Weekend-5-5

dhakatribune

Dhaka Tribune

vol 5 Issue 5 | friDAY, May 19, 2017

6

Kitchen

chronicles

8

Food

diary

15 Online

security


CONTENTS 1

Volume 5 | Issue 5 | May 19, 2017

Editor

Zafar Sobhan

Features Editor

Sabrina Fatma Ahmad

Magazine Editor

Farina Noireet

Deputy Magazine Editors

Khan N Moushumi

Shuprova Tasneem

Weekend Tribune Team

Saudia Afrin

Mahmood Hossain

Moumita Ahmed

Tasfia Huda

Baizid Haque Joarder

Saqib Sarker

Mahmood Sadi

Sabiha Akond Rupa

Contributors

Ishrat Jahan

Md Abdul Quayyum

Rifaqat Rasheed

Farzana Romine

Cartoons

Syed Rashad Imam Tanmoy

Priyo

Graphics

Md Mahbub Alam

Alamgir Hossain

Shahadat Hossain

Colour Specialist

Shekhar Mondal

Advertisement

Shahin Ahsan

Production

Masum Billah

Circulation

Masud Kabir Pavel

Website

dhakatribune.com/weekend

facebook.com/WeekendTrib

Email your letters to:

weekend@dhakatribune.com

4

10

Trending

Women’s fashion

Photo Story

Elder care

Editor’s note

Dear Readers,

Eating out and shopping being the

most common choice of recreation

for those who can afford it in

Dhaka, it’s hardly a surprise that

our beloved capital is fast turning

into quite the melting pot in terms

of offering a delightful array of local

and multi-cuisine delectables, as

well as a healthy fusion of trendy,

innovative styles.

Aarong has long been a

favourite with both locals and

expats in Bangladesh and, over the

years, has only grown in reputation

as one of the country’s top fashion

houses. Our Trending section this

week features a colourful spread

of their latest line – Herstory by

Aarong – hot from the runway, at

the glamorous event they hosted at

Radisson last week.

We also have a fun piece from

an epicurious foodie on the rising

trend of brunch and all the great

options you have in Dhaka.

In our constant effort to bring

our readers a balanced variety

of articles every week, we have

featured a range of other topics

as well, from online security to

healthcare initiatives for sex

workers.

Finally, in light of World Museum

Day on May 18, we end with an

informative list on six museums in

Dhaka you need to visit.

Wishing our readers a happy

weekend.

Farina Noireet

News

2 News

3 Meanwhile

Features

6 Cook your own way

Kitchen chronicles

8 Epicurious

Food diary

9 App

Harriken

12 Event

Digital innovation

13 Workshop

Event

14 Tech

15 Musing

Online security

16 Digital Culture

Privacy

17 Initiative

Healthcare for sex workers

19 Biz Info

20 World Museum Day

Local heritage

Regulars

18 Stay in

On the cover

Photo: Aarong

WEEKEND TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, MAY 19, 2017


2 News | This week

The world at a glance

Trump defends ‘absolute right’ to share ‘facts’ with Russia

Embattled US President Donald

Trump insisted last Tuesday he

had the right to share “facts” with

Russia, one day after bombshell

allegations that he divulged highly

classified intelligence to Russian

diplomats in the Oval Office.

According to an explosive report

from the Washington Post, Trump

revealed highly classified information

on the Islamic State group during

a meeting last week with Russian

Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov and

Moscow’s man in Washington Sergey

Kislyak.

“As President I wanted to share

with Russia (at an openly scheduled

WH meeting) which I have the

absolute right to do, facts pertaining

to terrorism and airline flight safety,”

Trump pushed back in an early

morning tweet.

Trump wrote that he was motivated

by “humanitarian reasons, plus I want

Russia to greatly step up their fight

against ISIS and terrorism.”

Photo: AP

Local

Murder case

lodged against

Test skipper

Mushfiqur’s

father

Iran reformist drops out of election, supports Rouhani

reformist candidate dropped out

A of Iran’s presidential election last

Tuesday and threw his support behind

President Hassan Rouhani, in a widely

expected move that will strengthen

the incumbent’s campaign against a

hard-liner.

Eshaq Jahangiri, senior vice

president under Rouhani, dropped

out, leaving just four candidates in

the race. Rouhani also has the support

Archaeologists last week dug up

17 mummies and other artifacts

from ancient Egypt near a historical

Osama bin Laden’s son has vowed

revenge on the west for killing

his father and is set to become the

next leader of al-Qaeda, according to

documents seized from bin Laden’s

Pakistan compound when he was

killed by US Navy Seals in 2011.

“I consider myself... to be forged in

steel,” Hamza bin Laden, now thought

to be around 28 wrote. “The path of

of former President Mohammad

Khatami, another reformist, who

endorsed him on Sunday.

On Monday, Tehran Mayor

Mohammad Bagher Qalibaf dropped

out of the election to back hard-liner

Ebrahim Raisi.

The election is largely viewed as a

referendum on the nuclear deal struck

with world powers and shepherded by

Rouhani’s administration. Iran agreed

17 new mummies from Ancient Egypt

animal graveyard, and they expect to

discover even more.

AFP reported the mummies, which

were not of ancient royals, were

uncovered in catacombs a few hours

southwest of Cairo while the experts

were “following a trail of burial shafts.”

They were not the only discovery.

There were limestone and clay

sarcophagi, the decorated coffins

often used in ancient Egyptian burials,

documents written in the ancient

Osama bin Laden’s son vows revenge on the west

jihad for the sake of God is what we

live.”

Bin Laden hoped his

son Hamza would eventually succeed

him.

Hamza was 22-years-old when the

letter was written and his leadership

potential had been recognised when

he was a boy.

Photo: AFP

to limit its enrichment of uranium

in exchange for the lifting of some

economic sanctions.

Photo: AP

Egyptian script called Demotic on

papyrus and gold, and animal coffins.

The mummies still need to be

officially dated, but it’s possible they

are from 300 years before Alexander

the Great conquered Egypt in 332 BC,

known as the Late Period, or from a

period shortly afterward during which

Ptolemy, Alexander’s general, and his

family ruled the land until 30 BC.

Photo: AFP

murder case was filed

A against Bangladesh Test

skipper Mushfiqur Rahim’s

father, Mahbub Hamid Tara,

his brother Mejbah-ul-Hamid,

a local municipality councillor

of Awami League, and 14 others

in connection with the killing

of teenager Mashuk Ferdous on

Sunday.

The victim’s father, Emdadul

Haq, filed the case with Bogra

Sadar police station on Tuesday

evening. In the case statement,

the plaintiff alleged that

Mahbub was involved in the

killing of his son over previous

enmity regarding a position in

the managing committee of

Matidali High School in Bogra

town.

Mashuk was found lying near

his home with grievous head

injuries. He was taken to a local

hospital where he was declared

dead the same night. After the

murder, Mahbub claimed that

he had no rivalry with Emdad

and condemned the incident,

demanding punishment of the

killers.

News: Dhaka Tribune

WEEKEND TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, MAY 19, 2017


. . . Meanwhile 3

Photo of the week

Dhaka dwellers

spending Shab-e-

Baraat in prayers,

in the midst of the

city crowd at Baitul

Mukarram Mosque in

the capital on May 11.

Photo: Mahmud Hossain Opu

Say what

Last Monday, things really

went off the rails at Union

Station in Washington DC

when a video screen meant to play

ads started showing porn instead.

The porn suddenly appeared on

the digital screen in the Main Hall

around 5:30pm and lasted about

three minutes.

A bystander recorded the

explicit footage, which appeared

to be streaming from the Pornhub

website, according to the

Washington Post.

One woman who witnessed the

accidental porn told the paper it left

her speechless.

“I couldn’t believe this was

happening in public and especially

during rush hour,” the woman told

the paper. “I mean, it was really

explicit porn being shown on this

huge screen and no one could turn

it off.”

Porn blasts

on huge

screen

at train

station

during rush

hour

Beverly Swaim-Staley, president

and CEO of the Union Station

Redevelopment Corporation, said

the video screen is supposed to

display ads, announcements and

names of businesses in the station.

She suspects the screen was

hacked, but is still investigating.•

News and photo: Huffington Post

Aries (Mar21-Apr19): You’ll be willing

to think outside the box and embrace

new ideas in a very down-to-earth

way. Studying and networking could

also be important.

Taurus (Apr20-May20): You might

want to share ideas that you’ve been

mulling over recently. You’re very

much in your element this week,

and it could be an opportunity to

take steps to fulfil one of your heart’s

desires.

Gemini (May21-June20): You may

find that you’re naturally more

connected with your feelings. This

week and over the coming weeks it

may become easier to discuss issues

that you’ve so far kept to yourself.

Cancer (June21-Jul22): Your social life

gets a boost, which could encourage you

out and about. If a new club or dating

website beckons, this might be the time

you go for it.

Leo (Jul23-Aug22): You might be in the

spotlight this week. This is your chance

to show off your skills and let others

know what you can do.

Virgo (Aug23-Sep22): You may become

curious about exploring countries or

cultures you’ve never encountered

before. The coming weeks might see you

booking a vacation to a place that can

provide sensual delights and plenty to

explore.

Libra (Sep23-Oct22): You may be thrilled

by a relationship that seems to offer

something different. This person could

be a breath of fresh air in your life,

enabling you to see key issues from a

fresh perspective.

Scorpio (Oct23-Nov21): If you’ve

experienced some difficulty in your

money making ability recently, a key

blend of energies could coincide with a

job offer that is very good for you.

Sagittarius (Nov22-Dec21): You could

find that a new hobby or creative activity

has a liberating effect on you, bringing

new friendships your way.

Capricorn (Dec22-Jan19): While you may

be very busy with your job, a focus on

your leisure sector could entice you to

explore hobbies that you might relish.

Aquarius (Jan20-Feb18): This week

could see you getting organised at home

by clearing out closets and tackling

chores. You might be able to earn extra

money by selling items you no longer

need.

Pisces (Feb19-Mar20): This can be a good

time to increase your income if you act

on an idea. It could be a game changer

for you. •

horoscopes

WEEKEND TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, MAY 19, 2017


4 Trending | Women’s fashion

HERSTORY by

Aarong

One of the country’s

leading labels puts

on an excellent

presentation at their annual fashion show

Mahmood Hossain

Entering the show through a curved, cave-like tunnel,

guests were instantly embraced by the pristine ambiance

of a rainforest. It has to be noted that the conventional

layout of a runway has been thrown out the window.

Aarong’s deep-rooted connection to its ethnic background remains,

but it’s good to know they play quite well with modern aesthetics.

The runway in the Grand Ball Room at the Radisson Blu was a figure

eight, winding around propped up tropical trees and other lush

greenery, complimented by the flawless lighting.

The new collection introduced a series of looks that could have

easily been used for print or online consumption as a brilliant visual

treat. The first run was a vintage take on hair and makeup, which

was accompanied by 1930s throwback of the Big Band era, playing

“Sing, Sing, Sing” by Benny Goodman through the appropriately

placed speakers. The show transitioned through the local tongues,

subtle jazz tunes and even an eardrum assault by the unapologetic

MIA. The latter introduced the new sub-brand HERSTORY – a fresh

new take on designer wear for the modern woman.

Each line of the new collection was on display in the finest form.

From exquisite Mughal inspired sarees to infused splashes of capes

and unorthodox elongated jewelry, each look demanded the proper

attention. What began as the first steps to discovery in uncharted

territory, quickly turned into an elegant summer soiree in this

particular plush jungle. The reactions gathered by the audience

seemed to be a pleasantly surprising one. •

WEEKEND TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, MAY 19, 2017


5

May 13, 2017, Aarong’s Fashion Show

Photos: Courtesy

WEEKEND TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, MAY 19, 2017


6 Cook your own way | Kitchen chronicles

Light, summer meals

Farzana Romine

Summer is here and spending time in the kitchen in this hot, humid weather is getting tougher by the day. During summer, I

really like having easy simple meals, with big portions of salad on the side. Today I am sharing my very quick recipes for two

salads and a grilled dish, which you can whip up in less than 30 minutes. It’s really refreshing in this hot weather and you

don’t have to spend hours in the kitchen. Hope you will enjoy them.

Grilled

shrimp

and

chicken

Ingredients:

For the chicken:

1 chicken breast

1/4 tsp red chilli flakes

1 tbsp olive oil

2 tbsp hot sauce, such as

Tabasco or Sriracha

1 clove of garlic, minced

For the shrimp:

10 medium sized shrimps

1 tbsp minced cilantro root

2 tsp mixed dried herbs like

oregano, basil, thyme, etc

1 tsp minced garlic

1 tbsp olive oil

Directions:

Mix the ingredients for the

chicken and shrimp separately.

Leave to marinate for 30

minutes.

Heat your griddle pan over

high heat. Oil it lightly. Grill the

chicken for five to six minutes

and shrimp for four to five

minutes until cooked through.

WEEKEND TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, MAY 19, 2017


7

Mango

Avocado

salsa

Ingredients:

1 avocado

1 ripe mango

1 small cucumber

2 tbsp minced red onion

2 green chillies, finely chopped

2 tbsp fresh lime juice

A handfull of cilantro leaves,

chopped

Salt to taste

Directions:

Cut the cucumber, avocado

and mango into small cubes.

Now mix everything together

and serve with the grilled fish

and chicken.

Note

You can make these

salads without avocados

too. You can use any

available fruits or

veggies you like.

Glazed

carrot

salad

Ingredients:

1 medium sized carrot

1/2 avocado

1 small bunch of lettuce

1/4 cup pumpkin seeds

1 small cucumber

For the dressing:

1/2 tsp toasted poppy seeds

1 tbsp balsamic vinegar

1 tbsp olive oil

2 tsp honey

1/2 tsp salt

1/2 tsp black pepper

For the glaze:

1 tbsp olive oil

1 tsp sugar

1/4 tsp paprika

1/2 tsp salt

Black pepper, as needed

Directions:

Mix together the ingredients

for the dressing and set aside.

To glaze the carrots, heat

olive oil in a pan. Cut the

carrots like thick French fries.

Once the oil is hot, add the

carrots. Cook for two minutes.

Now add the sugar, salt and

black pepper and cook until the

sugar starts to caramelise.

Once it’s slightly

caramelised, add 1/4 cup water,

then mix and cook the carrots

until they are tender and the

water has evaporated. Sprinkle

paprika and take it off the heat

and let it cool slightly.

Slice the other salad

ingredients as you like.

To assemble, mix everything

together and add the dressing.

Toss it well and serve. •

Photos: Farzana Romine

WEEKEND TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, MAY 19, 2017


8 Epicurious | Food diary

Its

Brunch

time!

Rifaqat Rasheed

So, I like to keep a close eye

on what is happening in

the local culinary scene in

Dhaka; I mean eating out

is what keeps us Dhakaites sane

right? I guess I could go to the park

or watch football or do whatever

wholesome activities the normal

populace indulges in, but activities

which involve the possibility

of dessert seem so much more

appealing. Under my watchful

(and high blood sugary) gaze a new

and delicious trend seems to be

emerging, a trend that every food

junkie can appreciate, a trend that

takes your standard three meals

day and then laughs at it for being

malnourished and underweight!

Rejoice all ye worthy, a new meal

has joined the holy trinity! Say

hello to brunch!

Brunch (although not named

thusly) was initially a repast

favoured by hunters who would

be up at the crack of dawn to track

their prey. I imagine someone up at

the wee hours of the day would be

hungry enough to eat their boots

by lunchtime. So they would pack

something simple, most often bread,

cheese and egg to tide them through

until the afternoon meal. Now

the actual term, this delightful

portmanteau combining two of

my favourite three words in the

English language (the third being

dinner of course) was first coined

in 1895. However brunch, as we

see it now, came about in the USA

half a century later. In true red and

blue style, the common hunter’s

meal transformed itself into the go to

repast for the jet setting upper crust.

Basically the J-Los, and Brad Pitts

of the 1930s would rise bleary eyed

and hungover from a night out on

and order a late breakfast from room

service. Hoteliers (being cannily

adept at separating dollar bills from

their owners) realised quite quickly

that this was a grand opportunity to

earn some incremental greenbacks.

They also realised that it was in their

best interests to ensure that their

clientele were suitably “mellow”

for the rest of the day as well. Thus

the modern brunch menu was born,

filled with “decadent spreads of food

and signature morning cocktails,

such as Bloody Marys, Bellinis and

Mimosas.”

“But kind sir,” I hear you ask

“Why this convoluted history

lesson on this oh so delectable

topic?” Well we in modern day

Dhaka are experiencing a restaurant

renaissance of sorts. The burgeoning

middle class and the increase in

disposable incomes have resulted in

a boom for the culinary industry in

this fair city of ours. And of course

the sophistication of the industry has

created a gastronomic citizenship

with a much more sophisticated

palate than the foodies of yesteryear.

To keep up with this increasingly

international client base, many

We in modern day Dhaka are experiencing a

restaurant renaissance of sorts

eateries are now offering menus

which cater to these sophisticated

aspirations. And if sophistications

and class were an Olympic sport then

brunch would be on the winner’s

podium cradling a glass of Moet and

reaching for the orange juice.

So over the course of these past

couple of years I have had the good

Photos: Courtesy

fortune to sample many of the fine

brunch menus our city has to offer.

There are a bunch of options at

different price points, so I thought

I’d give my two paisas on where

I experienced the best brunch in

Dhaka so far.

The first contender is to Bistro

E. Located in the gorgeous Bay

Edgewater Tower in Gulshan by the

Baridhara lake, this is a stylish eatery

with a great (albeit bereft of variety)

brunch menu. The eggs benedict

was delish, just the right amount of

runniness and the hollandaise was

smooth with enough bite to give it

character. For dessert, the French

toast with strawberry compote was

also good, but nothing to write home

about. All in all, a solid effort but

there was something missing. Like

modern remakes of classic songs,

everything (including the décor) was

very nicely done but a little sterile

and missing a certain charm.

On to contender number two,

Izumi. First of all for those who have

WEEKEND TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, MAY 19, 2017


9

not been, Izumi is one of Dhaka’s

classiest Japanese joints boasting

(IMO) the best quality beef in the

country. Also for those who haven’t

been, the location is somewhat

of a nightmare to find. It’s tucked

away in a corner off Gulshan 2 and

would be quite difficult to find

without Facebook directions (thank

god for technology). The décor

is as you would expect, Japanese

motifs, wooden and organic but

very sophisticated and classy. The

menu is again, compact. I ordered

the French omelette which was

too plain! The croissants however,

were to die for and I’m guessing

are sourced from the famed Holey

Artisan Bakery. All in all, it was good

but left me wanting something more.

That brings me to the champ,

numero uno; can we get a drum roll

please! This is also my most recent

brunch experience so one that is

quite fresh in this Swiss cheese I

call a memory. Over the weekend

the family and I took a trip down

to Chows to sample their Terrace

Brunch. For the uninitiated Chows,

is a delightful new eatery located in

Banani road 19A, which has made

quite the splash with their authentic

Chinese cuisine (the dumplings and

cold beef are to die for but that’s a

story for another day). The terrace

brunch is a collaboration between

the Gourmet Food Company (GFC,

the latest food venture of Mishal

Karim, the main man behind Chows)

and head Chef George Smith (an

American expat who is one of the

best trained chefs in the country).

Upon a little conversation, I came

to understand that the GFC is a

premium food delivery service

in Dhaka applying the farm to

table concept where the freshest

ingredients are sourced directly from

the producer.

Onwards to the experience; firstly

the premises are fantastic. The

restaurant is housed in a sprawling

duplex, all marble and natural

light. We were led to a cosy terrace

overlooking the lake. The menu is

great, with an amazing variety of

items to choose from. They have

your traditional English breakfast

style; eggs, sausage, beans, beef

bacon etc, along with pancakes and a

whole bunch of Gourmet pizzas. We

asked for the chef’s recommendation

which was a brick oven mushroom

pizza, chocolate chip pancakes and

freshly squeezed OJ.

The pizza was in one word

delicious! Perfect, crunchy, 12 inch

thin crust drizzled with just the right

amount of tomato sauce and basil

then topped with what I understand

is their own house made mozzarella,

and then the perfectly charred fresh

mushrooms and gruyere cheese

liberally scattered on top. That pie

did not last very long ‘cos we totally

inhaled that thing! Next up were

the pancakes. A plate of three large

chocolate chip pancakes with a little

cup of thick blackberry zabaglione

chocolate sauce to go with it. Being

a total savage I guzzled the first half

without the sauce and prematurely

started complaining to my wife on

its lack of flavour. She calmly poured

the sauce onto the plate and the

resulting goodness kept my trap shut

for a good five minutes (a miracle)!

Last but not least was the OJ, a

seemingly simple concoction but one

that is very difficult to perfect and

this one got pretty damn close!

All in all we had a great time. The

staff was very cordial, the ambience

was great and it’s safe to say that I

shall be back again to sample more

of their wares. The Terrace Brunch

menu offers a lot more and usually

gets updated every week, so I look

forward to my next visit. Entirely a

delightful experience; what more can

a hungry man desire?

So if you want to try out this

delightful new repast, IMHO Chows

Terrace Brunch is the best place

to begin, middle, and end! Keep

calm and have brunch ladies and

gentlemen! •

WEEKEND TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, MAY 19, 2017


10 Photo Story | Elder care

A home

for those who

need it

“The true measure of any society can be found in how it

treats its most vulnerable members.”

While there is debate on who actually said this, there can

be no doubt regarding the truth behind this statement. At

the Boyoshko Punorbashon Kendra (Old Rehabilitation

Centre), the elderly and vulnerable members of society

are taken in and taken care of, but the shadow of being

abandoned by or losing family members still hangs over

the venerable women who spend their days together at

the centre in Gazipur.

Photos: Mahmud Hossain Opu

WEEKEND TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, MAY 19, 2017


11

WEEKEND TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, MAY 19, 2017


12 Event | Digital Innovation

Supporting the leaders of

a digitalised world

Weekend Tribune Desk

In 2013, a couple of young

Bangladeshi innovators

developed Bipod Barta - a

digital alarm system that, once

initiated by a user in a dangerous

situation, simultaneously sends

notifications of his or her location

to the police, the user’s family,

and social media networks so that

immediate help may be dispatched.

Inspired by a similar alert system

in India, the tool is particularly

useful for young women commuting

alone in the roads of Bangladesh.

Launched at the Telenor Youth

Summit 2013 (now Telenor Youth

Forum) organised by Telenor,

Grameenphone’s parent company,

the system was subsequently

adopted by the Dhaka Metropolitan

Police (DMP).

Two years later, in 2015, a group of

young entrepreneurs started working

on the idea of Sheba.xyz - an online

platform that would establish direct

connections between customers

and service providers from various

industries. Service providers from

corporate, household, automobile,

general electronics, and various

other sectors are readily available to

customers on Sheba.xyz. Launched

at the GP Accelerator 2015, the

project is now a fully operational

business that has already attracted

large investments from enthusiastic

local and foreign investors.

The two projects mentioned

above represent a few of many other

groundbreaking ideas developed

by modern Bangladeshi youth

who have not only envisioned

enriching society through digital

technology, but actively worked

towards transforming their ideas

into realities. Accelerator projects

and other similar initiatives by

the public and private sectors to

support innovative startup projects

have become common in countries

around the world. In Bangladesh,

the number of such initiatives are

growing.

Supporting innovate startups

GP Accelerator and Telenor Youth

Forum, organised by Grameenphone

and its parent company Telenor

respectively, are prominent

examples. Over the years, these

initiatives have supported and

continued to patronise innovative

startups. The companies work as

facilitators to help these young

entrepreneurs develop their ideas

into actual businesses that integrate

a variety of conveniences into the

daily lives of people. Many of the

projects aim at addressing and

effectively solving social problems

digitally as well.

“Over the years, Grameenphone

has transformed from being just a

telecom service provider of voice

services into a leading digital

service provider. However, what

makes Grameenphone stand a class

apart is its continuous lookout for

young innovators through various

programs. We have designed a

program that provides eligible

candidates comprehensive support

to enable them to make sustainable

businesses out of their ideas. These

see that these individuals go on to

eventually establish them as youth

leaders who are changing society

for good, maybe in a way a young

Photo: Courtesy

Elon Musk or a Mark Zuckerburg

changed the world forever,” says

Kazi Mahboob Hassan, Head of

Transformation of Grameenphone.

Many other companies in the

private sector of Bangladesh

are also stepping forward to

make a contribution. SD Asia, an

organisation dedicated to the startup

scene, which has partnered with

organisations such as Grameenphone

to promote promising startups,

stands out as an example.

A Digital Bangladesh

A well-deserved notable mention

is the government’s Access to

Information (a2i) project, under

which a myriad of initiatives are

ongoing to gradually digitise the

nation and propel its transformation

into the much coveted Digital

Bangladesh. Comprehensive support

programs for digital service-based

startups are one of the key agendas

of the project, which is directly

regulated by the Prime Minister’s

Office.

“Combined efforts by the public

and private sectors are essential

in achieving the vision of a Digital

Bangladesh. Besides being an active

part of GP Accelerator and Telenor

Youth Fourm, Grameenphone has

also conducted digital eco-system

enabler programs such as the Smart

City Hackathon, and is currently

operating White-Board, a platform to

support and empower the disruptive

innovators of tomorrow. The

company has played a leading role

in the development of the telecom

and digital sectors of the country

in the last 20 years, and in the next

20 years, one of our priorities is to

be a trusted partner of tomorrow’s

leaders in their pursuit to carve a

digitally enriched future for the

nation. Our partnership with the ICT

Ministry for its National Demo Day is

another good example of how GP is

supporting the government’s agenda

for digital innovation through publicprivate

partnership,” continues Kazi

Mahboob Hassan.

Increased participation from

the public and private sectors to

nurture the innovative ideas of

young innovators in Bangladesh

ushers in greater optimism about

a digitalised future in a Digital

Bangladesh. Continuing this trend

can only accelerate Bangladesh’s

march towards comprehensive

digitalisation, much like many of her

developed counterparts. •

WEEKEND TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, MAY 19, 2017


workshop | Event 13

Social Innovation Design Week 2017

Ishrat Jahan

In today’s rapidly changing

world, we face a diverse set

of challenges for which the

solutions we create are often

ineffective. We usually forget that

solutions need not be disruptive in

order to solve prevalent problems,

and that answers are often found

in the smallest change through

insights. The idea that insights and

observations have the power to

Photos: Courtesy

staff shop and improving

health and hygiene in the

RMG community. The SIDW

Fellows made for a diverse

gathering of 20 individuals

from multidisciplinary

backgrounds. From artists,

engineers and architects

to health workers and

approach is necessary if we want to

build sustainable processes,” said

Nabeera Rahman, an SIDW Fellow

and a consultant of Bangladesh

Textile Competitiveness at IFC. The

Fellows reflected that spending

time at the Mohammadi Group

factory and understanding its

processes became an essential part

change people’s’ perspectives and

thus, change how we approach our

challenges, is at the core of Toru and

IDEO.org’s event - Social Innovation

Design Week (SIDW).

In April 2017, Social Innovation

Design Week - a co-design

workshop – was conducted by Toru

- Institute of Inclusive Innovation

in partnership with IDEO.org and

Mohammadi Group, with the

support of Levi Strauss Foundation.

SIDW was conducted with the aim to

create an engaging and empathetic

lens which can open the possibility

to developing human centered

solutions through design and

collaboration.

This year, SIDW hosted a weeklong

workshop with Mohammadi

Group, introducing Human-Centered

Design (HCD) to a multidisciplinary

group of 20 Fellows. With a focus

on improving the work and life

experience of RMG workers, the

Fellows were immersed into the

RMG community at the Mohammadi

Group’s factory. The workshop

immersed Fellows into the everyday

experiences of those workers,

making them put the theories to

test and see how solutions could be

curated to their needs.

“People often sit in rooms and

offices to design innovations and

that is a core reason why many fail

to create a desired impact. Being

immersed can help us empathise,

and critically analyse through the

eyes of the user. This builds real

solutions that have higher possibility

to scale and create an impact that

can become sustainable in the long

run,” says Saif Kamal, founder of

Toru.

The workshop was led by Rob

Gradoville, the Portfolio Manager

for IDEO.org’s Amplify program who

possesses expertise in implementing

design challenges and teaching

human-centric design tools. It

became an engaging space for design

and collaboration with five teams

working in developing day care

systems, improving living facilities,

worker’s happiness, creating a

entrepreneurs, they all came

together to co-design solutions

through HCD. Throughout the five

days, Fellows were taken through

the intensive process of HCD. In the

beginning of the week, they went in

with specific ideas and assumptions

that, along the week, were

disintegrated and reassembled into

ideas that they had not even been

considered before coming in.

“The immersive experience of

learning to design a human-centered

solution gave us a chance to see

why standardised solutions often

don’t work and a more user centric

of the workshop - broadening their

understanding of how local RMG

factories operate and breaking long

held stereotypes in the process.

SIDW sprung from Toru’s

belief that people are at the core

of every innovation. Solving

today’s problems requires skills

that are currently absent in the

ecosystem. There remains a dire

need to cultivate empathy and

a collaborative spirit in order to

build ourselves to be responsive to

problems in communities and to

be able to design for positive social

impact. •

WEEKEND TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, MAY 19, 2017


14 Tech | Apple Bites Back

A positive outlook (part 1)

This is a

bit of a

rebuttal to

the several

reasons

why Apple

should fear

Microsoft

Mahmood Hossain

Just recently, CNET published

an article that discusses 11

different reasons why Apple

and Adobe should fear the

new and improved Microsoft. It’s

true that Apple has lost the tight grip

they once had under the leadership

of Steve Jobs, but using the term

“fear” might not be appropriate.

Realistically, it’s more about being

aware or staying “woke” when it’s

regarding your competitors. These

tech giants may not always have a

detailed cheat sheet by their rivals,

but they’ll always have a heads up

on what to expect. Don’t be deluded

into thinking Apple would cower in

the presence of Microsoft.

Both companies have contributed

to the tech world like no other,

and we can applaud them for that.

But let’s take a look at the more

significant points, shall we?

Interface

It’s the first thing you see when

you boot up your fancy gadgets.

No matter which device triumphs

in performance, you still have to

make things, well, pretty. Design is

a huge component when creating an

operating system or software that’s

available to the public. It has to be

pleasing to the eye as well being easy

to navigate. The article on CNET

notes how this is an advantage for

the new look Microsoft because of

the company’s Xbox platform and its

influence through game design.

The use of the new Fluent Design

System is actually quite impressive;

it’s a gorgeous new look. And it’s

true, Apple haven’t made any

significant design changes in a very

long time for its OS and devices.

People have appreciated Apple’s

signature minimal, easy-to-use

design, more so for professionals.

Although we are in the dawn of

a new age for Microsoft, it would

be foolish to fall asleep on Apple’s

movement forward in design. There’s

always an evolved stage, Apple is

definitely due for another, and quite

sooner than we might expect.

Playing catch-up

This one, unfortunately, is quite true.

Well, sort of. Apple does have to play

a little catch-up. Even though the

company hasn’t lost its core target

market (fanboys shall remain), it

lacks in the department of advancing

technology in virtual reality. Apple

is still king when it comes to crossplatform

syncing, but you won’t

be seeing any new VR integration.

There will be no motion controllers

or headsets either. Then again, when

has Apple ever boasted about being

the ultimate gaming system? Never.

This addition might be a plus

for PCs; however, it’s not a make

or break element to Apple’s line of

devices or future plans. Nonetheless,

there will be similar tools that will

be featured for Apple devices in the

near future.

Capabilities for a pro

This point is more of a gripe than

anything else – a minor nuisance.

The article claims Apple had

abandoned creative professionals

a very long time ago. In order to

rectify the neglect, the company

introduced thinner and lighter

devices, just like the iPad Pro.

We can agree so far as to say

there has been a slight turn of the

cheek for professionals that used

to rave about what Apple had to

offer. While the iPad Pro won’t

fix anything initially, it’s actually

the right step towards bettering

the experience for creative

professionals.

It also must be highlighted that

there are many users that have

stuck to their older MacBook Pro

and iMac devices, and haven’t

complained or had the fear of

missing out. The biggest fear

might be them jumping ship for

the Surface Pro. However for most

Apple users, no one is being sent

to the plank or taking a dive in the

deep end just yet.

Dancing by itself

The argument here is that Apple

only talks to itself, linking only

Apple devices and not focusing on

incorporating other devices outside

its ecosystem. A device or service

has to be flexible to a certain

extent, but fresh on the dance floor,

Apple has always been about its

own ecosystem. The company has

always taken pride in that fact.

Microsoft does allow Windows

devices to connect outside its

ecosystem. For example, you

can toss in audio files from your

Windows PC to your Android

or iPhone (through iTunes).

It’s another one of those minor

annoyances, but downloading a

simple app in your iOS or Mac can

easily fix the transferring files

issue. A little extra effort won’t

drive anyone away. •

WEEKEND TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, MAY 19, 2017


Online Security | Musing 15

Ransomware:

the kidnapper of your data

Saqib Sarker

It is the year 2053. Mujahidul

Huq Shahin is sitting on a

sofa in his drawing room. He

doesn’t know how to break

the news to his wife. 27 Petabyte

(27 thousand Terabyte) of their

family data has been taken hostage

by data pirates. This means he will

lose all of his family memorabilia

– all the photos, videos, 3Deos (3D

videos) – if he does not pay them

0.80 satoshi (digital currency

prevalent in 2053, equivalent to

3000 US dollars). The pirates have

also threatened to encrypt the data

in his home appliances within the

next five hours. Shahin knows that

the pirates can do it because he

has just moved from commercial

servers to independent servers.

His wife warned him not to do so.

Shahin’s desire to stick it to the big

corporations has now blown up in

his face.

In 2053, most things are

automated. If the data for your home

appliances get scrambled you cannot

turn on air-conditioning or wash

your clothes. Shahin remembers

a simpler time when all of these

machines weren’t connected to a

network. The idea that a washing

machine or a table fan can be hacked

would induce laughter when he

was growing up. But they all need

to be connected to a network now,

because otherwise the stove cannot

auto-order refills when it runs out of

battery.

The network connection, though,

comes at a price. It creates the

opportunity for pirates to invade

and hack your data. Shahin could

not help but think that it was all a

bit pointless. “Yes, it was a bit of a

chore to order everything manually,

but we survived,” Shahin thought

affectionately of the past. But there

isn’t much time to dwell on his

thoughts. He slowly gets up from the

sofa and heads to the kitchen to tell

his wife.

Holding your information

hostage

Back in good ol’ 2017, we are actually

not very far from the technological

reality Shahin lives in. The recent

global ransomware attack provided

a glimpse into the kind of security

problems we are going to experience

as societies become completely

immersed in and dependent on

technology.

People at different institutions

across 150 countries turning on their

workplace computers last Friday

were greeted with an unfamiliar

red screen with the taunting

message: “Oops, your files have been

encrypted!”

The message also demanded

money through online bitcoin

payment; $300 at first, but the

amount would be doubled if not

paid within three days. The message,

delivered in 28 languages, also

snidely declared: “We will have free

events for users who are so poor that

they couldn’t pay in 6 months.”

The attack, which came to be

known as “WannaCry,” crippled

healthcare services and government

agencies, among all sorts of other

institutions, through a vulnerability

in the Microsoft operating system. It

is believed to be the biggest online

extortion scheme ever.

Glaring security flaws

Microsoft bluntly blamed the US

government for “stockpiling”

software code which was used in

the attacks. The hackers exploited

software code from the National

Security Agency that was leaked

online. The “stockpiling” refers to

the America government secretly

finding out flaws in operating

systems or any software in

general, and then keeping those

vulnerabilities for it own use, as

opposed to alerting the company

that developed the software.

“This attack provides yet another

example of why the stockpiling of

vulnerabilities by governments is

such a problem,” writes Brad Smith,

president and chief legal officer of

Microsoft, in the company’s official

blog. Smith wrote that information in

the hands of governments have leaked

into the public domain repeatedly and

resulted in widespread damage. “An

equivalent scenario with conventional

weapons,” Smith wrote in the strongly

worded statement, “would be the U.S.

military having some of its Tomahawk

missiles stolen.”

So, how much did The Shadow

Brokers (creators of Wannacry) make?

Interestingly, the ransom has not

been paid by many people relative

Photo: Bigstock

to the massive scale of the attack.

Considering that the malware affected

29,000 organisations in China alone

and its total number of victims has

reached 200,000 so far, the total

amount of money deposited to the

hackers’ bitcoin accounts is puny, less

than 70,000 US dollars, at the time of

writing this article. Approximately 250

payments have been made.

Technically though, the hackers

have not made a single penny, as they

haven’t withdrawn any of the bitcoin

currency deposited to their three

accounts. Even if they do withdraw,

they will have to convert that to a

conventional currency, which would

be unlikely for them to attempt, given

the amount of attention this has

gotten. •

WEEKEND TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, MAY 19, 2017


16 Digital Culture | PrivAcy

The right to be let alone

Mahmood Sadi

Some of you might not agree

with me but in my opinion,

it’s been a long time since

there was a true generation

gap, perhaps 50 years — you have

to go back to the early years of rock

and roll, when old people still talked

about “jungle rhythms”. Everything

associated with that music and its

greasy, shaggy culture felt baffling

and divisive, from its fashion sense

to its eating habits.

That musical divide has all but

disappeared. But in the past decade,

a new set of values has sneaked in

to take its place, erecting another

barrier between young and old.

And as it did in the 70s, the older

generation has responded with a

disgusted, dismissive squawk.

Yes, I, a representative of the

barefaced youth, officially am saying

to the elder generation that you have

got it right. We, the youth, without

any meaningful standard by which

to measure our worth, have turned

to the public eye for attention,

sacrificing the sense of shame along

with privacy.

When it is more important to be

seen than to be talented, it is hardly

surprising that the less gifted among

us are willing to do even the dirtiest

stuff on our way to spotlight.

Why do we over-share?

Can anybody from our generation

brush aside the fact that we are

toying with our privacy? I am not

against these social networking sites

or chat rooms, as it makes me sounds

like a grumpy old man.

But what is really the point of

sharing our most private things

Photo: Bigstock

online? What is really the point

of broadcasting or disseminating

information about the most private

matters that have happened between

individuals and what is really the

point of making it a ‘talk of the town’

amongst us?

Fact is, we do succumb to the

allure of peeping into someone

else’s private matters - be it the

video of a TV actress making love

to her boyfriend (which the angry

boyfriend later posted as an act

of revenge), or a video of a young

violent kid violently beating another

over a supposed girlfriend, or just an

unnecessary hateful and venomous

monologue by a seemingly unknown

singer bashing a late writer’s wife.

Because of the support we provide

in the form of clicks and views from

the comfort zone of “not being

involved thus why not take pleasure

in someone’s suffering” - these

things have become commonplace

now. And maybe because of that, we

see the rise of a clan who have this

notion that stardom will be bestowed

upon them if they do the same, even

at the cost of their or someone else’s

privacy.

Not the technology, but

the people

The problem here with the word

‘privacy’ is that it falls short of

conveying the really big picture.

Privacy isn’t just about hiding things.

It’s about self-possession, autonomy,

and integrity.

As individuals in the

computerised world of the 21st

century, privacy is becoming our

most important civil right. But this

right of privacy isn’t literally the right

of people to close their doors and

pull down their window shades; it is

the control over what details about

their lives stay inside their own

houses and what goes out.

The protection of privacy is

deeply embedded in the laws

and institutions of the modern

democratic state. Moreover, one has

a strong visceral sense of privacy

and apprehends clearly when it has

been abrogated. It would be like

saying that an individual does not

understand liberty and justice. Yet,

while passersby on the sidewalk

might be hard-pressed to give a

textbook definition of privacy,

they could easily provide several

examples of violations of their

privacy.

Since privacy is fundamentally

about the power of the individual,

in many ways, the story of

technology’s attack on privacy is

really the story of how institutions

and the people who run them use

technology to gain control over

the human spirit, for good and ill.

That’s because technology by itself

doesn’t violate our privacy. It’s

people using this technology who

do.

Science, society and

markets

Personal identification information

- your name, profession, hobbies,

and other bits that make up your

self - is being turned into a valuable

property right. But instead of

being given to individuals to help

them exert control over their lives,

this right is being seized by big

businesses to ensure continued

profits and market share. Yes,

if you want the convenience of

paying for a meal by credit card, or

getting some free Cloud storage,

then you have to accept the routine

collection of your purchases and

browsing habits in a large database

over which you have no control. It’s

a simple bargain, albeit a Faustian

one.

Privacy-invasive technology does

not exist in the vacuum though, of

course. That’s because technology

itself exists at a junction between

science, the market and the society.

People create technology to fill

specific needs, real or otherwise.

And technology is regulated, or not,

as people and society see fit. That’s

why the people on the ‘other side’

argue that when they invade our

privacy, the invasion is usually the

result of conscious choice, and for

making that choice they give you the

freedom and vehicle to post your

next privacy-invasive post which

might lead you to quick yet airy

stardom!

Now, due to the popularity of

overexposure, it may be time to

consider the possibility that young

people who behave as if privacy

doesn’t exist are actually the sane

people, not the insane ones. For

someone like me, who grew up

sealing my diary with a literal lock,

this may be tough to accept.

But under current circumstances,

a defiant belief in holding things

close to your chest might not be

high-minded. It might be an artifact—

quaint and naïve, like a determined

faith that innocence is pure. Or

at least that might be true for

someone who has grown up “putting

themselves out there” and found

that the benefits of being transparent

make the risks worth it. •

WEEKEND TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, MAY 19, 2017


Healthcare for sex workers | Initiative 17

‘I don’t want my daughter to

grow up ignominiously’

Bonded sex workers in Bangladesh have tough choices

Md Abdul Quayyum

Reshmi* (name changed)

says she doesn’t enjoy her

evening walks in a nice,

green park of Dhaka like

others do. While a stroll in the park

may be a healthy choice for most,

for Reshmi it is about survival - she

walks every day in the park to hunt

clients who will pay to have sex.

“People come in the park to enjoy

the greenery of it and have fresh

air but for me, I come here for my

ignominious livelihood, against

my will, so that my daughter can

continue her studies,” says Reshmi.

A young bonded sex worker,

Reshmi turns 25 this year, but her life

changed at the age of four when her

father died in a road accident.

“I was living with my family

at Khalishpur in Khulna district.

My father died in a road accident

when I was only four years old and

it was very hard for my mother to

arrange meals, three times a day, let

alone study. I never got a chance for

schooling.”

A life of extreme poverty

She continues to share her miserable

childhood - “to handle the situation,

my mother sent me to Dhaka for

domestic work and I had been doing

that for a few years. But when I

turned 13, my mother forced me to

get married to an older man, without

my consent. I didn’t want to get

married at that age so I escaped with

a friend of mine, to change my luck.

But worse came to worst, and I was

trapped in sex slavery. Since then I

am part of this trade,” Reshmi says.

After attending to three or four

clients a day at a hotel near the

park, Reshmi gets back to her little,

damp house at midnight to catch

a few hours of sleep. The house is

only rented for nights at double the

regular price, and on condition that

she can not show her face there

during the day. She hardly gets the

time to shower or have breakfast

before it’s time for her to leave.

As a hapless sex worker, she was

lured by the promise of a better life

by a man she married when she

was 18, only to later find he was a

human trafficker who planned to

sell her across the border. At the

time, Reshmi was pregnant and

that actually saved her from being

trafficked. She became the mother

of a beautiful daughter at 19 and was

instantly abandoned by her husband.

She had not a single penny with

which to feed her daughter and had

to return to the sex trade again.

“Many a time, I faced gang

rape and sex without condoms. I

was heavily injured at times and

managed to escape from being

murdered. But I want to give my

daughter an education, a good life.

That’s why I need money and have

to keep myself safe from diseases,”

Reshmi says.

Essential services

As there was no one to look after her

baby during work hours, Reshmi was

struggling with her daughter. She

had no place to rest from dawn to

dusk, except under the open sky, and

no option of getting a health check.

Then she came across the Drop-in-

Center’ of Save the Children where

she is now enlisted for essential

services.

In the centre, Reshmi is learning

different life skills, getting basic

education and receiving counselling

on safer sex and HIV prevention.

The lessons enable her to remain in

good health to earn her livelihood

and increase her confidence to

negotiate with the clients for

condom use. There is also a ‘Hotline’

and ‘Community Squad’ introduced

by Save the Children and its partner

organisation for the sex workers for

any kind of help, like when faced

with violence.

“I wanted to test my blood to be

sure about HIV following the advice I

got from the drop-in-centre. The test

was negative. I go there everyday

Photo: Courtesy

now. I have learned what to do in

emergencies and how to seek police

assistance. It helped me save my

life,” said Reshmi.

It is estimated that there are

1,02,260 female sex workers in

Bangladesh who are at high risk

of HIV. Save the Children and its

partner organisations have brought

26,000 female sex workers under

their coverage to provide essential

services through 43 drop-in-centres

in 26 districts and bring them under

universal health access with financial

support from the Global Fund.

While it’s uncertain if Reshmi and

her daughter can live a happy life in

the near future, there is always hope

from Save the Children that armed

with an education, her daughter will

be able to choose a different path. •

The author is

Senior Manager-

Communications and

Media, Save the Children

WEEKEND TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, MAY 19, 2017


18 stay in

Clues

Mini cryptics

ACROSS

1 Tool for shooting a cream

cocktail (6)

6 Dislocated elbow underneath

(5)

7 Throw away fight (5)

8 Happy the spanish consumed

dish initially (6)

DOWN

2 Einstein a Canadian

province (7)

3 Sell pie remade for

round shape (7)

4 For good, like Jolson

methods (6)

5 Sounds like pursued the

pure (6)

Sudoku

Use the numbers 1-9 to complete each

of the 3x3 square grids such that each

horizontal and vertical line also contains all

of the digits from 1-9

DIY: How to

make a sugar

lip exfoliating

scrub

Tasfia Huda

diy

Give your lips some much needed

Last week’s solutions

Solved it? Email answers to weekend@dhakatribune.com and win one free

month of the Dhaka Tribune.

ACROSS

1 Southwest garden in Scandanavia

(6)

6 Fruit beer contains hollowed pulp (5)

7 Parent loses head over something

else (5)

8 Head first into rubbish beat (6)

DOWN

2 Sport around the rain and

shine (7)

3 Leaves of French regions...

(7)

4 … want the French stylus (6)

5 Am lost, confused nearly (6)

Last week’s solutions

Solved it? Email answers to weekend@dhakatribune.com and

win one free month of the Dhaka Tribune.

love with a scrumptious DIY lip

scrub recipe. Homemade lip scrubs

only require a few ingredients and

are super easy to whip up!

You will need:

• A tablespoon of brown sugar or

white sugar

• A dash of honey (just enough

to make the sugar really stick

together) OR a bit of olive oil/

coconut oil

• A teeny tiny little drop of vanilla

(it makes it smell yummy, but isn’t

necessary)

• A small container

Directions:

Mix a tablespoon of brown sugar

with just enough honey (or olive

oil) to get it to stick together. Once

a week (twice at the very max) rub

the scrub onto your lips, vigorously

enough to loosen the dead skin.

Let it sit for 1 minute, and then wipe

off with a damp washcloth. Apply lip

balm after use. •

WEEKEND TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, MAY 19, 2017


Biz Info 19

Dhaka Regency hosts PATA Night 2017

PATA Night 2017, organised by

Pacific Asia Travel Association

(PATA) Bangladesh Chapter

was held at Dhaka Regency on

Saturday, May 13.

With the aim of “celebrating the

best in the Bangladesh travel and

tourism industry”, PATA Bangladesh

Chapter recognises the outstanding

contributions made by individuals

and organisations in the travel

tourism sector. The award recipients

have worked selflessly and with

dedication towards improving the

industry as a whole and their efforts

translate to a better Bangladesh.

Rashed Khan Menon, MP Minister

of Civil Aviation and Tourism was

the Chief Guest while Andrew Jones,

Chairman of PATA was the special

guest.

In his opening speech, Shahid

Hamid FIH, Chairman of PATA

Bangladesh Chapter, stated: “We

have seen a double digit growth

in domestic and regional tourism.

Private airlines are expanding their

fleets for domestic and regional

routes. Dhaka airport is handling

about six million passengers

in a year. Expansion of Sylhet,

Chittagong, Cox’s Bazar and Jessore

airports are being undertaken.

Dhaka- Chittagong 4 lanes highway

complete. Beautiful Marine drive is

now open to the public. Opening of

Padma Bridge will be a milestone

linking the capital with Southern

part of the country. Similarly, Capital

cities, flyovers made the substantial

improvement on the transportation.

Elevated Expressway and Metro rail

work is going on.”

Minister Rashed Khan Menon

MP stated: “I am pleased to see

the initiatives taken by the PATA

Bangladesh Chapter to bring all the

leaders and influential entities under

one roof to recognize their valuable

contribution to the travel and

tourism industry of Bangladesh.

The Chairman of PATA Mr.

Andrew Jones in his speech has

stated, “I am pleased to attend

this very special event and to be

a part of PATA Night organised by

the PATA Bangladesh Chapter. All

of us at the Association are happy

to see that the PATA Bangladesh

Chapter and associates are making

concerted efforts in providing much

needed support to the development

of tourism in Bangladesh. Such

actions and enthusiasm are

fundamental to the principles of

PATA in promoting responsible and

sustainable tourism throughout the

country.” •

MIB Summer Meet-up 2017 at Banani

MIB Spirit – Made in

and many more. You will

Bangladesh is back again, not believe how sugar

this time in celebration of and art can be such a

summer. After much anticipation,

they are hosting their Summer

Meetup 2017 on the grounds of

Claystation Dhaka at Banani.

Enjoy a discount of 10% on all

products with your purchase on a

check-in. Not only that, Hems and

Hues, 6 yards story, Meehee will

be there with their wide range of

apparel and jewellery.

For book lovers and Tumblresque

hearts, Made with Love will be

featuring their back to school

essentials like – side bags,

notebooks, pencil cases, stickers

potent combination if

you haven’t seen what

Hoang Cakes are. Hoang

Cakes are the first ever

3D Jelly art cake brought

in Bangladesh by Jelly

Hoang. Each of their

creations is an absolute

masterpiece that is too

pretty to eat.

Last but not least, come and

have a go in making your first ever

pottery as Claystation Dhaka guides

you. All this and much more are

awaiting you all at the MIB Summer

Meet-up. The two day event ends

today, so be sure to drop by Clay

Station Dhaka, House 28, Road 20,

Block K, Banani, between from

12pm–8pm. •

Special Ramadan offers at Lakeshore Hotel

Lakeshore Hotel has

There will also be options

month of Ramadan at Golden Goose

announced attractive offers for the banquet iftar and dinner Restaurant. •

on special delicacies for the for corporate and family

holy month of Ramadan. Guests programs.

will be able to enjoy special banquet Customers of BRAC Bank

iftar and dinner menu options at the Ltd, Dhaka Bank Ltd, NRB

Golden Goose restaurant, as well Bank Ltd, Standard Chartered

as special takeaway iftar boxes at Bank, Banglalink, and Hungry

reasonable prices.

Naki will get special privileges

Their iftar menu will feature at a price of Tk2,500++ buffet

delicious mutton haleem, jilapi and iftar followed by dinner

special dahi bora.

menu offered throughout the

Crimson Cup

in Uttara

Crimson Cup Coffee is proud to

announce the launch of their

new store in Uttara. Ever since

2015 when the franchise started

operating in Bangladesh, it has

gained tremendous success in

both the Banani and Dhanmondi

stores, and is very thrilled to

open and effectively run the

Uttara store from May 25 this

year.

The latest store in Uttara will

hold the largest floor space the

American franchise has to offer

their valuable customers in

Dhaka. The store is located on the

Gausal Azam Avenue in Sector-13

Uttara. A special addition for the

Uttara store will be the “quiet

room”. Here customers can

study, read and have meetings

as they have a sip of the famous

Crimson Cup Mocha. Uttara holds

a significant residential portion

of Dhaka city and Crimson Cup

Coffee will be glad to serve their

customers with a wide variety

of hot and cold beverages.

Moreover, the franchise is also

bringing attractive additions to

their bakery and sandwich line. •

WEEKEND TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, MAY 19, 2017


20 World Museum day | Local Heritage

Frozen in time

Six museums in Dhaka you need to visit

Tasfia Huda

Museums are a great

way to gain insight

into various aspects

of a city, and

Bangladesh has plenty of fascinating

museums to explore. In honour of

International Museum Day observed

internationally yesterday, we bring

you a list of some of the many

museums in the city that highlight

major events and conflicts that have

shaped this region and throw a light

on its culture and society as well.

Delve into our folk roots

The Folk Art Museum was

established in 1975 in Sonargaon,

and has not only become a major

attraction in the city since then,

but also for the entire region. The

main museum building focuses on

displaying the skills and expertise

of the artisans and artists of the

country. The two smaller Folk

Arts and Crafts Museums exhibit

wooden crafts, brass, bamboo and

metal crafts, painted work, musical

instruments, pottery, textiles,

ornaments and much more. The

museum complex also includes

a crafts sales centre, restaurants,

crafts village, library, rest house and

documentation centre.

Lest we forget

The Liberation War Museum (LWM)

is dedicated to the memory of the

sacrifices made by soldiers and

civilians during the Liberation War.

Located in Agargaon in Dhaka, the

museum was started by community

leaders who wanted to honour and

preserve this part of the history

of Bangladesh. The project grew

as community members began

donating mementoes, documents

and other items related to the

Liberation War, as well as making

donations for funding the museum.

The LWM has recently moved

to new premises, and is able to

display a much greater portion

of their collections, which ranges

from documenting the country’s

struggle against colonial control

and the period of Pakistani rule to

documents of the genocide of 1971,

the resistance and declaration of

independence.

From there to now

Originally established as the Dhaka

Museum in the year 1913 by Lord

Carmichael, the museum developed

into such a large establishment

that its wealth in artefacts was

acknowledged in 1983, by changing

its name to the Bangladesh

National Museum. Located in

Shahbag, the museum consists of

a conservatory laboratory, library,

three auditoriums, photographic

gallery, temporary exhibition hall

and an audio-visual division. Some

of the artefacts include sculptures,

tapestries, votive seals, terracotta

pieces, water colour drawings,

porcelain items, metal work,

weapons and medieval armoury,

wooden furniture, quilts, fossils and

traditional crafts.

One revolution to another

The Museum of Independence in

Dhaka depicts the history of the

nation since Mughal tenure to

independence in 1971. It is the first

and only underground museum in

the country. The museum is part of

a 67-acre complex at Suhrawardy

Udyan, the site from where Sheikh

Mujibur Rahman gave his historic

speech declaring the struggle for

independence in 1971, and where the

Pakistani forces surrendered after

the Liberation War. The museum

was opened to the public on March

25, 2015, the 45th Independence Day

of Bangladesh. The underground

museum contains a multimedia

projection theatre, an amphitheatre,

three water pools, Shikha Chirantony

(eternal flame) symbolising the

eternity of Bengali nationalism,

a mural based on the struggle for

independence and other ancillary

facilities.

Polices of the past

The Liberation War Museum of

Police began its journey in 2013

with limited resources. Later in

2015, Inspector General of Police

(IGP) AKM Shahidul Haque laid

the foundation stone for the new

museum at the eastern border of

the police line, and Prime Minister

Sheikh Hasina inaugurated the

museum on January 23 of this year.

The museum is divided into three

portions. The ground floor includes

a corner dedicated to Bangabandhu

Sheikh Mujibur Rahman, and a

library with nearly 2,000 books on

the Liberation War. The basement

is split into six different galleries

which are organised chronologically.

These relics range from the different

uniforms worn by police during

British and Pakistani regimes to a

number of weapons and equipment.

Stock up on your science facts

The National Museum of Science and

Technology (NMST) was established

in 1966 by the government of

Pakistan. It was first based in the

Dhaka Public Library building, after

which the museum moved a number

of times before it was established

in its permanent home in 1981. The

NMST in Bangladesh is divided

into three categories – Technology,

Biological Science and Physical

Science. It also contains galleries

with static and working exhibits,

as well as models, diagrams, charts

and animated posters. The exhibits

provide detailed information

concerning experiments and

inventions in a number of fields

including electricity, light, heat,

magnetism, communication, sound,

as well as motion, force and energy.•

WEEKEND TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, MAY 19, 2017

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