Weekend-5-5

dhakatribune

Dhaka Tribune

vol 5 Issue 6 | friDAY, May 26, 2017

6

Kitchen

chronicles

8

meal

deals

17 Ramadan


CONTENTS 1

Volume 5 | Issue 6 | May 26, 2017

Editor

Zafar Sobhan

Features Editor

Sabrina Fatma Ahmad

Magazine Editor

Farina Noireet

Deputy Magazine Editors

Khan N Moushumi

Shuprova Tasneem

Weekend Tribune Team

Saudia Afrin

Mahmood Hossain

Moumita Ahmed

Tasfia Huda

Baizid Haque Joarder

Saqib Sarker

Mahmood Sadi

Sabiha Akond Rupa

Contributors

Jennifer Ashraf

Farzana Romine

Cartoons

Syed Rashad Imam Tanmoy

Priyo

Graphics

Md Mahbub Alam

Alamgir Hossain

Shahadat Hossain

Colour Specialist

Shekhar Mondal

Advertisement

Shahin Ahsan

Production

Masum Billah

Circulation

Masud Kabir Pavel

Website

dhakatribune.com/weekend

facebook.com/WeekendTrib

Email your letters to:

weekend@dhakatribune.com

6

10

Cook your own way

Kitchen chronicles

Photo Story

Venture

Editor’s note

Dear Readers,

Just when you thought

you’d mastered the

heatwave currently burning

up the country, 2017 throws

a curve ball at you with

Ramadan starting in the

hottest month of the year.

Fear not, we’ve got you

covered. From the hottest

iftar deals around town

(See Ticket, Page 8) to a

schedule to calm the chaos

(Ramadan planner, Page

17), we’ve got it down to a

system. Keep it fresh and

light with skincare from

Seoul (Tempt, Page 5) and

those feet smelling fresh

(Tailored, Page 4). In other

words, your week has been

sorted.

So kick back, get your

hydration in during sehri

and iftar, and you’ll coast

through the holy month like

you were meant to.

Here’s wishing all our

readers a hearty Ramadan

Kareem

Sabrina Fatma Ahmad

News

2 News

3 Meanwhile

Features

4 Tailored

Maintenance

5 Tempt

Beauty

8 Ticket

Meal deals

9 Dining

Inside the tent

12 Travelogue

Greece

14 Interview

Shusmita Anis

16 Tech

Mac rebuttal (Part 2)

17 Weekly planner

Ramadan

19 Biz Info

20 Musing

Should journalists respond

to trolls?

Regulars

18 Stay in

On the cover

Photo: Syed Zakir Hossain

WEEKEND TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, MAY 26, 2017


2 News | This week

. . . Meanwhile 3

The world at a glance

IS bombing kills 22 in Manchester concert

bombing attack carried by IS at

A a concert in Manchester killed at

The Taliban have announced that

they will launch their spring

offensive on Sunday, signaling plans to

step up attacks as the weather warms

across Afghanistan, making both

travel and fighting easier.

The statement comes at the end of

a month which has already become

the deadliest of the year.

The militant group’s leadership

vowed on Saturday that “every

possible tactic will be utilised in order

President Donald Trump used his

centerpiece Holy Land speech last

Tuesday to reaffirm his commitment

to peace between Israelis and

Palestinians, but he offered no new

details on how to achieve a goal that

has eluded US leaders for decades.

Rounding out a 28-hour stay in

Jerusalem, Trump praised Israeli

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu

and Palestinian President Mahmoud

Abbas alike, saying both were ready for

suicide bomber killed five

A people, including a policeman,

and injured 12 others last Tuesday

at a police checkpoint in Somalia’s

northern Puntland region.

Although suicide bombings are

common in the capital of Mogadishu,

they are relatively rare in the semiautonomous

region of Puntland,

where the security forces are relatively

regularly paid and receive substantial

least 22 last Monday.

Police later on Tuesday identified

the man who blew himself up the

previous night at an Ariana Grande

concert in Manchester, England, as

22-year-old Salman Abedi.

The explosion rocked the 21,000-

seat Manchester Arena at 10:33pm

local time just after teen pop idol

Taliban announce start of spring offensive

to detain or inflict heavy casualties on

the foreign transgressors,” including

suicide attacks on military bases and

diplomatic areas.

The leadership also threatened

about insider attacks by members of

the Afghan security forces against

their colleagues or foreign troops.

Such attacks threaten the strength

of the Afghan forces as they work

to take over responsibility from

international troops. The latest attack

Trump promotes his goal of Middle East

peace, offers no details

peace. But he avoided any mention of

a Palestinian state and did not address

a campaign promise to move the US

Embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem,

something Netanyahu yearns for.

“I had a meeting this morning with

President Abbas and can tell you that

the Palestinians are ready to reach for

peace,” Trump said in a speech at the

Israel Museum in Jerusalem.

“In my meeting with my very

good friend Benjamin, I can tell you

Suicide bomber kills five in Somalia

US assistance.

The al Qaeda-linked Somali Islamist

insurgency, al Shabaab, which claims

responsibility for most attacks, told

Reuters they were not behind the

bombing.

Puntland, which is just across the

Red Sea from Yemen, is also home to

a splinter group of al Shabaab that has

sworn allegiance to the Islamic State

group. Security sources say there is a

Ariana Grande wrapped up her

sold-out show. Chaos ensued as

concertgoers, many of them preteens

and teens, scrambled for the

exits amid smoke and the cries of the

wounded.

Children as young as eight years old

were among the victims.

Photo: Reuters

took place in March, when a member

of Afghanistan’s government-backed

militia program shot and killed five of

his colleagues in Badghis province in

northwest Afghanistan.

Photo: Reuters

also that he is reaching for peace. He

wants peace,” he said. “Making peace,

however, will not be easy. We all

know that. Both sides will face tough

decisions. But with determination,

compromise, and the belief that peace

is possible, Israelis and Palestinians

can make a deal.”

Photo: Reuters

small contingent of foreigners there

too.

The fighters loyal to Islamic State

briefly seized the port town of Qandala

in December but were driven back into

the mountains by Puntland security

services.

Photo: Reuters

Local

EC drafts

national election

roadmap

without EVM

Prioritising seven issues, the

Election Commission has

announced a draft roadmap

for the next general election

without any mention of

electronic voting machine

(EVM) or digital voting machine

(DVM).

Chief Election Commissioner

KM Nurul Huda made the

announcement at his office

in Dhaka on Tuesday, reports

Bangla Tribune.

The roadmap consists

of seven points including

constituency boundary redemarcation,

review of the

electoral law, update of the

voter list, new voter registration,

enhancement of EC’s power at

vote centre and ensuring level

playing field for all.

He later said the roadmap

will be finalised within 15 days.

When asked about using

EVM or DVM in the polls, the

CEC said: “Our roadmap or

work plan does not include

this matter. But, during our

talks with political parties, we

will discuss the issue. We will

discuss the pros and cons of the

matter then. If they [political

parties] agree on this, a decision

on using EVM will be taken. We

will not take any risk regarding

this without the consent of the

political parties.”

Detailing the draft roadmap,

Nurul Huda said: “We will start

dialogues with political parties

at the end of July. Our talks

will continue till November.

Other than the parties, we will

also hold talks with everyone

concerned.”

News: Dhaka Tribune

Say what

Soon there will be a ‘rat cafe’ where you

can dine among rodent pals

Cat cafes are all the rage these

days, so it only seems logical

that some other species are

getting in on the action.

For two days this summer, San

Francisco will be host to a popup

rat cafe, where patrons will be

able to enjoy coffee and pastries in

the company of the critters. The

San Francisco Dungeon, a tourist

attraction where actors reenact

bits of the region’s history, will be

hosting the event July 1 and July 7.

Don’t worry — these aren’t wild

rats brought in from the streets.

Instead, the rodents of honour are

adoptable domestic pets from Rattie

Ratz, a Bay Area rat rescue group.

That means that if you get along

especially well with one of the

rats at the cafe, you may decide to

make your new friend a permanent

addition to your life.

Though many people are

freaked out by the very idea of

rats, domestic rats are social, clean

animals that are highly intelligent

and trainable.

Tickets for the rat cafe are

$49.99 apiece and include coffee,

tea or water and a breakfast

pastry, according to a press release.

Photo of the week

Due to the lack of

proper daycare

facilities available to

labourers, a mother

has to bring her baby

to work everyday in

Keraniganj.

Photo: Syed Zakir Hossain

When you’re done eating, you get 15

minutes set aside to hang out with

the “ambassador rats.”•

News and photo: Huffington Post

Aries (Mar21-Apr19): A strong

focus on your communication zone

offers you a chance to connect with

neighbours and others in your area.

Taurus (Apr20-May20): If you’re

looking for any expensive items,

you’ll also be seeking a bargain, and

you’ll be willing to negotiate in order

to get one.

Gemini (May21-June20): It will come

as no surprise if you feel moved to

tackle projects that you’ve been

dreaming up recently. Anything with

personal meaning could inspire you

to give it your best shot.

Cancer (June21-Jul22): You are now

in a period in which the cosmos

encourages you to reflect on your

progress. This can be an opportunity to

get closure on issues that may have been

bothering you for some time.

Leo (Jul23-Aug22): Your social life may

have some additional sparkle over

coming weeks as upbeat influences in

this sector encourage you to reach out in

new ways.

Virgo (Aug23-Sep22): You could be

moving into the spotlight over coming

weeks as a focus on the topmost

sector of your chart encourages you to

showcase your skills and abilities.

Libra (Sep23-Oct22): You may feel an

urge to leave your comfort zone and

explore options that represent a bit of a

challenge with a steep learning curve.

Scorpio (Oct23-Nov21): Looking beneath

the surface may help you understand

the subtle currents that make up a key

situation. Key insights could allow you to

help bring closure or find a way to tackle

a certain issue once and for all.

Sagittarius (Nov22-Dec21): While it

might be useful to speak the honest

truth to cut through too much fluff, there

are times when more sensitive souls

could find this hard to cope with.

Capricorn (Dec22-Jan19): Taking up yoga

or any other relaxing routine could seem

more desirable than watching TV. In fact,

a new and more healthful beginning may

be on the menu for you.

Aquarius (Jan20-Feb18): Painting,

drawing, or using feathers and beads can

unleash a vortex of creativity, and you

may find this spills over into other areas

of life, too.

Pisces (Feb19-Mar20): Playing host

can be especially fun as cosmic forces

encourage you to invite others over for a

friendly get-together. Your home could

become a hive of activity where friends

meet to discuss children, issues, and

clever solutions to everyday problems. •

horoscopes

WEEKEND TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, MAY 26, 2017 WEEKEND TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, MAY 26, 2017


4 Tailored | maintenance

beauty | Tempt 5

Sneakerhead

cleaning kit

Haute

hallyu

From casual to high-end quality, sneakers

need to love too, gentlemen

This could be the start of a beautiful

friendship

Mahmood Hossain

Sabrina Fatma Ahmad

The sneakerhead culture

has been around for

quite some time, being

led mostly by the most

popular athletes of the world. Formal

shoes have always been given more

attention and care over others, but

it is time to share that importance to

your favourite pair of sneakers.

It doesn’t matter if you’re wearing

Tk5,000 sneakers from Noir or

forking over Tk50,000 for a pair

of suede and grained-leather by

Brunello Cucinelli, you want to

make them last as long as possible.

It’s all about the investment, fellas.

Neglecting your sneakers is a major

foul in the style department. You

don’t need to be a serious collector

like DJ Khaled or any other sneakers

connoisseur who will never wear the

pair he bought last Wednesday. The

reality is: you have many pairs and

want to show them off as much as

you can.

Triple-threat

The three main steps to keeping your

shoes the freshest is to protect, clean

and deodorise. Unless you are of a

divine presence, there is no way in

hell you’ll be walking on water or

avoid getting wet on a not-so-dry

day. When you purchase a product

like Jason Markk’s ‘Repel’ spray

($17) and Crepe Project’s Ultimate

Stain & Rain ($15), you’ll be able to

avoid getting your new sneakers

wet, which consequently can hurt

the integrity of the materials used in

your shoes. These will not only keep

the moisture away, it’ll help with

some of the stains as well.

You can protect your shoes all you

want, but you can’t avoid cleaning

them. No matter what you wear,

each investment needs to be cleaned

properly. Another Jason Markk

product, Premium Shoe Cleaner

($18), has become the

number one go-to

shoe cleaner in recent

times. It’s been

around for about a

decade, smells like

grapes, and is 98.3%

natural. Hey, it’s not

perfect, but that’s

pretty damn close.

The final solution

and step to fight off

the grime is to keep

your shoes smelling

as close to how they smelled when

you first busted them out of the box.

It’s nearly impossible but a bottle

of The Laundress Sport Spray ($10)

will help remedy the issue of foot

odour. Gentlemen, it doesn’t matter

if you regularly get pedicures and

are known to be the most hygienic

person around, your feet will smell.

Whatever unfavourable stench leaks

its way out, the blend of leafy greens,

orange, rose, eucalyptus, jasmine

and undertones of musk will fight off

the offensive attack.

Tool time

There is the normal shoe brush that

gets rid of the usual dust and dirt.

Then, there are moments where

stains cannot be avoided. Those

moments when a dark coloured

beverage targets your fresh suede

shoes, and the world around you

is fixated in slow motion. Heart

wrenching as it is, suede sneakers

need to be cleaned with suede

erasers, as well as the brush, to

properly get rid of the stain. This

process is followed by a microfiber

towel that is specifically designed for

wiping any kind of sneaker.

While this is the most ideal kit to

have, you can always use a regular

old eraser and a toothbrush to fight

the stains.

Take care

Shoetrees are a must no matter what

style of shoes you own. It is plain and

simple, shoetrees keep your shoes as

close to its original shape. When it’s

fresh out of the box, it’s important

to first wear your shoes in to mould

the shoe’s fitting to your feet. Once

that is done after a few wears, it’s

important to carefully place those

shoetrees in so that the shoe doesn’t

lose its basic form. Cedar Elements

shoe trees come in $10 a pair. If you

haven’t caught up on the trend yet,

none of these wonderful shoe care

items will cost you an arm and a leg;

it’s quite the opposite.

It’s also good to keep in mind

that sneakers will require a rounder

toe with a metal spring design. This

isn’t only recommended for sneaker

heads. Shoetrees, as mentioned,

should be kept for your formal

shoes as well as high-top to low-top

sneakers.

Whether they are vital tools or

bottled cleaning products, each item

mentioned can be found on Amazon,

which you’ll be able to purchase via

backpackbang.com. •

Forget the caked on

foundation, the hours

spent baking, contouring

and beating your skin. This

season, the trends point towards skin

that breathes, and a fresh, glowing

look. And just like that, along with

K-dramas and Gangnam Style, the

great Korean Wave stands poised to

sweep over the beauty and skincare

scene.

The cornerstone of K-beauty lies

in a focus on skincare as opposed to

makeup. Those luminescent, dewy

faces you see on television are the

result of a strict 8-10 step regimen.

The actual makeup they use is

light, bright, and minimalistic. And

why not? Skin that good is its own

adornment.

In recent months, Dhaka has

also hopped on board the hallyu

(Korean culture wave), and there

has been a rise in demand for

Korean beauty products. Weekend

Tribune got in touch with Saameera

Taareen, one of the co-founders

of “Beauty Box from Korea”, one

of the most popular purveyors of

Korean beauty products in Dhaka

right now.

The cultural divide

“Korean products, which

promise gorgeous skin

but come with a

product-heavy,

labourintensive

routine” explains Taareen.

“When it comes to makeup and

cosmetics, South Koreans can’t stop

experimenting with ingredients or

methods of application. It is not

uncommon for these routines to

include 10 steps just to cleanse and

moisturise the face day and night.

That’s at odds with more minimalist

American skincare methods, which

can be limited to washing and

moisturising in many cases.” The

Viquarunnessa Noon alum, who

graduated from NSU, and

is currently working

– in addition to

Beauty Box – in

the textile

industry,

further

expands

on the

differences

between

Korean

products

and Western

counterparts.

“Many of these

(Korean) products come with

ingredients not commonly found

in Western skin care, like pearl

essence, snail secretions or donkey

milk, Innisfree’s Jeju Island volcanic

clay mask and fermented soybean

moisturiser. Korea’s latest trendy

cosmetics line, products change

monthly. Additionally, Korean

skincare products mostly focus on

moisturising and replenishing skin

by using natural ingredients, where

other international skincare lines

prioritise eliminating bacteria and

drying out (oily skin).”

How do these products impact our

skin?

Coloured skin, whether you’re

brown or East Asian, tends to have

a more compact epidermis, which

slows down the rate at which

skin-care products are absorbed,

as explained by skin treatment

therapist Florence Barrett-Hill. This

is why Koreans have adopted the

multi-step skincare regimen. This

might seem tedious – and expensive!

But you think about it, even our

own traditional South Asian beauty

routines incorporate many herbal

masks and oils.

Asian skin, by virtue of being

more pigmented and having more

melanin than Caucasian skin, tends

to burn less and tan more. While this

is certainly good news, it still doesn’t

preclude us from the threat of skin

cancer, and general degradation of

skin. “Most makeup products from

Korea have a minimum of 25 SPF, but

50 SPF is fairly common. This idea

seems to support why Koreans don’t

get premature wrinkles – because

they use a lot of sun protection,”

offers Taareen.

What’s trending in Seoul right

now?

“Right now, they’re pushing “hair

shockers” - neon tints for hair – and

nail polish with real flowers in it.

South Korea is by far the largest

market for men’s cosmetics, with

Korean men buying a quarter of the

world’s men’s cosmetics – around

$900 million a year.

The Beauty Box from Korea is

a popular Facebook store, and are

now available at Genetic Plaza,

Dhanmondi. •

WEEKEND TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, MAY 26, 2017 WEEKEND TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, MAY 26, 2017


6 Cook your own way | Kitchen chronicles 7

Ramadan

essentials

It’s

Farzana Romine

that time of the year again, when Ramadan is knocking

on our door. When it comes to iftar, I like making new and

healthy food but there are some traditional items without

which, iftar seems incomplete in my home. Growing up, it

didn’t matter what we had, there were two items that had to

be there on the table - daal puri and doi bora. I think every

household has its own recipes for these two items, and today

I am sharing the ones that I grew up eating.

Directions:

Wash the daal and soak it the night

before. Next day, wash it again and

grind it into a smooth paste. You can

use a food processor or any grinding

tools you have at home. Do not use

too much water, just enough to grind

it well.

Now use a hand held beater or a

whisk to beat the daal well. Beat it

until it starts to become light and

fluffy. To check the fluffiness of the

daal, drop a small portion of the daal

in a bowl of water. If it floats, that

means the daal is ready for frying.

Heat plenty of oil in a deep frying

Doi Bora

pan. In a medium size bowl, add

about one litre of water and mix 2

tablespoons of salt. Set it aside.

Once the oil is hot, it’s time to

fry the daal. The oil temperature

should be medium hot. Take a small

portion of the daal and flatten it

with your finger and drop it in the

oil. Repeat with rest of the daal. Fry

the balls until they become a dark

golden colour. It takes about five

to seven minutes. Once it’s fried,

drop them immediately into the

salted water. Let it soak for 15 to 20

minutes.

Now mix everything for the

yogurt mixture together and set

aside. Adjust the spice, sugar and salt

according to your taste.

Take the lentil balls out of the

water one at a time and press them

gently in between your palms to get

rid of any extra water. Put them in

the yogurt mixture. Once done with

all the boras, put it in the fridge.

To make the tamarind chutney,

grind the panch phoron coarsely.

Heat the oil in a small pan. Add the

panch phoron and the chili. Mix for

five seconds and add the tamarind

Daal puri

Ingredients:

1/2 cup urad/maskolai daal

1 kilo plain yogurt

To prepare the yogurt

mixture, dry toast the

coriander seeds and the

dried red chili and cool

pulp. Mix it well and add salt and

sugar. Let it come to a boil and

thicken a bit. Once thickened, let it

cool down completely.

Ingredients:

For the stuffing:

1 tbsp fresh mint paste

2 tbsp whole coriander seeds

4 dried red chili

them down. Once cooled,

grind them into a coarse

texture. Do not make a

To serve, just sprinkle on some

extra ground coriander and chili

powder and add the tamarind

1/2 cup red lentil/masoor daal

1 tsp toasted cumin powder

fine powder.

chutney. Serve cold. •

1/4 cup crispy caramelised onion

1/2 tsp toasted cumin powder

2 dried red chili

Directions:

Make the stuffing

1 tsp black salt/bit lobon

4 tbsp sugar

Salt to taste

Hand full chopped coriander

first. Soak the daal

Salt to taste

for an hour. Rinse it

Sweet tamarind chutney:

well. Boil the daal with

1/2 cup tamarind pulp

For the dough:

just enough water to

1 cup of sugar

2 cups of plain flour

soften it but not make

2 tsp five spice/panch phoron

2 tbsp oil

it too mushy. Make sure

1/4 tsp chili powder

1 cup water

to evaporate all the water

1 tbsp mustard oil

Salt to taste

while it’s cooking. Set it aside

Salt to taste

and let it cool down.

Fry the dry chili in oil and let it

cool down. Crush it with your hand.

Now mix all the ingredients for the

stuffing and set aside.

For the dough, mix the salt and oil

with the flour. Add the water, leaving

1/4 cup water aside. Start mixing

the dough. Add the rest of the water

as needed. Make a smooth and soft

dough. Cover the dough and set

aside for an hour.

To make the puri, take a small

portion of the dough and flatten it on

your palm. Add one teaspoon of the

stuffing in the middle and carefully

bring all the side of the dough

together on top and close the dough.

Make sure to seal it well. Repeat with

rest of the dough.

Heat enough oil in a deep pan

over medium high heat. With a

rolling pin, roll the stuffed balls

slightly. Make sure not to roll it too

much, or else the stuffing will come

out. Once the oil is hot, deep fry the

puris until they are golden brown.

Serve with cucumber and your

favorite chutney.

Photos: Farzana Romine

WEEKEND TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, MAY 26, 2017 WEEKEND TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, MAY 26, 2017


8 TICKET | meal deals

Inside the tent | Dining 9

Iftar deals around town

Tasfia Huda

With the holy month of Ramadan approaching, the restaurants

of Dhaka are offering some excellent packages to meet your

dining needs. Browse through the list below and decide

which ones you want to taste this Ramadan.

Ramadan bento at Fool’s Diner

Break your fast with all your favourite items from the menu, in one Bento.

The Ramadan Bento at Fool’s Diner is priced at Tk875 only, and includes:

• Teriyaki Chicken

• Chicken Crisps

• Lemon Butter fish

• Chef’s Special Maki Roll

• Vietnamese Roll

• Vegetable Tempura

• Iced Tea

• Vegetable Clear Soup

• Fried Rice

• Mango Kulfi

• Dates and Dips

Also, special offers available for the valued users of Grameenphone, Robi,

Icon from Banglalink, Standard Chartered Bank, BRAC Bank, Prime Bank Ltd,

Eastern Bank Ltd, Southeast Bank Ltd, Dhaka Bank Ltd and NRB Bank.

Kiyoshi’s special bento box

Make this Ramadan a healthy one with Kiyoshi’s latest bento to break your

fast. The special bento box offers a selection of delicious yet healthy recipes

for mains, appetizers and dessert, and will cost you Tk1495++.

This special bento box includes:

• Ebi meets Sake (Salmon & Prawn Fusion Roll)

• Streaks of Red (Crab Fusion Roll)

• Prawn, Crab and Egg Nigiris

• Teriyaki Salmon

• Yaki Chicken

• Mixed Tempura

• Gyoza

• Miso Soup

• Steam Rice

• Coconut Pudding

Dessert fantasies

Radisson Blu’s Ramadan offer

Weekend Tribune

It might be a little jarring to find a tiki-lit path leading to a palm-fringed grove housing a desert

tent, but an amazing experience waits inside. Stepping out of the sweltering Dhaka heat, and

into the chilled air inside the tent, one is instantly transported to a completely different reality.

The silken walls, the plush floor seating and dining setup will have you believe that you have

entered an elaborate scene straight out of Alif Laila.

This Ramadan, Radisson Blu Water Garden is offering up a refreshing Arabian experience

to indulge in after a hard day’s fasting. Guests can book a poolside gazebo converted to a tent

meant for feasting in luxury.

Once you’re settled in, servers dressed in the traditional thoub and headgear of the Gulf

states, come in bearing sparkling date juice and fresh fruits to break your fast with. Also on

offer are some 30 different varieties of dates imported from around the world. The iftar menu

contains the very best of the Middle East, including such items as hummus, labneh, stuffed

vine leaves, babaganoush, and lavash bread, to name a few. If your tastebuds are craving a few

familiar items, however, fear not, there’s haleem and rainbow jilapi.

Those preferring to experience the gazebo later in the night, can expect a regal offering

of whole lamb ouzi, saffron pulao and nut rice. Those with an adventurous palate can

even try camel bhuna. There’s also the option for live BBQ, and items such as lobster

thermidor, duck breast in apricot juice. These are just some of the highlighted items

on offer from a comprehensive menu that covers a whole gamut of Middle Eastern

delicacies. You can kick back after the meal at the private sheesha lounge located

behind the tent.

If you have a party of 6-8 looking for something out of the ordinary this Ramadan,

don’t forget to book the private dining tent at Radisson Blu.

For Private Dining Tent Reservation Call +8801730 089 176 or +8802 9834555 Ext-

8218 •

Iftar treat at The Westin, Dhaka

This ramadan, The Westin, Dhaka is preparing a luxurious multi-cuisine Iftar

and dinner buffet with various delicacies including Middle-East, Indo-Asian

and Western cuisine.

There are refreshing drinks and fresh fruits for a healthy way to break the

fast. At Seasonal Tastes (Level 2), a lavish buffet Iftar and dinner is being

offered at Tk5000 only. Moreover, a special buffet spread is also available for

the guests to enjoy at Suhur, which is priced at Tk2500.

An Arabian buffet Iftar and dinner, priced at Tk3300 only, is also being

offered at Splash (Level 5).

Daily Treats is also offering a sumptuous Iftar platter, at Tk1599. You can

also select their special takeaway Iftar boxes – the Standard box is available at

Tk1599, while the Premium one is priced at Tk2399.

Arabian Iftar at Radisson Blu Water Garden

Discover the warmth of Arabian hospitality with the richness of traditional

Arabian buffet spread at Radisson Blu Dhaka Water Garden. Feast your soul

to a choice of Arabian treats and beverages along with local delicacies in the

holy month of Ramadan.

More than 60 varieties of dates from around the world, along with multicoloured

rainbow Jilapis, camel meat bhoona (specially imported from UAE)

and whole Arabic style lamb spit will be available for the guests. Guests can

enjoy buffet Iftar with dinner everyday, and Suhoor nights on Thursdays and

Fridays.

For more details and table reservations, please call +88 02 9834555,

extension: 6029/8811 or +88 01730089130. •

WEEKEND TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, MAY 26, 2017 WEEKEND TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, MAY 26, 2017

Photos: Courtesy


10 Photo Story | Venture 11

For the children

Bangladesh, like many other developing nations across the world, is home

to a large number of underprivileged children, many of whom are orphans.

Former sex worker Hazera Begum, is one such orphan, having survived

the streets and unimaginable hardships. A child abuse victim, who was

ultimately forced into prostitution, in 2008, Hazera, with the help of a few

Jahangirnagar University students, started a shelter, Shishuder Jonno

Amra, in Savar to better the lives of street children.

In 2010, when the shelter was first established in Savar, it was home to

22 children. Since moving to Adabar, Dhaka, the shelter now houses 35

children under the caring watch of Hazera, who wants “to be their friend,

teacher and mother”.

This week’s photo story features heartwarming images from the daily

lives of Hazera and her children at their home in Savar.

Photos: Mahmud Hossain Opu

WEEKEND TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, MAY 26, 2017 WEEKEND TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, MAY 26, 2017


12 Travelogue | Greece 13

possess a ‘mysterious’ side to it.

Whilst exploring, we came across

some of the iconic Greek sights so

popular in magazines: churches

against the backdrop of the blue

sky, the single blue door within a

whitewashed wall, horse-drawn

carriages in front of the water, to

name a few.

We soon discovered that Spetses

was the island that rich Athenians

came to ‘chill out’ at and this was

evidenced by the range of brand

outfit stores and jewelry showrooms.

I remember admiring a simple white

cotton dress and then dropping it in

a hurry when I fould that the price

tag was almost 1000 Euro. That could

The Globetrotter’s

Chronicles

Livin da vida loca, Greece

Jennifer Ashraf Kashmi

I

remember feeling quite content

and in my “happy place”, even

as I woke up the next morning.

It was our fifth day on the

yacht, and everyone was well within

their comfort zones now. The only

reason I even picked up my phone,

or kept it next to me, was just to snap

pictures whenever something caught

my eye. Apart from that, we just

followed the rhythm of the sun and

the skipper’s instructions to remind

us of mealtimes. Hours had started

to mesh together and the days were

literally flying by!

Travel Tip: Ditch your phone, unless

you need it to snap pictures. Also,

forget about uploading or sharing

them right there and then. It just

takes up valuable time, and you

may never get that exact moment or

scenery back!

The group was quite sad to learn

that we would just be covering three

more islands over the next three days

before we docked back at Athens

- Spetses, Poros and Aegina, so we

decided to make the most of it before

the trip was over. Our schedule had

settled into a comfortable routine:

by the time the streaming rays of the

sun through our windows woke us

up, the boat would already be sailing.

We would stop and anchor in a

secluded bay for a spot of swimming

and breakfast, following which

we would set sail again till it was

lunchtime.

Our skipper would find a beautiful

spot to anchor in during lunchtime,

usually close to some caves which

we could swim and explore, or some

spots where the water was shallow

and abundant with marine life,

making it perfect for snorkeling. We

would spend a couple of hours here

before devouring lunch (and feeding

the leftovers to the fishes!), and set

sail again – this time towards the

island where we would be docking

for the afternoon and staying the

night at.

Travel Fact: Spetses is an affluent

island and a municipality

in the Islands regional

unit, Attica, Greece. It is sometimes

included as one of the Saronic

Islands. In ancient times, it was

known as Pityoussa, and later

as Petses. The island is now an

independent municipality with

no internal boundaries within the

municipality. The town of Spetses is

the only large settlement on the

island.

Spetses was our island and port

of call on the fifth day. This idyllic

island, whilst not possessing the

glaring beauty of Hydra or the quiet

charm of Perdika, still managed to

Photos: Courtesy

easily have bought me another eight

days on the Aegean Sea!

Our group seemed a little let

down, mainly because there wasn’t

really much to explore and mainly

because the locals here weren’t

particularly welcoming of tourists.

I guess they had bigger fish to fry

and did not want to waste their

time on young travelers, who would

probably not be splurging on 1000

Euro dresses! Even the stray dogs on

the street looked ‘fluffy’ and were in

good health, suggesting that money

was aplenty on this island. The only

friendly faces we came across were

those of the horse carriage drivers,

and we accepted their offer of a short

tour gratefully (after negotiating a

reasonable price, of course!).

Travel Tip: If you come across a

unique opportunity during your

travels, do your best to ensure that

you get to experience it, even if it

means parting with some of your

valuable cash. You can always buy

‘stuff’ later, but experiences and

memories are priceless!

Dinner was a low key affair, as

we all considered the skipper’s

recommendations and eventually

opted for a quaint restaurant built

directly over the water, where you

could feed the fishes swimming

underneath. A set menu containing

an appetizer (choice of mixed

canapés or bruschetta), a main

course (I opted for freshly caught

monkfish) and a glass of wine set

us each back 20 Euros, but it was

an excellent deal for Spetses, where

the typical main course dishes were

priced in the range of 35-60 Euros!

Our next port of call was the

lovely and lively island of Poros.

After the non-committal attitudes

of the locals at Spetses, we were

delighted to once again be greeted by

the famous Greek hospitality of the

locals. Although Poros also had little

to see in the immediate vicinity of

the harbour, the laid back charm and

artsy vibe of the island was apparent

as soon as we landed. We decided

to have an evening snack whilst we

watched the sunset, deciding on this

quaint family-run café by the pier

which served amazing crepes with

generous filings of eggs, tomato and

feta cheese, costing only two Euros

per head!

Travel Fact: Poros is an island

with rich vegetation. Much of the

northern and far eastern/western

sides of the island are bushy,

whereas large areas of old pine forest

are found in the south and center of

the island. In the northeastern part

of the island, in a location called

“Kavos Vasili”, the archaeologists

have discovered the ruins of a

settlement of the Early Bronze

Period. This settlement is believed to

be interrelated with the wreck found

on the nearby Dokos island which

dates to the same period.

With nothing much to do on the

island at night (the nightclubs and

bars were all empty!), we decided

to opt for a late dinner under the

stars at an open air traditional Greek

taverna. Their vegetarian moussaka

was simply outstanding, and the

chef’s recommendation of seafood

spaghetti with mussels, calamari

and king prawns was something

that still haunts me in my dreams!

Poros was also where we finally had

the opportunity to try ‘limoncello’,

the traditional citrus lemon liqueur,

unique to the Gulf of Naples.

Our last and final port of call was

the island of Aegina, where we were

heading the next day. Although

the group was sad (we had bonded

pretty strongly over the past week),

the general consensus was that

the final day would be something

unforgettable for sure.•

Jennifer aims to travel all of the

Globe within the next ten years,

either solo or with company.

Suffering from a serious case of

wanderlust, she seeks to absorb

the essence and soul of a place,

rather than chilling back in a

resort. She is always up for new

travel adventures so if you’re a

kindred soul, get in touch!

WEEKEND TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, MAY 26, 2017 WEEKEND TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, MAY 26, 2017


14 Interview | Music 15

An able bearer of a

strong legacy

tough for her amid so many great

singers of her time, and particularly

as a Muslim girl, to stand out. But

she made a huge effort. Because of

her enormous efforts she was able

to create and present a voice that

people accepted and loved.

An indepth interview with Shusmita Anis

Mahmood Sadi

Being a singer and having

the legacy of your aunt,

the Nazrul sangeet expert

late Firoza Begum,

Any discussion of Nazrul

Sangeet is inevitably

connected to Rabindra

Sangeet. As two main

manifestations of

mainstream Bengali culture,

the two are related. Do you

think that Nazrul Sangeet is

taken up by as many artists

as Rabindra Sangeet?

Both of them were extremely

could be rather daunting. However

talented poets. I would say that as

Shusmita Anis, an acclaimed

Nazrul Sangeet and modern song

performer herself, credits her aunt

our national poet, there is a lot of

room for work on Nazrul. His songs

have such an intensity and depth

creativity is a 360 degree compass.

I think about music the same way

Could you tell us a fond

memory with Firoza Begum?

many programms the audiences

are divided too. This is a new

not for casting such a formidable

that attracted me greatly. It had

I think about graphic design. Here,

There are so many! I had a very deep

environment.

shadow, but for helping her find and

attracted my aunt as well. I think

I am customising and modulating

connection with her, because my

I think there is a lacking of

understand the philosophy behind

we should be more inspired to sing

my voice by interpreting a story to

relationship with her developed

initiative here. If you sing a great

her music. This week, we sat down

Nazrul, especially the songs that

create an auditory experience. While

through many years. I could

song, that doesn’t guarantee that

with this charming lady to talk about

are less explored. I think these two

graphic design is a static form of art,

understand just by looking at her

you will get a platform to perform

music and her passions.

giant figures of our literature and

music is a translation of the auditory

face when I sang a part wrong. When

again. This is unfortunate. The artist

How has your illustrious

family connections

influenced your music?

It is certainly my good fortune that

music should co-exist with equal

importance.

Does art have any borders?

It shouldn’t. As an artist, if you look

sound. The question is, am I able

to touch the people thought this

auditory form of art that can only be

felt in the heart? Everybody is tested

on this same ground. Only time will

practicing the song ‘bolechile tumi

tirthey ashibey’, she spent a long

time on just the word ‘bolechile’, to

perfect the throwing. I would try to

perfect it and after a while when I

is not a marketer. I have seen this

many times. Someone has a great

voice and singing skill. But they

don’t know where they should go.

Where is the platform? If there was

I grew up in such an environment

where music inseparably intertwined

Shusmita Anis with her aunt Firoza Begum

Photo: Courtesy

at the Earth from outside, does it

have any borders? No, it doesn’t.

tell how receptive the audiences are

to artists.

would try to sing it in front of her, I

would be very careful to do it right

a system, say a fantastic singer from

Rajshahi who became first in an

with life. The way my aunt Firoza

Begum trained me from my

childhood and the care she gave

me contributed to my success. This

is certainly a teacher dependent

art, but I did my part too. I kept on

practicing the Nazrul Geeti from

an early age. I was a child artist in

Bangladesh Television, and I stood

first in the national competition

Notun Kuri in Nazrul Sangeet in my

70s. From what song I should do to

how I should perform it, what were

my mistakes, where I could improve

– my aunt influenced every detail

until the time of her death. Her loss

Mohammad Asafuddowlah, and I

continue to take lessons from him.

I think becoming an artist is

an ever evolving process. My

interaction with my aunt was such

that I could not separate my music

time with my personal time where

she would teach me about life.

We used to spend hours at a time

together talking and truly I cannot

segregate at what point she was my

guru or my aunt.

Have you had any formal

education in music?

I didn’t study music as an academic

God does not give

everyone the same

strengths. A little bit

however has to be

God-gifted, but the

way you enhance that

is by rigorous training

like modern Bengali songs, geet,

wealth of knowledge I received from

her was already unbelievable and

overwhelming. Certainly, formal

training would be different. I would

say though, the training I got, and

still getting from my uncle is very

special. I am very lucky to get this

tradition passed on to me.

How much of being a

musician is training, and how

much just natural talent?

You certainly can train to have

these skills. God does not give

everyone the same strengths. A

little bit however has to be God-

All of that is created by human

beings. We are part of the human

race, irrespective of cultures and

religions. The cultures we have as

Bengali speaking people tie all of

us together. Nazrul is part of that,

Rabindranath is part of that too. This

is my philosophy and I want to keep

it that way.

What is the definition of

“modern music” to you?

I would say as an individual and

a graphic designer, I am very

progressive and experimental. I

would say that modern songs give

Do you like the new trend of

fusing Nazrul or Rabindra

Shangeet with modern

music?

In my training I, too, am a puritan.

My guru was so particular that she

would spot and correct minute

alterations. I wasn’t allowed to

deviate from the original tune. There

is room for variation in Nazrul songs

within the ‘raag’. There is the scope

of variation in some. But in general,

one should not distort the tunes of

Nazrul songs.

One may introduce modern

and before anything happened, she

would understand what I was trying

to do and we would both laugh at the

same time.

The countless hours we spent

together training all went into that

non-verbal communication. Also

because she was my aunt, I spent

even more time with her as my

family member.

You won the Natun Kuri

prize in 1976. Do you think

it is possible to maintain

standards with so many

programmes on TV now?

audition, he can then get called to a

program in one channel every three

months or so. This is what should

happen. Our platform is divided and

there is so much politics in it that

an artist like that would get lost.

Sometimes talents like that can also

get exploited.

Tell us about the modern

song that got two million

views.

It’s “Keu jaanuk ar nai januk” which

is a beautiful love song, composed

by Adit and the video was made by

Angshu. This is the first time I sang

as a mentor is immeasurable.

discipline in college or universities.

ghazals etc. Although my aunt

gifted, but the way you enhance

you an opportunity to push your

musical arrangements depending on

I look at this positively. I still recall

a modern song formally. Because

I had gone abroad for higher

I studied Graphic Design in the

focus primarily on Nazrul songs,

that is by rigorous training. It is true

boundaries, to see what works and

the nature of the song. What does

though, at that time everyone knew

I got such a great response I am

education but I never really took a

US. Actually, my aunt was such

she always exposed me to different

that training only takes you so far.

what doesn’t. You can play and mix

the song demand? If it is a prayer,

every programme on TV, the timing,

following that up with a release

break from practicing even when I

a great artist that I did not think

types of music and wanted me to be

Ultimately the vocal qualities in

and match and no one will mind. You

then you have to present it that way.

the contents, everything, because

for Eid. The story in that song was

was away. Music is like oxygen to me.

about getting additional training.

a versatile singer.

a singer’s voice have to appeal to

can’t do that in things that are fixed.

Why do you have to play around

there was just one channel. But

unfinished and we are going to finish

When I returned to Bangladesh in

She taught me everything from

She herself was taught by another

the listeners. However, I think the

You can unleash your creativity

with these songs? For me personally,

you have to adapt as time moves

that story in the upcoming release.

2009, I had the privilege of intensive

the rudimentary training to the

big guru, legendary music director

willingness to be good at what you

when it is outside of those certain

I think I don’t have that right, but

on. However, I do think that with

I am busy working on my new song.

training from my a for six years. I

advanced level. She taught me subtle

Kamal Das Gupta. Chittya Ranjon,

do plays a big part. But the ultimate

rigid fields.

there can be fusion in the musical

so many channels, it is a little

At the same time, I am scheduled to

also started training with my uncle,

nuances and finer parts of musical

who was the main associate of poet

test is your listeners. My aunt is a

An artist is a holistic person, she

part only in my opinion.

diluted. But we have to figure out

perform in Kolkata and Churulia for

music composer, lyricist and artist

renditions of songs and other songs

Nazrul, also trained my aunt. So the

good example of that. It was very

isn’t locked in a confined space. Your

how we make things work. With

Nazrul’s birthday. •

WEEKEND TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, MAY 26, 2017 WEEKEND TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, MAY 26, 2017


16 Tech | Mac Strikes BACK

RAMADAN | Weekly PLANNER 17

A positive

outlook

(part 2)

The rebuttal to the several

reasons why Apple should fear

Microsoft featured on CNET

Mahmood Hossain

We conclude our

discussion on the

silly notion that

Apple should fear

their rivals, Microsoft.

Developer’s access

The argument here is that Microsoft

is more developer-friendly. There’s

no denying that, they have a similar

approach to what Android does

with smart-gadget apps. The only

You can either tinker or create

something original. Your choice

roadblock for Apple is basically

security. They will never find

themselves relying on third-party

app developers. For those who aren’t

well versed in the world of Apple

might find that bump in the road an

annoyance. However, Apple since

the beginning had a larger and more

diverse app market. Many companies

are having to develop particular apps

specifically for Apple gadgets. The

same approach can be found in the

videogame world; a studio cannot

limit itself to one platform if seeks

to be as successful as other leading

studios.

The problem

isn’t with who is

more accessible.

The issue is if a

developer wants to

customise software

or applications, he or she will have

an easier time with Microsoft. A

developer can easily take the steps

to fiddle around with a Microsoft

product but there are also developers

who seek to produce software that

can be applied in cross-platforms.

The company can allow users to

customise an app but only to give

feedback in order to improve the

app. You can either tinker or create

something original. Your choice.

Custody battle

So who wins the kids? The article

of discussion claims that Microsoft

wins over the children, and children

are our future. In turn, Microsoft

wins the future. Windows 10 S is

an open gate for those who wish

to learn code, dabbling along with

Codebuilder for Minecraft. Windows

10 S isn’t ideal or even something to

brag about, but it becomes cheaper

for schools. The article also adds

that it’s more practical than iPads.

To a certain extent, the statement is

somewhat true. It’s always a good

thing to be able to use affordable

gadgets for education, but you’re

also compromising on quality tools.

There is a legitimate argument

behind Microsoft having better

graphics regarding this topic, and it’s

a huge advantage for underfunded

schools. We’ve got to give credit

where it is due. On the flipside,

schools that can afford such luxury

prefer the Apple route. In addition,

the student discounts can also

come into play, even though it isn’t

available worldwide as of yet.

Expectations

Then, there is always the annual

WWDC to consider. The event will

reveal plenty of what Apple has

in store for the rest of the world.

Along the way, Microsoft has plenty

of chances to slip. Another thing

to always keep in mind is to never

underestimate the pop culture

influence Apple has had a grip on for

the past decade or so. One way or

another, they find a way to lead the

path and set trends in both design

and functionality. No matter how

bitter we may be that they decided

to take away the headphone jack for

their phones. Sigh. That’s going to

sting for a while.

To completely sum things

up, Apple isn’t going to find

themselves complacent. They simply

cannot afford to; that’s a huge

understatement. It might seem that

there is a die-hard approach to the

core supports of Apple, or even label

it as a cult following. If so, that’s a

very large cult. And with so much

discontent, there may be plenty who

jump ship. It’s also true that there

are many Apple converts that pop up

from time to time. It has never been

a one-way street.

For now, Apple has done just

enough to keep their loyal supporters

hanging around. But we’re heading

into an era of overly sophisticated

audience and users that demand

the best and fastest. Perhaps “just

enough” won’t be good enough in

the long-run. Well, that’s why they

have some of the most brilliant

minds around. We can agree to

disagree all we like, but these two

giants will continue their battle for

supremacy in years to come.•

Week 1

A different kind of Ramadan

Tasneem Chow

Most of us know that Ramadan is a month of fasting,

prayer and introspection. All of us know it’s 30 long

days of feeling pretty lethargic, and spending half your

day wishing you weren’t at work and the other half

wondering how to stay awake after Iftar.

Starting this week, we bring you a full month of little tips and

reminders to help you shake off the sloth and not only get on with the

day, but try and make it a little more in the spirit of Ramadan.

Day 1

The first day of Ramadan starts is

arguably one of the most important

days. Of course, the obvious thing

to do is make sure you plan healthy

seheri and iftar meals, a proper meal

time routine and stick to it. But how

about coming up with a seheri meal

that the whole family can enjoy and

that isn’t just your mother slaving

away in the kitchen to make? Instead

of having a full meal prepared by the

madre, stock up on healthy cereal,

fruits, cold sandwiches or anything

else you can make in a jiffy without

putting in too much effort. And of

course, remember to drink water.

Day 2

I don’t know why but for most

people, the second day tends to

be the hardest. One of the most

common things we end up doing

is losing our cool, especially in this

heat. There’s a lot a food and water

starved brain can react to, so if you’re

anywhere close to seeing red, make

sure your first good deed of the

Ramadan is to step back. Once angry

words have been said, they can’t be

taken back.

Day 3

Now that you’re just starting to settle

into Ramadan and it’s the middle of

the week, how about spending the

evening after the Iftar reading a good

book? One interesting read you could

try out is Theo’s Odyssey by Catherine

Clement, a great travel adventure

that takes you on a crash course on

the world’s different religions and

spiritualities.

Day 4

Ramadan is also the perfect time

to strengthen your bond with your

family. It will probably be the middle

of the week by now, and you and the

family will probably end up seeing a

lot more of each other, either at Iftar

or after. Instead of retreating to your

room and sleeping off the fast, how

about spending some quality time

together? You can watch a movie,

play a game together or just have a

good old heart-to-heart.

Day 5

Since Ramadan is also meant to be

the best time to feel connected to

your community, how about actually

investing in your neighbourhood? As

we get more and more industralised,

the ‘elaka’ feel of different parts of

our city seem to be getting lost to us.

How about playing a game of cricket

with the neighbour’s kids, or going

upstairs to say hello to the elderly

grandmother no one really speaks to?

It’ll only be a little bit of your time,

but you’ll be all the better for it.

Day 6

A month of introspection and

spirituality, to me, automatically

translates into a month of feeling a

kinship with all of Allah’s creations.

This will probably be the weekend

by now, and you’ll have more time to

prepare your iftar meals. How about

doing the animals a good turn and

going for a vegetarian one? Most of

our traditional iftar items actually

tend to be meat-free anyway, like

piaju, beguni and chola, and you can

definitely make your own animalfree

halim too!

Day 7

Now that you’ve done a whole week

of fasting and survived, how about

starting on the more heavyweight

resolutions? Ramadan is all about

fighting your vices and breaking the

bad habits, so what’s yours? If you’re

a smoker and you’re not smoking

during the day, now is the time to

really focus and stop lighting that

cigarette at night. If you’re lazy and a

big eater, now is the time to drop the

fork and pick up the weights instead.

Remember, mind over matter,

always! •

WEEKEND TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, MAY 26, 2017 WEEKEND TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, MAY 26, 2017


18 stay in

Biz Info 19

Clues

ACROSS

5 El Spain trained

dog (7)

6 Common name for

metal worker (5)

9 Sounding like a pig

without tattoos (7)

Last week’s solutions

Mini cryptics

Solved it? Email answers to weekend@dhakatribune.com and win one free

month of the Dhaka Tribune.

ACROSS

1 Tool for shooting a cream

cocktail (6)

6 Dislocated elbow underneath (5)

7 Throw away fight (5)

8 Happy the spanish consumed

dish initially (6)

DOWN

1 Alaska has question (7)

2 Fellow slips arm in clothing (5)

3 Hairstyle of end of 8 Across

producer (7)

4 A record peak (3)

7 Raise pot to highest level (3)

8 Cell energy two thousand (3)

DOWN

2 Einstein a Canadian province (7)

3 Sell pie remade for round shape

(7)

4 For good, like Jolson methods

(6)

5 Sounds like pursued the pure (6)

Sudoku

Use the numbers 1-9 to complete each

of the 3x3 square grids such that each

horizontal and vertical line also contains all

of the digits from 1-9

Last week’s solutions

Solved it? Email answers to weekend@dhakatribune.com and

win one free month of the Dhaka Tribune.

DIY

SWEATER

PILLOWS –

COZY UP!

Tasfia Huda

You will need:

• Sweater – one from your closet

• Pillow form

• Measuring tape

• Scissors

• Needle and thread

• Sewing machine

• Straight pins

• Embellishments (like buttons) –

optional

Step 1

Wash and dry your sweater. Then,

turn the sweater inside out.

Step 2

Place your pillow form onto your

sweater, lining up one edge of the

form with a side of the sweater if

possible. This makes one less seam

for you to sew.

diy

Abinta Cyber Center and Archive inaugurated at Dhaka University

The Abinta Cyber Center and

Archive was inaugurated

on May 24, at the premises

of the Faculty of Fine Arts, Dhaka

University. The centre, patronised

by the Abinta Kabir Foundation, is

going to be used by the students and

The James P Grant School of

Public Health, Georgetown

University and Department

of Economics and Social Sciences,

BRAC University successfully

organised the fifth Speakers’ Forum

on Faith, Mental and Emotional Well-

Being in Bangladesh.

The fifth Speakers’ Forum focused

on the much over-looked topic of

mental health in Bangladesh and

the many critical intersections

with religious belief and practice.

It explored the impact of religious

ideas on local etiologies of mental

illness and approaches to mental

health treatment and stigma

reduction.

faculty members of the Faculty of

Fine Arts of Dhaka University.

The 450 sq feet centre

accommodates 13 computers,

two printers, a photocopier, and

internet equipment. The state of

the art centre also contains custom

The Forum officially commenced

with opening remarks by Katherine

Marshall (Executive Director, World

Faiths Development Dialogue,

Georgetown University) and featured

a first panel discussion led by Rahul

Shidhaye (Research Scientist and

Adjunct Assistant Professor, Public

Health Foundation of India) and

Monira Rahman (Founder and

Executive Director, Innovation

for Well being Foundation). The

speakers discussed regional and

local perspectives of mental health

in South Asia and shared preliminary

observations on the role of faith

and faith-based practitioners in

Bangladesh.

made glass tables and chairs, air

conditioning system, and window

blinds.

AAMS Arefin Siddique, Vice

Chancellor, Dhaka University,

was present at the inauguration

ceremony as the chief guest. Nilu

Rowshan Murshed, Chairman,

Abinta Kabir Gallery of Fine Arts, was

also present among other esteemed

guests at the event.

“Since its inception, Dhaka

University has been at the forefront

of academic and creative excellence

in Bangladesh. The students and

faculty members of the Faculty of

Fine Arts at our university have

produced excellent work over the

last few decades, and now, equipped

with the digital facilities, they are

Exploring linkages between faith and mental and emotional

health in Bangladesh

The second panel session

engaged faith-inspired approaches

to overcome stigma around mental

illness with speakers such as

Naomi Iwamoto (a Nurse at L’Arche

Community, a French-based NGO

in Mymensingh) who works with

individuals with intellectual

disabilities. The panel also had

poised to take it to the next level. We

thank the Abinta Kabir Foundation

for the support,” said AAMS Arefin

Siddique.

“Besides being a talented student,

Abinta was an avid lover of arts

and aesthetics. The Abinta Kabir

Foundation has taken this initiative

not only to assist the brilliant work

of the students and faculty members

of the Faculty of Fine Arts at Dhaka

University, but also to keep Abinta’s

memory alive through their work,”

said Nilu Rowshan Murshed.

This initiative is one of the various

initiatives being conducted by the

Abinta Kabir Foundation in memory of

Abinta Kabir, a talented young student

who was one of the victims of the

Holey Artisan tragedy last July. •

Ashna Chowdhury (Learning

& Development Specialist and

Founder of Thrive) who merges

psychological tools and coaching

frameworks to nurture leadership

and well being skills such as

emotional intelligence, effective

communication, and stressmanagement.•

Step 3

Measure around the pillow leaving

a margin to sew. Mark and cut the

sweater. Sew the two pieces together

leaving a space to slip the pillow

form in. Cut away the excess sweater

and turn the right side out.

Step 4

Slip the pillow form in and hand

stitch the opening closed. Embellish

if desired.

And that’s it! Make your pillows in

bold fun colours to add that zing to

your couch! •

Straight from the kitchen of BBQ Bangladesh

Originated in South Korea in late found that the chicken and egg are from

1995, the international franchise their own farm and are free of antibiotic,

BBQ Premium Café has over 4000 toxic chemicals and harmful bacteria. The

outlets in over 60 countries, including US, feeds are also produced by them. Almost

China and many more. The name, often all of the ingredients are imported, and the

mistakenly thought of as barbeque, actually olive oil used in their cooking is regularly

stands for Best of the Best Quality. And monitored and changed to maintain quality.

you can be sure that is exactly what you’ll While preparing the chicken, they

get amongst the pizzas, pastas, rice, soups, inject pickles in it. After preparing each

chicken cooked in countless ways and dish, the oil is filtered again. The bakery is

various other delicacies, all cooked in 100% situated at BBQ Premium Café Banani, and

pure olive oil.

supplies the bakery items to the other three

After a tour through the kitchen, it was outlets.•

WEEKEND TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, MAY 26, 2017 WEEKEND TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, MAY 26, 2017


20 Musing | Online trolling

Should journalists respond to

online trolls?

Mahmood Sadi

Decades ago, when online

newspapers and social

media journalism were

not part of the media

landscape, words like “troll” hadn’t

yet become a buzzword used by

journalists and non-media folk alike.

Things have changed now. Internet

trolls have become popular news

fodder in the past few years with the

geometric rise of online and social

media.

Before putting such trolls under

the ethical scanner, we have to

understand why things like trolling

have gained such popularity in the

first place.

even bolder in revealing some of

the darkest parts of their thought

process. The highly polarised nature

of public life also aids trolls in finding

refuge in comfortable bubbles in

the virtual world. And very often,

journalists and writers tend to be on

the receiving end of such trolling.

The question here that we have

to ask ourselves is – as journalists,

should we also jump onto the

bandwagon and respond to said

trolls?

the rest is PR” and that indicates that

your news is not going to be liked by

everyone. In the online and social

media landscape, that dislike can

come in the form of trolling but that

doesn’t necessarily mean journalists

will respond to that.

However, the issue of how

journalists respond to trolls has

become murkier in recent times.

At first, the usual norm in the

newsroom was “don’t feed the

trolls”- that is, deprive them of the

in many shapes and sizes. Given this

complexity, we risk losing sight of

what’s at stake when we reduce them

to a single stereotype. We need to be

careful not to let trolling discourage

us from pursuing online interactions

in a way that enhances democratic

participation.

I, as a practicing journalist, have

my own stance on trolling. Plato

once said, “wise men speak because

they have something to say; fools

because they have to say something”

A new form of freedom of

expression

People have, for the most part,

generally been the consumer of

news produced by the media and

publishing houses. However, that

relationship between media and

the people has predominantly been

a simplex communication, with

media overwhelmingly directing

the nomenclature of discourse.

The best a common person could

do against the media was to write a

letter to the editorial section (with

no guarantee of having it published)

or to stop buying that newspaper or

periodicals, or refrain from watching

that channel.

Online media and social media

have changed that. They somehow

empower the people to be vocal

about their opinions, since now

they can immediately put out their

reactions on the comments section

of online news websites. On social

media, a regular person can even

write an analysis about any issue and

post it for anyone to see.

This new freedom of expression

is of course susceptible to misuse.

Internet trolling and cyber bullying

can be termed as parts of this misuse

of freedom of expression. The

problem is, the relative anonymity

of the internet makes such trolls

Attention at all quarters

Before answering that question,

we need to understand our roles as

journalists. A media house is not

just another regular organisation,

and a journalist is not just another

professional with an official identity

card. A journalist’s ID card usually has

the word ‘press’ written on it – and that

word is way bigger than the journalist

or even a particular media house. It

represents an institution that has a

public duty to be the watchdog and

interpreter of public issues and events.

The public has a certain level

of trust on the products delivered

by journalists. Of course, there is

a saying that “real news is what

somebody does not want you to print,

oxygen of attention. However, a

large number of media outlets have

backtracked from that stance, once

they found how effective trolls

can be in generating story interest.

We have to understand that trolls

don’t arise in a vacuum, rather it

is part and parcel of the complex

socioeconomic online landscape

and media houses, as a means of

financial survival, can’t help but

engage and keep the conversation

going, in order to draw attention and

stay relevant in this market driven

global village.

Engage or draw back?

Besides, trolls and their intentions,

behaviors and consequences come

Photo: Bigstock

and I believe in that. The business

manager and the marketing head of

course want to respond against the

trolls, as they look after the business

side of the media house. But the

practitioners in the newsroom

shouldn’t indulge in this practice

just to generate more traffic. Such

activities don’t befit real journalists,

I believe.

My response to online trolls

can be summarised using a quote

by Professor Martin Rees, the

astronomer royal of Great Britain. He

once said that “the Internet creates

a global village and every village has

its village idiots. It’s better to ignore

them.”

I want to ignore them. •

WEEKEND TRIBUNE | FRIDAY, MAY 26, 2017

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