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N O R T H S H O R E

GOLF

S u m m e r 2 0 1 7

OPEN SEASON AT SALEM

PLUS:

• Changing the rules

• Improvements at Ould Newbury and Sagamore

• Nahant’s new 19th hole


Celebrates the 2017

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Wines

Sparklings

Spirits

Hard ciders

Beer

Cocktails

Cigars

Buckets

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Gifts

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GOLF

N O R T H S H O R E

S u m m e r 2 0 1 7

OPEN SEASON AT SALEM

PLUS:

• Changing the rules

• Improvements at Ould Newbury and Sagamore

• Nahant’s new 19th hole

ABOUT THE COVER:

Salem Country Club’s power players –

general manager, Greg Cincotta, head professional, Kevin

Wood, general chairman, Bill Sheehan, superintendent Kip

Tyler, and “his assistant,” Molly---prepare for the

2017 U.S. Senior Open.

PUBLISHER

Edward M. Grant

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

Beth Bresnahan

CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER

James N. Wilson

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

William J. Kraft

EDITOR

Bill Brotherton

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Anne Marie Tobin

DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING

& BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

Mike Germano

DESIGNER

Tim McDonough

DIRECTORS

Edward L. Cahill

John M. Gilberg

Edward M. Grant

Gordon R. Hall

Monica Connell Healey

J. Patrick Norton

Michael H. Shanahan

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Bob Albright

Bob Green

Webb Heintzelman

Gary Larrabee

PHOTOGRAPHERS

Scott Eisen

Spenser Hasak

Mark Lorenz

Owen O’Rourke

ADVERTISING SALES

Ernie Carpenter

Bob Gunther

Michelle Iannaco

Ralph Mitchell

Patricia Whalen

INSIDE THIS EDITION

N O R T H S H O R E

GOLF

PUBLISHED BY ESSEX MEDIA GROUP

ESSEX MEDIA GROUP, INC.

110 Munroe St., Lynn, MA 01901

781-593-7700

Subscriptions: 781-593-7700 x1253

northshoregolfmagazine.com

COVER PHOTO: Spenser Hasak

Senior moments await ........................................................ 4

From caddie to chairman ....................................................16

Interview with Ollie Cook ....................................................18

Bruno stars .........................................................................19

Grass is always greener .................................................... 20

Friendly advice ................................................................... 21

Looking back at Salem CC's rich history .......................... 22

Lots cooking behind the scenes at Salem CC ................... 24

Ouimet: America's greatest golf hero ............................... 25

Lynnfield barber made the cut .......................................... 26

Farmer's spirit lives on at Salem CC ................................ 27

2017 U.S. Senior Open spectator guide ............................ 29

Reedy Meadow Jr. Golf Invitational ................................... 33

Nahant's new 19th hole ..................................................... 36

Do proposed USGA rules changes go too far? ................... 37

North Shore Golf notebook ............................................... 38

Ould Newbury opens its second century with a bang ....... 39

'The Local Guy' Steve Swedberg ....................................... 40

Around the green ................................................................ 41

'The Back Niners' .............................................................. 42

Around the course ............................................................. 43

Course directory ................................................................ 52

2 >>> SUMMER 2017


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EDITOR’S LETTER

Bill Brotherton

bbrotherton@essexmediagroup.com

Senior moments await

“Is John Daly playing at Salem?”

AC/DC concert in a small

fandom. (His girlfriend sported

marketing the whole shebang.

That’s the first question most

room. And his ample belly

matching short-shorts as she

There’s plenty of non-Senior

people ask when they find out I

hasn’t shrunk much, due in no

ran across the 18th green to

Open goodies here too, including

edit North Shore Golf magazine.

small part to an allegiance to a

wrap her arms around his meaty

news from North Shore

Bernhard Langer and Fred

whiskey and popcorn diet, a

tummy.) Even President Trump

courses. Bob Green, longtime

Couples have made the most

food pyramid nightmare to

tweeted his congratulations.

head golf professional at

money. Billy Andrade, Jerry

be sure.

Tedesco CC, examines the rules

Kelly and Gene Sauers have the

T h e S e n i o r O p e n i s

changes proposed by the

devoted New England following.

“When I had a good buzz going,

understandably the focus of

USGA. Webb Heintzelman,

Tom Watson and Davis Love

I felt I could make everything

our Summer issue. Planning

Director of Instruction at The

III are the most recognizable.

and play some really good golf,” is

for the biggest sporting event

Golf Club at Turner Hill in

Nearly every competitor has

one of his more colorful quotes.

in New England this year

Ipswich, offers tips on how to

the skills.

started back in 2013, and we

chip and pitch like a pro. Beth

Statements like that generate

chat with the principal players

Bresnahan checks out the new

But when the world’s finest

headlines. But Daly has also

who helped make it happen,

19th hole at Nahant Golf Club.

golfers age 50 and older tee it

quietly donated lots of money

including Salem CC member

We visit with “The Back

up at the U.S. Senior Open

to numerous charities.

Bill Sheehan, the general

Niners” of Marblehead and

Championship at historic

chairman, and his predecessor

some local golfers’ quest to play

Salem Country Club June 26 to

Daly is expected to be in the

Ollie Cook.

the top-100 public courses.

July 2, it’s 51-year-old John

Senior Open field at Salem.

Patrick Daly the galleries will

Until his victory at the

SCC’s Kip Tyler (golf course

We hope you like this Summer

clamor to see.

Insperity Invitational in

superintendent), Kevin Wood

edition of North Shore Golf

Texas

last month, that was

(head golf professional),

magazine. At 60 pages, it’s the

It’s easy to see why the average

questionable. He was 42nd on

Greg Cincotta (general manager)

fattest issue we’ve ever produced.

golf fan rallies around Daly.

the Champions Tour money

and Fred Yanosick (executive

A rude man would say that’s

He’s real. You can see yourself

list; the top 20 get in but

chef) discuss their roles and

appropriate given the above

sitting next to him at the bar,

others have to earn their way

what players and spectators can

focus on the larger than life Mr.

hoisting a beer (or three). He

in via sectional qualifying.

expect during the championship.

Daly, but my mom raised me

still hits the ball a ton. He

smokes like a chimney. He’s

brutally honest about his

weaknesses and life choices.

His slacks are louder than an

But by winning, he earned an

automatic exemption. The fact

he wore American flag pants

on the course in Texas only

endeared him more to his

We introduce you to three

North Shore power players

behind Bruno Event Team,

which is managing and

right so I won’t stoop to that

level.

See you on the course! l

Bill Brotherton is editor of North Shore Golf magazine. He grew up in Beverly, caddied and worked in the pro shop at Essex CC,

is a Ouimet Scholar who graduated from Suffolk University, has written about golf for the Beverly Times and Daily Item of Lynn.

He recently retired from the Boston Herald, where he wrote about music and edited the Features section. Tell him what you

think at brotherton@essexmediagroup.com.

4 >>> sUMMER 2017


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PHOTO: Spenser Hasak

FROM CADDIE

TO CHAIRMAN

By BILL BROTHERTON

Salem Country Club and its members mean the world to Bill Sheehan. The club and the friendships he has made through

golf at the Peabody site has played an integral role in Sheehan’s life and success.

“I started caddying here as a kid in 1965,” said Sheehan, who grew up in Peabody. “I loved it, everything about it.” That led

to his being awarded a Francis Ouimet Fund Scholarship. As most golf lovers know, the Francis Ouimet Trophy is given to

the Senior Open champion. “So that’s significant to me and to Salem, too,” said Sheehan, a 1970 St. John’s Prep graduate

and member of that school’s Hall of Fame.

The Senior Open will be held at Salem June 26-July 2. Sheehan is serving as general chairman, succeeding Salem

member Ollie Cook, who served in that role for the 2001 Senior Open, the 1984 Women’s Open and the 1977 USGA Senior

Amateur championships. >>>

16 >>> sUMMER 2017


As general chairman, Sheehan estimates he’s

volunteered thousands of hours. But then he joked,

‘The best decision I made was to not keep count.’

“Ollie and I met here at Salem, I carried his bag as a caddie,”

said Sheehan, a Rowley resident. Upon his graduation from

Boston University Law School in 1977, Cook and Jack

McNiff, also a Salem CC member, hired the young attorney

to their Peabody law firm. Sheehan rose to partner. He is now

a shareholder in the Peabody firm of MacLean Holloway

Doherty & Sheehan.

“I learned from the best, Ollie Cook,” said Sheehan. As

general chairman, Sheehan estimates he’s volunteered

thousands of hours. But then he joked, “The best decision I

made was to not keep count.”

“It was 2009 when we started discussions with the USGA

about coming back to Salem,” said Sheehan, who carries a 6

handicap and was club champ in 2006. “The 2001 event was

very successful, and by 2009 nice changes and improvements

had been made to the course, the greens the practice area, the

clubhouse and more.”

The contract between the United States Golf Association

and Salem CC was signed in 2013, “and we’ve been getting

ready ever since,” said Sheehan, with a smile. The executive

committee has been meeting regularly, as have 43

chairpersons who report to the committee. Sheehan and

his committee members have attended various USGA

championships every year since 2013 and learned from the

hosts, including last year at Scioto Country Club in Ohio. Gene

Sauers won the title and will be at Salem to defend.

The executive committee is comprised of Andrea Bruno

(Hospitality), Joe Mahoney Jr. (Accounting and Finance),

Andy Campbell (Corporate Hospitality Sales), Dan Doherty

(Championship Services), Wayne Guyer (Player Services),

Walter Nugent (Scoring Services), Mike Tripoli (Spectator

Services), Steve Freyer (Volunteer Services) and Sheehan

(General Chair).

The Committee meets regularly with Executive Director

Eddie Carbone of Bruno Event Team, SCC General Manager

Greg Cincotta and SCC Vice-President Ron Mini, who serves

as the liaison with the Board of Governors.

When discussing the improvements to the golf course,

Sheehan is enthusiastically giddy. “Bringing the greens back

closer to Donald Ross’ original design has added a shot-anda-half

to your score every round. A higher premium has been

placed on the short game.

“The 16th and 17th greens are a little smaller. Jack Nicklaus

was tricked by the 16th in 2001. (The Golden Bear bogied the

hole and his troubles around the green may have cost him the

title.) The hole is not the same now,” and Nicklaus’ decisionmaking

back then would likely not come into play with the

new configuration.

“The championship 9th and 18th holes have also been

lengthened significantly, making the placement of the ball off

the tee more important,” added Sheehan. “Salem is a secondshot

golf course. Staying below the hole is paramount.”

Matt Sawicki, director of championships for the USGA, said

“Salem Country Club has been a phenomenal partner

with the USGA. Ollie Cook, the chairman when the 2001

championship was held here, and Bill Sheehan, chairman of

this championship, and I have become good friends.”

Sawicki said the USGA has been impressed by the club’s

commitment. “You need a great course to host a championship.

This is one of the best. The club did everything needed to

prepare for it. As a golfer, I love the course. The first time I

came up here I was blown away. The club restored it back to

the way it was, the way Donald Ross designed it. Its strength

is on the greens. If you have no short game, chip or putt,

you’re in trouble. But it’s a course you can play every single

day and have fun. It’s a special place.” l

NORTH SHORE GOLF


Interview with Ollie Cook

Gary Larrabee

garylarrabee.com

F

orty years after taking over as both Salem Country

Club liaison to the United States Golf Association

and general chairman of the 1977 USGA Senior

Amateur, Ollie Cook is preparing for the upcoming

38th United States Senior Open at his beloved Salem Country

Club with mixed emotions.

“It’s been a wonderful, rewarding experience all these

years,” Cook, 77, a prominent Peabody attorney and longtime

Beverly Farms resident, said. “Working with my fellow Salem

members, with the USGA, with the terrific amateur and

professional players who came to Salem for these national

championships, it’s been the best. But it was time a few years

ago to step aside and turn my golf responsibilities over to my

good friend and law practice colleague Bill Sheehan.”

Cook, an Ohio native and former

Salem CC president and club champion,

enjoyed overseeing the rain-marred ’77

U.S. Senior Amateur as general

chairman so much that he stayed on as

USGA liaison and general chairman

for two more wildly successful USGA

championships, the 1984 U.S.

Women’s Open and the 2001 U.S.

Senior Open.

Ollie Cook

was chairman

of the ‘77, ‘84

and 2001

USGA events

The Salem-USGA courtship reached

such an embracing level that there was

no doubt, following Bruce Fleisher’s

dramatic 2001 U.S. Senior Open

victory over several rivals, including

Jack Nicklaus, that a second U.S.

Senior Open was in store for Salem Country Club.

Cook stepped aside for Sheehan, a Rowley resident, as

negotiations moved forward, however he has gladly offered

input whenever Sheehan asked for it over the past few years,

with Championship Week quickly approaching.

“Bill has done a great job as chairman and I’m certain he

and his executive committee will receive rave reviews right up

until the final accounting months after the Senior Open wraps

up,” said Cook.

“I’ve learned from the best,” Sheehan said as the countdown

continues for the sixth USGA championship overall for which

Salem has served as venue. It all started with the 1932 U.S.

Women’s Amateur, won in lopsided fashion by Virginia Van

Wie, 10 and 8, over Glenna Collett Vare. That was followed by

the heartwarming 12-stroke victory by the cancer-stricken

Babe Zaharias in the 1954 U.S. Women’s, Dale Morey’s 4 and

3 title match win over defender Lewis Oehmig in the U.S.

Senior Amateur in 1977, Hollis Stacey’s narrow victory in the

1984 U.S. Women’s Open and Fleisher’s 2001 U.S. Senior

Open win by one stroke (Nicklaus finished two back after

being tied with Fleisher and three others with four holes

remaining).

S T R A I G H T D OWN THE MIDDLE

“I loved every minute of the job for all those years,

especially the memorable competitions,” said Cook, who was

groomed by the legendary Lionel MacDuff, a two-time Salem

president and former Massachusetts Golf Association

president, to take over from him as general chairman when

ever the USGA returned to Salem after Zaharias’ historic third

Women’s Open success in ’54.

“Lionel took a liking to me. I was interested anyway and I

stayed involved for more than three decades. It’s been an

honor and a privilege to represent the Salem membership and

work with the USGA for three outstanding championships on

our marvelous Ross course. Now I look forward to staying out

of the way and just watching the action this time around.”

It should come as no surprise that golf has been a vital

part of his life since growing up in Steubenville, Ohio, and

summering in Gloucester. He surely has had the playing

genes. His father, Cal, qualified for three U.S. Opens and one

British Open as an amateur. An uncle on his mother’s side

played in five U.S. Amateurs. Ollie has always had game. He

qualified at Salem for the 1955 U.S. Junior played at Purdue

University and won by Cotton Dunn, who would become

Kernwood pro.

Ollie liked the North Shore so much that he moved here in

the early 1960s, joined Salem CC in 1966 and has practiced

law here since 1964. He struck it rich in those earliest years

when he married Cape Anner Sharon Love, the noted area

writer/illustrator.

“I was a little nervous chairing my first USGA event here,

the ’77 Senior Amateur,” Cook recalled. “Lionel kept reassuring

me it’s a low-key event and so forth. But when we got

drenched with rain most every day and had to cancel one day

of play, I wondered if I was a jinx. But it turned out the USGA

was most impressed with the way we ran that event under

difficult conditions and even more so how well the course

played despite all the rain – thank goodness for Donald Ross’

raised greens — that they soon were talking to us about a

much bigger event, a Women’s Open. Three Opens later it’s

all worked out just fine for us and the USGA.”

That’s an understatement. The 1984 U.,S. Women’s Open

drew record crowds and Salem got national TV exposure with

the matchless ABC-TV pair of Jim McKay and Dave Marr.

The club’s first U.S. Senior Open, starring Nicklaus, Gary

Player, Arnold Palmer, Tom Watson and eventual winner

Bruce Fleisher, recorded the earliest sellout to that time in U.S.

Senior Open history and a terrific four-day competition that

included local amateur hero Steve Swedberg of Beverly.

“Operationally, 2001 was light years beyond 1984,” Cook,

elected a Salem CC life member in 2016, remembered, “but

our people, staff, volunteers, and USGA staff, did a spectacular

job all week, and we had NBC-TV with Johnny Miller to boot.

It was a great week for the club, for the city of Peabody and golf.”

And a fantastic way for Ollie Cook to, as it turned out, say

farewell as general chairman and USGA liaison. l

18 >>> sUMMER 2017

PHOTO: Spenser Hasak


BRUNO STARS

THIS WINNING TEAM MAKES SURE EVERTHING RUNS SMOOTHLY

By ANNE MARIE TOBIN

Mary LoBello and Mike Goggin speak about the upcoming U.S. Senior Open.

PHOTO: Spenser Hasak

L

egendary football coach Vince Lombardi once said,

“Individual commitment to a team effort, that’s what

makes a team work, company work, a society work, a

civilization work.”

It’s also what makes the 2017 U.S. Senior Open at Salem Country

Club work.

For nearly 18 months, the brains behind Bruno Event Team have

been toiling behind the scenes in preparation for the big event,

which is expected to bring record galleries to Salem, architect

Donald Ross’ 1925 gem.

The team set up shop on the second floor of the clubhouse in

January 2016. Last fall, Bruno relocated to a trailer next to the club’s

tennis courts across the street, where the team of eight has been

burning the midnight oil under the direction of former NEPGA

executive director Eddie Carbone.

Carbone was named championship director in November 2014

after serving a 10-year stint as director of the PGA Tour tournament

(from the Ford Championship through the World Golf

Championship) at the Doral Resort in Doral, Fla.

“I had an amazing run in Florida but wanted to do something

different,” said Carbone. “When I got the job, I commuted from

Florida for several months, but relocated here and have been here

ever since. I was born and raised here, I caddied at Charles River

and was a Ouimet scholar, so I have roots here. We have assembled

a talented team that is working day and night to make this Open

what we hope will even top the 2001 event.”

Carbone said it all begins with Mary Lisa LoBello (Sales

and Client Services director) and Mike Goggin (Operations

director).

“We are so fortunate to have two of most versatile and

experienced event operations and tournament services people

in the event business,” said Carbone. “Mary and Mike are two

incredible people, and consummate team players.

“Mike is like a Swiss Army knife, who handles any and all tasks

deftly. Mary has a wealth of knowledge, especially since she was

here in 2001 for the last U.S. Senior Open at Salem, and her event

and country club experience has been a huge help.”

Carbone answers to Sean Sovacool, president of Bruno Event

Team’s Golf Division, who oversaw the operation of the 2001 U.S.

Senior Open when he worked for Golden Bear Enterprises, which

is where LoBello comes in.

“I think it was 2011 when I got a phone call from Sean,” said

LoBello, who also worked at the 2001 championship while with

Golden Bear. “I was working at Turner Hill as Sales and Member

Services director at the time. Sean said, ‘Mary, we’re going back to

Salem.’ So I kept thinking about it and we stayed in touch, then the

opportunity just fell into place.”

The Northampton native hit the ground running. Her

responsibilities run the gamut from straight sales, to tweaking

hospitality packages to their clients’ satisfaction, to ensuring that

the needs of more than 100 corporate supporters are met and even

to helping to interview, train and supervise a staff of four interns.

She also works daily with Volunteer Services manager Megan

Gormley.

“We will have more than 2,000 volunteers working the

tournament,” said LoBello. “That’s a huge undertaking, but Megan

has done a fantastic job with making sure that everyone will be

in place.”

LoBello said the key is organization and attention to detail.

“I keep a lot of lists. I have lists next to my bed, so when I wake

up in the middle of the night, I just add things I remember to the

list. I have lists on my cell phone and on my desk as well.”

>>> CONTINUED ON P. 32

NORTH SHORE GOLF


Grass is always greener

on Kip Tyler’s side

By BILL BROTHERTON

Salem Country Club Golf

Course Superintendent

Kip Tyler and “his assistant"

Molly inspect the 18th green.


Each day the course

gets better. It’s getting

warmer and a nice

sunny day is good for

soil temperature.


Kip Tyler, Salem Country Club’s

golf course superintendent/miracle

worker for the past 35 years, looks

out at the 18th fairway and smiles.

The grass is, for the most part, green

and lush. After a drought-plagued

summer of 2016, the classic Donald

Ross-designed links came through

winter just fine.

That’s a far cry from the last time

Salem hosted a major championship,

the 2001 U.S. Senior Open. Grass on

most of the putting surfaces was

dead. The turf on about a quarter

of the fairways was brown.

“Even the winterkill damage to

the putting green was devastating.

It was 99 percent dead,” said Tyler.

For much of that winter, frigid

temperatures followed heavy rains.

The damage was so severe, the

course was closed to members

until late May.

“We had to get the grass growing

again,” said Tyler.

And in just a month the best

senior players in the world, led by the

Big Three of Jack Nicklaus, Arnold

Palmer and Gary Player, were going

to tee it up in the Senior Open. The

tourney would be televised throughout

the world on NBC.

Tyler and his crew aggressively

nursed the course back to life.

It drew raves from competitors

and fans alike.

Salem is one of the busiest

private courses in New England.

Its 375 members, spouses, and

another 100 or so golfers on a

waiting list, played about 25,000

rounds last year.

“Things are starting to pop,”

said Tyler.

“The grass is thin in some areas,

but the cool, wet spring has been OK.

The rough is growing. Each day the

course gets better. It’s getting warmer

and a nice sunny day is good for

soil temperature.

“This isn’t bad,” added Tyler, the

king of humility and understatement.

Truth is, the course looks spectacular.

When defending champ Gene Sauers,

Tom Watson, Bernhard Langer and

others arrive in late June, the course

should be in optimum condition. l

PHOTOS: Spenser Hasak

20 >>> sUMMER 2017


Friendly advice

‘Drive it in the fairway; stay below the hole’

offers Salem’s genial PGA pro Kevin Wood

By BILL BROTHERTON

No male golfer has ever

finished under par during a USGA

championship at Salem Country Club.

Bruce Fleisher, the 2001 Senior Open

champion, shot a 2-under 68 in the

final round to finish at even par.

Dale Morey, who captured the 1977

Senior Men’s Amateur at the Donald

Ross-designed gem 4 and 3 over

Lewis Oehmig, was medalist at 143,

3-over par.

Kevin Wood, entering his 18th year

as head PGA professional at Salem,

thinks that will change during this

U.S. Senior Open.

“I imagine they’ll break par this

year,” said Wood, a Lowell native who

grew up in Beverly. “It’s a different

50 year old today. In better shape

physically and still playing well. Just

look at Steve Stricker; he’s still a

strong competitor on the PGA Tour.”

John Daly, David Toms and Jose

Maria Olazabal are other Champions

Tour rookies expected to challenge for

the title at Salem June 26 – July 2.

What advice does Wood, who will

attempt to qualify on June 8 in

Tennessee for the Senior Open

Championship, have for competitors?

“You’ve gotta drive it in the fairway.

If you can’t control the ball off the tee,

you can’t put it in the right place on

the green. The rough is tough. If you

start missing left or right, you’re

going to be in trouble.

“And going long is not good on

this course,” said Wood about the

Donald Ross-designed gem, which

will play at just over 6,800 yards

for the championship. Two of the

four par 5s - the 11th (#2 for the

championship) and the 8th hole

(championship #17) will be par 4s

for the pros. Both are a smidge shy

of 500 yards.

“The greens will be challenging.

But these players are good at adapting

very quickly and they’re used to

playing undulating greens,” added

Wood. “Staying below the hole is key.”

Wood said a few players teed it up

at Salem last year during Ryder Cup

week. They all learned being above

the hole can be disastrous.

“The greens have been brought

back to their original specs. Squaring

them off makes them more like what

Donald Ross intended. Actually, the

16th and 17th greens have been

reduced a bit in size. There’s a lot

more runup, more false fronts. And

some pin placements will be new.

Summing up his advice to the

competitors: “drive it straight, stay

out of the rough, don’t go long on

the greens. If a player does that and

putts well, he’ll be in the hunt on

the final day.” l

Salem Country Club's Head Golf Professional Kevin

Wood discusses the upcoming U.S. Senior Open.


The greens have

been brought back to

their original specs.

Squaring them off

makes them more like

what Donald Ross

intended.


PHOTO: Spenser Hasak

NORTH SHORE GOLF


Babe Zaharias celebrates after winning the 1954 U.S. Women’s Open. Jack Nicklaus chips during the final round of the

2001 U.S. Senior Open. The crowd looks on as Glenna Collett Vare tees off during the 1932 Women’s Amateur Championship.

PHOTOS: USGA archives

22 >>> sUMMER 2017


LOOKING BACK AT SALEM’S RICH HISTORY

By ANNE MARIE TOBIN

I

f history has anything to do with it, this year’s U.S.

Senior Open at Salem Country Club is going be a

real doozy.

At the 2001 Senior Open, eight players were within two

shots of the lead on the back nine. Five of them - Jack Nicklaus, Isao

Aoki, Jim Colbert, Larry Nelson and eventual champion Bruce

Fleisher – were even par and held shares of the lead.

Fleisher emerged from the pack, parring the final 12

holes, then waited and watched as the rest of the field imploded.

In 1984, the year that Michael Jackson’s ‘Thriller’ album was

at the top of the charts, Hollis Stacy was embroiled in a thriller of her

own, playing the last 14 holes in 5-under-par to come from behind

to win her third U.S. Women’s Open.

Donald Ross and champion Dale Morey shared the spotlight

at the rain-soaked U.S. Senior Amateur in 1977. Thanks to Ross’

genius design, the course stayed above water and remained playable

for all but one day of competition.

And who can forget the magical 1954 U.S. Women’s Open, won

by the great Babe Didrikson Zaharias, who cruised to a 12-shot

victory, despite having had colon cancer surgery just 15 months prior

to the event? Even more impressive was that she played 36 holes on

the final day. Sadly, Babe died from the disease a little more than two

years after her sensational win.

The USGA first came to Salem in 1932 for the 36th

U.S Women’s Amateur. Virginia Van Wie, twice a bridesmaid to the

great Glenna Collett Vare, played flawlessly, romping to a 10 and 8

victory over the five-time champion.

Who will win this year’s U.S. Senior Open? The likely answer is

the golf course, as no one has ever beaten par in a USGA stroke play

championship staged at Salem.

One sure thing is that club historian Tom Standring is going

to need more square footage in the club’s archives room as another

exciting chapter to the storied history of Salem Country Club is about

to be written.

Let’s look back at Salem CC’s impressive five previous

championships:

2001 U.S. SENIOR OPEN

The 22nd Senior Open was a golf junkie’s dream, highlighted by

the participation of the original “big three” of Nicklaus, Arnold

Palmer and Gary Player. Toss in the likes of Tom Watson, Hale Irwin,

Chi Chi Rodriguez, Ray Floyd, local favorite Allen Doyle and surprise

qualifier Steve Swedberg of Beverly, and it added up to a star-studded

who’s who’s of golf royalty.

Playing in the third-to-last group in Sunday’s final round, Fleisher

trailed Aoki by four shots, but rallied with a 2-under 68 to finish at

even par, 280. One by one, Fleisher’s opponents played themselves

out of contention. Nicklaus bogied the 15th and 16th holes to finish

two shots behind in a three-way tie for fourth place at 2-over with

Doyle and Colbert, who bogeyed 16 and double bogeyed 18. After

Aoki 3-putted the 17th and Gil Morgan airmailed the 18th green and

made bogey, Fleisher had secured his second USGA title, setting a

record for the most years between wins (33; Fleisher won the 1968

U.S. Amateur). Palmer and Nicklaus are the only other players to win

national amateur and open championships.

1984 U.S. WOMEN’S OPEN

The 32nd U.S. Women’s Open came down to the 72nd hole. Stacy

parred it, to post the lowest round of the tournament, a 3-under par

69, and finish 2-over par 292.

Stacy was locked in a three-way tie with Amy Alcott and Rosie

Jones, who were still on the course. All the 30-year old could do was

wait and watch.

Hogan’s Alley was Alcott’s undoing. She made double-bogey six

after a poor tee shot on the 9th hole to finish two shots behind Stacy,

while Jones finished one shot out of a playoff with a bogey.

Stacy’s round ranks as one of the most exciting comebacks in

tournament history.

She was five shots behind the leaders, Donna White and Alcott,

after a double bogey on the 4th hole, but birdied the 5th and 8th holes

to pull within two.

On the par-4 13th hole, Stacy drove into the rough. She punched

a 7-iron under some low- hanging tree limbs from 133 yards out; the

ball disappeared into the cup for an eagle. She then birdied the 16th

and parred in to claim her sixth USGA title and the winner’s prize of

$36,000.

Stacy said, “Babe (Zaharias) won here the year I was born.

Maybe that was a lucky charm.”

Stacy and Zaharias share a common bond; they each won the

final majors of their careers at Salem, Stacy her fourth and Zaharias

her 10th.

1977 U.S. SENIOR AMATEUR

The big story of the 23rd U.S. Senior Amateur was the weather.

A September nor’easter dumped buckets of rain in the area, forcing

grounds crew workers to scramble to keep the course playable. While

the abilities of Ross have always been obvious to those fortunate to

have played the classic layout, Ross’ hidden genius was on display

when only one day of play was washed out. The final round was

played in driving rain, but Morey rose to the occasion, beating Lewis

Oehmig, 4 and 3, to capture his second senior title in four years.

1954 U.S. WOMEN’S OPEN

Zaharias’ win in the 9th U.S. Women’s Open (second conducted

by the USGA) is considered one of the most remarkable feats in the

history of sports. She blitzed the 53-player field, finishing 12 shots

clear of runner-up Betty Hicks and 16 shots ahead of Louise Suggs.

She shot 71 in the first round, then followed up with 72 in the second

round to go into the final day with a seven shot lead. Battling

oppressive heat, Zaharias finished a 73 and 75 to capture her third

open title with a 3-over 291.

Upon finishing the round, Zaharias threw her hat in the air and

said, “Thank goodness it’s over. I couldn’t have gone another hole.”

Lionel MacDuff, Salem ‘s president in 1954, said in 1995, “It was

an amazing performance that compares with anything I’ve ever seen

in a championship at any level. The Babe always puts on a great

show, but this one topped ‘em all.”

Zaharias’ paycheck for the week? A whopping $2,000.

(Lionel MacDuff quote is from the Green and Gold Coast written by Gary Larrabee)

>>> CONTINUED ON P. 34

NORTH SHORE GOLF


Lots cooking

behind the

scenes at

Salem CC

PHOTO: Spenser Hasak

By BILL BROTHERTON

Salem CC's executive chef, Fred Yanosick, and general manager, Greg Cincotta, estimate that as many as

17,000 meals will be served to guests during Senior Open week.

While Tom Watson, Gene Sauers, Fred

Couples and other professional golfers are

making birdies on Salem Country Club’s

championship course June 26 – July 2,

the club’s general manager, Greg Cincotta,

and executive chef, Fred Yanosick, and

their staffs, will be doing a thoroughly

professional job taking care of guests

behind the scenes.

“We will make sure everyone is taken

care of,” said Cincotta. “Some 16,000 to

17,000 meals (breakfast, lunch, afternoon

hors d’oeuvres and full bar service) will be

served during the week inside and outside

the clubhouse,” by a staff of 200 and many

more volunteers. Lifeguards, pro shop

staff and other SCC employees will be

pressed into action as needed, he added.

More than 1900 guests per day,

including golfers and their families,

will be treated like royalty during the

championship. That’s more guests in

one week than they usually do in

three months.

“This is a great opportunity for the staff,”

said Cincotta. “It’s a once-in-a-lifetime

event that will provide great memories for

everyone. It’s a great staff and they’re

raring to go.”

“The demands of the kitchen staff will

be immense. The chef and sous-chef do

yeoman’s work. They were here in 2001

and have some idea what to expect. They’ll

be here at 4:30 a.m. getting things ready

and leave at 8 p.m. each day, for a 7-to-10-

day period,” added Cincotta, who was GM

at Nashua Country Club in New

Hampshire before arriving in Salem 11

years ago.

Food and beverage service will be

provided from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. for players,

their families, USGA officials and VIPs.

Cincotta added that Clubhouse Manager

Bill Crocker, Locker Room Manager Gene

Zorzonello and Bar Manager Scott Rainey

and their staffs are well prepared to take

care of guests.

Prom Levy will provide on-course

catering in hospitality tents on holes 9, 17

and 18.

The facility is much different than

the players saw in 2001. Cincotta said

improvements have been made to the

dining room, men’s locker room, pro shop,

patio, kitchen and much of the clubhouse

inside and out. He can’t wait to show off

the “new” Salem Country Club. Cincotta’s

mom was GM at Nashawtuc for six years

during the time the Senior PGA Tour

held a tourney there.

Cincotta was not here in 2001,

when Salem hosted its first Senior Open.

But executive chef Fred Yanosick and

sous-chef Scott Hoffman were.

“2001 was an eye-opening experience,

many more people than we were

accustomed to serving,” said Yanosick,

a Beverly resident. “We also learned how

weather can affect best-laid plans, but

everything went very well. I was very

proud of everyone and the excellent

job they did.”

You might recall that a violent thunder

and lightning storm rolled through the

North Shore on Saturday of the 2001

championship that left 14 players with

incomplete rounds. Following completion

of the third round at 7:57 a.m. Sunday,

the final round began at 9:15 a.m. with

players starting on the No.1 and No.10

tees, in groups of three, to finish ahead of

another stretch of predicted bad weather.

The Sunday storm did not arrive until

champion Bruce Fleisher was conducting

his post-round news conference.

Yanosick said there is a New England

theme to his meals, which will include

lobster bisque, clam and fish chowder,

haddock and that Saturday night favorite

Pearl hotdogs and beans. “It’ll be the end

of June, fresh berries and fruits should

be plentiful,” he said. He said chefs from

other clubs have offered to assist, and

two students from “Essex Aggie” (Essex

Technical High School) who have been

working in his kitchen will be on hand.

“They are full of life and energy and a big

plus,” he said. Yanosick expects Thursday

and Friday to be the busiest days.

“Planning started the day after it was

announced we were going to host the

Senior Open,” said Cincotta. Bruno Event

Team, led by Eddie Carbone, was hired

to run the show. “They’ve been a great

partner,” said Cincotta. “And our members

and the executive committee led by Bill

Sheehan have been immense, as has the

City of Peabody from Mayor (Edward)

Bettencourt on down. They’ve been very

helpful and positive.” l

24 >>> sUMMER 2017


TOP LEFT TO RIGHT: Francis Ouimet, center, is photographed with Harry Vardon, right, and Ted Ray after the 1913 U.S. Open held at The Country

Club in Brookline • Quimet in the red jacket of the Royal & Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrew’s • Francis Ouimet Scholarship Fund Executive Director

Robert P. Donovan • Gene Sauers raises the trophy after winning the 2016 U.S. Senior Golf Open at the Scioto Country Club in Ohio. (Kyle Robertson

The Columbus Dispatch via AP) • Ouimet Caddie Scholarship bag tag at the Golf House at TPC Boston.

Francis Ouimet:

America’s

greatest golf

hero

By BILL BROTHERTON

When the 2017 U.S. Senior Open

concludes on July 2 at Salem Country

Club, the champion will pocket more than

a half-million dollars and get to hoist the

Francis D. Ouimet Memorial Trophy in

front of adoring fans.

Who was Ouimet?

Those of us who grew up golfing in

Massachusetts are well aware of Ouimet’s

legacy. Quite simply, he is the most

important figure in the history of

American golf.

“Francis Ouimet’s victory as a

20-year-old amateur in a playoff in the

1913 US Open Championship over British

professionals Harry Vardon and Ted Ray

was the turning point in American golf,”

said Bob Donovan, executive director of

the Francis Ouimet Scholarship Fund for

the past 26 years. “It propelled golf into a

mainstream American sport.”

The trophy the USGA now uses for its

Senior Open championship had been at

The Country Club in Brookline, the site

of Ouimet’s improbable victory. “TCC

contributed the trophy to the USGA, and it

is thrilled to have it,” said Donovan, adding

that in addition to the Ouimet Museum

at the Scholarship Fund’s home in Norton,

Mass., there’s also a Ouimet Room at the

USGA Museum in Far Hills, N.J.

Donovan said as spectacular as

Ouimet’s Open victory was, his 1914

US Amateur win at Ekwanok CC in

Manchester, Vermont, “was the one he

really wanted to win, to prove that the

Open win was not a fluke.”

Ouimet would go on to win six Mass.

Amateur titles and compile an 11-1 record

as a member of 12 Walker Cup teams,

which pits top American amateurs against

counterparts from Great Britain and

Ireland. Ouimet was an original inductee

into the PGA/World Golf Hall of Fame

along with Bobby Jones, Walter Hagen

and Gene Sarazen.

The Ouimet Museum occupies a small

room at the William F. Connell Golf House

and Museum adjacent to the TPC Boston

course in Norton. The state’s top amateur

golf associations share space in this

modern, welcoming building. Connell,

the late Lynn businessman, philanthropist

and “golf nut,” as characterised by

Donovan, partnered with Bank of Boston

and the TPC Boston partnership in

funding the headquarters.

The museum showcases a red jacket

from the Royal & Ancient Golf Club of St.

Andrew’s presented to Ouimet when he

became the first American-born captain of

the R&A. Today, it’s wisely protected in a

frame on the wall; Donovan said “we had

it on a coat rack, and people could touch

it, people with greasy fingers.” There’s

also a painting of Ouimet wearing the

jacket, painted by President Dwight D.

Eisenhower who enjoyed golf, painting

and Ouimet’s company.

There’s a corner exhibit dedicated to

the 2005 Disney film “The Greatest Game

Ever Played,” an entertaining, mostly

factual telling of Ouimet’s and caddie

Eddie Lowery’s improbable U. S. Open

victory at The Country Club, near his

Brookline home. Mark Frost’s manuscript,

red editing marks and all, is here, as are

photos of Shia LaBeouf, who spent two

hours at this very museum interviewing

Donovan and learning as much as he could

about the man he would portray in the

movie, and other cast members at the

premiere at a North Attleboro theater.

Donovan said this year the Ouimet

fund will award $1.8 million to some 340

scholars who caddied or worked at area

golf courses. Since its inception in 1949,

when 13 scholars received a total of

$6,400, it has helped 5,600 young men

and women pay for their college education.

Applications are up 40 perfect in the past

three years, he said. l

For more information on Francis Ouimet or the

scholarship fund, go to ouimet.org.

NORTH SHORE GOLF


OUR COURSES ARE LOCATED IN LYNN, NORTH READING AND BEVERLY

Lynnfield barber

made the cut with

Open winner

By ANNE MARIE TOBIN

Sometimes it all comes down to being in the right place

at the right time.

For Dick Blaisdell, that place happened to be his own

Western Barber shop at the intersection of Route 1 and

Salem Street in Lynnfield, where Blaisdell has spent the past

50 years cutting hair.

It was just a normal Thursday until a special customer

walked through the door.

“This fellow walked in asking for a trim,” Blaisdell

recalled. “I recognized him right away. It was Bruce Fleisher,

who was playing the U.S. Senior Open up the road at Salem

Country Club. We ended up having a great conversation

about golf and the tour. He was very honest and said he just

didn’t hit far enough to make it on tour.

“The funny thing was, I believe he was leading the Open

and was the only one under par that day, but you never

would have known it, as he was just a regular guy. He ended

up winning the thing a few days later. I only remember when

he was leaving, he asked ‘How the hell do I get out of here

with these traffic lights?’ ”

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Managing Public Golf

Courses for 30 Years

Western

Barber owner

Dick Blaisdell

reflects on the

time he cut

Bruce Fleisher's

hair before he

won the 2001 U.S.

Senior Open as he

points to a signed

photo of Bruce.

PHOTO:

Owen O’Rourke

Blaisdell got the thrill of a lifetime a couple of days later

after closing up the shop at noon.

“I promised him I would come and watch him on

Saturday, found his group and he spotted me right away,”

said Blaisdell. “He called me and a friend of mine, Randy

Compton, to watch from inside the ropes. So we ducked

under and followed him the rest of the way until a vicious

thunderstorm rolled in and play was suspended. It was an

incredible experience.”

Blaisdell went back to the course for Sunday’s final round

to cheer on his new friend. After congratulating Fleisher on

his victory, the golfer promised he would send Blaisdell an

autographed picture of him holding the winner’s Ouimet

Trophy.

“A friend of mine ran into him later that year in Florida

and mentioned me, so Bruce sent the picture, as promised,”

Blaisdell said. “He was just such a likable and down-toearth

guy.”

The framed photo is one of many pieces of memorabilia

displayed in the barbershop. l

26 >>> sUMMER 2017


When the U.S. Senior Open begins on June 26, the friendly, feisty

spirit of the late Ray Farmer will live on at Salem Country Club.

Farmer, member and past president of Salem CC, passed away unexpectedly at his Middleton

home last July 22 at age 78. The volunteers headquarters during the championship has been

dubbed “Ray’s Tent,” a tribute from the many friends he made at the Peabody club.

Ray, who many of his pals said was a great guy and a straight shooter who wasn’t afraid

to speak his mind, organized many golf trips through the years for family and friends, old and

new. His days as president of the Black Rum Golf Association and as leader of golf excursions

to Ireland and other far-away locales are still recalled by fellow SCC members with awe,

smiles and good humor.

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28 >>> sUMMER 2017


2017 U.S. SENIOR OPEN CHAMPIONSHIP

SALEM COUNTRY CLUB ~ PEABODY, MASSACHUSETTS

2017USSENIOROPEN.COM

------------------------ SPECTATOR GUIDE ----------------------

By ANNE MARIE TOBIN

With the 38th U.S. Senior Open just

around the corner, now is the time to plan

how to follow the championship action.

The tournament, which features some of

the world’s best professional and senior

golfers age 50 and older, will be held at

Salem Country Club in Peabody June 26

to July 3.

There are many options for golf fans

to stay abreast of the action.

There is the old-fashioned way; strap

on your most comfortable pair of walking

shoes, sneakers or flip-flops, apply plenty

of sunscreen and join the throngs of

fans (expected to number up to 25,000

per day) at the course for an up-closeand-personal

view.

If you’re unable to join the galleries, 16

hours of live television coverage will be

broadcast in 100 countries, including all

four rounds of the championship on the

Fox and FS1 networks.

If social media is your thing, join the

#USSeniorOpen conversation on Twitter

and Instagram at @SalemCC1895 or @usga.

Here is some handy information to help

you get the most of your Senior Open

experience. >>> CONTINUED ON P. 30

NORTH SHORE GOLF


SPECTATOR GUIDE continued >>>

EVENT SCHEDULE

Practice rounds are Monday, June 26,

Tuesday, June 27, and Wednesday June

28. The championship rounds begin on

Thursday, June 29, with the final round

set to be played on Sunday, July 2. The

gates open every day at 7 a.m. and close

after the completion of play.

TICKETS

Tickets may be purchased online at the

official championship website,

www.2017ussenioropen.com. Tickets will

also be available for purchase at the ticket

booth at both the main entrance and

satellite entrance.

There are several ticket packages.

General admission tickets are $25 for

practice rounds (single day) and $50 for

championship rounds (single day). Weekly

general admission tickets that are good

Monday through Sunday are $125 each and

include a championship program voucher.

Upgrades are also available. Ouimet

Trophy Club ticket holders have access

to the climate-controlled club located

along the 17th fairway. Trophy Club tickets

provide expanded beverage and dining

options, flat-screen televisions and

lounge seating along with a 15 percent

merchandise discount and a championship

program. Tickets cost $50 a day for

practice rounds, $80 per day for

championship rounds and $225 for a

weekly ticket, good Monday through

Sunday.

VIP tickets features include access to the

climate-controlled 17th Green Suite with

complimentary beer, wine and food as well

as flat-screen TVs. This suite will be open

from Wednesday, June 26, through

Sunday’s final round. The cost of a single

ticket is $1,350, two tickets are $2,400

and four tickets are $4,000.

Corporate tickets are also available.

For more information, please call the

USGA at 978-818-6006.

PARKING & TRANSPORTATION

Parking for the championship is free and

off-site. The general parking lot is at the

Topsfield Fairgrounds on Route 1. Shuttles

will provide transportation to and from the

main entrance at Salem Country Club.

The fairgrounds will be the only location

with shuttle service for fans with general

admission tickets.

Handicapped parking, along with shuttle

service, is also available in the general

public parking lot.

VIP TRANSPORTATION

VIP shuttles will take VIP ticket holders

to and from the satellite entrance, which

is located at the Salem Country Club

member’s entrance on Forest Street.

MAIN ENTRANCE

The main entrance is on Forest Street

across the street from the 17th fairway.

30 >>> sUMMER 2017

CAMERAS/ELECTRONICS/CELL PHONES

Cameras are permitted during practice

rounds, Monday through Thursday only,

for personal use.

Tablets, computers, video and/or audio

recording devices and noise-producing

devices of any kind (including portable

speakers) are not allowed. Cellular

mobile devices smaller than seven

inches are permitted.

CONCESSIONS & REST ROOMS

Full menu concession stands are located

inside the main entrance, next to the 6th

and 13th greens, and in the lower parking

lot on the left side of the 9th fairway.

Limited menu concession stands can be

found between the practice putting green

and the 10th tee, between the 11th and

12th holes and between the 16th and 17th

holes. Rest rooms will be near all menu

concession stands, except the limited

menu concession stand on the 10th hole.

FIRST AID

First aid stations are located inside the

main entrance and in the lower parking

lot between the 2nd and 9th holes.

ATM

An on-site ATM will be available at the

main entrance.

JUNIOR TICKETS

Juniors age 17 and younger are admitted

free when accompanied by a ticketed adult

(general admission only).

LEADERBOARDS

Several strategically-placed leaderboards

are located throughout the course.

Leaderboards will be at the 4th green,

6th green, 8th green, 9th green, 10th

green, 13th green, 16th tee, 17th green

and on the right side of the 18th fairway.

BLEACHERS

Bleachers are located behind the 1st

and 10th tees and the 4th, 9th, 15th and

17th greens.

SECURITY SCREENING

Spectators and championship attendees

will have to go through strict security

screening prior to entering at all

entrances. and will not be allowed to

bring any of the items listed below.

To expedite admission into the

championship, it is recommended that

all prohibited items be safely stowed

prior to boarding the shuttle.

The following items are prohibited:

• All weapons (regardless of permit,

including but not limited to firearms

or knives)

• Explosives and/or fireworks of

any kind

• Backpacks, briefcases and/or bags

larger than 6-inches by 6-inches in

their natural state

(Note: Clear plastic hand and shoulder

bags no larger than 12-by-12-by-6 (depth)

are permitted)

• Signs, posters and/or banners.

• Food and/or beverages, except for

medical or infant needs

• Containers and/or coolers except for

medical or infant need

Note: personal care items (3 ounce size

or less) and transparent/clear plastic

empty water bottles (24 ounces or less)

are permitted.

• Pets, other than service animals

assisting disabled individuals

• Lawn chairs and/or oversized chairs

with arms. Compact chairs without

arms are permitted with no case

• Ladders and/or step-stools or

similar items

• Bicycles

TICKETS and WILL CALL

The tickets and will call area is located

inside the main entrance.

MERCHANDISE TENTS

Merchandise tents are located inside the

main and satellite entrances.

WELLNESS PAVILION

The Lahey Wellness Pavilion is located

inside the main entrance.

HOSPITALITY

Hospitality villas and chalets are located

along the left side of the 9th hole and right

side of the 17th fairway.

WEATHER WARNINGS

The USGA will have meteorology staff

on-site monitoring the weather. If inclement

weather approaches, special “weather

warning” signs will be posted on

leaderboards. Fans are advised to take

immediate precautions, including

evacuation of all grandstands, prior to

the suspension of play. Fans are advised

to follow all safety and evacuation

instructions.

HANDICAP SCOOTER RENTAL

Scooter rentals are available at the

main entrance.

TELEVISION COVERAGE

The first two rounds of the championship

will be televised live on FS1 from 2-7 p.m.

Rounds three and four will be televised

live on Fox from 1-6 p.m.

The USGA will present bonus coverage of

all four rounds on its website,

www.usga.org; the first two rounds from

10 a.m. to noon and the final two rounds

from 1 to 6 p.m.

SOCIAL MEDIA

Join the conversation about the

#USSeniorOpen at Salem Country Club

on social media.

Twitter: @SalemCC1895 | @USGA

Instagram: @SalemCC1895 | @USGA


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>>> BRUNO STARS, CONTINUED FROM P. 19

LoBello, who lives in Beverly, said that

much has changed in the 16 years since

the last Senior Open was staged at Salem,

beginning with technology.

“It’s incredible, we had no cell phones, we

had no email, no texting,” she said. “When it

came to sales, everything was all paper. For

newspaper ads and tickets we used paper

forms and old-fashioned mail with stamps.

Now, everything is online and everything is

accessible at any time of the day or night.

That’s just the way business is conducted

now, with information available to clients on

a second’s notice on blogs, on websites at the

click of a button. We didn’t have any of that

in 2001.”

Goggin’s road to Salem began in San

Francisco in 2008 when he was working at

Harding Park Golf Club.

“I knew a guy who was working in

operations for the PGA at the 2009 Ryder

Cup and he offered me an internship,” said

Goggin, a Triton Regional High School

graduate who grew up in West Newbury. “I

just got swept up in it.”

After the Ryder Cup, Goggin spent the next

six years traveling the world as operations

director at Global Management Inc. He

worked 70 professional tournaments in Asia,

the Caribbean, Latin America and the United

States before landing at Bruno.

Goggin’s responsibilities are varied. He

works closely with sales, the championship

staff and interns. He works with vendors,

suppliers and sponsors and also manages the

budget relating to the same, as well as

coordinating with local, state and federal

officials regarding permits, transportation

and security.

Goggin says his biggest challenge, other

than dealing with the long and winding road

that is Forest Street, is keeping a low, if not,

invisible, profile.

“Forest Street is so close to two major

highways and it will be closed during

championship week. Part of my job is to

handle emergencies and to solve problems,”

he said. “If I am doing my job correctly,

nobody even knows that my job exists as I am

behind the scenes, and not, say, out in front,

finding out why we have a 20-minute shuttle

delay, as an example. My goal is to remain

invisible.”

Goggin said he also must be prepared

to deal with the one thing the Bruno team

cannot control: the unpredictable New

England weather, which interrupted

play during the third round of the

2001 Open.

>>> CONTINUED ON P. 35

32 >>> sUMMER 2017


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>>> LOOKING BACK, CONTINUED FROM P. 23

1932 US WOMEN’S

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Women’s Amateur was particularly sweet as

she had been clobbered by Vare in the 1928

final, 13 and 12, and also lost to her in 1930.

She went on to win the 1933 and 1934 titles,

becoming the fourth woman to win three

amateur titles.

The New York Times reported, “Miss Van

Wie’s chipping and putting were phenomenal,

and time and time again she sent her ball so

close to the hole ...that getting down in a

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BRUNO STARS, CONTINUED FROM P. 32

“It was a free-for-all on Saturday when

violent thunderstorms caused power

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he said. “We are and will be totally

prepared with emergency plans

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monitoring weather conditions well in

advance to keep everyone safe. I’m

hoping for sunny skies, temperatures in

the mid-70s and light breezes, but will be

prepared for any weather conditions we

have that week.”

LoBello says she loves the way the

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to pitch in and help when needed,

especially the nterns.

“You never know, you might look

outside and see one of them shoveling

mulch with Mike,” she said. “I just love

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NAHANT’S NEW

Season’s changes dining options at Nahant Golf Club

By BETH BRESNAHAN

PHOTOS: Mark Lorenz

W

hen we visited Nahant Golf

Club at Kelley Greens soon

after the first of the year the

clubhouse was covered in sawdust and

the walls were being stripped down to the

studs. Play It As It Lies Golf Management

Inc., the course’s new management team

led by partners Anthony De Dominicis

and John Moore, shared they were

transforming the former clubhouse into a

facility that offered patrons a fine dining

experience, a nice bar and lounge.

De Dominicis and Moore have certainly

lived up to their word.

The new Season’s restaurant is as

fresh and crisp as the ocean air permeating

the 9-hole public golf course that sits on

39 acres of conservation land in the

sea-surrounded community of Nahant,

Mass.

Gone is the old dark wood bar and

matching paneled walls that once

weighed down the room. A beautiful new

custom-made, bamboo bar with walnut

inlays surrounded by high-back walnut

stools is the lounge’s focal point. There

are also high-top tables neatly placed

throughout the room. And the Keno

monitors that once hung by the bar?

They’ve been sent back to the lottery and

replaced with three flat-screened TVs.

Almost every night of the week, the

lounge hosts the club’s many golf leagues

for post-round drinks and a bite to eat.

For those looking for a spot for a family

dinner, to host a special event or hold

an outing, Season’s also features a separate

42-seat dining room and a three-season

patio that seats 75 with its own bar.

Season’s has a full liquor license,

which extends to refreshments served at

the course’s snack shack. For those looking

to put an extra kick in their swing, the bar

menu features Nantucket Natural Blends

Bloody Mary premium mixes, including

Bold & Spicy and Pineapple Habanero,

for $9. In addition to an array of bottled

beer, ranging from Budweiser to local

craft beers, Season’s has four brews on tap:

Lagunitas IPA, Hoegaarden White, Cisco

Brewers’ Whale’s Tale Pale Ale and Bud

Light. There is a sizable wine menu with

more than 50 bottles to select from,

several available by the half-bottle and a

dozen served by the glass. And a highlight

of the drink menu is the selection of

cocktails made with Nantucket-based

Triple Eight Distillery’s spirits. Our

favorite? The blueberry lemonade—a

quintessential summer blend made

with Triple 8 Blueberry Vodka and

hand-squeezed lemonade.

And for on-the-course refreshments,

we’d be remiss if we failed to mention the

snack shack’s $4 “tall boy” and $9 “tall

girl” specials: 16 oz. cans of Harpoon Take

5 IPA, as well as other varieties of beer,

and 16 oz. cans of ‘Babe’ rosè (a nod to the

late Eileen "Babe" Lombard, who served

as Kelley Greens’ longtime pro-shop

manager).

TOP: Proprietor John Moore

behind the new custom-made bamboo

bar. MIDDLE: Season’s hosted a Derby

Day Fundraiser on its first day of business.

One-hundred percent of the event’s $2,500

proceeds was donated to the Nahant

Recreation Fund. BOTTOM: The steak frites

—grass fed flat-iron steak topped with

chimichurri sauce served with crispy fries.

While many 19th holes are post-round

hangouts, Season’s is a destination

whether you’re a Masters’-level golfer or

simply in search of an Arnold Palmer and

a good meal. The lounge and restaurant

share a menu that includes many favorite

items from Moore’s award-winning Navy

Yard Bistro in Charlestown.

>>> CONTINUED ON P. 46

24 36 >>> FALL sUMMER 20162017


SHADES OF GREEN

OVERRULED!

DO PROPOSED USGA CHANGES GO TOO FAR?

By BOB GREEN

A few months ago, the United States Golf

Association and the Royal and Ancient, golf's

governing bodies in this country and the rest

of the world respectively, announced a series

of proposed changes to the current Rules

of Golf.

“Modernizing Golf's Rules” is the term

the USGA is using to describe the changes.

The real reason seems to be a simplification

of the rules and speeding up the game.

These rule changes, if approved, would

go into effect January 1, 2019. The USGA and

R&A are asking for golfers’ input through

August 31.

So, let's go over a few of the major and

not-so-major changes. I'll grade them with:

Eagle - great change

Birdie - good change

Par - OK

Bogey - questionable

Double Bogey - not good

DROPPING THE BALL

CURRENT RULE: The ball has to be dropped

while standing erect, holding the ball at

shoulder height at arm's length.

PROPOSED: You will be able to drop a ball

from any distance above the ground.

BOB’S VERDICT: This certainly is a simpler

procedure and will make sense to the

average golfer.

GRADE: PAR

LOST BALL SEARCH TIME

CURRENT RULE: A player has 5 minutes

to look for his ball once the search begins.

PROPOSED: The search time has been cut

to 3 minutes.

BOB’S VERDICT: The change will hopefully

speed up play. A percent of players at the

recreational level are accustomed to taking

a lot longer than the 5 minutes allotted now.

This rule, if followed, will save some time.

GRADE: PAR

TAPPING DOWN SPIKE

MARKS ON THE GREEN

CURRENT RULE: A player is not allowed to

repair spike marks on the green.

PROPOSED: Players will be allowed to

repair spike marks and any other damage

to the green done by shoes and other causes.

BOB’S VERDICT: I have a problem with this

proposed change. This will slow down the

pace of play. With players tapping down

multiple “damaged” areas on their line, it

can't help but lengthen the time it takes

to play.

GRADE: DOUBLE BOGEY

PUTTING WITH THE

FLAGSTICK IN THE HOLE

CURRENT RULE: If you are on the green

and your ball hits the flagstick, it's a 2 stroke

penalty or loss of hole.

PROPOSED: No penalty

BOB’S VERDICT: If you're 60 or older, you

likely remember when there was no penalty

for hitting the flagstick when you were on

the green.

GRADE: BIRDIE

PENALTY AREA

REPLACES HAZARD

CURRENT RULE: A player is not allowed

to ground his/her club or move loose

impediments within a hazard. The penalty is

2 strokes or loss of hole.

PROPOSED: You can ground your club in

the penalty area and remove any loose

impediments with no penalty.

BOB’S VERDICT: If you're a traditionalist like

I am, you have problems with this proposal.

A penalty area should impose a penalty.

Depending on each condition on the course,

going from fairway to rough to hazard, the

conditions and challenges get more difficult

as they should. It shouldn't be easy to hit out

of penalty areas.

GRADE: DOUBLE BOGEY

ELIMINATING ANNOUNCEMENT

REQUIREMENTS BEFORE

LIFTING A BALL

CURRENT RULE: Before lifting, the player

must announce to another player or marker

that he/she is doing so, and allow that person

to observe the process.

PROPOSED: The player is no longer required

to announce to another player the intent to lift

the ball or give that person the opportunity to

observe the process.

BOB’S VERDICT: If I'm on the opposite side

of the fairway and see my opponent lift the

ball without announcing the reason why,

I'm going to be concerned. Wouldn't you be?

I realize it's a “gentlemen's game” but this

is a common courtesy that should not

be eliminated.

GRADE: DOUBLE BOGEY

MAXIMUM SCORE IN

A STROKE PLAY EVENT

CURRENT RULE: In a standard individual

stroke play event, players must hole out at

every hole.

PROPOSED: The new rule is a “Maximum

Score” form of stroke play. The committee

can establish a maximum score.

BOB’S VERDICT: This proposal is really

bizarre. There would now be Match Play,

Stroke Play and Sort-of Stroke Play.

GRADE: DOUBLE BOGEY (I'd say quadruple

bogey, but the committee announced a

maximum score of double bogey.)

THERE ARE SEVERAL GOOD

PROPOSED CHANGES:

• Not allowing the caddie to stand behind

the player to aid with alignment - EAGLE

• Range finders can be used unless a local

rule forbids it - EAGLE

• Committee may mark more hazards as

lateral (red stakes) - BIRDIE

• No penalty for playing out of turn in

stroke play - BIRDIE

• No penalty if a player's own ball

accidentally deflects off him/her - EAGLE

But let's face it, the 800-pound gorilla in

the room, as far as the Rules of Golf are

concerned, is reacting to the three recent

incidents that have involved television

viewers calling or emailing the governing

bodies when they see an infraction.

>>> CONTINUED ON P. 54

NORTH SHORE GOLF


N O R T H S H O R E

GOLF

Notebook

Sagamore plans a Masters-ful

change on 9th hole

PHOTOS: Spenser Hasak

If the newly-designed ninth hole at Lynnfield’s

Sagamore Spring Golf Course looks familiar,

don’t be surprised if Dave Loggins’ iconic theme

music, “The Masters” (yes, that music), pops into

your head as you approach the green. That’s

because, well, the hole has been cleverly

renovated to replicate the treacherous par-3 12th

hole at Augusta National Golf Club.

The new hole made its public debut during

Memorial Day weekend. It features a brand new

two-tiered green, sloping downward from left to

right. Located to the right of the old green and

left of the lesson/nursery green, the new green

measures 3,400 square feet and is only about a

club-and-a-half deep. It is approximately 70 feet

wide with a steep-faced bunker protecting about

half the width of the green in front.

The old hole measured 210 yards from the tips.

Players could bounce the ball onto the green as

there were no bunkers or other obstacles in front,

except for the large water hazard about 70 yards

short of the green.

The new hole measures only 165 yards, but the

penalty for a poor shot is more severe.

“It’s definitely going to play tougher for the

average golfer as it’s a much smaller target,” said

Assistant Course Superintendent Phil

Miceli, who supervised the construction. “It may

be shorter, but the target is smaller, certainly

more shallow; you can’t run the ball over the

green like you can on the old hole. Players are

going to have to hit a much higher shot to hold

the green.

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Attention junior golfers! North Shore Golf magazine and

Reedy Meadow Golf Course are teaming up to revive the

Junior Golf Invitational, last held in 2014. It will take place

July 28 at 11:30 a.m. at the 195 Summer St. nine-hole course

in Lynnfield. For more info and the entry form, go to Page 33.

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Matt Parziale (Thorny Lea) and Herbie Aikens (Pinehills)

won their second straight MGA Four-Ball Championship,

which was held at Renaissance GC and Haverhill CC May

9 and 10. Aikens’ birdie on the first sudden death playoff hole

clinched the title. Sean Fitzpatrick (George Wright GC) and

Chris Tarallo (Thorny Lea GC) were runners-up. Both

teams were 16-under par.

Many competitors from the North Shore did well. Nick

Maccario and Shawn Roderick from Bradford CC finished

third at 15-under. Two teams from Gannon GC, Jay Fiste

and Tim Calvani and John Bolland and John Lynch Jr.,

finished at 7-under and tied for 11th place.

“Anything that is short of the green will end

up in the bunker or rolling back away from the

green toward the water. You go over, you are

facing a downhill chip shot that will be tough to

keep on the green. Hit it too hard and you are

going to roll off the green and end up in the

bunker or rolling down the hill. It is definitely a

much more challenging hole.”

Miceli said the cost of the renovation was

more than $100,000 and involved the removal

of many trees, mostly pines. Approximately 16

pines, other smaller trees and underbrush were

cleared from the tee box area alone, to promote

better growing conditions and open up a direct

line of flight from the right tee box to the

new green.

The renovation was handled in house by

Sagamore’s grounds staff: Superintendent

Jerry Dunklee, Miceli, Stu Spooner and

Billy McCarthy.

The reason for the renovation? Public demand.

“I’ve only been here two years, but from what

I understand, players have been asking for a

practice putting green for years, so the old green

is now the new practice green,” said Assistant

Professional Tim Doucette.

“I’m not sure who came up with the original

idea to rebuild the hole, but I think it was a total

group effort with everyone coming on board.”

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

The North Shore Chamber of Commerce’s annual

Summer Golf Outing will be held at Ipswich Country

Club on Monday, July 17. Tee-off is 1:30 p.m. The Bramble

format will be used. For details or to register, call

978-777-8565.

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

The Lynn Area Chamber of Commerce will hold its annual

Golf Tournament at Gannon Golf Course in Lynn on

Monday, Aug. 14. Shotgun start at 10 a.m. A full-catered meal

will follow. For more details or to register, call 781-592-2900

or go to LynnAreaChamber.com

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Big doings at your club? You or a pal get a hole-in-one?

Planning a tournament for charity? Something North

Shore golfers should be aware of? Please let us

know by contacting editor (Bill Brotherton at

bbrotherton@essexmediagroup.com) l

38 >>> sUMMER 2017

TOP: From left to right: Mark Gentili of North Attleboro, Joe Tocchio of Wakefield, Mike Cournoyer of

Salem, and Scott Thomas of Middleton finish up a round of golf at Sagamore Spring Golf Club in Lynnfield.

MIDDLE: From left to right: Ray Tomasko of Manchester, N.H., Larry O'Conner of Framingham, Mass.,

and George Desko of Andover finish up a round of golf at Sagamore Spring Golf Club in Lynnfield.

LEFT: Scott Thomas of Middleton hits out of a green-side bunker on the 18th hole.


TOP: The Pub at Ould Newbury got a facelift this

fast winter, including the addition of a new bar.

MIDDLE: Seating in the clubhouse includes an

enclosed deck and an open deck overlooking

the course. BOTTOM: Nicole LaPerriere of

Newburyport stripes a drive during her round.

PHOTOS: Mark Lorenz

Ould Newbury

opens its

second century

with a bang

By BOB ALBRIGHT

ralbright33@comcast.net

On Labor Day weekend in 1916, a

scenic golf course was unveiled off the

old Newburyport Turnpike in Newbury

promising unparalleled views of the

winding Parker River Estuary and nine

challenging golf holes. Flash-forward a

century, and that description of Ould

Newbury Golf Club still rings true today,

but that doesn’t mean things have stood

still off the golf course. To help celebrate its

centennial last year, the club completed an

ambitious clubhouse renovation project

that gutted the bar area and was paid for

solely by donations from its members.

“We raised about $60,000 through

raffles and donations,” General Manager

Ron Margeson said. “It was really important

to do it on our 100th year, to really kick the

whole thing off and get people excited.”

Typical of the tight-knit club, which

sees its membership grab rakes, shovels and

paint brushes each April to get the course

ready for another season, simple sweat

equity was a driving force in completing

the project. Ould Newbury member Mike

Meadows and his company, Meadows

Construction, donated all the work to build

the new bar. Fellow member Bill Jodz did

all the finish carpentry.

“We wanted that old-fashioned look with

the modern touch,” said Margeson of the

impressive mahogany bar that already looks

like it has been around nearly as long as the

prodigious Hickory tree that guards the

ninth green outside the clubhouse window.

With the inside of the clubhouse completed,

Margeson and the membership have turned

their sights on the outside of the building,

installing new decking and railings

this year.

To coincide with the renovations,

Margeson brought in veteran executive

chef and caterer Karen Butt, who has been

wowing members and guests with her

new pub-style menu and theme-oriented

dinners. The renovations, new food service,

along with a substantial TV advertising

campaign, have all paid dividends for the

semi-private club, which has grown from

165 members to 242 since the end of the

2015 season.

“We did run a television commercial

that had a lot of people talking about the

club, but I think the biggest thing has just

been the word of mouth from current

members telling people how much they

love this place,” said Margeson, who has

been a member since 2006. “Having the

new bar and food service has been a big

draw. A lot of couples have joined and

we have built some special memberships

for them as well as for members under 40.”

Margeson’s vision seems to be working.

“My whole thing was that I wanted to take

this from being just a golf course to being

a golf club once again,” he said.

Changes to the clubhouse and bar are

not the only new development at Ould

Newbury this year. Longtime course

superintendent Nate Walker, who grew

up playing the elevated greens at the testy

nine-holer, has moved on to take over at

Renaissance in Haverhill.

Filling the popular Walker’s shoes

was a tough task, but Margeson thinks

the club has found the right guy in Scott

Godfrey, who served as the super at Little

Harbor Country Club in Wareham.

Godfrey started in April and quickly got

a firsthand appreciation for the “all-in”

spirit that has always embodied the

Ould Newbury membership.

>>> CONTINUED ON P. 44

NORTH SHORE GOLF


PHOTO: Spenser Hasak

‘The Local Guy’

IN 2001, EVERYONE WAS ROOTING FOR DANVERS’ STEVE SWEDBERG

By BOB ALBRIGHT

F

or one momentous week 16 years

ago, Steve Swedberg was the story

at the 2001 U.S. Senior Open at

Salem Country Club. Sure, Nicklaus,

Palmer, Player and Trevino were all there

too, but everyone on the North Shore was

talking about the affable physical therapist

from Danvers who improbably went from

playing for skins over at Beverly Golf &

Tennis Club, to teeing it up with golf

royalty just a few miles up the road in the

pre-eminent major on the Senior Tour.

“For me, it was way beyond my

expectations to be where I was,”

Swedberg recalled fondly.

Swedberg had qualified at Plymouth

Country Club that May, where he rode a

very hot putter to 67 and a three-way tie

for medalist honors. The congratulatory

banner went up for the popular perennial

club champion on the porch at Beverly

G&T shortly thereafter. The enormity of

the situation quickly began to sink in.

“I can remember thinking, ‘What have I

gotten myself into?’” Swedberg recalled,

with a chuckle.

After a pair of solid practice rounds,

Swedberg found himself in a nondescript

threesome when play teed off on Thursday.

But he was sandwiched between two very

notable groups: Jack Nicklaus, Raymond

Floyd and eventual champion Bruce

Fleisher on one side and Dana Quigley,

Hale Irwin and Doug Tewell on the other.

“I remember the guys from Beverly

saying that they had seen me play more

than enough and that they were going to

watch Nicklaus and Irwin,” said Swedberg,

who brought his friend and fellow Beverly

G&T member Billy Elwell along for the

wild ride as his caddie. “I just happened to

be in the middle of it.”

Pick out any five synonyms for the word

“surreal” and Swedberg will tell you that

they all applied to that eventful week in

Peabody. After firing an opening round 86

on a day where the temperatures were at

least 10 degrees higher, Swedberg vividly

remembers making his way to the locker

room where he found the most unlikely of

souls to commiserate with.

“I was straddling my bench with my

hat in my hand and my head between

my knees.

I picked my head up and six feet away

from me was Arnold Palmer doing the

same thing,” Swedberg reminisced of “The

King,” who had stumbled to an 81 himself

in the heat. “He put out his hand and said,

‘Arnold Palmer’ and I just said, ‘Mr.

Palmer you don’t have to introduce

yourself to me.’”

A 20-minute conversation ensued with

the late legend offering plenty words of

encouragement.

“I told him that I was the local guy and

that I had not played very well and he told

me that was a lot of pressure. He said I had

nothing to be ashamed of and that I had

made it here and that I belonged here.”

Nicklaus also made a point of

introducing himself to the “Local Guy”

who was getting his fair share of headlines

in all the local papers. Then there was his

final hole of the first day where Swedberg’s

approach shot just rolled into the front of

the trap below Salem’s elevated 18th

green, which served as the tournament’s

ninth hole.

“I’m standing outside the trap and I’m

looking at all the television cameras and I

guess Nicklaus had just sunk a long putt

before me,” Swedberg noted. “I’m thinking

that I could blade this thing into the crowd,

or I could whiff and fall into the trap

head-first!”

Summoning the form that has led him

to six club titles at Beverly G&T, the crowd

favorite did neither as he pitched out onto

the ultra slick green and then sank a

winding 30-footer to save par.

“I even doffed my hat to the crowd,”

Swedberg, who shot an 81 the following

day and missed the cut, recalled with a

grin. “They said it was even a louder

applause than what Nicklaus got.”

Now 67, the last few years have not

quite been the idyllic retirement that

Swedberg had hoped for. In the winter of

2013 he lost his beloved wife of 33 years,

Joyce, to lung cancer. He still plays golf

throughout the winter at his home in

Boynton Beach, Fla., and several times a

week with his regular group at Beverly

Golf & Tennis Club throughout the spring

and summer, but has had to battle

through a series of setbacks on the course

as well. He has had both hips replaced in

recent years and lost sight in his left eye

two years ago after a bizarre reaction from

an encounter with fire ants on the golf

course. Still, the resilient Swedberg has

worked his way back to a single-digit

handicap.

“I try to focus on the positives rather

than the negatives,” he said. “I had a very

good run and I’m lucky to have the

memories that I have.” l

40 >>> sUMMER 2017


AROUND THE GREEN …

ANALYZE THEN EXECUTE

By Webb Heintzelman

Golf is a game of skill and experience.

The more we play and practice, the better

we become. This is especially true around

the green. Having the correct approach

when you find your ball on the fringe or in

the greenside rough is critical to success.

CHIPPING: a low-running shot played with a

lob wedge through 7 iron or hybrid; no wrist

action; 1/3 carry and 2/3 roll; contact with the

ball first, then the ground; ball position is

back in the stance; weight’s on the front foot.

PITCHING: a higher-and softer-landing-shot

played with a lob wedge through pw; wrist

action; 2/3 carry and 1/3 roll; contact with the

ball first, then the ground; ball position is in

the center; weight’s on the front foot.

IN THE ROUGH, THINGS TO CONSIDER:

• How is the ball sitting in the grass? If it’s

sitting up, you can chip or pitch. If the

ball’s sitting halfway down, pitch. If the

ball is buried, pitch.

• If the rough is wet or thick, the ball will

come out slow.

• If the rough is dry or thin, the ball will

come out normal.

• If the grass is growing toward you, the

ball will come out slow. If the grass is

growing away from you, the ball will

come out fast.

ON THE FRINGE OR CLOSELY-MOWED

FAIRWAY WITHIN 5 YARDS OF THE GREEN,

THINGS TO CONSIDER

• What is the intended path like?

• If the intended path includes debris, divots

or sprinkler heads, you can either chip

or pitch.

• If the ground is wet or dewy, the ball will

travel slowly if played on the ground; you

can either chip or pitch.

• If the grass is growing toward you, the ball

will hop if played on the ground; you can

either chip or pitch.

• Always choose the lowest-risk shot: first

choice, putter; second choice, chip; third

choice, pitch.

WHEN YOU APPROACH THE

BALL GO THROUGH THIS CHECKLIST

• Can I land it on the green and stop it near

the hole?

• Is the proper shot a chip, pitch or putt?

• What club should I use?

• Where should I land the ball?

• How fast is the ball going to roll?

• How much break do I need to play?

DEVELOPING A GOOD PRACTICE ROUTINE

Bring your golf bag and six balls to the

short-game area at your course. If there isn’t

such an area, visit the course at a slow time.

Next, drop the balls in the rough (play the

ball as it lies) and choose a target pin on the

green. Now go through the above checklist for

each of the six balls. Keep a record of how

close to the pin each ball finishes. Repeat this

routine until you’ve hit 30 shots, changing the

target pin for each round of six balls. (You can

place a tee in the ground as your target.)

OK, now do the same from the fringe to 5

yards off the green. Again, keep a record of

how close each ball comes to the pin. Repeat,

until you’ve hit 30 shots, changing the target

pin for each round of six balls.

PRE-SHOT ROUTINE ON THE COURSE

As you go through your checklist in

evaluating the shot at hand, consider the

following:

• Taking a few practice swings is very

beneficial, as it will help you determine

the thickness and moisture of the grass,

any slopes that may alter your stance,

and help you gain a feel for the shot.

• Next, walk onto the green to determine

the firmness and confirm any slope. With

all the information calculated, choose

your club, visualize your shot and

stay committed.

RECIPE FOR SUCCESS

When practicing your short game, spend

50 percent of your time around the green

and 50 percent of your time on the green.

When practicing putting, spend 80 percent

of your time inside 6 feet and 20 percent of

your time outside 20 feet. This will help you

become a great short putter and a great

lag putter.

FINAL THOUGHTS:

Everyone is capable of improving and

becoming a better golfer. A good short

game will allow you to enjoy the game

more and lower your scores. See you

around the green.

Webb Heintzelman is a former member of the

PGA Tour and a PGA professional since 1988.

He is the Director of Instruction at The Golf Club

at Turner Hill in Ipswich. He teaches both private

and semi-private lessons for members and

nonmembers. His customized golf schools

focus on the short game. You can reach him

at webbpro@comcast.net or 978-821-9168 or

check out the videos and tips on his

Facebook page at Webb Heintzelman

Golf Instructor PGA.

PHOTO: Spenser Hasak

NORTH SHORE GOLF


‘THE BACK NINERS’

MARBLEHEAD MAILMAN’S SPECIAL DELIVERY GETS STAMP OF APPROVAL

By SANDI GOLDFARB

MEMBERS OF THE "BACK-NINERS," FROM LEFT, KEVIN O'NEIL, DR. JOHN UNTERBORN, JIM MURPHY, TOM RYAN, BOB MORIN,

DR. PAUL BUSSE, JOHN HARPER, DREW TRIPODI, FRANK SWEENEY AND JIM SUMMERS AT THE MEADOW IN PEABODY.

M

any consider golf a test of skill and

athleticism, while the uninitiated

may view the game as nothing more

than a “good walk spoiled.” For 12 North

Shore residents, a shared love of golf is

what connects them. But it was Bob Morin,

a Peabody resident, former Marblehead

postman and lifelong golfer, who first

brought them together.

Jim Murphy, 69, of Marblehead,

remembers chatting with Morin in August

of 2007. “I think my monthly subscription

to Golf Magazine prompted Bob to inquire

if I’d be interested in a round of golf,” said

Murphy. “We discussed getting a few guys

together to play at The Meadow. So Bob

began asking folks on his route if they

would like to join us. That’s how the

“Back Niners” were formed.”

Soon three other Marbleheaders, Paul

Busse, a radiation oncologist, Kevin O’Neil,

a software developer, and Frank Sweeney,

a financial adviser, came on board. “Bob

Morin is the common denominator for

most if not all of the group,” said O’Neil.

Busse, 66, is another fan of Morin’s,

both on and off the course.

“Bob was more than our mailman.

For 30 years he cared to know about our

families, our lives, our health, and was a

bright spot in the day for everyone who

came across him.”

Over time, Morin invited Tom Ryan, an

insurance executive he met along his route,

while the original members encouraged

friends and neighbors to join: John Harper,

a veteran of the mortgage industry,

Art Pearce, a CPA, Jim Summers, who

specializes in technology, physicians Myles

Keroack and John Unterborn, and Drew

Tripodi, an executive in software sales.

For Keroack, 55, “Sunday morning is

more than just golf, more than the game;

it’s the people you play with.” The intrepid

“Back Niners” hit the links every Sunday

morning, spring through fall, rain or shine,

at The Meadow in Peabody, a place that

Morin, 67, describes as “the finest public

course on the North Shore.” An early tee

time allows the players to enjoy nine

holes and, more often than not, gets

them home in time for a late breakfast

with their families.

“Occasionally, golf competes with other

activities of daily life, particularly on the

weekend. But when I say, ‘I’m off to play

nine holes with Bob, all I hear is,

have a good time’,” said Busse.

Asked about the most unforgettable

moments of their decade of play, several

PHOTO: Scott Eisen

members recalled a singular achievement,

Summer’s hole-in-one on the 12th.

“Watching a near-50-year-old-man

call his dad from the green— to share his

excitement with the guy that taught him

to love the game—that was special,”

said Ryan.

The golfers enjoy rhythms and

rituals, such as the annual “Postal Cup,”

a competition held over four weekends,

which honors Morin’s 50-year career with

the U.S. Postal Service. This event includes

a system designed to level the playing field,

with Morin, the official scorekeeper,

calculating handicaps based on rounds

played throughout the year. And each

spring, the “Back Niners” compete in

“Maria’s Match,” a mini-tournament that

concludes with the losing teams treating

the winners to breakfast at Maria’s Place

in Salem.

Tripodi, who at 48 is the youngest in the

tightknit troop, is credited with initiating a

36-hole outing at courses around the state.

Initially, the group played at The Pinehills

in Plymouth. Last year, Tripodi and

Sweeney—both members of Tedesco

Country Club in Marblehead— and Busse,

who belongs to Salem Country Club,

arranged for the group to play 18-holes

at each course, all in one day. >>>

42 >>> sUMMER 2017


Unterborn, 54, appreciates the group,

which offers company and continuity, from

season to season, year in and year out.

“It is my ‘man cave’ every Sunday,” he said.

In late March, Pearce, who battled

cancer for the past 10 years, recalled the

group’s “empathy, encouragement and

unconditional friendship” and the special

role the “Back Niners” played in celebrating

his 50th birthday last winter.

“It’s been an incredibly uplifting few

months for me (with) support coming from

all corners. But this ‘Back Niners’ gesture

still stands out as overwhelming.”

LEFT:

Art Pearce

BELOW:

Jim Summers

celebrates after

his hole in one

at The Meadow

on June 29, 2014

Before Pearce’s

death in April, the

group rallied

around their friend,

gathering at his

home, and later at

the Kaplan Family

Hospice House in

Danvers, for

wide-ranging conversations

that Pearce said touched on “parenting

ruminations, career lessons learned

and mixed drink expertise.”

The “Back Niners” coordinated visits

and encouraged special requests, with

Pearce often asking for his favorite ice

cream, Ben & Jerry’s Chocolate Chip

Cookie Dough.

“Sometimes we’d watch golf, but most

of the time we just talked,” said Murphy.

The group kept in touch with Pearce between

visits through phone calls, emails and texts.

Harper, 60, has fond memories of Pearce,

“a phenomenal player,” who would show up

every Sunday, carrying his golf shoes. “At

first, Art would put his shoes on at the 10th

tee. Then, he started forgetting his shoes

altogether.” Harper added that for Pearce,

playing a round in sandals was not uncommon.

“One day he had on flip-flops. After teeing

off, he removed them and played the entire

round barefoot. He beat me handily that

morning. I think he shot a 41 or 42—in

bare feet!”

Despite his passing, Pearce will always

be a part of the “Back Niners.” Each week,

a member of the group carries in his bag

one of Pearce’s clubs in a lasting tribute

to their friend. l

AROUND

the

COURSE

1ST ROW: Merchandise on display at the 2017 PGA Merchandise Show held in January at Orange County

Convention Center in Orlando; A colorfully-dressed crew attending the show. (PHOTOS: Traci Edwards/PGA

of America); 2ND ROW: Ed Toner of Swampscott gets ready to tee off on Middleton Golf Course's 1st hole; Jen

Dorney of Peabody and Susan O'Connor of Danvers at Middleton Golf Course. (PHOTOS: Spenser Hasak) Kevan

Elliot on the green at Beverly Golf & Tennis Club. (PHOTO: Owen O’Rourke) 3RD ROW: The clubhouse at Olde

Salem Greens; Dennis McFall plays the 18th at Gannon Colf Club in April. (PHOTOS: Spenser Hasak)

4TH ROW: Connor Hayes plays at Olde Salem in May (Photo: Spenser Hasak); Karen Miller, Sue Page, Lea Healey,

Betty Lou Fecteau and Jane McDonald, all sporting fascinators, have Kentucky Derby Day fun at The Pub at Ould

Newbury. (PHOTO: Mike Norris)

NORTH SHORE GOLF


OULD NEWBURY, CONTINUED FROM P. 39

CONTACT:

joanne@windhamcc.com

603-434-2093

WINDHAM COUNTRY CLUB

One Country Club Road

Windham, NH 03087

Be sure to make

your next tee time at

wenhamcountryclub.com

or call (978)468-4714

BEST JUNIOR GOLF

DEAL AROUND

All juniors 15 years old or

under are free with a paying

adult 7 days a week!

Memberships still available

• Fun Family Friendly

Atmosphere

• Over 30 professionally run

tournaments for members to

enjoy and a little competition!

10 PACK SPECIALS

Pay for 10 green fees and

get the 11th Free!

OUTING DATES also available

Looking for a great venue for

all skill levels, look no further.

Contact us for details.

AND SO MUCH MORE!

Reserve your tee time

Pro Shop: 603-434-2093

windhamcc.com

Visit the Golf Academy for

professional swing analysis

and club fitting

COME PLAY

NORTH SHORE’S

HIDDEN GEM

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

7 DAYS A WEEK!

Wenham Country Club 94 Main St., Wenham, MA 01984

978-468-4714 • wenhamcountryclub.com

“He actually came up for his interview on

Member Cleanup Day,” said Margeson. We’re

driving around and he saw 70 members with

rakes in their hands and Jimmy Hilton, the

head pro, drive by on a tractor. He said he had

never seen nothing like it. I told him, ‘This is

the kind of place you’re coming to.’”

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Though it appears Ould Newbury is built to

last another 100 years, another course up the

road may very well be in its final season. The

Newburyport Planning Board voted 6-2 in

March to grant a special permit for a 38-lot

open space residential development on

the site of Evergreen Valley Golf Club. The

nine-hole course, which is situated on 36

acres off Boyd Drive, has been the subject of

numerous development plans through the

years. All have been fiercely combated by

local residents citing traffic concerns and

that the project would threaten nearby

municipal wells.

If this summer is indeed the final season, it

will be a sad end for the par-35 track right

off I-95 that was built in 1993. With its

large greens, laid-back nature and, most

importantly, $10 green fees, Evergreen has

been the ideal place for beginners of all ages

to play their first rounds. My son, like so many

others, recorded his first par on Evergreen’s

very generous 215-yard, par-4 finishing hole.

Reports are the course should be open

through at least September. Stay tuned.

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Despite a soggy April, course superintendent

Mike Mellon once again has Amesbury CC

in top form. Amesbury’s Chris Francoeur

will be looking for his third-straight club

championship in July. Francoeur, who will be

teeing it up for URI this fall after a great career

at St. John’s Prep, ran away with last year’s

tournament with a four-day, 1-under-par

total of 279 (73-67-69-70). Other defending

champions this summer in Amesbury include

Rick Roaf (net champion) and Jeff Hume

(member’s club champion).

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Big doings over at Bradford Country Club this

year where head pro/owner Kevin Murphy

has been busy overseeing the expansion of the

old finishing hole from a 205-yard, par-3 to a

342-yard, par-4. Construction on the new

18th is scheduled to be completed early this

month. It was nice to see Murphy’s parents,

Ted and Mary, receive the Legacy Award by

the Haverhill YMCA for their nearly 50 years

of dedication and support to the Haverhill

community. Owners of the bustling Murphy’s

Garrison Golf Center since 1969, the couple

has raised more than $200,000 for those

in need through their annual Santa Fund

Hole-in-One contest each fall, while also

donating their time and their facility to myriad

other endeavors. >>>

44 >>> sUMMER 2017


••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

As you sit in traffic at the New Hampshire tolls

this summer and glance over at the rolling

fairways at Sagamore Hampton Golf Club,

you may notice something a little different —

FlingGolf. The rapidly growing sport

combines equal parts golf and lacrosse.

Instead of lugging 14 clubs around the course,

FlingGolfers use just one, a FlingStick, and

can play right alongside golfers simply

counting the strokes, or flings, it takes to finish

a hole (the FlingStick can also be used as a

putter). Aspiring FlingGolfers can book tee

times at Sagamore Hampton between noon

and 2:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday.

Before hitting the course, its recommended

golfers try flinging a few balls at Sagamore

Hampton’s top-notch practice facility, the

Sagamore Golf Center, in North Hampton.

FlingGolf is also available at nearby Apple Hill

GC in Kingston, NH. Speaking of Apple Hill,

the 18-hole par-70 course has one of the better

deals around this summer: all you can play

with a cart for just $50 on Mondays. Over in

Greenland, Breakfast Hill is set to host the

final round of the Seacoast Amateur on

Sunday, June 25. l

COME PLAY AT

THE CLUBHOUSE

The Clubhouse Golf & Entertainment is the North Shore’s

premier active event space, featuring over 12,000 square

feet of indoor golf, featuring the official PGA Tour aboutGolf ®

Simulators, games and entertainment space for your next

special event.

Bob Albright is a freelance writer who lives

on the New Hampshire seacoast. Email him at

ralbright33@comcast.net and follow him on

twitter @BobAlbright1

• 4 professional billiard tables

• 3 ping-pong tables

• 6 Minuteman League

approved dart boards

• 4 custom cornhole courts

• Vintage shuffle board table

• Bank Shot Shuffleboard

• Foosball Table

• 3 14 ft. HD projection screens

• Full bar

160 SO. MAIN ST., Rte. 114 • MIDDLETON

978-774-4476 • golfcountry@comcast.net

• Fully Lighted 50 Tee Golf Driving Range

• Natural Grass Practice Area

• Covered and Heated Tees for Year Round Practicing

• 2 Beautifully Landscaped Miniature Golf Courses

• 9 Station Baseball & Softball Batting Cage Facility

• Golf Lessons by PGA Professionals

BUY 1 LARGE BUCKET OF RANGE BALLS

GET 1 SMALL BUCKET FREE

EXPIRES: 7/30/2017

Open until midnight daily • Great for corporate events, birthday

parties & more! • Game room is 21+ after 8 p.m.

220 South Main St. (Rt. 114) • Middleton, MA

(978) 539-8725 • TheClubhouseGE.com

NORTH SHORE GOLF


1













>>> 19TH HOLE, CONTINUED FROM P. 36

There is traditional pub fare such as 12-

inch pizzas with choices spanning from

traditional margherita, to roasted vegetable,

to more gourmet selections like shrimp

scampi, lobster and clam toppings. All of

the toppings are fresh and the pizzas are

made to order. There are also two burgers

on the menu, both made with grass-fed

beef. The lunch burger is $9, while a larger

version of the burger is offered on the

dinner menu for $12.50.

Herbivores will rejoice over the

salad selections, which include a red

and golden beet salad with arugula, crispy

goat cheese and toasted almonds, topped

with roasted shallot vinaigrette ($9).

And pescatarians will enjoy the tuna

tartare made with cucumber, red peppers,

ginger oil and spices, served with

homemade potato chips ($12).

Nutrition · Treats · Bakery · Beds · Bowls · Toys

Collars · Leads · Accessories · Grooming · Training

Everything at DogSpa has

been tailored to our

philosophy of treating

every one of our dogs with

the same care and concern

that their owners have for

them at home. All of our

staff are professional pet

care specialists trained in

the art of grooming as

well as Pet First Aid by

the American Red Cross

Association. We strive to

not only make your dog

beautiful, but to also

educate our clients on the

importance of canine

nutrition, health and

general well-being.

The DOGSPA Difference

The

Difference

45 Enon St., Commodore Plaza, Beverly

978-922-9227 • beverlydogspa.com

Season’s ginger sake salmon

($20) is sure to become a

menu favorite.

If you’re ordering one of Season’s many

entrees, which range in price from $17 to

$22, we recommend the ginger sake

salmon served over lemongrass-scented

Jasmine rice and topped with seaweed and

cucumber salad, wasabi crème fraiche,

citrus ponzu sauce ($20). Another dishworthy

plate is the steak frites—grass-fed

flat-iron steak topped with chimichurri

sauce served with crispy fries ($18).

Early morning visitors to the club

can also enjoy a bite to eat and the

atmosphere, fueling up on breakfast

sandwiches, parfaits and fruit cups, as well

as sip java from Beverly-based Atomic

Coffee Roasters while taking in the view on

Season’s new outdoor seating area located

next to the building.

Season’s at Nahant Golf Club is

located at One Willow Road in Nahant. It is

open seven days a week, serving breakfast,

lunch and dinner. Visit Season’s online at:

nahantgolfclub.com l

/ / / /

What’s your favorite 19th hole at

North Shore Golf clubs? Let Beth know at

bbresnahan@essexmediagroup.com and

she’ll check it out.

46 >>> sUMMER 2017


Z

Zolotas Bros., Inc.

PLUMBING • HEATING • REMODELING

SERVING thE NoRth ShoRE FoR 60 YEARS

515 LoweLL Street, Peabody, Ma 01960 Phone 978-535-4035 Fax 978-535-4032

eMaiL info@zolotasbros.com web zolotasbros.com

6 WAYS TO IMPROVE YOUR GAME

AT PARADISE FAMILY GOLF!

1. NEW CALLAWAY BALLS AND MATS EVERY YEAR

2. SHORT GAME PRACTICE AREA – Free to use with

a bucket purchase

3. WEEKDAY AM BUCKET SPECIAL – 2 for 1 from

mats, 8am – 11am

4. GUARANTEED VALUE – Our everyday pricing,

Rewards Program & Discount Debit Card

guarantee you the best value at Paradise

5. PGA PROFESSIONALS ON STAFF – Lessons

at Paradise give you access to the only private

teaching studio north of Boston providing year

round indoor/outdoor instruction in addition

to short game and grass tees

6. PARADISE COMMITMENT – We give you access

to more products and services to improve your

golf game at the best value you will find

anywhere

25 Lonergan Road, Middleton

978-750-4653

paradisefamilygolf.com

We are easy to find! 1.2 miles from Route 1.

Ten minutes from Routes 128 or 495.

Open 7 Days a Week – All Year Round

STOP BY AND WORK ON YOUR GAME. YOU’LL BE IN PARADISE!

NORTH SHORE GOLF


Visit our

Website for available

Outing Dates

Greater Boston’s Rediscovered Classic

WEB SPECIALS

at

playgolfne.com

Mike Farrell, PGA Professional

Slayton Road, Melrose, MA

www.mthoodgolfclub.com

Call for tee times & directions.

781-665-6656

Junior Schools & Clinics

Full Service Pro Shop • Lessons

Bar • Restaurant • Functions

Golf Outings & Tournaments

Enjoy a Country Club Lifestyle on the North Shore

& C O M PA N Y

Ferncroft Country Club $1,100,000

Middleton’s newest community of luxury designer inspired townhomes. Estates on the Green at

Fernroft Country Club Golf Course. This home has all the amenities of a single family home with

exceptional detailing and none of the maintenance. 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths. Open floor plan. 1st floor

Master Suite, wrap-around deck, 3-car garage.

Anne LeBlanc-Snyder

Ipswich Country Club $1,075,000

Pristine single-owner home built to redefine

pride of ownership. 4 bedrooms, 2 full baths, 3

half baths. Stainless kitchen, family room, 3 gas

fireplaces, wine cellar. Deck, 5-car garage.

Maloney Howard Group & Kyle D’Addieco

Turner Hill Country Club $1,195,000

Elegant, well-maintained home. 3 bedrooms,

3 baths, 2 half-baths. Open 1st floor plan,

fireplaced living room, luxury master suite, office/

library. Granite eat-in kitchen.

Josephine Baker

Turner Hill Country Club $975,000

Stunning Shingle-style townhouse. Wellmaintained

3-bedroom, 3.5-bath home offers

library, granite chef’s kitchen, open concept

living-dining room. 1st floor master suite. Deck.

Josephine Baker

Ipswich Country Club $665,000

Well-maintained 3-bedroom, 3.5-bath home

with views of 2nd hole. Open concept 1st floor,

hardwood floors, granite kitchen. 3-sided gas

fireplace in living-dining room. Heated 2-car garage.

Amy Wallick & Brittany Stinson

Ipswich Country Club $639,000

Well-maintained 3-bedroom, 2-full bath, 2-half

bath home. Open concept living-dining-kitchen.

Updated kitchen, Master Suite. Finished lower

level, private patio area.

Dee Penachio

Turner Hill Country Club $785,000

Stunning 2-bedroom, 2.5-bath townhouse.

15th fairway panoramic views. Open floor plan,

granite chef’s kitchen, fireplaced living room,

deck. 1st floor en suite master. Garage.

Josephine Baker

www.jbarrettrealty.com

Prides Crossing 978.922.2700 • Beverly 978.922.3683 • Ipswich 978.356.3444

48 >>> sUMMER 2017


S A L E M , M A S S A C H U S E T T S

Just 30 minutes

North of Boston

1 CLUBHOUSE LANE • DRACUT, MA

3 3 1 L A FAY E T T E S T R E E T

COMING SOON

PRIME RETAIL

SPACE AVAILABLE

Only 2 units left!

For information

call: 978.927.9700

18 hole championship golf course

GREAT SENIOR RATES MONDAY – FRIDAY • BAR & GRILLE

GRAZIE ITALIAN RESTAURANT • WEDDINGS AND EVENTS

PUBLIC WELCOME

FOUROAKSCOUNTRYCLUB.COM • 978-455-0054

The North Shore’s

First Cantonese Restaurant

••••••

Enjoy Our Authentic Chinese Cuisine

••••••

Ginger Scallion Lobster

Shrimp Stuffed Eggplant

(in black bean sauce)

Walnut Shrimp

Rack of Lamb

(so delicious, it needs to be ordered a day in advance)

Our chefs always choose

the freshest ingredients for all our

authentic and luscious meals.

••••••

Enjoy Live Music Wednesday Nights

6:30 – 8:30 p.m.

SU • CHANG’S 373 Lowell St., Peabody

suchangspeabody.com

T. 978.531.3366

(Take out always available) F. 978.531.3060

Sun. – Thurs. 11:30 a.m. – 10 p.m.

Friday and Saturday 11:30 a.m. – 11 p.m.

QUALITY WORK.

COMPETITIVE PRICES.

LOCATED IN SWAMPSCOTT

781-581-0031 • AVICOMASONCONTRACTORS.COM

We’re a family-owned business

with an eye on craftsmanship and

perfection in all aspects of our

masonry and waterproofing work.

Since 1988

( Ask to see our catering menu )

AVICO

You can put your trust in

our professionalism first-hand.

Fully licensed and insured

since 1988.

MASON CONTRACTORS

NORTH SHORE GOLF


VISIT US ONLINE AT: GCAJEWELERS.COM

GCA

JEWELERS

You’ll always find excellent sales

prices for your favorite jewelry at

GCA Jewelers. Whether you need

diamond jewelry or sterling silver,

we have the best deals in town.

S U M M E R S P E C I A L !

25% OFF

O N I N S T O C K

D I A M O N D J E W E L R Y

451 L I N C O L N A V E .

S A U G U S , M A 019 0 6

781-233-5513

Country Club of

New Hampshire

1287 Main St., Lynnfield, MA 01940

781-334-3151

sagamoregolf.com

• 6000-7000 challenging yards of golf at the foot

of majestic Mount Kearsarge

• Weekday and weekend “Stay n’ Play” packages available

COMING SOON:

Day trips from Mt. Hood golf course via luxury motor coach

Includes breakfast and a meal after your round

Call 603.927.4246 to reserve your tee time.

We’re close! An easy highway drive, under 90 minutes from Boston, just off l-89 at Exit 10, in North Sutton, NH

Tee times 7 days in advance

____

PGA instruction available

____

Driving range and

new short game area

____

New golf cart fleet

NEW FOR 2017

REDESIGNED 9TH HOLE

(OPENING EARLY SUMMER!)

50 >>> sUMMER 2017


A life well planned...

A retirement well played.

WEALTH MANAGEMENT SERVICES

Thomas T. Riquier, CFP ® , CLU

Member of Ed Slott’s Master Elite IRA Advisor Group

The Retirement Financial Center

10 Liberty Street, Danvers, MA 01923

978-777-5000 RetirementCtr.com

Thomas T. Riquier, CFP ® , CLU is an Investment Advisory Representative offering Securities and Advisory Services through

United Planners Financial Services. Member: FINRA, SIPC. The Retirement Financial Center and United Planners are independent companies.

NORTH SHORE GOLF


NS GOLF /// COURSE DIRECTORY

PRIVATE CLUBS

Andover Country Club

60 Canterbury St., Andover, MA

andovercountryclub.com; 978-475-1263

Golf Professional Daniel Taylor Slope 131;

Rating 73.1 SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 12

Bass Rocks Golf Club

34 Beach Road, Gloucester, MA

bassrocksgolfclub.org; 978-283-1866

Golf Professional Peter Hood

Slope 124; Rating 69.3

Bear Hill Golf Club

2 North St., Stoneham, MA

bearhillgolfclub.com; 781-245-4295

Golf Professional Jeff Wirbal

9 holes; Slope 133; Rating 71.9

Bellevue Golf Club

320 Porter St., Melrose, MA

bellevuegolfclub.com; 781-665-7900

Golf Professional Jeffrey Monteleone

9 holes: Slope 128; Rating 69.8

Essex County Club

153 School St.,

Manchester-by-the-Sea,MA

essexcc.org; 978-526-7311

Golf Professional Jack Davis

Slope 136; Rating 72.5

Ferncroft Country Club

10 Village Road, Middleton, MA

ferncroftcc.com; 978-739-4032

Golf Professional Philip Leiss

27 holes; Slope 135; Rating 72.9

Haverhill Country Club

58 Brickett Lane, Haverhill, MA

www.haverhillcc.com; 978-373-1146

Golf Professional Jason Dufresne

Slope 129; Rating 70.6

Indian Ridge Country Club

Lovejoy Road, Andover, MA

indianridgecountryclub.us; 978-475-9484

Golf Professional Mike Miller

Slope 133; Rating 72.1

Ipswich Country Club

148 Country Club Way, Ipswich, MA

ipswichclub.com; 978-356-3999

Golf Professional Daniel R. Dwyer

Slope 139; Rating 73.9

Kernwood Country Club

1 Kernwood St., Salem, MA

kernwoodcc.org; 978-745-1210

Golf Professional Frank Dully

Slope 130; Rating 71.7

Long Meadow Golf Club

165 Havilah St., Lowell, MA

longmeadowgolfclub.com; 978-441-1542

Golf Professional Gene Manley

9 holes; Slope 127; Rating 69.3

Meadow Brook Golf Club

292 Grove St., Reading, MA

meadowbrookgolfclub.org; 781-942-1334

Golf Professional Steve Sheridan

9 holes; Slope 137; Rating 73.8

Mount Pleasant Golf Club

141 Staples St., Lowell, MA

mpgc.com; 978-452-8228

Golf Professional Joel Jenkins

9 holes; Slope 126; Rating 70.1

Myopia Hunt Club

435 Bay Road, South Hamilton, MA

myopiahuntclub.org; 978-468-4433

Golf Professional Mike Bemis

Slope 135; Rating 73.2

Nabnasset Lake Country Club

47 Oak Hill Rd., Westford, MA

nabnassetlakecc.com; 978-692-4606

Golf Professional Dan Gillis

9 holes; Slope 119; Rating 67.0

North Andover Country Club

500 Great Pond Rd.,

North Andover, MA

northandovercc.com; 978-687-7414

Golf Professional Peter Farley

9 holes; Slope 119; Rating 65.4

Renaissance Golf Club

377 Kenoza St., Haverhill, MA

renaissancema.com; 978-241-6700

Golf Professional Stuart P. Cady

Slope 142; Rating 75.0

Salem Country Club

133 Forest St., Peabody, MA

salemcountryclub.org; 978-538-5400

Golf Professional Kevin Wood

Slope 134; Rating 73.5

Tedesco Country Club

154 Tedesco St., Marblehead, MA

tedescocc.org; 781-631-2800

Golf Professional Robert Green

Slope 129; Rating 72.1

Thomson Country Club

2 Mid Iron Drive, North Reading, MA

thomsoncc.com; 978-664-2016

Golf Professional Christopher Young

Slope 132; Rating 72.8

The Golf Club at Turner Hill

3 Manor House Lane, Ipswich, MA

turnerhill.com; 978-356-7070

Golf Professionals: Nate Hopley

and Mike Brown

Slope 138; Rating 75.1

Vesper Country Club

185 Pawtucket Blvd.,

Tyngsborough, MA

vespercc.com; 978-458-8731

Golf Professional Stephen Doyle

Slope 137; Rating 73.6

Winchester Country Club

468 Mystic St., Winchester, MA

winchestercc.org; 781-729-1181

Golf Professional Jim Salinetti

Slope 137; Rating 73.5

Winthrop Golf Club

453 Main St., Winthrop, MA

winthropgolf.com; 617-846-9775

Golf Professional Jim Bruce

9 holes; Slope 116; Rating 68.5

PUBLIC CLUBS

Amesbury Golf and Country Club

46 Monroe St., Amesbury, MA; 978-388-5153

amesburycountryclub.com; 9 holes.

Club Pro Butch Mellon; Tee times: 5 days in

advance; Fee for 9 holes: $20/$21

weekday/weekend;Fee for 18 holes: $30/$32

weekday/weekend; Cart rental: $15 per

person for 18 holes, $7.50 per person for 9

holes; Yards 6,095; Slope 125; Rating 70.5

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 54

Beverly Golf & Tennis Club

134 McKay St., Beverly, MA;

978-922-9072 ext. 111

beverlygolfandtennis.net; 18 holes.

Director of Golf: Dave Trull; Tee times: 6 days

in advance; Fee for 9/18 holes: $26/$45

weekday, $29/$54 weekends; Cart rental:

$19 for 18 holes; Yards 6,803; Slope 129;

Rating: 72.9 SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 26

Black Swan Country Club

258 Andover St., Georgetown, MA

978-352-7926; blackswancountryclub.com;

18 holes. Director of Golf: Dave Trull;

Tee times: 6 days in advance; Fee for 9/18

holes: $26/$45 weekday, $29/$54 weekends;

Cart rental: $19 for 18 holes; Yards 6,803;

Slope 129; Rating: 72.9

Bradford Country Club

201 Chadwick Road, Bradford, MA

978-372-8587; bradfordcc.com; 18 holes.

Club Pro: Kevin Murphy; Tee times: 5 days in

advance (online tee times also available); Fee

for 9/18 holes: $19/$34 weekdays, $23/$44

weekends; Cart rental: $20 per person for 18

holes; Yards: 6,157; Slope 130; Rating 70.8

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 10

Candlewood Golf Course

75 Essex Road, Ipswich, MA; 978-356-5377

candlewoodgolf.net; 9 holes.

Tee times: no; Fee for 9/18 holes: $16/$21

weekday, $17/$22; weekend; Cart rental:

$14 for 9 holes; Yards: 2,075; Slope N/A;

Rating N/A

Cape Ann Golf Club

99 John Wise Ave., Essex, MA

978-768-7544; capeanngolf.com; 9 holes.

Club Pro: none; Tee times: 5 days in advance;

Fee for 9/18 holes: $25/$38 everyday; Cart

rentals: $11 per rider for 9 holes; Yards 5,862;

Slope 119; Rating 68.3 SEE OUR AD ON

PAGE 14

Cedar Glen Golf Course

60 Water St., Saugus, MA

781-233-3609 cedarglengolf.com; 9 holes.

Club Pro: none; Tee times: no; Fee for 9/18

holes: $20/$34 weekdays, $22/$37 weekend;

Cart rental: $18 for 9 holes; Yards 6,050;

Slope 107; Rating 66.7

Chelmsford Country Club

66 Park Road, Chelmsford, MA

978-256-1818 sterlinggolf.com/chelmsford;

9 holes.Club Pro: Gary Burke; Tee times: 4

days in advance; Fee for 9/18 holes: $19/$26

weekday, $22/$30 weekend; Cart rental: $16

for 18 holes; Yards: 4,934; Slope 108,

Rating 64.6

Country Club of Billerica

51 Baldwin Road, Billerica, MA

978-667-9121 ext. 22;

countryclubofbillerica.com; 18 holes.

Club Pro: Ed O’Connell; Tee times: 5 days in

advance; Fee 9/18 holes: $22/$35 weekday,

$25/$40 weekend; Cart rental: $17 per person

for 18 holes; Yards 5,847; Slope 123;

Rating 67.9

Crystal Lake Golf Club

940 North Broadway, Haverhill, MA

978-374-9621; golfcrystallake.com; 18 holes.

Club Pro: none; Teetimes: 10 days in advance

for members, 7 days in advance for public;

Fees: 18 holes $28 weekdays,

$37 weekends; Cart rental: $18 for 18 holes;

Yards 6,525; Slope 129; Rating 72.4

Evergreen Valley Golf Course

18 Boyd Drive, Newburyport, MA

978-463-8600; evergreenvalleygolf.com;

9 holes. Tee times: no; Fee for 9/18 holes:

$13/$25 everyday; Cart rental: $14 for 9

holes; Yards 2,997; Slope 108; Rating 67.4

Far Corner Golf Course

5 Barker Road, Boxford, MA; 978-352-8300

farcornergolf.com; 27 holes. Club Pro: John

O’Connor; Tee times: 5 days in advance; Fee

for 9/18 holes: $23/$41; weekday, $27/$47

weekend; Cart rental: $18 per person

Four Oaks Country Club

1 Clubhouse Lane, Dracut, MA

978-455-0054; fouroakscountryclub.com

Golf Pro: Anthony Martinho; Tee times: 6 days

in advance; Fee 9/18 holes: $24/$41

weekday, $30/$51 weekend; Cart rental: $20

per person for 18 holes; Yards 6,268; Slope

136; Rating 71.4

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 49

Gannon Municipal Golf Club

60 Great Woods Road, Lynn, MA

781-592-8238; gannongolfclub.com; 18 holes.

Club Pro: David Sibley; Tee times: 2 days in

advance after 6 p.m.; Nonresident fee for 9/18

holes: $22/$39 weekday, $24/$47 weekend;

Cart rental: $18 per person for 18 holes;

Yards 6,110; Slope123; Rating 70.2

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 26

Hickory Hill Golf Club

200 North Lowell St., Methuen, MA

978-686-0822; golfhickoryhill.com; 18 holes.

Club Pro: none; Tee times: every day;

Fee: 18 holes: $42 Mon.-Thurs., $45 Fri., $52

Sat.-Sun., Cart rental: $18 per person for 18

holes; Yards 6,287;Slope: 123; Rating: 70.8

Hillview Golf Course

149 North St., North Reading, MA

978-664-4435, hillviewgc.com; 18 holes.

Golf Pro: Chris Carter;

Tee times: 3 days in advance; Fee for 9/18

holes: $22/$40; Weekday, $25/$43 weekend;

Cart rental: $16 per rider for 18holes;

Yards 5,773; Slope 120; Rating 67.4

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 26

52 >>> sUMMER 2017


NS GOLF /// COURSE DIRECTORY

PUBLIC COURSES, continued

King Rail Reserve Golf Course

427 Walnut St., Lynnfield, MA; 781-334-4643;

9 holes. Club Pro: Eddie Whalley; Fees for

9/18 holes: $21/$31 weekday, $22/$44

weekend; Cart rental: $9 per person for

9 holes; Yards 3,460; Slope 112; Rating 63.6

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 33

Lakeview Golf Course

60 Main St., Wenham, MA

978-468-9584;lakeviewgc.com; 9 holes.

Club Pro: Michael Flynn; Tee times: 7 days in

advance; Fee for 9/18 holes: $18/$28 weekday,

$20/$30 weekend; Cart Rental: $7 for 9 holes

per person; Yards 4,200; Slope 91, Rating 59.3

The Meadow at Peabody

80 Granite St., Peabody, MA; 978-532-9390

peabodymeadowgolf.com; 18 holes.

Director of Golf: Peter Cronan; Tee times:

3 days in advance; Nonresident fee for 9/18

holes: $21/$40 weekday, $26/$47 weekend;

Cart rental: $10 per person for 9 holes

Yards 6,708; Slope 135; Rating 73.7

Merrimack Valley Golf Club

210 Howe St., Methuen, MA; 978-685-9717

merrimackvalleygolfclub.com; 18 holes.

Club Pro: Steve Katter; Tee times: 7 days in

advance; Fee for 9/18; Holes: $23/$38

weekday, $28/$48 weekend; Cart rental:

$18 per person for 18 holes; Yards 6,012;

Slope 29;Rating 70.1

Middleton Golf Course

105 S. Main St., Middleton, MA; 978-774-4075

middletongolf.com; 18 holes. Club Pro: Chris

Costa; Tee times: 1 week in advance; Fee for

9/18 holes: $23/$36 daily; Cart rental: $12 per

person for 18 holes; Yards 3,215 Slope N/A;

Rating N/A SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 14

Mount Hood Golf Club

100 Slayton Rd., Melrose, MA

781-665-6656; mthoodgolfclub.com; 18 holes.

Club Pro: Mike Farrell; Tee times: 5 days in

advance; Nonresident fee for 9/18 holes:

$25/$43 weekday, $50 for 18 on a weekend;

Yards 5,630; Slope 115; Rating 65.4

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 48

Murphy’s Garrison Par 3

654 Hilldale Ave., Haverhill, MA

978-374-938; garrisongolf.com/contact;

9 holes. Club Pro: Ted Murphy; Tee times: no;

Fee for 9 holes: $11 weekday, $12 weekend;

Yards 1,005; Slope N/A; Rating N/A

Nahant Golf Club

1 Willow Road, Nahant, MA

781-581-9000; nahantgolfclub.com;

9 holes; Golf Pro: Toby Ahern;

Tee times: 3 days in advance; Non-resident

fee for 9 holes: $18 weekday, $21 weekend;

Cart rental: $12 for 9 holes;Yards 3,910;

Slope: 104; Rating 61.0

New Meadows Golf Club

32 Wildes Road, Topsfield, MA

978-887-9307; newmeadowsgolf.com; 9 holes.

Club Manager: Gerry Peckerman; Tee times:

yes; Fee for 9 holes: $19 weekday, $22

weekend; Cart Rental: $9 per person for 9

holes, $15 perperson for 18 holes;

Yards 2,883; Slope 117; Rating 64.8

Olde Salem Greens

75 Wilson St., Salem, MA; 978-744-2149;

9 holes. Club Pro: none; Tee times: 1 day

in advance weekday, 2 days on weekend;

Non-resident fee for 9 holes: $20

weekday/$21 weekend; Cart rental: $13

for 9 holes; Yards 3089; Slope 121;

Rating 69.4

Ould Newbury Golf Club

319 Newburyport Turnpike, Newbury, MA

978-465-9888; ouldnewbury.com; 9 holes;

Club Pro: Jim Hilton; Tee Times: No; Fee for

9/18 holes: $25/$38 weekday, private play on

weekend; Car Rental: $10 per person for 9

holes; Yards 6,230; Slope 128; Rating 71.0

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 50

Reedy Meadow At Lynnfield Centre

195 Summer St., Lynnfield, MA

781-334-9877; 9 holes. Club Pro: Donnie

Lyons; Tee times: no; Fee for 9/18 holes:

$20/$30 weekday, $21/$31 weekend;

Cart rental: $8 for 9 holes per person;

Yards 5,120; Slope 102; Rating 63.8

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 33

Rockport Golf Club

Country Club Road, Rockport, MA

978-546-3340; rockportgolfclub.net

9 holes. Club Pro: Stephen Clayton;

Tee times: 1 day in advance; Fee for 9/18

holes: $25/$37 everyday; Cart rental: $13

for 9 holes; Yards 6,076; Slope 125;

Rating 69.8

Rolling Green Golf Course

311 Lowell St., Andover, MA

978-475-4066; 9 holes. Club pro: none;

Tee times: no; Fee for 9 holes: $16 weekday,

$17 weekend; Pull cart rental: $3 for 9 holes;

Yards 1,500; Slope N/A; Rating N/A

Rowley Country Club

235 Dodge Road, Rowley, MA

978-948-2731; rowleycountryclub.com;

9 holes. Club Pro: Darin Chin-Aleong; fee

for 9/18 holes: $21/$33 weekday, $23/$35

weekend; Cart rental: $19 for 9 holes for two

riders; Yards 5,936; Slope 131; Rating 69.1

Sagamore Spring Golf Course

1287 Main St., Lynnfield, MA; 781-334-3151

sagamoregolf.com; 18 holes. Club Pro: Steve

Vaughn; Tee times: 7 days in advance; Fee

for 9/18 holes: $27/$45 weekday, $29/$52

weekend; Cart rental: $12 for 9 holes per

person; Yards 5,914; Slope 124; Rating 68.8

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 50

Stoneham Oaks

101 R. Montvale Ave., Stoneham, MA

781-438-7888; stonehamoaks.com; 9 holes.

Club Pro: Michael Gaffney; Tee times: no;

Non-resident fees for 9 holes: $16 weekday,

$18 weekend; Cart rental: $9 per person

for 9 holes; Yards 1,125; Slope N/A; Rating N/A

Swanson Meadows GC

216 Rangeway Road, Billerica, MA

978-670-7777; swansonmeadows.com;

9 holes. Club Pro: none; Tee times: 7 days in

advance; Fee for 9 holes: $22 weekday,$25

weekend; Cart rental: $11 per person; Yards

4,486; Slope 108; Rating 62.6

Tewksbury Country Club

1880 Main St., Tewksbury, MA; 978-640-0033

tewksburycc.com; 9 holes. Club Pro: Mike

Rogers; Tee times: Friday-Sunday 2 days in

advance; Fee for 9/18 holes: $23/$39 weekday,

$26/$42 weekend; Cart rental: $11 per person

for 9 holes; Yards 5,268; Slope 116; Rating 65.6

Trull Brook Golf Course

170 River Rd., Tewksbury, MA; 978-851-6731

trullbrook.com; 18 holes. Club Pro: Al Santos;

Tee times: 7 days in advance; Fee for 18 holes:

$42 weekday, $53 weekend; Cart rental: $18

per person for 18 holes; Yards 6,345;

Slope 124; Rating 69.8

Tyngsboro Country Club

80 Pawtucket Blvd., Tyngsboro, MA

978-649-7334; 9 holes. Tee times: 5 days

in advance for weekends; Fee for 9 holes:

$17weekday, $19 weekend; Cart rental: $14

for 9 holes; Yards 2,397; Slope 104;

Rating 65.2

Unicorn Golf Course

460 Williams St., Stoneham, MA

781-438-9732; unicorngc.com

9 holes. Club Pro: Jeff Barnes; Tee times: no;

Nonresident fee for 9 holes: $22 weekday/ $24

weekend; Cart rental: $9 per person;

Yards 6,446; Slope 127; Rating 71.6

Wenham Country Club

94 Main St., Wenham, MA; 978-468-4714

wenhamcountryclub.com; 18 holes.

Club Pro: Jason Greene; Tee times: weekends

only; Fee for 9/18 holes: $23.50/$38 weekday,

$25/$44 weekend; Cart rental: $16 per person

for 18 holes; Yards 4,554; Slope 118;

Rating 63.3 SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 44

Windham Country Club

1 Country Club Drive., Windham, NH

603-434-2093; windhamcc.com; 18 holes.

Club Pro: Joanne Flynn; Tee times: 7 days in

advance; Fee for 9/18 holes: $24/$42 weekday,

$29/$50 weekend; Cart rental: $9 per person

for 9 holes; Yards 6,442; Slope 135; Rating 71.2

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 44

Woburn Country Club

5 Country Club Road, Woburn, MA

781-933-9880; woburncountryclub.com;

9 holes. Club Pro: Paul Barkhouse; Tee times:

2 days in advance; Non-resident fee for 9

holes: $21 weekday and $22 weekend;

Cart rental: $16 for 9 holes; Yards 5,973;

Slope 121; Rating 68.9

DRIVING RANGES

INDOOR FACILITIES

BFM Mini Golf & Driving Range

327 Main St., North Reading, MA

978-664-9276

Big Sticks Golf

26 Ray Ave., Burlington, MA

bigsticksgolf.com

781-229-2269

The Clubhouse Golf & Entertainment

222 S. Main St., Middleton, MA

theclubhousege.com

978-539-8725

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 45

Delisio Golf Range

115 Swampscott Road, Salem, MA

delisiogolfdrivingrange.com

978-745-6766

Golf Country

160 S. Main St., Middleton, MA

golfcountry.org

978-774-4476

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 45

Golf Galaxy

40 Walkers Brook Drive, Reading, MA

golfgalaxy.com

781-944-0535

Golfers Warehouse

4 Newbury St., Danvers, MA

edwinwattsgolf.com

978-777-4653

Golftec

194 Newbury St., Peabody, MA

golftec.com/locations

978-777-2930

Paradise Family Golf

25 Lonegan Road, Middleton, MA

paradisefamilygolf.com

978-750-4653

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 47

Sagamore Golf

22 North Road, North Hampton, NH

sagamoregolf.com

603-964-8393

Sarkisian Farms & Driving Range

153 Chandler Road, Andover, MA

sarkisianfarms.com

978-668-5522

Sun ‘n Air Golf Center

210 Conant St., Danvers, MA

sunairgolf.com

978-774-8180

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 14

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>>> OVERRULED, CONTINUED FROM P. 37

The most recent incident being the Lexi

Thompson ruling at the ANA Inspiration

championship. A viewer emailed the LPGA

tournament committee on Sunday that during

Saturday's round, Lexi had marked her ball on

the 17th green, but had not replaced it to the

exact spot it had been. After much video review

it was determined she had not returned it to its

original spot. Consequently, on the 12th hole

Sunday, with a 2 stroke lead, Thompson was

assessed a 2 stroke penalty for playing a ball

from the wrong position and an additional

2 stroke penalty for signing an incorrect

scorecard. That put her 2 strokes behind with 6

holes to play. Thompson finished the round tied

for the lead, but lost in a playoff to So Yeon Ryu.

The uproar from around the golf world was

deafening. Much louder than the Dustin

Johnson situation in the U.S. Open at Oakmont

last June or the Anna Nordqvist situation in

the Women’s Open. DJ went on to win the

championship despite the 1 stroke penalty he

was assessed for accidentally moving his ball.

Nordqvist was assessed a 2 stroke penalty for

"grazing" the sand on her backswing while

hitting a shot from a fairway bunker in a playoff

with Brittany Lang in last year's Open. Lang

won the playoff.

There's no doubt these were all infractions

that went unnoticed by the player. They were

seen by television viewers who brought >>>

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54 >>> sUMMER 2017


it to the attention of the respective tournament

rules committees.

In late April, the USGA and R&A formed a

rule that limits the use of video evidence,

effective immediately. It is as follows;

New Decision 34-3/10 implements two

standards for Rules committees to limit the

use of video: 1) when video reveals evidence

that could not reasonably be seen with the

“naked eye,” and 2) when players use their

“reasonable judgment” to determine a

specific location when applying the Rules.

The first standard states, “the use of video

technology can make it possible to identify

things that could not be seen with the naked

eye.” An example includes a player who

unknowingly touches a few grains of sand in

taking a backswing with a club in a bunker.

If the committee concludes that such facts

could not reasonably have been seen with the

naked eye and the player was not otherwise

aware of the potential breach, the player will

be deemed not to have breached the Rules,

even when video technology shows otherwise.

This is an extension of the provision on

ball-at-rest-moved cases, which was

introduced in 2014.

The second standard applies when a player

determines a spot, point, position, line, area,

distance or other location in applying the

Rules, and recognizes that a player should not

be held to the degree of precision that can

sometimes be provided by video technology.

Examples include determining the nearest

point of relief or replacing a lifted ball.

As long as the player does what can

reasonablybe expected under the circumstances

to make an accurate determination, the

player’s reasonable judgment will be accepted,

even if later shown to be inaccurate by the use

of video evidence.

So, North Shore Golf readers: How do you

feel about the new rules? Has the new ruling

on the use of video clouded the issue even

more or does it solve the problem?

What do you think about the delay in

assessing these penalties? Should signing

and attesting the card at the conclusion of

the round be the end of any possible penalty

resulting from a viewer’s email or call?

"Reasonable judgment" and "intent" are

difficult to define. Who decides that?

Iis the real question whether to allow any

viewer input at all? But isn't the main goal to

"get it right" no matter what?

Should there be a 2 stroke penalty for

signing an incorrect card after a viewer

brings an infraction to light after a round?

Let me know what you think of the

proposed rules and the video review rules

that were rushed into place. l

Bob Green is the head PGA professional at

Tedesco Country Club in Marblehead. Write to

him at bgreen@tedescocc.org.
















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