and sprinkle with thyme.

5. Transfer pizza to the oven and bake

for 6–10 minutes or until crust is nicely

browned and the edges of potatoes have

colored and begun to curl.

THE MACROS

171 3g 21g 9g

CALORIES PROTEIN CARBS FAT

32 MUSCLE & FITNESS JULY/AUGUST 2016


PIZZA CRUST

DOUBLE CHICKPEA PIZZA WITH

CHORIZO, SPINACH & MANCHEGO

SERVES 6

1 cup chickpea flour

1 cup lukewarm water

5 tbsp olive oil, divided

Sea salt and freshly ground pepper

½ cup diced dry-cured chorizo

1 cup chickpeas, drained and rinsed

One 7 oz container baby spinach

1/4 cup freshly shaved manchego cheese

1. Put chickpea flour in a medium bowl

and gradually pour in water. Add 2

tablespoons olive oil, season with salt

and pepper, and whisk well. Cover and let

mixture rest for at least 20 minutes and

up to 2 hours.

2. Put a 12-inch cast-iron skillet in the

oven and heat to 450°. When pan is very

hot, carefully pour in 2 more tablespoons

oil and swirl around to coat evenly. Pour

batter into pan and let cook for about

10 minutes, or until set and beginning to

pull away at the edges.

3. Meanwhile, heat remaining tablespoon

olive oil in a large skillet over mediumhigh

heat. Add chorizo and reduce heat

to medium. Cook for about 5 minutes,

stirring occasionally, until some of

the fat from sausage has rendered.

Add chickpeas and toss to coat them

in the spicy oil; continue to cook until

chorizo begins to brown on the edges,

another 3 minutes. Using a slotted

spoon, transfer chorizo and chickpeas

to a bowl and set aside. Add spinach

to the hot pan, sprinkle with salt and

pepper, and cook, tossing frequently,

until just wilted. Remove spinach

from heat and press with a spatula

to drain off any excess liquid.

4. Top crust with chorizo, chickpeas, and

spinach and return to the oven for

another 3–5 minutes or until crust begins

to brown. To serve, top with manchego

shavings and a grind of fresh pepper.

HIGH

PROTEIN

PIZZA/SOCCA

THE MACROS

400 16g 42g 20g

CALORIES PROTEIN CARBS FAT

CHEF’S TIP:

Known as socca in France, this

high-protein batter benefits

from resting for at least

20 minutes before cooking so the

flour absorbs the water.

FOR MORE

delicious pizza recipes,

check out Suzanne

Lenzer’s book Truly Madly

Pizza ($18, Amazon).

JULY/AUGUST 2016 MUSCLE & FITNESS 33


HE 2016

OCK HARD

HALLENGE PART I

> IT’S THAT TIME OF

YEAR AGAIN: TIME TO SHED POUNDS

AND PACK ON MUSCLE TO FORGE YOUR

BEST-EVER PHYSIQUE—IN JUST EIGHT

WEEKS.

BY SEAN HYSON, C.S.C.S.,

AND JOE STANKOWSKI, C.P.T.

/// PHOTOGRAPHS BY EDGAR ARTIGA

THOMAS CANESTRARO

is an actor, fitness

model, and trainer.

Follow him on Instagram:

@thomastheboxer

SHOT ON

LOCATION

AT MATRIX

FITNESS,

ASTORIA, NY


2016 ROCK HARD CHALLENGE PART I

Every year, we introduce a new

program in late spring designed to

get you in the best possible shape in

time for Fourth of July barbecues

and a summer of beach parties and

shirtless pride. The training we’ve

prescribed in previous Rock Hard

Challenges has run the gamut from

all-out bodybuilding programs to

athletic boot camps geared toward

helping you perform at a high level

as well as look like you can.

One thing we haven’t shown, however,

is how a busy man can build

muscle and burn fat with an absolute

minimum investment of time or

energy—not because you don’t want

to invest it, but because we know

you probably can’t. Look, physique

transformation isn’t that hard, and

in the modern world, with all its

traffic jams, long workdays, and

distractions on social media, most of

us can’t afford to make it complex if

we’re going to accomplish anything.

Losing fat and gaining muscle takes

only a few weeks (we’re giving you

eight) and some hard training (but

only three lifting days per week),

and a very solid nutrition plan (we’ll

show you everything you need to

eat). Crack of dawn cardio sessions

and marathon lifting? Leave those

to the professional physique athletes

who get paid to do it—or the

wackos who just like to suffer.

This year’s Rock Hard Challenge—

the first part appears here, and the

second four-week installment premieres

in our July/August issue—

promises to be one of the simplest

in terms of what we’ll ask of you,

and yet the results won’t be any less

spectacular. Take your before pictures

now, and in eight weeks you’ll

be looking back to say “that wasn’t

so bad,” while the changes to your

physique will have others saying

“that is amazing!”

THE TRAINING

WE’VE OPTED FOR

a three-day workout

split. Think that’s not

enough work to put on

muscle? Tell it to Steve

Reeves—owner of arguably

the most impressive

physique of all time, who

trained the same way,

along with the many

other natural bodybuilders

of the 1940s and

’50s. The first day of

the week is lower-body

focused; the second,

upper; and the third, a

mix of both. Fewer

training days means

more time for recovery,

and you’ll need it.

The exercises are

laughably basic but brutally

intense, and have

their roots in powerlifting

and strongman, as

well as bodybuilding.

They maximize your

time in the gym by training

as many muscles as

possible at once, making

you stronger. And

greater strength results

in more muscle mass.

The farmer’s walk, for

example—wherein you

simply walk holding

heavy dumbbells at

your sides—trains the

legs, core, grip, back,

and traps while doubling

as a cardio conditioning

workout. You won’t find

any curls or pushdowns

in this program because

the biceps and triceps

will get plenty of work

as it is from lifts like the

Zercher carry and push

press. Trust us. If you

haven’t been basing

your workouts around

heavy-duty, compound

lifts, these exercises

will unlock a world of

growth potential for

you. And if you have,

well, there are plenty of

isolation lifts too—such

as the calf raise, incline

flye, and glute bridge—

that will give you the

targeted attention you

want to make muscles

achieve their maximum

size and shape.

Keeping with the

theme of simplicity,

we’re going to ask you

to memorize only one

set and rep scheme per

week. It will apply to

every exercise you do.

The volume starts out

low with the weights

fairly light, to help build

a foundation of work

capacity. Each week,

you’ll go a little heavier

and do a few more total

reps until the fourth

week, when you’ll back

off a bit to recover.

Then, in Part II, the

work will ramp back

up again and we’ll push

you to set new personal

records on your lifts.

GROOMING BY CHRISTIE CAIOLA

JULY/AUGUST 2016 MUSCLE & FITNESS 35


2016 ROCK HARD CHALLENGE PART I

RHC DIRECTIONS

Perform each workout (Day I, II,

and III) once per week, resting a

day between each session. You’ll

perform the same number of sets

and reps for each exercise in each

workout the first week—the sets

and reps will change each week.

So you’ll do two sets of 15 for every

move in Week 1, then three sets of

12 for everything in Week 2, and

so on. Perform all the exercises as

straight sets, resting 45–60 seconds

between sets.

On one separate day per week—

not a weight-training day—complete

30–60 minutes of light aerobic

training. This is done mainly for

recovery, so keep your heart rate

between 120 and 150 beats per

minute. To estimate this, hold your

index and middle finger to the pulse

in your neck and count the beats for

six seconds. Multiply by 10 to get

your approximate beats per minute.

You can jog, swim, row, cycle, or

perform a circuit of light bodyweight

exercises.

PHASE I

WEEK SETS REPS

One 2 15

Two 3 12

Three 4 10

Four 3 15

DAY I

EXERCISE

Sumo Deadlift

Farmer’s Walk

Glute Bridge

Ab Wheel Rollout

Standing Calf Raise

Ab Wheel Rollout

Use an ab wheel if your gym has

one or load a barbell with five-pound

plates. Kneel on the floor with your

shoulders over the bar. Brace your

abs and extend your arms in front of

you, rolling the bar forward until you

feel your lower back is about to sag.

Roll the bar back.

Farmer’s Walk

Hold a heavy dumbbell in

each hand and walk as quickly

as you can. Every two steps

equals one rep. Keep your

shoulders back and chest out.

You can use two dumbbells

that together equal your body

weight (approximately), or a

loaded trap bar.

36 MUSCLE & FITNESS JULY/AUGUST 2016


2016 ROCK HARD CHALLENGE PART I

DAY I

Sumo Deadlift

Stand with your feet outside shoulder

width and toes turned out 45

degrees. Bend your hips back to

grasp the bar at arm’s length with

a shoulder-width grip. Push your

knees out and drive through your

heels to extend your hips to lockout,

lifting the bar until it’s in front

of your thighs.

Glute Bridge

Sit on the floor and roll a loaded

barbell into your lap (you may need

to wrap it in a towel or use a bar pad

for comfort). Lie back on the floor,

bend your knees, and plant your feet

on the floor. Brace your abs and drive

through your heels so you raise your

hips off the floor to full extension.

JULY/AUGUST 2016 MUSCLE & FITNESS 37


2016 ROCK HARD CHALLENGE PART I

DAY II

EXERCISE

Dumbbell Bench Press

Hang Clean

Incline Dumbbell Flye

Push Press

Lateral Crawl

Lateral Crawl

Get into a pushup position and cross your left hand over your right while taking a step out with your right leg. Then

move your right hand out and bring your left leg in to form a pushup position again. Continue moving laterally. Each

step is one rep. Repeat in the opposite direction.

Fat loss

comes mainly

from your diet,

so one day of

light cardio is

enough.

Push Press

Hold a barbell at shoulder level with

hands at shoulder width. Bend your

knees quickly so that your body dips a

few inches, then immediately extend

them to help you power the bar overhead.

Hang Clean

Stand holding a barbell with

hands at shoulder width and feet

hip-width apart. Bend your knees

slightly and then bend at the hips

until the bar is just above your

knees. Explosively extend your

hips and shrug the bar. Let the

momentum carry the weight up

to your chest and then flip your

wrists so you catch the bar at

your shoulders.

38 MUSCLE & FITNESS JULY/AUGUST 2016


2016 ROCK HARD CHALLENGE PART I

DAY III

EXERCISE

Front Squat

Face Pull

Zercher Carry

T-bar Row

Single-arm Partial Bench Press

Face Pull

Attach a rope handle to a pulley

and grasp an end in each hand with

palms facing you. Stand back to put

tension on the cable and pull the

handle to your forehead, flaring your

elbows out at the end position.

Front Squat

Grasp the bar with hands at

shoulder width and raise your

elbows until your upper arms are

parallel to the floor. Take the bar

out of the rack and let it rest on

your fingertips. Step back and set

your feet at shoulder width with

toes turned out slightly. Squat as

low as you can without losing the

arch in your lower back.

JULY/AUGUST 2016 MUSCLE & FITNESS 39


2016 ROCK HARD CHALLENGE PART I

DAY III

Zercher Carry

Hold a heavy dumbbell in the bends of

your elbows, take a deep breath, and

walk with it. Every two steps equals one

rep. If your gym has one, use a sandbag

instead of a dumbbell.

Actively

push your

heels into the

floor to make sure

your hips stay

parallel to

the floor.

Single-arm Partial Bench Press

Hold a dumbbell in one hand and lie back on a bench so

that only your upper back is supported—your midsection

and hips must not be. Brace your core and squeeze your

glutes. Press the weight over your chest.

T-bar Row

Wedge a barbell into a

corner or landmine and

straddle it. Hook a V-grip

handle under the bar and

grasp it, facing away from

the corner. Keeping your

lower back flat, row the

handle to your belly and

then lower the bar down

until you feel a stretch in

your lats.

40 MUSCLE & FITNESS JULY/AUGUST 2016


2016 ROCK HARD CHALLENGE PART I

THE NUTRITION

Building rock-hard abs owes more

to what you do in the kitchen than

what you do in the weight room.

First, decide if your main priority is

gaining muscle or losing fat. To simplify

the decision-making process,

consider this: Your body’s ability

to put on muscle rather than fat is

determined by its insulin sensitivity,

and if you’re currently soft (that is,

no visible ab definition whatsoever),

any efforts you make to bulk will

only make you fatter. For 90% of the

people undergoing this program,

getting lean will be the ultimate

goal, but we’ll show you how to

both gain and lose accordingly.

To begin eating for fat loss, set

your calories at 12 times your goal

body weight. That is, if you want to

lose 20 pounds, eat as if you were

20 pounds lighter already. So if

you weigh 180 and want to be 160,

consume 1,900 calories daily (160 x

12—you can round the number off ).

Now determine how those calories

break down into grams of protein,

carbs, and fat. Set your daily protein

intake at one gram per pound of

body weight. You need carbs to

provide energy for workouts and to

recover from training, so again, one

gram per pound is good. As for fat,

keep it low to keep calories under

control (one gram of fat has more

than twice the calories of a gram

of protein or carbs), but not so low

that you negatively affect hormones

like testosterone: Start with 0.4

grams per pound per day. So for

our 180-pound man who wants to

be 160, his macros are 160 grams of

protein, 160 grams of carbs, and 65

grams of fat.

To gain weight (remember, you

must already be quite lean to do

this—some abs showing), multiply

your current weight by 17. So

a 160-pound guy who wants to

put on muscle size will consume

2,700 calories daily. From there,

the formula is the same as for fat

loss—except you’ll want to double

the carbs to two grams per pound.

Our 160-pounder will then eat 160

grams of protein, 320 grams of

carbs, and 65 grams of fat.

Note that these numbers provide

just a starting point. If you’re not

losing weight after two weeks,

cut calories to 10 times your body

weight. You may have to experiment

with cutting more carbs than

fat. Likewise, for the muscle seeker,

you should increase calories to 18

per pound if you’re not gaining,

SHARE YOUR PROGRESS

l Inspire and get

inspired by sharing

your pics and

progress with other

M&Fers throughout

your transformation on

Twitter and Instagram—

#rhc2016. Go to

muscleandfitness.com/

rhc2016 for more.

and even as high as 20 if necessary.

If the number of carbs you need to

eat to put on size seems too daunting,

you can add more fat to your

meals. For any change you make,

give it time to work and make sure

you’re hitting your numbers. You

can’t just guess blindly at what

you’re eating and blame the program

if you don’t see results. Track

your macros.

For more tips to help you keep

your diet on point, check out the

complete guide to our nutrition

philosophy at muscleandfitness

.com/foodpyramid.

JULY/AUGUST 2016 MUSCLE & FITNESS 41


RING MASTER

At 50, Frank Grillo

boxes daily and

carries only 5%

body fat.

THE

FIGHT

OF HIS

LIFE

> ACTOR FRANK GRILLO IS A

REAL-LIFE ACTION HERO WHO’S

READY TO SAVE HOLLYWOOD.

BY SEAN HYSON /// PHOTOGRAPHS BY DUSTIN SNIPES

There’s a 50-year-old man

sitting across from me who

looks like he could take my head

off with one clean shot. Frank

Grillo, who plays the supervillain

Crossbones in this summer’s

Captain America: Civil

War, is having lunch, and with

each slice of his knife through

the grilled salmon on the plate in front of

him, the vein in his swollen biceps leaps

from his skin. But that’s nothing compared

with the veins on the right side of his neck:

They look like the hydraulic cylinders that

help the Terminator turn his head.

To compare Grillo to a machine, particularly

a killing machine, is neither a swipe

at the guy nor an embellishment. Consider

that he gets up at 6 a.m. daily to travel to

one of L.A.’s premier boxing gyms, where

he’ll put in two hours of training, including

sparring sessions with professional fighters.

Then he’ll go film either his MMA-

42 MUSCLE & FITNESS JULY/AUGUST 2016


FRANK GRILLO

themed TV show, Kingdom, or the

next installment of one of his huge

movie franchises—The Purge series

or Captain America—and then he’s

back home at night to be a husband

and dad to three kids. “My wife

used to ask me, ‘Why are you always

fighting?’ ” says Grillo with a smile.

“I said, ‘I don’t know, but there’s

a reason.’ ”

UP-AND-COMER

There are several reasons, in fact,

and they started for Grillo in the

second grade. “I’ll tell you what did

it,” he says to me, pushing himself

back a bit from the table as if bracing

for impact after I ask him what

got him interested in combat sports

in the first place. “I had a fight with

a kid named J.J. Morales. He beat

me up. Then he beat me up again.

So I said to myself, ‘I’m going to

learn how to fight, and I’m going to

beat up J.J. Morales.’ And I did.”

Grillo’s dad taught him to throw a

single punch, and Grillo landed it on

Sled Drag q

Grillo attaches a rope to a

weighted sled and will row it

toward him for the length of

the room. Then he’ll grasp the

sled itself and push it all the

way back immediately. The sled

builds endurance and strength.

the bully’s face, ending his torment

and beginning a lifelong love affair

with all things martial. He wrestled

in high school and began boxing in

his mid-20s. In 1991, he discovered

Brazilian jiu-jitsu—two years before

the rest of the world did when

Royce Gracie effortlessly dominated

the first UFC event. He trained

under Rickson Gracie (widely

regarded as the best jiu-jitsu fighter

ever), ultimately ascending to the

rank of brown belt.

Grillo was born in the Bronx (that

much is evident as soon as you hear

him speak) and raised an hour north

in Rockland County. Apart from his

blue-collar Italian roots and schoolyard

fisticuffs, he says he doesn’t

really know where he got the drive

to push his body or his limits and

that the last thing anyone expected

was for him to become a movie actor.

Grillo went to New York

University and landed a job on Wall

Street. “I did it for about a year, but

it wasn’t for me,” he says. “Wearing

the suit? No.” He had dabbled in

theater, performing in school and

regional plays, and decided to move

to L.A. to make a run at acting.

“Nobody in my family ever acted

or was in the arts. It was like my

dirty secret. Who would take me

seriously as an actor?”

Casting agents did. They

responded to his dark good looks

and natural charisma, and he got

TOW THE LINE

Box ’N Burn

co-owner Tony

Jeffries looks

on as Grillo gets

after it.

cast on the long-running CBS soap

opera Guiding Light. “And that’s

when I didn’t have to work odd jobs

any more,” he says. “They paid me

$2,500 a day and guaranteed me

three days a week. I figured I was

rich.” The job had other perks, too:

Grillo met castmate Wendy Moniz,

and the two married in 2000.

IN THIS CORNER

Grillo turns 51 this month, but his

body could easily pass for 30. He

carries just 5% body fat. When I

remind him that imdb.com has him

turning 53, he snaps, “I know! And

you know they won’t change it? I

have to go to them with my passport,

not my license, to get them to

change it. I have no idea why.” He

reaches into his back pocket and

produces his California driver’s

license. It confirms his age will be

51 on June 8, his height is 5'10", his

weight 170, and (in case you’re wondering)

he is, in fact, an organ donor.

Like his body, Grillo’s face, too,

is surprisingly youthful, which he

partially credits to switching his

martial arts mainstay from jiu-jitsu

to boxing since he became serious

about acting. How exactly can getting

punched in the kisser be better

for your looks?

“When you get punched, you get a

lump,” Grillo explains to me, mushing

his cheek with his own right

cross to demonstrate. “You put some

ice on it, and it goes away in a couple

of days. But with jiu-jitsu, they’re

abrasions.” Repeated headlocks

and rubbing of one’s face into an

opponent’s gi, or the mat scrapes

and scratches the face, he says. “Being

an actor, you have to be careful

with that.” I laugh, pointing out to

Grillo that his job is forcing him to

care about his looks far more than

he ever would on his own. It’s made

him a “pretty boy,” right? He replies

that, most of the time, he doesn’t

even wear makeup in his movies.

GROOMING BY CARLY CAMPBELL

JULY/AUGUST 2016 MUSCLE & FITNESS 43


FRANK GRILLO

Grillo’s preserved condition

surely also owes something to his

immaculate diet. He eats no grains,

no dairy—“nothing that is postagricultural

revolution,” he says. “All

of my meats are grass-fed or wild

caught, and they can’t eat grains

either.” It might seem limiting, but

Grillo says he eats a lot, including

lots of fat from nuts, seeds, and

avocados. He’s nearly done with his

order of salmon and kale at Cheebo,

a low-profile organic eatery on

Sunset Boulevard, and he says he’ll

eat again when he’s hungry. Grillo

doesn’t count calories, track his

macros, or even weigh himself, and

he doesn’t take supplements. “I’ve

never done fucking steroids.”

As for his organic, Paleo-esque

diet, Grillo says, “I’m the first one to

say, ‘That’s a fad,’ but it works. For

years I avoided fat, but I was fucking

myself up. They tricked us into

believing if you ate fat you’d get fat,

and it’s the opposite. My cholesterol

and blood pressure, all my vitals,

have never been better.”

Grillo mentions that his brother

is a vegan, and he shakes his head

and furrows his brow. “I watch the

Discovery Channel with my son,” he

says, “and you look at these cats who

eat nothing but meat—the predators.

They’re all fuckin’ ripped!”

Shockingly, Grillo is having a beer

with lunch, but that’s a rarity. He’s

not above going out with friends and

having a few drinks, as he says he

did a bit excessively at an L.A. Kings

game the night before our meeting,

but he almost never eats crap food.

Red wine, however, is a regular

indulgence. “I’ll have a glass or two a

night,” he says. “Sometimes I’ll do a

bottle. I’m convinced they’re making

bottles smaller these days,” he says

with a smile.

KING OF THE RING

Seven days a week, Grillo trains

at Box ’N Burn Academy in Santa

Monica or at Fortune Gym in

Hollywood. He’s studied the sweet

science with Justin Fortune—who

handled conditioning for Manny

Pacquiao—for more than 10 years

and has become fast friends with

many pro fighters. Grillo was

recently in Las Vegas working

Chris “the Heat” van Heerden’s

corner, as the South African

welterweight mounts a comeback.

(Spoiler alert: Van Heerden won.)

The two often train together, which

includes sparring.

“For his age, he can take a punch,”

says van Heerden, who’s 28 with a

24–2–1 record. I watched the two of

them go at it for our photo shoot at

Box ’N Burn. Grillo didn’t look out of

place, and van Heerden didn’t seem

merciful.

“He’s got great footwork,” he says

of Grillo, “and a little overhand right

he loves throwing. I think he could

have made it as a boxer. There are a

lot of young boys he would make pay.”

I’m wondering if Grillo ever rang van

Heerden’s bell, so I ask. “No comment,”

he says, smiling.

“I love training more than acting,”

says Grillo. “But there’s not a career

there for me.” But if he were 20 years

old again? “Yeah,” he says, he probably

would have tried to pursue boxing.

“But then I would have fucked up my

life,” he says, laughing.

Outside the ring, Grillo doesn’t go

looking for fights, but he’s not above

using violence to settle disputes if

the other side is willing. He admitted

to punching out a loudmouth on the

street in an interview on Jimmy Kimmel

Live!, and he says there have been

times when crew members on his sets

were acting disrespectfully and tensions

almost came to blows.

“I’m the first one to say, ‘Let’s just go

outside,’ ” says Grillo. But he knows the

consequences. “I could lose everything.

Not that I have that much, but I

could lose it. I get those speeches from

my agent a lot.”

Grillo admits he doesn’t go out as

often as he used to, since roles in

DirecTV’s MMA drama Kingdom and

the movie Warrior, in which he played

another MMA trainer, have made him

a target for wannabe tough guys in the

same way Rocky did for Stallone and

The Fast and the Furious has for Vin

Diesel.

“People like to challenge you. They

read stuff like this [he points to the

notes I’ve taken], and they want to

44 MUSCLE & FITNESS JULY/AUGUST 2016


think The Purge: Anarchy showed

Hollywood that people still like

movies like that, and I’m in a small

pool of guys who can sell that. A

lot of times movies get made, and

I don’t really believe that the guy

who’s doing the action is really ‘the

guy.’ I think that maybe all the stuff

that I do makes me the guy.”

THE LAST ROUND

I love training more than acting, but

there’s not a career there for me.

see if you’re really a tough guy.

Guys need to make themselves look

harder than they are. But if you’ve

had any kind of training, you can

immediately tell if a guy’s ever had

an altercation.”

Grillo’s authenticity as a badass has

made him an obvious choice for violent

and heroic characters, which he

enjoys playing but sees as a doubleedged

sword. He looks for roles that

let him draw on his blue-collar roots

and athleticism but is wary of being

typecast as a thug or bruiser. He’s

particularly proud of his work in

2014’s The Purge: Anarchy, wherein

he played a cop who, while out to

avenge his son, shifts focus to protecting

innocents.

“You saw the vulnerability and

pain the character was in. If I’m

doing a movie where there’s an

emotional payoff at the end of the

journey, then cool,” he says. “If it’s

just a rote, paint-by-numbers tough

guy, then I’m not interested.” Grillo

acknowledges that his look, and, yes,

his muscles, can be limiting in the

eyes of movie directors, but he sees

great potential in his niche.

“I’m certainly not going to be in

The Danish Girl,” he says, “but I

don’t mind that. I had this discussion

with CAA [Creative Artists

Agency] recently. I have a certain

look, and we don’t need to be afraid

of it. We need to lean into it. Let’s

find great scripts, work with great

people, and elevate the genre.”

What Grillo aspires to do is fill the

void left behind by his heroes: 1970s

action stars like Steve McQueen

and Charles Bronson—men who

were physical and undeniably tough

but not larger than life. Not comical.

“Those movies were about real

people, no gimmicks. Look at The

French Connection, Death Wish, and

Escape from New York. They were

unapologetically unsentimental. I

While Grillo is still leading on the

scorecards in his bout with Father

Time, age is a factor for everyone

who makes his living with his body.

And Grillo’s love of a good fight may

be accelerating it in some respects.

“I took a shot a couple of days ago,”

he says, pointing to his forehead. “My

eyes crossed. And one thing you don’t

ever do when you’re fighting is stop.

You just don’t quit. So I’m trying to

get my head straight, and my eyes

suddenly popped back into place and

I was OK. Then I took another three

rounds of punishment.”

However, Grillo still sees spots in

his peripheral vision. He saw an eye

doctor, who told him some of the gel

around his retinas had detached. “So

now I have to be careful. Some of it

looks like little hairs. There are little

dots. One looks like a seahorse that’s

right here,” he says, pointing to the

upper righthand corner of his field

of vision. As a result, Grillo plans to

reduce his sparring going forward

and spend more time lifting weights.

But as long as the flesh is strong

enough, Grillo’s spirit will be willing.

He recently had a conversation

with fellow pugilist-turned-performer

Liam Neeson, his co-star in

2011’s The Grey. Neeson, of course,

has had his own challenges playing

heroes of substance and avoiding

repetition of the I-will-find-youand-I-will-kill-you

variety.

“I called him up and said, ‘I’m getting

offered all these action movies.

What do I do?’ He said, ‘Frankie,

how’s the money?’ I said, ‘The

SHOT ON LOCATION AT BOX ’N BURN, SANTA MONICA, CA


SPRING FRANK TRAINING

GRILLO

Frank Grillo’s

Boxing Workout

EXERCISE SETS REPS

Jump Rope 6–10

minutes

Shadow Boxing 3

rounds

Grillo

varies his

speed and

steps

Holding

3-pound

weights

Sparring 5

rounds

Wearing

16 oz

gloves

money’s good.’ He said, ‘How are the

roles?’ I said, ‘Some of them are good.’

He said, ‘I have one piece of advice for

you: Keep your knees healthy. That’s all

you need to know.’ ”

Grillo also needs to think about

longevity for the sake of his wife and

three sons. I ask him if he has any

advice for his kids, or anyone, on

building the kind of toughness that

makes for success. “ Grit…is a word

that I love.” He describes how his sons

come with him to the boxing gym, and

he recently enrolled his youngest son

in a kids’ boxing class.

“About halfway through, he was

being a pain in the ass. So I pulled

him aside and I said, ‘Listen, I don’t

care if you don’t like doing this. You

don’t have to. But it’s an hour once a

week. You can make this fun, or you

Bag Flip q

Grillo flips a heavy bag end

over end for the length of the

gym. He believes that repeated

explosive motions build conditioning

best for the anaerobic

demands of boxing. His rest

periods are usually 30 seconds.

can sit over there and watch the

other kids, but you are never going

to quit.’ He went back in reinvigorated.

Does he love it? No. But did

he under stand what I was saying?

Yes. And that’s the important

thing. Whether you’re in the ring

or you’re auditioning over and over

again, don’t fucking quit. I know

that sounds clichéd, but when you

think about it, only good things

can happen.”

Mitt Work 5

rounds

Heavy Bag 5

rounds

Swiss Ball

Bench Press

Wearing

10 oz

gloves

3 minutes

each*

3 10

Swiss Ball Flye 3 10

Goblet Squat 3 10

Pullup 3 10

Swiss Ball Plank 1 Hold for

time

Crunch 1 100

*Rounds last three minutes, and Grillo

rests only 30 seconds between them.

After hitting the heavy bag, Grillo rests five

minutes before strength training.

Sometimes he’ll perform a set of battling

ropes between sets of strength exercises

for a more active recovery. Grillo changes

his workouts constantly, opting for

whatever exercises he feels up to on a

given day. He performs weight-training

exercises for the entire body over the

course of a week. Despite having

impressive arms, Grillo does no direct

arm training and credits his development

to boxing.

Battling Ropes q

Grasp the ends of a rope

(secure the middle around a

sturdy anchor point) and assume

an athletic stance. Whip the

ropes into the ground as hard

as you can. Grillo alternates

patterns to change the stimulis.

46 MUSCLE & FITNESS JULY/AUGUST 2016


HEART-

STOPPER

> A FORMER HOOTERS

WAITRESS AND A CURRENT

REGISTERED NURSE, JANET

LAYUG OPENS UP ABOUT

BEING A MOM AND

OVERCOMING HER SHY

TENDENCIES TO MAKE IT ALL

THE WAY TO THE BIKINI

OLYMPIA.

BY DAVE LEE ///

PHOTOGRAPHS BY PER BERNAL

ANET LAYUG IS TOO

humble to say it, but she’s a

powerhouse in the IFBB Pro

League bikini division. Her résumé

includes nine wins, two runnerups,

and one third-place finish.

Impressive for someone who first

took up competing in 2013.

But long before she was turning

heads on bikini stages around the

world, the stunner from Lakeland,

FL, was doing it at Hooters, where she

worked for seven years as a waitress.

In between bringing diners their wings,

she graced the Hooters calendar, won its

International Swimsuit Pageant, became

a registered nurse, and won the FLEX

Bikini Model Search Championships. Oh,

and she’s a mom. Here’s how the selfprofessed

shy 27-year-old burst out of

her bubble to become one of the sport’s

JULY/AUGUST 2016 MUSCLE & FITNESS 47


JANET LAYUG

M&F: How did you come to work

at Hooters?

JL: I was 18 years old and I’d never

been to Hooters, but my friends

suggested we go to watch the

college football championship

game. I was approached by the

manager, who handed me an

application. The hours were flexible,

which was great because I was

starting college. And also, I was

kind of shy growing up, so I knew

that meeting new people all day

would help me develop better

social skills. And of course I loved

the fast money!

I’ve always been

athletic and into fitness

but never on this level.

Getting into the Hooters calendar seems like

a tough process. Was it?

They had tryouts every year. My first year

I didn’t make it. I wasn’t devastated; I just

knew I would try again. I did, and made it

every year I worked there, including the cover

in 2015. I also won the 2014 Miss Hooters

International Swimsuit Pageant.

What motivated you to enter the 2013 FLEX

Bikini Model Search?

I had recently graduated from nursing

school at Polk State College in Florida and

was working 12- and 13-hour shifts at the

hospital. I wanted a break from my “big

girl” job to go back to my first passion—

modeling. I had done many swimsuit/

beauty pageants, but this was geared toward

a fitness audience. I always had more of an

athletic look, but I knew I needed to step it

up, so I got a trainer.

Snapshot

Birth Date: Dec. 31, 1988

Current Residence:

Lakeland, FL

Height: 5'8"

Weight: 130 pounds

Career Highlights: 2015

EVLS Prague Pro, 1st; Korean

Grand Prix, 1st; Bikini Olympia,

2nd; New Zealand Pro, 1st; Bikini

International Australia, 1st;

2014: Battle on the Beach, 1st;

Bikini Olympia, 2nd

And then the next logical step was the NPC?

I had heard about the NPC for years, but I

was scared I would fail. But after winning

the FLEX [Bikini Model Search], I wanted

to see if I could transform my body

to the next level. I entered my first show

and became addicted. I did four shows that

year, won all of them, and earned my IFBB

pro card.

What were the major differences between

being a Hooters model and an NPC/IFBB

competitor?

Training and dieting. It requires a lot of


JANET LAYUG

preparation weeks before the show.

You have to be very dedicated.

Oh, let’s not forget the superdark

tans and posing. As far as stepping

onstage in front of a big audience,

glamming up with big hair, makeup,

and the bikinis, it’s similar to Hooters

and other pageants I’ve done.

Has training always been a part

of your life?

When I was younger I did tumbling,

soccer, and competitive cheerleading.

I would condition on my own

with lots of running and cardio.

But I never picked up weights

before [competing].

What is your favorite body part

to train?

Glutes all day. They’ve always been

a weak point of mine, but I feel like

I’ve made improvements.

Least favorite?

Calves. Who likes training calves?

How do you juggle being a

competitor and a mom?

It’s not easy. You have to know

your priorities and plan your day

around them. Luckily, my daughter,

Briley, is very athletic. She’s

7 years old and will join in on my

at-home workouts. And sticking to

the diet is crucial in prep, so I take

my meals with me for any function.

My daughter actually likes eating

the same healthy foods; she has

learned a lot about healthy choices

and being active. At such a young

age their minds are sponges, so it’s

important to be a good influence.

But I still enjoy cooking her typical

kid meals like mac ’n’ cheese.

Do you still work as a nurse?

I’m going back to school at the

University of South Florida and am

halfway through the nursing program.

Eventually, I want to become

an advanced practice registered

nurse. I still work occasional jobs

and do volunteer work. I hope to

finish school in the next year or two.

I’m sure you’ve heard the old “you’re

making my pulse race” line, but what

was the most ridiculous line a patient

tried on you?

When I worked in the surgical

intensive care unit, we would get a

lot of patients going through openheart

surgery. One patient woke up

and said, “Wow, you’re my nurse?

I think I’m going to have another

heart attack.”

What was it like being in your first

Bikini Olympia?

Crazy! Being on the same stage with

my idols…was an honor. Just being

a part of it, hanging backstage with

inspirational athletes, the packed

expo, and having tons of fun meeting

fans from all over the world was

an experience I won’t forget.

How are you planning to go from

runner-up to Bikini O champion?

I’m looking forward to bringing my

best physique. My biggest downfall

is glutes. I’ll be focusing on tightening

and lifting them with a variety

of training techniques. And of

course, I will come in conditioned.

I’ll be ready.

LAYUG’S LEG &

GLUTES WORKOUT

EXERCISE SETS REPS

Squat* 4 10–25

Leg Press** 4 25

Bosu Ball Hip Thrust 3 25

Walking Lunge

superset with

Vertical Jump

6

6

20 yards

10 yards

Stiff-leg Deadlift 4 10–25

*Use a wide stance and go down low.

Push through your heels to fully engage

your glutes.

**Place your feet high on the platform.

This position puts more emphasis on

the glutes and hamstrings.


JOE’S NEW

THRONE

> NEW GAME OF THRONES STAR

JOE NAUFAHU IS AS HUMBLE AS

HE IS RIPPED.

BY RAVI YANDE ///

PHOTOGRAPHS BY EDGAR ARTIGA

FORMER NEW ZEALAND

rugby standout Joe Naufahu

has headed into a different

arena these days. The

38-year-old actor plays the

role of Khal Moro, head of

the Dothraki tribe warriors

in the sixth season of HBO’s

highly acclaimed show

Game of Thrones.

One of the most watched on television,

the series airs in more than 170

countries, with a cult following worldwide.

The tough and physically fit

Naufahu rocks a pony tail, rides horses,

wears lots of armor, leads a team of

warriors in fighting the enemy, and

gets up close and personal with co-star

Emilia Clarke.

We tried to pry spoilers from him but

failed. However, we did get the GoT

star to reveal how being a lifelong fitness

fanatic helped sculpt him for the

role of a lifetime.

50 MUSCLE & FITNESS JULY/AUGUST 2016


Naufahu was born and raised in

New Zealand, and like many young

boys in that part of the world, he

was drawn to rugby.

“I can remember as a child playing

with a rugby ball, aspiring to be part

of the national rugby team. That’s

all I thought and cared about,”

he recalls.

Naufahu would eventually turn that

passion into a profession, earning the

chance to play for pro organizations

such as the Canterbury Crusaders,

Leicester Tigers in England, and

Glasgow Warriors in Scotland; he also

played as a representative of New

Zealand’s under 19s and 21s team. But

when he was 26, a spate of injuries

changed the game for Naufahu.

“I had a few serious knee injuries

where I had most of the cartilage

removed from my right knee,

leaving it virtually bone on bone.

I remember the doctor coming in

after surgery telling me that I still

could play but I would be risking

the quality of life down the road

with my family, my children,” says

Naufahu, who has two kids, Freddy,

6, and Eva, 9. “I couldn’t have that,

so for me it was an easy decision to

give up rugby.”

T

HE DECISION WOULD TURN

his world upside down. He went

through a “period of darkness”

during which he would shut himself

indoors and ponder his options.

“I would be all alone [because I]

didn’t feel like going out or meeting

anyone, but I never stopped training,”

he explains. “I learned how to

Naufahu’s Circuit u

The 10-1 Ludus Vine circuit

starts with 10 reps of each exercise

per round, then drops to

nine, eight, and so on until you

reach one. Between rounds, row

15 calories and run 400 meters.

JULY/AUGUST 2016 MUSCLE & FITNESS 51


JOE NAUFAHU

SIMON BAKER/GETTY IMAGES; MACALL B. POLAY/HBO

train without equipment in solitude

since I did not feel like going to the

gym or being around people.”

But that alone time was ultimately

a blessing in disguise as it eventually

led to him partnering with his

brother Rene on a personal-training

business—Ludus Magnus School of

Training, in Auckland, New Zealand

(ludusmagnus.co.nz). Their emphasis:

body-weight training. Today, the

Naufahu brothers have more than

20 “lanistas” or trainers working

for them.

“For me, training was therapy and

took me out of my depression,” he

admits. “I had to do it to keep me

sane, and it’s the same type of training

I am doing today with clients

and in my business. So, you know,

everything happens for a reason.”

He adds, “If I hadn’t gotten

injured, I wouldn’t have done that

type of training. And during that

time to reflect, I got introduced to

acting and Rene [an accomplished

writer and director] gave me a small

role in a crime series, which led to

other acting roles.”

More opportunities soon presented

themselves, including roles

in the television series Spartacus:

War of the Damned (2012) and

The Last Saint (2014), which premiered

at the 2015 Harlem Film

Festival and was directed by Rene.

“I have a passion for acting,” says

Naufahu. “[It] kind of took rugby’s

place. I get the same buzz and feeling

when I go into a scene as I did

when I was running on a field. For

me, I need [acting] to breathe now,

and if I can carry on getting good

roles, I will be happy.”

My rules are pretty basic: I try to eat

clean. Nutrition is not rocket science.

P

ART SAMOAN, GERMAN,

and Irish, Naufahu says his

background is similar to that

of WWE Superstar and Hollywood

heavyweight Dwayne “The Rock”

Johnson in that they both have

Samoan heritage. Samoans are

known for their massive structure

and ability to build muscle easily.

“Samoans just look at weights

and we get bigger,” he jokes. “Look

at The Rock. He is an incredible

guy with a massive build. Coming

from a small island and seeing his

successes, you can’t help but be

inspired to be something like him.”

When asked what kind of workout

he would give Johnson, Naufahu

had an answer in the chamber:

“Body weight! He would so smash

me in the weightlifting, but I would

get him on cardio.”

For his Games of Thrones prep,

Naufahu wasn’t out to get as huge

as Johnson, nor did he change

anything diet-wise. He eats no sugar

(he doesn’t have a sweet tooth) and

Naufahu playing rugby for Southland

in a match against Waikato in 2001

(right) and with co-star Emilia Clarke

on the set of Game of Thrones.


p Whatever Works

If kettlebells aren’t available, Naufahu suggests

using “whatever you can get your hands on—

barbells, dumbbells, weight plates, boulders.”

shuns all processed food.

“My rules are pretty basic: I try

to eat clean. Nutrition is not rocket

science; it’s common sense, really. As

long as you are burning more than

what you are taking in and not eating

too much crap and processed

foods, you are good to go.”

Naufahu usually has a light

breakfast because, he says, he just

doesn’t feel hungry in the a.m.

For the rest of day, he sticks to

a Polynesian diet, which is high

in fish such as snapper, teriyaki,

vegetables, and fruit. He’ll down a

protein shake sometimes, too. His

cheat meals include boiled green

bananas or savory island chips. But

there’s one meal he refuses to go

without: oka.

“Oka is an incredible [raw] fish

dish my mom makes. You can never

say no to oka, or my mom, for that

matter. It’s my favorite dish by far.”

Naufahu trains seven days a week

for about 60 minutes a session

using “fun pieces of equipment,”

which include sledgehammers,

tires, and kettlebells. Unsurprisingly,

he most enjoys training using

only his body weight, as those

exercises allow him to be more

p Push It

“Pushups are probably the best

upper-body/core exercise you can

do. Some favorites: spider (above),

Roman, and crouching tigers,”

Naufahu says.

creative and versatile. And that

creativity came in handy when he

was traveling to places like Spain

and Ireland for Game of Thrones.

In between filming, he even put

some of the GoT cast members

through his Ludus training when

time allowed.

The leader of the Dothraki tribe

may be open about his workout,

but when it comes to revealing

any inside info on the most popular

show in the world, Naufahu is

tight-lipped.

“I was at the red-carpet premiere

in L.A. with my mom, and

reporters were hounding me,” he

reveals. “They were asking about

any secrets. But I didn’t divulge. I

was good.”

SHOT ON LOCATION AT DRIVE495, NEW YORK, NY


SPRING JOE NAUFAHU TRAINING

Smart move. Talking out of school

while on a show like GoT is like

begging for Khal Moro’s early and

grisly death. And such an untimely

and forced fate for his character

would shatter the dream Naufahu is

currently living.

“I remember watching Game of

Thrones with my siblings [he has

four brothers], and I would say to

them, ‘If there is one show that I

would love to do, it’s gotta be Game

of Thrones,’ and they would laugh at

me. And a couple of years down the

road, here I am on the show playing

the leader of the Dothraki.”

A

LONG WITH BEING A

standout rugby player, respected

personal trainer, and

talented actor, Naufahu also enjoys

reading magazines.

“I read almost every issue of

Muscle & Fitness when I was 10,”

he says. “It’s such a huge honor to

be part of it. I have always had so

much respect for [M&F]. I remember

at 19, going to train with my

cousin, the famous bodybuilder

Sonny Schmidt, at his gym in

Melbourne. We used to read the

magazine, and now, years later, I am

in it. It’s pretty awesome.”

Despite traveling the world to

film GoT and running a business,

Naufahu stresses that without his

family’s support, he would have

never achieved the kind of successes

that have come his way. As a token of

his appreciation, he had his family’s

names tattooed on his body.

“There are Mother Mary and Baby

Jesus for my mom; the birds are doves

and represent my two sisters; my oldest

brother’s name is Tiger, so there is

one for him; and the horseshoe is for

my other brother, whose nickname is

horse.”

Samoans just look

at weights and we

get bigger.

In addition to having a rose tattoo

named after his godmother, there

is also a set of praying hands and a

profound phrase in Latin on his chest

that translates to “Be strong. Pain will

be useful to you someday.”

“I wanted to have that because

pain strengthens you,” he explains.

“At the time it happens, it seems like

the worst, but you get through it and

you’ll see how much you grow as a

person.

“Nothing is impossible if you set

your mind to it. Focus on it and you

can achieve it. When the lights turned

on after the L.A. premiere, my mom

turned to me with pride and said,

‘Son, I didn’t know you had so many

lines.’ For me, the coolest part of doing

what I do is setting goals and achieving

them—and for my mom to be here

to see my success.”

t Must-Know Moves

Here are Naufahu’s top 10

exercise picks: leg raises, pullups,

pushups, burpees, sprints,

kettlebell swings, crawls,

thrusters, knee-touch wall

donkeys, and rowing.

GROOMING BY CHRISTIE CAIOLA

54 MUSCLE & FITNESS JULY/AUGUST 2016


ASK

YOU SUPPLIED THE QUESTIONS, WE FOUND THE ANSWERS

What will

happen to

my tattoo

when I start

adding size?

—MATT G., BOSTON, MA

A:

THE TATTOO WILL

increase in overall size

as the skin increases

in size, essentially because your

skin is stretching and expanding

to cover the increased muscle

size underneath.

That doesn’t mean it’s necessarily

going to distort the image

of the tattoo; in fact, it likely

would not distort the image.

DAVID CANGELLO,

M.D., is a clinical assistant

professor of plastic surgery at

NewYork-Presbyterian Weill

Cornell Medical College.

JJ MILLER

DELOADS, MYOSTATIN & MORE


ASK

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO ASK@MUSCLEANDFITNESS.COM

DELOAD

Every four to six

weeks is standard,

but listen to your

body. It’s OK to

pencil in a deload

day if you’re overly

sore or fatigued.

How often should

I include a deload

day in my training

program?

WEEK 4

—DAN B., CENTENNIAL, CO

WEEK 1

A:

IT ALL

DEPENDS

ON the inten

sity—meaning the load

you’re working with—and

the amount of volume in

your program. As you

increase your training

load and decrease your

volume (which is part of a

solid program), you’re

putting more stress on

your central nervous

system. Deloads are

really, really important to help

your central nervous system

reset itself. Depending on the

type of training that you’re

doing, a true deload should

happen every fourth to sixth

week, where loads are at

40% to 50% of your typical

training weight.

MICHAEL GEREMIA

is an N.A.S.M., C.P.T., C.E.S.

certified personal trainer.

MATTHIAS DROBECK/CORBIS (2); ALAMY

A:

FRUIT HELPS

restore your

glycogen, but

doesn’t do much for protein

resynthesis. So it’s important

to pair the fruit with some

protein, about 20 grams.

Is eating fruit

post-workout

beneficial?

—NED K., NORWALK, CT

LESLIE BONCI, R.D., is

the sports dietitian for the

Pittsburgh Pirates, Toronto

Blue Jays, and Kansas City

Chiefs; and the owner of Active

Eating Advice by Leslie.

56 MUSCLE & FITNESS JULY/AUGUST 2016


ASK

ROBERT HARIRI, M.D., PH.D., is chairman

of MYOS RENS. For more on his formulation,

Muscle Health, go to remusclehealth.com

I read the recent

M&F story on

myostatin and

would love it

if there was a

supplement that

reduces it. But

wouldn’t anything

you ingest be

destroyed by

stomach acids

before it reached

the bloodstream?

—MIKE T., EL PASO, TX

A:

FIRST, MYOSTATIN IS

a very important regulatory

protein that is highly

conserved in all vertebrates. It is

one of the molecules that has been

carried forward in evolution to play

an important signaling roll, and it is

connected to what is called the TGF

beta class of molecules. TGF beta is

transforming growth-factor beta.

That is a class of molecules that is

responsible for controlling much of

the biology of inflammation, repair,

defense, etc. Myostatin plays an

important role that has this additional

effect of suppressing the

recruitment of satellite stem cells

from muscle, to divide and repopulate

muscle.

As to your question about an oral

myostatin blocker being destroyed in

the gut: that is complete fiction.

Many believe that all proteins are

broken down and denatured during

digestion. That is a fallacy because

the vast majority of your immune

system resides in the gut…in the

walls of the intestines.

The fact is that the majority of

proteins, especially proteins of

certain configurations, survive

digestion; they make it through.

Some proteins survive even better

than other nutrients. I’ve come up

with what we call a proteolipid

complex. It’s lipids and proteins—

hundreds of them—that are found in

egg yolks, and much of that material

survives digestion in an active form,

and gets absorbed.

If protein didn’t survive

digestion, there would not be

food allergies. When you have

a food allergy, you’re allergic

to large peptides. Moreover, if

all proteins and all lipids were

denatured, how would

bacteria survive transit and

take up residence in the lower

intestines?

Anybody who says that these

proteins can’t be absorbed is

wrong. The pharma industry

has played with absorption

and bioavailability in a variety

of ways. Just as a pharmaceutical

company creates

what’s called an enteric

coating to help get a pill

through the stomach, certain

things, like egg yolks, have

their own kind of intrinsic

enteric coating, and it’s with

this that the proteins make it

all the way through. And just

like a bacterial cell, it has a cell

wall, and that cell wall allows it

to survive digestion.

The ability to modulate

myostatin activity using a

convenient, orally active

dietary supplement formulated

into a variety of products

provides a powerful tool for

PAVEL YTHJALL

JULY/AUGUST 2016 MUSCLE & FITNESS 57


SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO ASK@MUSCLEANDFITNESS.COM

JOHN FEDELE/CORBIS; COREY

JENKINS/CORBIS

I took some time off

from training and now

I’m cramping up badly.

What am I doing wrong?

—EUGENE W., DAYTON, OH

A:

CHANCES ARE you’re going

too intense too soon. It’s a

common problem. We don’t

train, and then we try to go back to

training at the same intensity or volume as

before, and we get cramped up. Try

starting out with 50% or 60% of

where you left off and you probably

won’t cramp up as much.

—MICHAEL GEREMIA

DON’T FRET

Geremia recommends

to “start light, check

your ego at the door,

and listen to your body.

Everyone will return

to ‘normal’ at a

different rate.”

I get blisters on my

feet when I run more

than a few miles.

How do I prevent this?

STEVE H., TUCSON, AZ

A:

GET NEW, DIFFERENT, OR

better accommodating footwear

(a snug shoe), because blister

formation occurs if there’s too much friction

between the skin and some external source.

A cheap, quick fix, however, is to put a

bandage or Band-Aid over the affected area

to minimize the rubbing and friction. But

again, if there’s going to be trauma, you’re

going to cause a blister and there’s kind of

no way around that.

DAVID BANK, M.D., is an assistant

clinical professor of dermatology at

Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center.

Muscle & Fitness Philippines,

is published in the Philippines

monthly except combined

January/February and July/

August issues, each of which

counts as two of twelve in

an annual subscription by

International Ventures for

Media & Distribution, Inc.

(IVMDI), 82 E. Rodriguez Jr.

Avenue, Acropolis, Quezon

City 1110, Philippines. Muscle

& Fitness is a trademark of

Weider Publications, LLC,

a subsidiary of American

Media, Inc. (AMI), 4 New York

Plaza, 4th Floor, New York,

NY 10004. Copyright © Weider

Publications, LLC 2015. All

rights reserved. Copyrighted

under the Universal Copyright

Convention and International

Copyright Convention.

Copyright reserved under

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is PHP 1,000.00 for (1 year) 12

issues in the Philippines. Orders

outside of the Philippines

must be prepaid in U.S. funds.

For Customer Service and

Back Issues call + 63 2 655

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Ventures for Media & Distribution,

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SUBSCRIBERS: If the postal

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Ventures for Media

& Distribution, Inc. (IVMDI),

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published in this magazine

are the exclusive property

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(IVMDI), and cannot be used

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Muscle & Fitness Philippines

is not responsible for returning

unsolicited manuscripts,

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Weider Publications, LLC,

American Media, Inc., and

International Ventures for

Media & Distribution, Inc.

(IVMDI), publisher of Muscle

and Fitness Philippines, does

not promote or endorse any

of the products or services

advertised by third-party

advertisers in this publication.

Nor does Weider Publications,

LLC, American Media Inc.,

and International Ventures

for Media & Distribution, Inc.

(IVMDI), publisher of Muscle

and Fitness Philippines verify

the accuracy of any claims

made in conjunction with

such advertisements. Title

Trademark registered in U.S.

Printed in the Philippines.


THE LAST WORD

FOLLOW SHAWN

on Twitter: @shawnperine

Get Healthy Now!

Getting muscular is

always worthwhile,

but never at the expense

of one’s health.

EVEN THE M&F

editor in chief

needs to take his

internal health

seriously.

FIVE RULES TO GET HEALTHY NOW!

1 2 3 4 5

EAT

ORGANIC

If not all the

time, at least

do so when

it’s convenient.

SPIKE

INSULIN

NATURALLY

Have honey

or fruit postworkout,

not candy.

MEATLESS

MONDAYS

Try ditching

meat one day

each week.

(meatless

monday.com)

STIMULATE,

DON’T

ANNIHILATE

Train hard,

not too hard.

It worked for

Lee Haney.

MEDITATE

Escape with

yoga or hike

in the woods.

Find a yin to

your gymtime

yang.

FOR MOST OF THE THREE-PLUS

decades I’ve been training, health

concerns took a mega–stretch limo

backseat to my goals of getting peaked

biceps and a six-pack.

This was wrong.

As a young aspiring bodybuilder, I

focused on transforming the appearance

of my body, ignoring internal

needs in favor of my pecs, quads, and

lats. While my muscle myopia did beget

me a respectable physique, it also

begat stomachaches, headaches, and,

I’m guessing, more colds than I would

have had if I focused on food quality

rather than macros alone.

At 50, I now see the folly of my

youthful ways. Though I never dabbled

in chemical solutions for muscle gains, I

did, at times, consume more meal

replacements than meals, ignored the

quality and source of my food, and

gorged myself in an attempt to add a

few pounds of muscle.

Again, wrong.

Yes, it’s important to think about

protein, fats, and carbs. But you should

also question them: Which farm did that

steak come from? Is it one where cows

are injected with hormones and

antibiotics? Were your vegetables and

grains genetically modified or exposed

to pesticides? Does that prepackaged

meal contain chemicals you can’t

pronounce and cheap ingredients that

have low bioavailability or, worse, are

potentially carcinogenic?

I’m not trying to be a buzzkill. Go

ahead and aim to get as big, strong,

lean, and athletic as your heart desires.

But you can do so while also taking

care of your organs not spelled

m-u-s-c-l-e. You’ll feel better and still

have that hard-earned muscle when

you’re 50.

And that’s the right thing to do.

DUSTIN SNIPES


A D V E R T O R I A L

GOLD'S GYM

Gold's Gym Story

Fifty years ago, the fitness movement

as we know it was born. It all began

with one visionary named Joe Gold.

He owned and operated Gold’s Gym,

a modest fitness center in Venice

Beach, California where aspiring

bodybuilders would flock to not only

for the equipment but for the strong

sense of community and family that

Gold fostered. Gold’s Gym would

later be hailed “The Mecca” of

bodybuilding and eventually grow into

the largest co-ed gym in the world.

Gold’s began a tradition of commitment,

passion and dedication which

continues today at over 700 locations

around the globe.

From Venice Beach, Gold’s Gym

grew, setting up in over 36 states and

30 countries. The rapid growth of

Gold’s Gym worldwide is due in part

to their commitment to providing the

best and latest equipment, a wide

variety of classes, and a supportive

staff of personal trainers and group

exercise instructors who are the best

in the business, providing experience

and guidance to athletes, movie stars,

and anyone interested in the best

fitness services in the industry.

In 2002, the iconic gym franchise

reached Philippine soil. Gold’s

Gym Philippines’ first branch was

in Glorietta 3, Ayala Center Makati.

From there, Gold’s Gym Philippines

has steadily grown. Now with over

25 branches all over the country,

Gold’s Gym is stronger than ever.

60 MUSCLE & FITNESS JULY/AUGUST 2016


NEW MEMBER'S SECTION

Welcome to

Gold's Gym

Schedule a New Member’s

Orientation, which consists of

three free personal training

sessions with your annual

membership and a free nutritional

counseling session.

Just approach the fitness desk

to schedule your orientation

and ensure that your assigned

trainer will always be available

for you. Please take note that

nutritional counseling

may be at a different club.

DAY I:

1st Free Workout

or 1W

1. Fill out the Foundation of Fitness

(FOF) Form with your

basic health information, physical

activity and goal setting.

2. Undergo Fitness Assessment -

body composition, fitness

Always bring a workout and

bath towel (for the gym and

for the shower) and a padlock.

Wear comfortable exercise

clothes and rubber shoes.

Bring a padlock for your

gym-use locker. You cannot

use the locker when you’re not

in the gym working out.

and flexibility tests which will help

your PT create a specific program

for you to follow.

DAY 2:

2nd Free Workout

or 2W

1. Establish your SMART (specific,

measurable, attainable, realistic,

time bound) goal with your trainer.

2. Your PT will take you through

your first general workout

session to show you how to use

the different equipment.

DAY 3:

3rd Free Workout

or 3W

1. Your PT will present your personalised

program based on all your

assessments.

2. Time for your first specific workout

with your unique goal

in mind!

DAY 4 :

4th Free Session

or 1NC: Nutritional

Counselling

1. Get your anthropometric or nutritional

assessment

2. Conduct 24 hour food recall.

3. Set your nutritional goal.

GOLD'S GYM

LOCATION

ACROPOLIS

82 E. Rodriguez Jr.

Ave. Acropolis, Q.C.

470-0579

ALABANG

BMW Autocenter

Commerce Ave.

Alabang

772-4986

BAY AREA

Bluebay Walk, EDSA

Extension corner

Roxas Boulevard

225-7849

BGC

5th floor W Bldg.

9th corner

30th Avenue

463-2643

CDO

Limketkai Drive,

Cagayan de Oro,

Misamis Oriental,

Cagayan de Oro City

0925 803 8761

CENTRIS

Centris Walk, EDSA

corner Quezon

Ave., Brgy. Pinahan,

Quezon City

935-6778

CEBU

(CEBU CITY)

4th level, Ayala Center

Cebu, Cebu Business

Park, Cebu City

0917 882 8994, (032)

319 0509

CEBU

(MANDAUE)

J. Center Mall 2nd

Floor, Mandaue City

(032)515-3974

CHINATOWN

2nd Floor Lucky

Chinatown Mall,

Binondo

9660670,

0917-8767005

CIRCUIT

Circuit Makati, A.P.

Reyes St., Brgy.

Carmona, Makati City

264-2143

CLARK

CENTER

Berthaphil Clark

Center 05 - 045-499-

0482, 09228094494

GALLERIA

East Wing Robinsons

Galleria, Ortigas

Pasig City

634-0908

A D V E R T O R I A L

GLORIETTA

Glorietta 3 Ayala

Center Makati

752-8283

GREENHILLS

220 Wilson St.,

Greenhills San Juan

724-3694

HOLIDAY INN

5th Floor Holiday Inn

Hotel Ortigas Pasig

City 634-9943

KATIPUNAN

4th Floor Regis Plaza

Bldg. # 327 Katipunan

Ave. Loyola Heights

Q.C. 263-3035,

0922-8017398.

MARIKINA

2nd Floor. Tropicana

Retail and Banking

Building, Sumulong

Avenue, Barangay

Sto. Nino, Marikina.

Telephone number -

263-6636.

NEW MANILA

84 Dona Hemady St.

Corner E. Rodriguez

Sr., Quezon City 721-

0249, 09328600934

NORTH EDSA

2nd Floor Waltermart

EDSA Quezon City

332-1040

SAN

FERNANDO

Paseo Las Palmas,

Jose Abad Santos

Ave. City of San

Fernando, Pampanga

(045) 435-5649,

0925-867-4653

SHERIDAN

Warehouse 3

Sheridan Street,

Greenfield District

Mandaluyong City

998-2635

TIMOG

6th Floor Victoria

Towers Bldg. Panay

corner Timog Ave.

Quezon City

355-0377

TWIN OAKS

Unit 23, The Portal,

United Street,

Greenfield District,

Mandaluyong

0943 130 7622

Soon to open: DLSU Taft, Fairview Terraces,

Marquee Mall, McKinley Hills, Subic, The 30th


GROUP EXERCISE

CLASS GUIDE

ZUMBA

Dance-fitness class featuring

exotic rhythms set to high

energy Latin and internationalbeats

with fun and easy to

follow choreography

ZUMBATONING

Blend body sculpting

techniques and specific

Zumba moves into a

calorie burning, strength

training experience

ZUMBA STEP

Tone and strengthen glutes

and legs with a gravity defying

blend of Zumba routines

and step aerobics

PILOXING

An exciting fitness program

that blends the best of Pilates,

boxing and dance into a high

interval workout

LES MILLS:

BODY COMBAT

A non-contact martial artsbased

fitness program with

moves taken from Karate, Tae

Kwon Do, Kung Fu, Kickboxing,

Muay Thai and Tai Chi

LES MILLS:

BODY JAM

An addictive fusion of the

latest dance styles and hottest

new sounds puts the emphasis

as much on having fun as

on breaking a sweat

SPINNING

Indoor cycling simulating an

outdoor ride with pumped-up

music

MIXXEDFIT

Explosive dancing and

bootcamp-inspired moves

set to the same music you

hear at the radio and in the

clubs

JUKARI

A workout specially designed

to improve flexibility while

increasing joint mobility and

range of motion developed by

Reebok and Cirque du Soleil

GURLESQUE

Fitness dance program that

uses heels while dancing -

unleash your inner diva and

perform with feminity

RETRO

Dance your way into your

dream body to the tune of 70’s,

80’s “Disco Music” and 50’s to

60’s classics

POPHITS

Dance workout class with

pop music from 1990 – present

STREETDANCE

A more advanced hip-hop and

pop dance class to improve

aerobic endurance and

coordination

BOOTCAMP

Intense total body workout

using a variety of fitness

equipmentand drills from

military training, sports, and

fitness

PILATES PLUS

Pilates with added equipment

such as weighted balls and

dumbbells

DEFINITIONS

Total body sculpting class

using a variety of fitness

equipment

SIMPLY STEP

Step up and down on a

platform called the “step” to

the rhythm of easy

choreography

GOLD'S MIX

Separate segments of cardio,

strength, and flexibility

integrated in a single class

CORE

Core strengthening class

using body weight and a

variety of fitness equipment

SMOOVES

A funk class developed by

Jungee Marcelo, pioneer

hiphop/funk dance instructor

in the Philippines

MAT PILATES

A form of exercise, developed

by Joseph Pilates, which

emphasizes the balanced

development of the body

through core strength,

flexibility, and awareness in

order to support efficient,

graceful movement

YOGILATES

Combination of Yoga poses

and Pilates exercises

YOGA

Yoga with a fitness approach

to develop balance and

flexibility

BELLY DANCE

Traditional Middle-Eastern

folk dance

CARDIO MARTIAL

ARTS

A fusion of different martial art

disciplines integrated into fun

choreography

BELLYPOP

Belly dance set to pop

tunes and modern moves

HI-LO ENERGY

Traditional aerobics class

of alternating high-impact

low-impact moves

SEXY HIP-HOP

Sweat it out to top 40 music

including hip hop and R&B

in a fun and sexy routine

GOLD'S GYM

General

Gym Rules

1. No membership card, no entry

policy is strictly enforced.

2. No children and non-members

may accompany you in the gym or

lockers during your workouts as

the gym is exclusively for

members.

3. Gold’s Gym is a worldwide

celebrity gym. Aside from

providing results, celebrities

patronize Gold’s Gym because

their privacies are respected.

You are not allowed to seek

autographs, photos or speak to

our celebrity VIP clients

especially when they are with

their personal trainers.

4. Please return the dumbbells,

mats, plates and any exercise

equipment you use back to its

proper place.

5. Use your gym towel to wipe off

your sweat from the

equipment as a courtesy to the

next user.

6. Standard rules of decency,

respect of privacy and good

general conduct applies. Refer to

the back of your membership

contract for details.

10 Commandments

of the Gym Floor

1. Dress properly.

2. Keep your belongings in your

locker.

3. Do not eat on the gym floor.

4. Do not stare at people.

5. Share the use of equipment.

6. Clean as you go.

7. Keep noise to a minimum.

8. Practice personal hygiene.

9. Ask assistance from a fitness

instructor.

10. Do not drop the weights.

A D V E R T O R I A L

10 Commandments

of the Wet Area

1. Bring your own sturdy

padlock.

2. Bring your own towel or

rent at the front desk.

3. Do not touch the controls of

the steam and sauna.

4. Throw used sachets in the

garbage can.

5. Do not leave your belongings

unattended.

6. Do not reserve a cubicle

(only meant to be used by one

person at a time).

7. Keep your hands to yourself

(stray hands have caused a lot

of fist fights or even court

cases).

8. Respect others. Do not take

photos (even of yourself) and

do not take other people’s

belongings.

9. Do not bring food or

beverages in the locker room.

10. Report all lost items to the

reception area immediately.


GOLD'S GYM

A D V E R T O R I A L

Frequently Asked Questions

WHO SHOULD I CONTACT

IF I HAVE PROBLEMS OR

CONCERNS ABOUT MY

MEMBERSHIP?

Any issues, concerns, and questions

can be addressed to your Membership

Consultant or through an accomplished

Customer Service Form (CSF) in any of

the clubs. Management will get back to

you as soon as possible.

WHAT ARE YOUR GYM

HOURS?

Mondays to Fridays: 6:00AM to 12MN

Saturdays: 6:00 am to 9:00 pm

Sundays/Holidays: 8:00AM to 9:00PM

THIS IS MY FIRST TIME TO

ENROLL IN A GYM. DO YOU

HAVE A PROGRAM FOR

BEGINNERS?

All new members are encouraged to

avail of their three (3) free Foundations

of Fitness (FOF) Orientation sessions.

HOW MUCH IS YOUR

PERSONAL TRAINING

PACKAGE?

Please approach our fitness manager or

front desk for the rates.

I CANNOT AFFORD A

PERSONAL TRAINER.

WHAT DO YOU SUGGEST?

Many members still derive the benefits of

exercise without a personal trainer. However,

you can get a personal trainer for a

group of 2 to 5 through our Team Physique

and Not-So-Personal Training Programs.

You can even join our group exercises

classes such as Zumba, Spinning, or Piloxing

and ask the instructor for tips to help

you.

DO I HAVE TO PAY AND REGIS-

TER AHEAD OF TIME TO TAKE

GROUP EXERCISES CLASS?

Unlimited access to all group exercises

classes is already inclusive in every

Gold’s Gym Membership. Participation is

on a first-come-first-serve basis.

ARE CLASSES SUITABLE FOR

ALL FITNESS LEVELS?

Yes, they are. If any modification is

needed, the instructor will provide options

for all fitness levels.

MAY I GET THE SCHEDULE OF

ALL GROUP EXERCISES

CLASSES?

Please check our Facebook page

facebook.com/GoldsGymPh for the

complete and updated schedule of group

exercises classes in all clubs. The updated

schedule is also available through our

Gold’s Gym PH app available for iOS and

Android devices.

I HAVE CERTAIN MEDICAL COM-

PLICATIONS, WHAT PROGRAM

SHOULD I JOIN?

It is advised that you consult a physician

before participating in any physical activity.

You should disclose your health condition

and any medical complications with a fitness

trainer.

Our trainers will develop a program to

strengthen your body with these in mind.

In case you need to rest after starting our

membership, we can offer up to 2 months

added to your membership upon presentation

and verification of medical documents.

HOW CAN OUR COMPANY GET A

CORPORATE ACCOUNT?

Send your company details to

management@goldsgym.com.ph for

an assessment.

CAN A MEMBER TRAIN ANOTH-

ER MEMBER? OR BRING IN HIS

OWN PERSONAL TRAINER?

Gold’s Gym reserves the right to all personal

training at our club facility. Under no

circumstances is any member allowed to

train another member. Members may bring

their own PT provided they have made a

previous agreement with the Fitness

Manager and agree to pay a corkage fee.

PERSONAL TRAINING PROGRAM GUIDE

RIP 60

RIP 60 stands for Rotation is Power. It is a type of

suspension training that uses body weight as the

resistance. This program is great for both beginners

and advance gym goers. It is a very versatile equipment

that can train multiple muscle groups at one

time. Best of all, it allows the body to rotate which is

the key in releasing power.

RAPID FIT

Rapid fit is a type of circuit training program which

uses three different pieces of equipment: the dual

cable cross for strength, the incline trainer for cardio

and fat burning, and the vibration trainer for recovery

and flexibility. It promises to burn 600-900 calories

in just 30 minutes. Rapid fit is available in Acropolis,

Alabang, Bay Area, BGC and Sheridan.

TEAM PHYSIQUE

Looking for a program with a small group? Team

Physique is a small group training program that can

be done with friends, officemates or gym buddies.

It is an exciting, fun and rewarding workout that uses

both machines and body weight.

CIRCUIT TRAINING

Circuit training is a type of training that combines

endurance and strength. It is a whole body training

program that can burn many calories and fat. Imagine

doing a cardio workout and lifting weights at the

same time. It is a fun workout, using different types

of equipment that would suit both beginners and

advanced gym goers.

30 MINUTE BLAST

For those who are busy or for those who want to

workout during their lunch breaks, the 30 minute blast

is a great way to maximize your workout. This consists

of a 5 minute warm-up, 20 minute workout and a

5 minute cool-down.

HIIT TRAINING

High Intensity Interval Training or HIIT for short is a

special program for those looking to break their plateaus

or for those looking for a challenging workout

that is sure to break them past their limits. HIIT can be

used for almost all types of equipment including cardio

machines and body weight. It is the best way to burn

the most calories and torch that fat away. This class

however is for advanced gym goers only.

REHAB

Our Fitness Department consists of a diverse yet highly

qualified team of trainers including Physical Therapists.

So if you are looking for someone to help you get past

that injury or strengthen a body part, our team can help

bring you back in tip top shape.

SPORTS CONDITIONING

Participating in sports is a great way to test one’s

fitness level. Participation in sports can unlock one’s

potential and talent. Our team of Personal Trainers can

develop sport specific skills such as: power, agility,

coordination, balance, reaction time and speed. Unlock

the athlete in you by availing of our sports conditioning

training.

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