1859 March | April 2016

Statehoodmedia

TRIP PLANNER:

BROOKINGS

pg. 42

Kitchens with

Vintage Flair

Jaunts for the

History Buff

Recipes:

Get Cheesy

5 Getaways

Escape to Oregon’s

warmest locales

pg. 84

+

Mainstream

Green

A growing industry

navigates new regulations

on an old drug.

pg. 94

march | april 2016 • volume 35

+

Fire

tellers

oregon

story-

Lookouts

A VISUAL HISTORY pg. 90

1859magazine.com

$4.95 display until April 30, 2016

Live Think Explore Oregon


IF YOU KNOW THE ANSWER,

ASK BIGGER QUESTIONS.


HIGHWAY 20 GALLERY

Road Reconsidered

Go to page 50 to see more

photos by Eugene Pavlov


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Rogue Valley Manor is an Equal Housing Opportunity.


FEATURES

march | april 2016 • volume 35

94

Crystallizing what

Measure 91 means

for Oregon

76

Buzz Martin: The

Singing Logger

The poet laureate of

loggers, Buzz Martin put

a way of life to music and

met Johnny Cash along

the way.

by AMY DOAN

84

Escaping the Cold

Spring weather can be

unpredictable. Take the

guess work out of your

recreation and explore our

five getaways in Oregon’s

warmest locales.

by VANESSA SALVIA

90

Fire Lookouts

An historic gallery of

these towering wilderness

icons that offered Pacific

Northwest forests

protection, with a view.

photos provided by

U.S. Forest Service

94

Mainstream Green

Oregon is once again a pioneer

state, this time navigating the

legalization of marijuana for

recreational use. We parse

details of the budding cannabis

industry.

by AMY FAUST

COVER An historic photo of the Gifford Pinchot National Forest Lookout, circa 1930.

Cameron Zegers


The Oregon Community Foundation

provides tax-deductible options to

help create a brighter horizon for

Oregon’s future.

oregoncf.org


DEPARTMENTS

march | april 2016 • volume 35

50 54 72 102

Eugene Pavlov Intisar Abioto Peter Mahar Talia Galvin

Around Oregon

28 NOTEBOOK

People, places and products we

love. Events. Libations. Restaurants.

Lodging.

42 TRIP PLANNER

Where palm trees grow and tourists are

rare birds—Brookings.

48 TRAVEL SPOTLIGHT

A nautical pitstop in Portland en route to

the coast.

50 ROAD RECONSIDERED

Over the western slopes of the

Cascades toward the coast or Central

Oregon on Highway 20.

22

24

26

127

135

136

138

From the Editor

1859 Conversations

Digital Page

Explore Guide

Oregon Postcard

Map of Oregon

Oregon Quotient

Local Habit

54 ARTIST IN RESIDENCE

Arvie Smith tackles racism with a

saturated vaudeville twist.

60 FROM WHERE I STAND

Silver Lake resident Angel Roscoe loves

country life and runs one of the most

famous remote restaurants in Oregon.

62 SOUND OFF

Grazing rights.

64 MUSICIAN

Richard Swift’s creativity spans his solo

work to playing with The Shins to touring

as the bassist for The Black Keys.

Ventures

66 STARTUP

Trail Labs explains why “outdoor

technology” isn’t an oxymoron.

68 WHAT I'M WORKING ON

Naturally felled lumber gets

repurposed at Urban Lumber Co.

70 MY WORKSPACE

Given Back Bird Houses are green

builders for the aviary world.

72 INTO THE SOUL

A rescued bull inspires a squeaky

clean business.

74 GAME CHANGERS

A nonprofit runs on the premise that

recipients of aid should be active

participants in their future—no matter

what age.

106

Oregon Recipes

Food & Home

102 FARM TO TABLE

Face Rock Creamery revives

Bandon’s long history of

cheesemaking.

108 HOME GROWN CHEF

Smoked bleu cheese dressing.

110 DESIGN

Kitchen updates retain a vintage feel.

Outdoors

118 ADVENTURES

Four ways to combine a history

lesson with the outdoors.

124 ATHLETE PROFILE

Heptathlete Brianne Thiesen-Eaton

is headed to the Olympics.


www.legacyhealth.org

Purple yarn, safer babies

...knitted together

Every year, knitters all around the state gather to knit purple caps.

Legacy Health then gives the caps to the parents of newborns at

our hospitals as part of the CLICK for Babies campaign.

The caps remind the parents to be calm — even when babies cry

themselves purple.

Using little caps to help put an end to

Shaken Baby Syndrome is just one of

the countless ways we are working

with others to make our community

a healthier one.

To see more of these stories:

www.legacyhealth.org/together

Our legacy is yours.

Legacy donates yarn, organizes volunteers and

collects and distributes caps as part of a national

campaign aimed at preventing injuries to babies.

AD-1179 ©2016


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ian o’keefe

brian o’keefe

brian o’keefe

alkrause photography

brian o’keefe

Come to a place we think is a little

slice of heaven. Camp Sherman,

the hidden gem of Central Oregon,

is waiting to greet you and your

family. The majestic Metolius

River flows under a tall canopy of

Ponderous Pines, Larch, Fir and

Cedar trees. Fly-fishing, camping,

hiking, biking and wildlife viewing

are favorite pastimes. For more

information on lodging and our

area visit MetoliusRiver.com

Camp Sherman Store & Fly Shop

campshermanstore.com

Cold Springs Resort & RV Park

coldspringsresort.com

House on Metolius

metolius.com

Hoodoo’s Camp Sherman

Motel & RV Park

campshermanrv.com

Kokanee Café

kokaneecafe.com

Lake Creek Lodge

lakecreeklodge.com

Metolius River Lodges

metoliusriverlodges.com

Metolius River Resort

metoliusriverresort.com

The Lodge at Suttle Lake

Time to Unplug


CHIEF CONTENT OFFICER Kevin Max

MANAGING EDITOR

CONTENT PRODUCER

DESIGN

PHOTO EDITORS

WEB | SOCIAL MEDIA

DIGITAL MEDIA MARKETING COORDINATOR

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS

OFFICE MANAGER

HOME GROWN CHEF

ADVERTISING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

ILLUSTRATIONS

Megan Oliver

Anna Bird

Crystal Jeffers

Brendan Loscar

Talia Galvin

Rob Kerr

McKenna Dempsey

Bronte Dod

Brittney Hale

Colleen Peterson

Cindy Cowmeadow

Thor Erickson

Fletcher Beck

Monica Butler

Susan Crow

Kate Knox

Kristie La Chance

Anna Bird, Kimberly Bowker, Melissa Dalton, Lee DiSanti,

Amy Doan, Bronte Dod, Thor Erickson, Amy Faust, Lee

Lewis Husk, Julie Lee, Sophia McDonald, Allison Miles, Peter

Murphy, Phil Nelson, Felisa Rogers, Vanessa Salvia, Lori

Tobias, Mackenzie Wilson, Brian Yaeger

Intisar Abioto, Talia Galvin, Rob Kerr, Peter Mahar,

Eugene Pavlov, Meg Roussos, Claire Thorington,

Heidi Weiss-Hoffman, Cameron Zegers

Karen Eland

Brendan Loscar

Statehood Media

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Suite 100-218

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All rights reserved. No part of this publiCation may be reproduCed or transmitted in any form or by any means, eleCtroniCally or meChaniCally, inCluding

photoCopy, reCording or any information storage and retrieval system, without the express written permission of Statehood Media. ArtiCles and photographs

appearing in 1859 Oregon’s Magazine may not be reproduCed in whole or in part without the express written Consent of the publisher. 1859 Oregon’s Magazine

and Statehood Media are not responsible for the return of unsoliCited materials. The views and opinions expressed in these artiCles are not neCessarily

those of 1859 Oregon’s Magazine, Statehood Media or its employees, staff or management.

Statehood Media sets high standards to ensure forestry is praCtiCed in an environmentally responsible, soCially benefiCial and eConomiCally viable way. This

issue of 1859 Magazine was printed by AmeriCan Web on reCyCled paper using inks with a soy base. Our printer is a Certified member of the Forestry Stewardship

CounCil (FSC) and the Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI), and meets or exCeeds all federal ResourCe Conservation ReCovery ACt (RCRA) standards.

When you are finished with this issue, please pass it on to a friend or reCyCle it. We Can have a better world if we Choose it together.


ian o’keefe

brian o’keefe

brian o’keefe

alkrause photography

brian o’keefe

Come to a place we think is a little

slice of heaven. Camp Sherman,

the hidden gem of Central Oregon,

is waiting to greet you and your

family. The majestic Metolius

River flows under a tall canopy of

Ponderous Pines, Larch, Fir and

Cedar trees. Fly-fishing, camping,

hiking, biking and wildlife viewing

are favorite pastimes. For more

information on lodging and our

area visit MetoliusRiver.com

Camp Sherman Store & Fly Shop

campshermanstore.com

Cold Springs Resort & RV Park

coldspringsresort.com

House on Metolius

metolius.com

Hoodoo’s Camp Sherman

Motel & RV Park

campshermanrv.com

Kokanee Café

kokaneecafe.com

Lake Creek Lodge

lakecreeklodge.com

Metolius River Lodges

metoliusriverlodges.com

Metolius River Resort

metoliusriverresort.com

The Lodge at Suttle Lake

Time to Unplug


CONTRIBUTORS

Rob Kerr

PETER MAHAR

HEIDI WEISS-HOFFMAN

THOR ERICKSON is

INTISAR ABIOTO is

LORI TOBIAS arrived

is a photographer based

is a food and lifestyle

a chef instructor at the

an adventurer, dancer,

on the Oregon Coast

in Oregon City with a

photographer based in

Cascade Culinary Institute

photographer and writer.

fifteen years ago and

passion for capturing

Bend. With an extensive

in Bend. He likes to say that

With a research focus on

after traveling the country

real moments, people’s

background in the food and

his culinary career chose

the global African diaspora,

for two decades. She

true personalities and the

wine industry, she brings an

him. His father owned

her form of story inquiry

was a feature writer and

jaw-dropping beauty of

educated and creative eye

several restaurants in the

as a way of life has taken

columnist for the Rocky

the Northwest. He and his

to her photography. If she

San Francisco Bay area,

her from Memphis to

Mountain News, and has

wife photograph weddings

is not in the kitchen testing

and he grew up working

Berlin to Djibouti, seeking

spent more than a decade

together for most of

and photographing recipes,

in them. Prior to teaching,

authentic stories of people

covering the Oregon Coast

the year, and use their

she can be found out on

Thor worked for thirty-two

within the African diaspora.

for The Oregonian. She

vacation time to travel,

the trails running, biking,

years in the restaurant

In 2013, she founded The

freelances for numerous

play cards and eat great

bird hunting or exploring

industry, including at Chez

Black Portlanders, an

publications from the

food. In his free time, he

Oregon’s rivers with her

Panisse in Berkeley. He also

exploratory photo blog

central Oregon Coast

goes on hardcore camping

husband and German

trained as a butcher in Italy

imaging people of African

home she shares with her

trips, makes pizza, and

shorthaired pointer. For

and Germany. Thor lives in

descent in Portland, where

husband, Chan, and rescue

enjoys a glass of scotch

us, Heidi photographed a

Bend with his wife, Cathy,

she also makes her home.

pup, Mugsy. Her novel

and a good pipe. In this

delicious cheddar crumb

and their son, Jahn. Thor

Portland is where Intisar

Wander is due out from

issue, Peter photographed

apple pie for Recipes on

makes smoked bleu cheese

photographed painter

Red Hen Press in the fall of

soapmaker Skyler Veek

p. 106.

dressing for us (and for

Arvie Smith for Artist in

2016. In this issue, Lori tells

and her 1,500-pound muse

you) in this issue’s Home

Residence (p. 54).

the story behind Lucky Bear

for Into the Soul on p. 72.

Grown Chef (p. 108).

Soap Co. for Into the Soul

on p. 72.

20 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016


EDITOR’S LETTER

Rob Kerr

POOR CINDY, OUR LONG-TIME office

manager. How many calls she’s taken over

the years from anxious subscribers asking

when the next issue was coming out! “Did

I miss one? Is my subscription current?”

Such is life for a bi-monthly magazine. For

our readers, 1859 has been a lot of things

over the past seven years—an insider’s

travel guide, a source of culture, a slice of

history, a scenic byway through the middle

of Oregon. Beginning July, however, we will

be one more thing for our fans—monthly.

Expect the same high-quality story-telling,

without the two-month intermission. Current

subscribers will receive the extra issues

at no additional cost. We offer an introductory

discount for new subscribers at

1859magazine.com.

Will we ever run out of things to write

about? Probably not. This is Oregon—the

monolithic coast, the rugged high desert,

the cool high alpine, and soggy temperate

rainforest and the people whose lives inspire.

This state’s got stories to tell. We hope

you will join us as we delve deeper into the

Cascades, listen to tunes from emerging

musicians, discover innovative companies

and talk with leaders who embody the spirit

and the soul of Oregon.

In 1971, Johnny Cash said, “The only difference

between me and Buzz is that he’s

singing about lumberjacks and I’m singing

about cotton pickers.” Buzz Martin came

from an era of loggers, cork boots, chokes,

whistle-punks and hooktenders. He didn’t

have a charmed life by most accounts—living

without electricity in the Oregon woods,

going blind at age 13 before regaining his

sight two years later, losing both of his parents

as a teen and finally following his brother-in-law

into the woods to become a logger.

In camp with his colleagues, Buzz would

break out his guitar and sing songs about

the life of being a logger. His lyrics were simple,

his voice a rugged mix of John Wayne

and Johnny Cash, his audience growing.

In “The Story of Buzz Martin, the Singing

Logger” on page 76, Amy Doan looks back

at one of Oregon’s cultural icons. A special

thanks to Buzz’s son Steve Martin for retelling

some of the stories and songs.

Around the same time that Buzz was

crooning about timber, an arduous artist in

the making, Arvie Smith, was confronting

racism in America. In the 1950s, he said he

was turned away from art school with the

comment, “We don’t need your kind here.”

Today, Smith is an accomplished master who

addresses issues of race in bold and colorful

paintings created in his Portland studio. See

his work and read his inspirational story in

our Artist in Residence piece on page 54.

I remember my first Forest Service lookout.

It was the Green Ridge Lookout, standing

two stories above the ground and another

2,000 feet above the Metolius River.

Mt. Jefferson gives a stunning profile to the

north and this is even more cleverly framed

when one is sitting in the outhouse adjacent

to the lookout. We made a fire, cooked

steaks and drew on wine and, later, whiskey

as night brought its chill. That was 2005.

In this issue’s Gallery on page 90, we

look back at these structures in a photo

journal culled from an era soon after they

were built nearly a century ago. This series

comes from the U.S. Forest Service. You can

feel the history in these wooden dinosaurs.

You can witness the sky as you’ve never had

the chance to before. You can go online and

book one of these rustic suites on stilts.

There’s nothing like it, really.

Finally, you’ll have to get up and move,

though the spit of spring may persuade you

to stay indoors just until the weather lifts

and warms. Instead of waiting, head to one

of Oregon’s perpetually warmer and drier

climates colloquially known as “banana

belts.” We take you to a handful of spots

around the state that make getting out a

drier proposition during Oregon’s otherwise

soggy spring. Cheers!

22 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016


The summit?

Just the beginning.

We never stop searching. For sustainable design

techniques. New K-12 classroom methods. Insights

into biology. In physics. And our own minds.

UO academic programs? Like those just mentioned?

Among the best in the country.

Because once we find an answer, we’re back out there.

Asking more questions. Looking for a new vista.

And sometimes the view we need is right in our

own backyard.

So, one of these days, we’ll see you on top of

Spencer Butte. Bring questions.

visit.uoregon.edu


1859 CONVERSATIONS

Readers and our online

community engage.

Ben Herndon

Going Paleo

Love the “Painted Hills.” I was born in Oregon

nearly 52 years ago and saw this place for the

first time last year!

—Cindy Taverne

First time I was there I was amazed we had

such a beautiful place in Oregon. It gets very

little publicity.

—Vi Jacoby

Bigfoot Trap

If you don‘t find the big hairy guy, the hike is

really nice.

—Mike Mayne

Road Reconsidered: Highway 97

We went as kids. It was fun and I remember a

great ice cream place there.

—Janet Lee-Carlson

A great place to take friends to see the “old

world” in Oregon.

—Steve Quick

I experienced the best road trip through Shaniko!

What a beautiful part of Oregon!

—Madeline Rhodes

Don’t forget to stop at Oregon’s newest state

park, Cottonwood Canyon. It is beautiful and

not far from Wasco.

—anonymous

Claire Phillips

What a gal! Very few men, or women, could

have pulled this off.

—Gerry Marsh

Filed under I did not know this—always like

these forgotten history stories.

—Annie Oakley

Incredible story.

—Roberta Thissell

Amazing story about a very brave woman.

—James

24 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016

Join the conversation: 1859magazine.com facebook.com/1859oregon twitter.com/1859oregon


OREGON MANUFACTURERS.

LOCAL BUSINESSES.

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ALL GETTING MORE FROM THEIR ENERGY.

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+

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Visit www.energytrust.org/more or call us at 1.866.368.7878.

Serving customers of Portland General Electric,

Pacific Power, NW Natural and Cascade Natural Gas.


1859 ONLINE

More ways to connect

with your favorite Oregon content.

1859magazine.com | #1859oregon | @1859oregon

WEB EXCLUSIVES

AROUND OREGON

Every month we highlight the

best events going on around

the state. To see more, go to

1859magazine.com/aroundOR

135

Cameron Zegers

Extended Gallery: Mainstream Green

1859magazine.com/cannabis

Shared by

@ronaldhope

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and #1859Oregon on our

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SUBMIT YOUR OREGON

POSTCARD

It’s no secret that Oregon is a

photogenic state. When you

take a photo that captures her

splendor, send it our way for

a chance to get it published in

the magazine.

1859magazine.com/postcard

Last issue’s Postcard taken on the Lower

Deschutes River by Arian Stevens.

DON’T MISS

Make your own

homemade Smoked

Bleu Cheese Dressing

and catch our picks for

restaurants, events and

to-dos coming up.

26 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016


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AROUND OREGON

28 Notebook 42 Trip Planner 48 Travel Spotlight 50 Road Reconsidered

Our Picks

People, places & products we love

1.

3.

Ellen Morris Bishop

1. Holding onto history | Wallowa Lake Lodge

When the Wallowa Lake Lodge was put up for auction last year, a group

of Joseph residents stepped in. Built in 1923, the lodge sits among oldgrowth

trees and undeveloped wetlands where the Wallowa River runs

into Wallowa Lake. The lodge is a popular retreat for visitors, and the

surrounding area provides important habitat for bald eagles, golden

eagles, otters, mergansers and Kokanee. The group of locals formed Lake

Wallowa Lodge LLC and have been working to raise more than $2 million

to buy the property. | lakewallowalodge.com

2. The Photographs of Brian Lanker | Tribute book

Released in January, From the Heart: The Photographs of Brian Lanker

celebrates the life work of the late Brian Lanker, a Pulitzer Prize winner who

moved to Eugene in 1974. Before Lanker’s death in 2011, he lived a big life

and built a decorated career as a photojournalist. From the Heart combines

his most striking photos with poignant captions from Lanker’s former

colleague Mike Tharp, along with essays from loved ones and quotes from

Lanker himself. There will be an exhibit of his work in honor of the book at

the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art in Eugene until April 24.

2.

4.

3. Rural author | Mary Emerick

The Geography of Water is Wallowa County resident Mary Emerick’s

first published novel, released this past November. It’s about a young girl

named Winnie (short for Winchester, her father’s favorite hunting rifle),

who lives on a secluded Alaskan island. Emerick had the idea for the story

when she was a Forest Service kayak ranger off the coasts of Alaska’s

Baranof and Chichagof islands. “It’s impossible not to let the wildness

of the country inspire you. It’s really true wilderness out there,” she said.

maryemerick.com

4. Protein and peanuts | Wild Friends Foods

Wild Friends Foods, a Portland-based company that was formed out of a

dorm room at the University of Oregon in 2011, launched new Protein+

flavors this past year. The company’s nut butters have been hugely popular

since they first hit shelves. | wildfriendsfoods.com

5. Pre-flight cinema | PDX Hollywood Theatre annex

This summer, Portland International Airport (PDX) travelers will have a

new way to kill time before boarding or during layovers. Portland’s historic

Hollywood Theatre is opening an eighteen-seat theater annex at PDX that

will show local and regional short films. This annex joins a crew of food

trucks and local restaurants at the airport, suggesting that PDX might be

the next up-and-coming Portland neighborhood.

5.

28 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016


notebook

AROUND OREGON

Calendar

Wooden Shoe

Tulip Festival

Woodburn | March 25-May 1

woodenshoe.com

written by Bronte Dod

Take some time this spring to

stop and smell the tulips at the

annual Wooden Shoe Tulip Festival

in Woodburn. There are

more than forty acres of tulips

to explore every day on the

farm, with u-pick sections to

bring home a freshly cut bouquet.

The farm also has bulbs

to buy. Try the authentic Dutch

food, or bring your own picnic

lunch to kick back with stunning

views of Mt. Hood.

MARCH | APRIL 2016 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 29


AROUND OREGON

notebook

Calendar

Save the date for these

events around Oregon

written by Bronte Dod

TRACK & FIELD

IAAF World Indoor Championships

Portland | March 17-20

portland16.com

For the first time since the inaugural event in 1987, the

IAAF World Indoor Championships will be held in the

United States, and Portland was chosen as the host

city. For four days, 600 athletes from 200 countries will

compete for world titles and records in thirteen track

and field events. Ashton Eaton, the 27-year-old Oregon

athlete known for holding the world record in the

decathlon, will compete again this year to defend his title.

If you can’t make it to the events at the Oregon Convention

Center, there will be a Fan Festival every day of the

competition at Pioneer Square in downtown Portland.

CANNON BEACH

Savor Cannon Beach

March 10-13

savorcannonbeach.com

At this year’s Savor Cannon Beach

Culinary Festival, wine from more

than forty wineries available at the

wine walk, giving you the opportunity

to try a variety of the worldclass

wines produced in the Pacific

Northwest. The weekend festival will

also highlight the growing art and

culinary scenes on Oregon’s coast.

BEND

St. Patrick’s Day Dash

March 12

stpatsdash.com

This is the sixth year of the St.

Patrick’s Day Dash in downtown

Bend. The annual 5k race is fun and

family friendly and starts and ends

at Deschutes Brewery. Prizes go

to those with the best outfits. All

proceeds from the race will benefit

Kids Center, a child abuse intervention

center for Central Oregon.

Illustrations

Brendan Loscar

ASHLAND

Ashland Independent

Film Festival

April 7-11

ashlandfilm.org

Thousands of film lovers will be

in Southern Oregon in early April

for the Ashland Independent Film

Festival, which recently received a

$10,000 grant from the National

Endowment for the Arts. This

year’s festival will screen ninety

documentary, feature and short

films from around the world in

downtown Ashland at the Art

Déco Varsity Theatre.

PORTLAND

Soul’d Out Music Fest

April 13-17

souldoutfestival.com

Portland’s Soul’d Out Music Fest

differs from the usual music

festivals. The four-day event puts

together surprising pairs to perform,

and the venues are spread

across the city. The headlining acts

for the seventh annual festival in

Portland are Gary Clark Jr., Sharon

Jones + Trombone Shorty and

Bonnie Raitt.

HOOD RIVER

Hood River Hard Pressed

Cider Fest

April 16

hoodriver.org/cider-fest

With more than 400 orchards,

Hood River is known as Oregon’s

“fruit loop.” The small city is now

home to eleven craft cideries, and

it is quickly becoming known as

the craft cider hub of the Pacific

Northwest. This festival is your

chance to get versed in cider by

trying brews from twenty cideries

from Hood River and other areas

around the Pacific Northwest.

EUGENE

Eugene Marathon

April 29-May 1

eugenemarathon.com

The Eugene Marathon is consistently

ranked as one of the best

running courses in the marathon

world. Chances are that if you’re

not running in one of the events

yourself, you probably know

someone who is. After all, it is

“Tracktown USA.”

30 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016

MORE ONLINE For more information on these and other events, visit 1859magazine.com/events


YOUR LOCAL

BUSINESS BANK

At Summit, we’re a business bank that’s more like your own

professional advisor. We know your name, your business,

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Eugene: 96 East Broadway • Bend: 560 SW Columbia Street • SummitBankOnline.com


AROUND OREGON

notebook

Culture

written by Anna Bird

Cool Cabarets

Oregon Cabaret Theater

HAVE YOU EVER thought your cocktail

or dinner could use a little extra spice? Add

a dash of cabaret in Eugene or Ashland and

your meal will be anything but bland.

Cabaret has roots in Europe in the

1800s, becoming a prominent piece of

American culture during the 1920s.

Cabaret blends comedy, music and

dance in a dinner theater experience.

Performances often dabble in political

satire or social commentary, while

drinking in the whimsy and decadence

of the Roaring ’20s.

While cabaret was a rousing success in

its heyday, traditional cabaret disappeared

from the cultural landscape during the rise

of television. In the late ’70s and early ’80s,

cabaret experienced a resurgence. By the

mid-1980s, cabaret flapped through scores

of New York City clubs.

A long way from New York, the Oregon

Cabaret Theater (OCT) was formed in

1986 in Ashland’s First Baptist Church.

A natural fit in Ashland’s theatrical landscape,

OCT has grown steadily over the

past thirty years and now presents more

than 270 performances every season. In

traditional cabaret fashion, the OCT offers

food and drinks. This spring, for example,

you can enjoy a broiled filet mignon

with oregonzola scalloped potatoes while

watching Ring of Fire, a musical from the

iconic Johnny Cash repertoire.

“People know they’ll eat well, they’ll

get live music and watch professional talent

in this beautiful old vintage space,”

said Rick Robinson, managing director

of OCT. “It’s a good counterpoint to the

offerings of the world-class theater down

the street.”

The Actors Cabaret of Eugene, a nonprofit

performing arts organization in

downtown Eugene, has been around since

1978. Its winter production of Disenchanted,

a musical comedy about fed-up Disney

princesses, received rave reviews for its

bawdy take on antiquated classics.

Both shows get you more bang for your

buck than the average restaurant or bar. It’s

a kick in the pants … and all that jazz.

CATCH A CABARET

“Ring of Fire” | Oregon Cabaret Theater

theoregoncabaret.com

Through April 17

“Priscilla Queen of the Desert”

Actors Cabaret of Eugene

actorscabaret.org

April 1-30

32 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016


Salishan Spa & Golf Resort

Newly renovated

embrace Salishan

Welcome to the authentic Oregon Coast

Just as the magnificent Oregon coastal forest surrounds and embraces Salishan Resort, our beautifully

remodeled guest rooms will wrap you in luxury. From the views of towering Douglas firs and tranquil

Siletz Bay to the Oregon timber used in the woodwork, every aspect of your stay will be infused with

authentic elements of the coast. Come stay with us, and embrace all that Salishan has to offer.

Rosy Future

Maloy's offers a fabulous selection of antique and

estate jewelry and fine custom jewelry, as well as

repair and restoration services.

1-800-452-2300 - salishan.com

Plan your Oakridge getaway at EugeneCascadesCoast.org/Waterfalls | 800.547.5445


AROUND OREGON

notebook

Libations

Untap Oregon’s Spirits

Recipe Card

written by Anna Bird

WHEN RAVEN & ROSE OPENED in the

130-year-old William Ladd carriage house

in Portland, bar director David Shenaut saw

an opportunity to create historically inspired

cocktails. Shenaut and his staff infused the

history of the building into the drink menu,

naming drinks after friends and family of the

Ladds, while incorporating classic ingredients

and single-barrel spirits.

Shenaut is not just the bar director of Raven

& Rose’s bar program, but the events and

hospitality director for the Oregon Bartenders

Guild and the co-founder of Portland

Cocktail Week as well. You can learn from

his liquid genius in a Raven & Rose cocktail

class—a monthly event teaching home-bartending

basics and techniques for making

classic cocktails. ravenandrosepdx.com

From Barnyard to Urban

Farmhouse ales are doing the unthinkable—going metro.

written by Brian Yaeger

FARMHOUSE ALES were traditionally

golden, earthy and yeast-driven, making

them as rustic as their birthplace. Logsdon

Farmhouse ales, for example, is housed in

a red barn on a twenty-acre farm in Hood

River Valley where organic spent grains are

fed to the farm’s Scottish Highlander cattle.

The Logsdon seizoen is zesty and hazy, with

detectable funk. By all accounts, it upholds

the farmhouse ale tradition.

The Commons Brewery’s urban farmhouse

ale is a fruity and peppery golden ale redolent of

the Belgian countryside, though the apples ferment

in Portland’s Central Eastside Industrial

District. This makes the designation of “farmhouse”

part marketing (as there’s nary a farmhand

anywhere near The Commons Brewery),

but the urban version does retain many classic

characteristics of the farmhouse style.

Two more breweries that are taking the

farm to the city are Portland’s subterranean

Upright Brewing and Corvallis’s once

basement-based Block 15 Brewing. The beer

style is becoming as likely to hail from industrial

Oregon as from farm-based breweries

such as Agrarian Ales in Coburg or the

forthcoming Wolves & People in Newberg.

It’s safe to say that the definition of a farmhouse

ale has firmly moved into urban dictionary

territory.

Alexandrea Hlousek

A Bee’s Knees

2 ounces Honey Rye from Dogwood

Distilling and Bee Local

3/4 oz Ransom Dry vermouth

1/4 oz Combier Pamplemouse

Rose Water Spritz

Stir all ingredients, except rose water.

with ice. Strain into a Nick and Nora glass.

Garnish with a fancy lemon twist and a

spritz of rose water.

WINE IN A CAN?!

WHEN UNION WINE CO. came out with its

Underwood pinot noir in a can in 2014, a groan

could be heard from France and California.

True, Oregon wineries have been challenging

snobby wine presumptions for years, but this

was the ultimate oddity. Underwood canned

wines, which now include a rosé and a pinot

gris, are approachable and ready-to-travel. Is it

a brilliant invention for the outdoorsy Oregon

oenophile, or does it mark a hipster demise of

otherwise respectable wines? Pop the tab and

decide for yourself.

34 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016


PURVEYOR

TO THOSE

SEEKING THE

FINER THINGS

IN LIFE.


AROUND OREGON

notebook

Dining

written by Julie Lee

Cravings

FISH & CHIPS

When seeking delicious fish & chips

on the coast, look for the hardware

store sign. The Cannon Beach

Hardware & Public House, otherwise

known as Screw & Brew, has everything

you need to repair, replace or

retool while also serving the best

halibut fish & chips and craft brew

off of Highway 101.

1235 S. HEMLOCK ST., CANNON BEACH

cannonbeachhardware.com

THAI

Heading to the Oregon Shakespeare

Festival? Thai Pepper

in Ashland offers the perfect

intersection of delicious food and

romantic atmosphere. Located

along the majestic Lithia Creek,

just steps away from Ashland’s

historic plaza, the sweet and sour

shrimp with black tiger prawns

garners applause.

84 N. MAIN ST., ASHLAND

thaipepperashland.com

GRILLED CHEESE

Afternoon Tea at Hotel deLuxe

HENRY JAMES ONCE SAID, “There are few

hours in life more agreeable than the hour dedicated

to the ceremony known as afternoon tea.”

Afternoon tea is a lost ceremony finding its

way back. The tradition started in 1840 as a way

to satiate Anna, the seventh Duchess of Bedford,

when she became famished between the only two

meals served per day, breakfast and a late dinner.

Habit became ritual when she began inviting

friends to join her, and the custom of dressing for

tea in the late afternoon spread throughout countries

and over centuries until modern day.

Hotel deLuxe in Portland is reinventing reason

to pause. Sterling silver tea sets pour loose

teas from Portland’s Steven Smith Teamaker. On

a three-tier cake stand, dainty tea sandwiches

are served, including James Beard’s Vitelli onion

sandwich. Warm housemade scones are served

with clotted cream from England. Pastries by

Petite Provence are a sweet finish. Afternoon

tea at Hotel deLuxe also offers tea-inspired

cocktails and bubbles. Service starts at 3 p.m.,

Sunday through Thursday, by reservation only.

hoteldeluxeportland.com

There is something comforting

about that first bite into a grilled

cheese sandwich, no matter the

season. While many joints do a

stellar grilled cheese, some truly

move the needle. Such is the case

with The Barn Light in Eugene,

which uses provolone and housemade

pimento spread to up the

ante. Perfection happens when

the grilled favors are paired with

tomato and roasted garlic soup.

924 WILLAMETTE ST., EUGENE

545 E. 8TH AVE., EUGENE

thebarnlightbar.com

SEAFOOD

Aqua Seafood Restaurant and

Bar is a delightful spot on the riverfront

in Corvallis offering great

seafood and upbeat island ambience.

Our favorite is the seafood

lasagna with freshly made pasta,

scallops, shrimp and smoked

salmon.

151 NW MONROE ST., CORVALLIS

aquacorvallis.com

36 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016

MORE ONLINE For more Oregon eats, visit 1859magazine.com/dining


AROUND OREGON

notebook

BEST PLACES FOR

Pizza

SOLSTICE WOODFIRE

CAFÉ & BAR

Unusual ingredients are at the

core of success for nationally loved

Solstice Woodfire Café & Bar in

Hood River. From The New York

Times to Food Network Magazine,

the Country Girl Cherry pizza—with

chorizo, cherries and goat cheese—

has earned a cult following.

501 PORTWAY AVE., HOOD RIVER

solsticewoodfirecafe.com

LA PERLA PIZZERIA

When Beppe & Gianni’s Trattoria

in Eugene started busting at the

seams with hours-long waits, John

‘Gianni’ Barofsky and Beppe Macchi

opened a second option that

became an overnight success. The

authentic Neapolitan-style pizza at

La Perla Pizzeria, cooked at nearly

1,500 degrees, is delicioso.

1313 PEARL ST., EUGENE

laperlapizzeria.com

RED SAUCE PIZZA

Red Sauce Pizza is the standout

among Portland’s wood-fire pizza

scene. Owner Shar Dues greets

customers personally, then serves up

unrivaled pizza and Caesar salad. Her

sauce is divine, and, unlike others, she

splurges on toppings.

4935 NE 42ND AVE., PORTLAND

redsaucepizza.com

EXECUTIVE CHEF JUSTIN WILLS elevates

local sourcing, regularly foraging the nearby

beaches and forests of Depoe Bay in search of

edible delicacies (think sea beans and oxalis) to

complement the daily catch and farm produce

Restaurant Beck

Carrie Welch

served at Restaurant Beck. His ingenuity and artistry

have twice earned him James Beard nominations

for Best Chef Northwest.

2345 S. HIGHWAY 101, DEPOE BAY

restaurantbeck.com

INDUSTRY TIDBITS

- The Washington Post named

Portland the #1 best food city in

America.

- Evening Land’s La Source pinot

noir landed #3 on Wine Spectator’s

top 100 list.

- Thrillist claims Oregon is the

booziest state in the U.S., with

an impressive 6.3 craft

breweries per 100,000 and $4.6

billion economic impact from

beer and wine.

- Global sandwich domination

continues, as Bunk Sandwiches

opens Bunk Brooklyn.

38 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016


hen we opened Veritable Quandary in 1971, we

had no idea the impact it would have in our

community, and in our hearts. Many of you have

been coming here since we first opened. Others may have

only recently discovered us but are just as welcome and

appreciated as everyone we’ve gotten to know over the years.

A lot has happened here. Deals have been made, celebrations

shared; families and friends connected and reconnected —

because that’s what you, our customers, are to us. You’re our

family. Our friends. You’ve seen us through hard times and

good, through rain, and snow and glorious evenings on the

patio. Without you, we’d never have been here so long, and

we want to thank you for your patronage, your support and

your friendship over these wonderful years. We’re not done

yet. Spring will soon be here, and the patio will bloom once

again, full of flowers and cheer. That garden and our

restaurant are our pride and joy, and every day that we can

continue to share them with you, we will. Stop by soon. We’d

love to see you again before we go. Keep up with our news at

Facebook.com/VQuandary, and book online at

VeritableQuandary.com. Thank you.

Denny King

1220 SW FIRST AVENUE • 503 227 7342 • VERITABLEQUANDARY.COM


AROUND OREGON

notebook

Lodging

written by Julie Lee

Details

HISTORY

Built in 1993 out of the ashes

of the old Viking Motel, the

four-diamond Stephanie Inn

was named for Jan and Steve

Martin’s daughter, Stephanie.

ROOMS

The property has forty-one

rooms, with a carriage house

behind the main property for

those who want more privacy

and just as stunning a view. The

rooms in the main property are

spacious and inviting. A separate

bedroom, and dining and living

areas give guests room to

stretch out. There’s also a deck

with built-in lounge chairs overlooking

Haystack Rock.

AMENITIES AND EXTRAS

Stephanie Inn

CANNON BEACH’S oceanfront

gem is a serene escape.

Once there, you won’t want

to leave. Steven Smith teas

and hot coffee are served 24/7

in the spacious lobby, along

with freshly baked cookies. Ice

cold lemonade and fruit-infused

water beckon in warmer

months, accompanied by

homemade scones. Ready to

unwind? The afternoon wine

tasting in a scenic, sunlit library

is complimentary to all

guests of age. Many hotels and

resorts offer in-house dining

options, but Stephanie Inn’s

dining room is a destination

in itself, offering a Europeanstyle

dining experience that is

not only the crown of the town,

but unique in the Northwest.

Chef Aaron Bedard was raised

in La Grande and graduated

from Le Cordon Bleu College

of Culinary Arts in Portland.

Crowerks

Bedard is fanatic about local

sourcing, with 90 percent

of the fare sourced from the

Northwest. “Everything but

the lemons,” he said. At 1 p.m.

daily, guests can partake in a

cooking lesson and sample one

of the items on the menu. This

is a way to connect with guests

and create memories, demonstrating

“how simple things

can be,” said Bedard.

It’s the little details that add

up to an unforgettable experience.

From the two L’Occitane

shampoos (let’s face it, one

little bottle is never enough for

two people) to the luxurious

option of in-room massage, the

attention to detail makes the

stay superb.

DINING

Make sure to reserve a spot

in the small dining room when

making room reservations, as it

fills with not only hotel guests

but also anyone in Cannon

Beach looking to celebrate a

special occasion. Stephanie Inn

has a shuttle to fetch guests

from neighboring hotels—no

driving required after indulging.

Make sure to stay for the

farmer’s breakfast, included with

the room reservation and loaded

with hearty and healthy options.

40 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016

MORE ONLINE For more Oregon stays, visit 1859magazine.com/lodging


“The Way We Were!”

Just one of the

“Seven Wondrous

Trails”

You’ll find in

Albany, Oregon

Over 700 Historic Homes

& Buildings

Covered Bridges

Museums

Water Powered Flour Mill

Carousel Project

Plus

Great restaurants and shopping!

Let us help you plan YOUR next adventure!

110 3rd Ave SE Albany, OR

541-928-0911

albanyvisitors.com

B I S T R O

exceptional

food & service

breathtaking

river view

gluten-free

friendly

open every day • lunch.dinner.sunday brunch • 503.325.6777

bridgewaterbistro.com • 20 basin street, astoria or • on the river


AROUND OREGON

trip planner

TRIP PLANNER

Brookings

A remote gem with a mild climate

written by Lee Lewis Husk

photos by Claire Thorington

IN THE SOUTHWEST CORNER of Oregon, six miles

from the California border, is unpretentious Brookings.

This coastal mill and fishing town at the mouth of the

Chetco River remains true to its roots, too far from

population centers to attract the crowds of Seaside

or Lincoln City. It was inaccessible until 1936 when the

Roosevelt Highway, now Highway 101, connected it

to the rest of the Oregon Coast. Its remoteness and

mild climate (note the palm trees) make it a charming

place to spend a couple of days. Let your attention

wander among the thrilling rugged bluffs, fin-shaped

rock stacks, turbulent surf, laid-back marina, redwood

forests, coffee shops and brewpubs. Retirees flock

here for a slower lifestyle, ample recreation, friendly

village vibe and daytime temperatures float in the midfifties,

even in winter months.

Day

HIKING • CHOWDER • AZALEAS

Arrive from the north and

you’ll pass 365 feet above

Thomas Creek Canyon on Oregon’s

highest highway bridge,

about halfway into the eighteen-mile

Samuel H. Boardman

State Scenic Corridor.

The highway’s name is apt—

every mile between here and

Brookings is eye candy. If you

want to hike, observe migrating

birds and whales or find a

secluded beach, this would be

a good place to start. Pull off

at Arch Rock, Natural Bridges

and Whaleshead for views; go

deeper into the terrain at Indian

Sands or Cape Ferrelo.

Once into Brookings proper,

take a few minutes to get oriented.

The downtown is easy—

you’ll pass through it on the

highway. Cross the river and

you’ll be in the town of Harbor,

the port for both cities. Take the

first right to reach the port and

the Brookings-Harbor Chamber

of Commerce for maps and

brochures. If you travel by RV,

reserve a spot at Beachfront

RV Park for its million-dollar

view of Sporthaven Beach just

beyond your windshield. Note

that the park is currently under

renovation but still open.

Alternatively, the Best Western

Beachfront Inn is nearby.

Travel a few more miles south

42 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016

MORE ONLINE See more Trip Planner photos at 1859magazine.com/tripplanner


AROUND OREGON

trip planner

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT Capella by the Sea at Azalea Park.

Crissey Field State Park. Oxenfrē Public House.

and you’ll pass farms that grow

nearly all of the country’s Easter

lilies for potted plants. At the

border is the Crissey Field State

Park and Oregon Welcome Center.

The 4,500-square-foot building

overlooks a sandy beach,

wetlands and the start of the

382-mile, north-bound Oregon

Coast Trail.

When hunger strikes, make

your way to the Sporthaven Marina

Bar & Grill, where you can

sit on the outdoor patio, watch

harbor boats come and go and

slurp up the award-winning

clam chowder served in a sourdough

bread bowl. Other local

favorites include grilled fish and

chips and the Cajun fish tacos.

Azalea Park on the Brookings

side of the river is an easy afterlunch

amble. This six-acre city

park has azalea “bushes” from

the Jurassic era, wandering paths

and Capella by the Sea, an architectural

standout built by Elmo

Williams in memory of his wife,

Lorraine. A longtime Brookings

resident before his death in

2015, Williams was a Hollywood

film editor and producer who

won an Academy Award for his

editing of the classic 1952 Western,

High Noon, starring Cary

Grant. Azalea Park’s open-air

amphitheater hosts many summer

concerts.

Ready for a brew and dinner?

Grab a seat at Chetco

Brewing Company’s recently

opened Tap Room downtown

behind Khun Thai. The brewery

grows hops, fruit, and herbs

and serves twelve beers in the

Tap Room. Try the Block and

Tackle Stout, 2014 winner of the

World Beer Cup Silver Medal

in the American Imperial Stout

category. There’s no food service,

so bring your own or walk

over to Oxenfrē Public House, a

contemporary take on a Britishstyle

pub with live music and

excellent, made-from-scratch

food and cocktails. Be sure to

check out the light fixtures here,

too. Ask for the off-menu dinner

salad and order the shrimp and

swine gumbo or flatiron steak.

BROOKINGS

where to stay

Beachfront RV Park

beachfrontrvpark.com

Best Western Beachfront Inn

bestwesternoregon.com

Mt. Emily Ranch Bed & Breakfast

mtemilyranch.com

South Coast Inn Bed & Breakfast

southcoastinn.com

where to eat & drink

Sporthaven Marina Bar & Grill

sporthavenmarina.com

Chetco Brewing Company

chetcobrew.com

Oxenfrē Public House

oxenpub.com

where to play

Crissey Field State Park

oregonstateparks.org

Azalea Park

brookings.or.us

Salmon Run Golf Course

salmonrun.net

44 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016


Where ideas

come to live.

opb.org


AROUND OREGON

trip planner

DON’T MISS:

THE OLDEST CRAFT

DISTILLERY IN

SOUTHERN OREGON

Brandy Peak Distillery

uses wood-fired pot

stills, the only legal ones

in the country, to render

award-winning natural

and aged pear brandies

and other fruit-based

brandies. Be sure to try

the blackberry liqueur,

made from local berries.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP

Strolling on Mill Beach

at low tide. A still at

Brandy Peak Distillery.

Food is reasonably

priced at Fat Irish.

Day

WILD BIRDS • BRANDY • BOTTOM-FILLED BEER

If coffee and food get you moving,

the Downtown Coffee

Lounge is a good place for tasty

pastries, fruit smoothies and

egg dishes. Conversely, search

for the hard-to-find, local hangout,

Superfly Distilling Co.

Martini Bar and Grill near Bi-

Mart. The neon lights, playful

décor and the vocals of Aretha

back up excellent granola,

Greek yogurt and fresh fruit or

the monster breakfast burrito.

With fuel in your belly, head

to Harris Beach State Park on

Brookings’ north end. Hike,

beachcomb and see Oregon’s

largest off-coast island, alternately

called Bird or Goat Island,

a national wildlife sanctuary

and breeding site for the

tufted puffin and rare birds.

This popular park has yearround

camping, including RV

hookups and six yurts.

For golf, book a tee time at

Salmon Run Golf Course, an

eighteen-hole course open to

the public. Golfers consider it

a challenging gem with tight

fairways, lush valleys and a

signature fourth hole which

has an island putting green. If

surfing is your gig, catch the

swell at either Mill Beach in

the center of Brookings or at

Sporthaven Beach, both good

for all skill levels.

Brandy Peak Distillery, four

miles up steep and windy Carpenterville

Road, is one of

Brookings residents Tim and

Cindy Young’s favorite places

to take visitors. “It’s a unique

business where the family cuts

wood (for the still) and bottles

by hand,” said Cindy. Founded

in 1993, it is the oldest craft

distillery in Southern Oregon.

Two wood-fired pot stills, the

only legal ones in the country,

render award-winning natural

and aged pear brandies and

other fruit-based brandies. The

distillery also makes a blackberry

liqueur from local berries—

a favorite of the Youngs. Call

ahead for a tour and finish up in

the tasting room.

Cap off the busy day with

dinner at either Fat Irish Pub in

the port or the Black Trumpet

Bistro downtown. Sit at the bar

and watch closely as the bartender

fills glasses from a bottom-up

beer dispenser—a technology

that reduces foam and

wastage. The Black Trumpet is

an intimate, French-style bistro

featuring local brews, wines

from around the world, and fish

caught by chef and co-owner

Rob Krebs. Popular menu items

include chicken marsala with

foraged mushrooms and lemon

meringue crème brûlée.

46 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016


AROUND OREGON

travel spotlight

Travel Spotlight

Lighthouse Inn

written by Bronte Dod

Before the Lighthouse Inn Restaurant and Bar became the nautical-themed bar that attracts travelers on their way to

the coast from Portland, it was the first bank in the city, according to owner Charles Salyer. Today, the inn is packed with

whimsical charm—wood-paneled walls, nautical trinkets and barstools that make you feel like you’re at sea (whether

you’ve had too much Captain Morgan’s or not). The Lighthouse Inn is currently for sale, so stop in to explore the hidden

treasures before it’s too late.

Talia Galvin

48 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016


NewbergTasting Room

214 E. First st., NEwbErg, Or

Estate grown vines.

Award winning wines.

c l i F F c r E E k . c O M

2 Locations – Open Thursday through Monday 12-5 pm

Vineyard Tasting Room

1015 McDONOugh rD, gOlD hill, Or

Cliff Creek Ad (4 x 5.06).indd 1

It’s the most beautiful

coast in the world.

Face it.

2/11/16 12:38 PM

Experience exceptional lodging and

dining at Oregon’s only resort hotel built

right on the beach. All guest and

meeting rooms are oceanfront with

floor-to-ceiling windows that frame

glorious sunsets, spectacular cloud

formations and the ocean waves. And,

some say you can actually see the curve

of the earth as you enjoy breakfast,

lunch, dinner, or a drink at Fathoms, our

penthouse restaurant and bar.

Visit our website for gift certificates,

special rates, menus, and unique

lodging packages.

4009 SW Highway 101, Lincoln City, OR

800-452-8127

SpanishHead.com


Reconsidered

Over the River, Through the Woods

to the Pacific Ocean

Highway 20

written by Peter Murphy

photos by Eugene Pavlov

Trip Tracks

Oregon tunes for

the journey

playlist by 1859 music blogger

Phil Nelson

The Domestics

It Came To Me

Laura Gibson

La Grande

Joseph

Cloudline

Larry and His Flask

Slow it Down

Vikesh Kapoor

Bottom of the Ladder

Check out these and other

Oregon tunes:

1859magazine.com/triptracks

NESTLED IN THE western

slopes of the Cascades, Highway

20 emerges from the Willamette

National Forest like a serpentine

asphalt stream leading up to Cascadia,

where American Indian

lore takes the form of petroglyphs

at the Cascadia Cave in Cascadia

State Park.

The Molalla and Santiam Kalapuya

traveled here as many as

8,000 years ago, and left their

mark at the cave. Today, time

has taken its toll on the site, but

it remains an interesting destination.

White settlers found

this trail and used it extensively,

eventually transforming it into

the Santiam Wagon Road and

subsequently the eastern leg of

Highway 20.

Traveling west on Highway

20, part of which is the “Over

the River and Through the

Woods” Scenic Byway, you’ll

find an array of Oregon communities

that rely on the state’s

natural resources to draw visitors

and locals.

It was the “Steelhead Strength

and Fitness” center that caught

my attention in Sweet Home.

The $9 haircut shop, Rio Theatre

and the “Don’t Tread On

Me” flag told me more about

this town. Sweet Home has

been on the front line of natural

resource issues for generations.

Wood products mills are chief

among them.

Farther downhill, you’ll motor

beyond the Happy Acres Horse

and Pony Farm, past the Straw

Palace, which, of course, stores

stacks of bales. Then there are a

couple of Linn County Parks that

signal your arrival in Lebanon, a

small city that harkens back to

the past.

The next few miles carry you

across acres of green shoots. The

waves of green morph into gold

as the seasons change. Often,

you’ll see sheep feeding in the

pastoral areas. Grasses, grains

and livestock grow profusely in

the rich soil of the Willamette

Valley, with much of its bounty

finding its way into dining rooms

(and bars) across Oregon. These

lands provide the majority of the

grains for the Oregon craft brew

industry.

Crossing over the interstate

and across the river leads you

into the industrial and commercial

center of the Willamette

Valley—Albany. The Kalapuya

tribes were the first to settle

50 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016


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AROUND OREGON

road reconsidered

Cascadia

Cascadia

Cave

20

1

Sweet Home

Straw Palace

20

Lebanon

Albany

Corvallis

20

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT Chitwood Bridge. Earth tones in

Cascadia. Straw Palace in Lebanon.

20

Burnt Woods

2

Burnt Woods

Store

here, where the river by their name and the

Willamette River meet. The European settlers

came in the 1840s. Albany solidified its

place as a trading post with the arrival of

the railroad and remains a busy commercial

center for farmers, growers and ranchers.

Highway 20 follows the Willamette River

here and into Corvallis. This town has long

prospered from Oregon State University, a

land grant college.

To the west, the highway changes character,

but the story remains natural resources:

timber, wood products, fishing and camping.

The highway cuts near the Siuslaw

National Forest, across two Coast Range

passes and along Marys River and Little Elk

Creek. There are a few campgrounds along

the highway, and even more as you head inland

uphill and into the trees.

“Life along the highway is like a step back

in time,” observed Randy Quetschke, owner

of the nearby historic Burnt Woods Store.

The Burnt Woods Store itself dates back to

the 1920s.

History along Highway 20 in the Coast

Range points to some bleak times, though.

The Chitwood Bridge is a standing memorial

to the vibrant logging industry that once

was an economic engine. Before the demise

of the old-growth logging industry, Chitwood

had a town store, post office, homes,

the dance hall and more. Little, beyond the

bridge, is left.

The railroad tracks that run parallel to the

highway through the Coast Range carries

products along this route that terminates in

Toledo, on the shore of upper Yaquina Bay.

Like many of the towns along this stretch

of Highway 20, this was and remains tied to

natural resources.

Newport is the westernmost point on

Highway 20. Any farther and you’ll need a

dory or a stand-up paddleboard for transportation.

As the largest port on the central

coast, Newport has a special character.

Just ask the folks at Rogue Ales and Spirits,

who founded their craft brewery here to

match the blue collar nature of the bayfront.

Newport, with its diversity of seafarers,

artisans and scientists is a perfect

location for the upstart craft brewery. “We

Oregonians are by definition rogue,” said

Rogue Ales president Brett Joyce. At its facility,

there are more than forty varieties of

brews from which to choose as you gaze

out over Yaquina Bay.

Roadside Must-do

1

2

3

Take a hike in verdent Cascadia State

Park. Soda Creek Falls is a quick onemile

hike in.

The Burnt Woods Store dates back to

the 1920s.

Newport is the westernmost end of

Highway 20 and a popular bayfront

tourist destination.

Road Stats

3,365

8,000

Chitwood

Covered Bridge

3

Chitwood

Newport

Rogue Ales

& Spirits

Miles is the full

length of US20, the

longest road in the

United States.

The approximate

number of years

ago the Molalla and

Santiam Kalapuya

started traveling

through Cascadia.

52 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016

MORE ONLINE For more scenes along Highway 20, visit 1859magazine.com/roadrecon


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LOCAL HABIT

54 Artist in Residence 58 Oregon Storytellers 60 From Where I Stand 62 Sound Off 64 Musician

Talking

About Color

Arvie Smith

written by Anna Bird

photos by Intisar Abioto

WHEN TEENAGE ARVIE SMITH walked into

the Otis Art Institute in Los Angeles, he couldn’t

get past the receptionist. She told the young

black man, “We don’t need your kind here.”

Smith, 77, is now a celebrated painter and educator

living in Portland. He received a master’s

in fine art from the Hoffberger School of Painting

at the Maryland Institute College of Art in

Baltimore, where he worked as a graduate assistant

for the renowned painter Grace Hartigan.

After teaching at Pacific Northwest College

of Art—where he received his BFA in

1985—for more than twenty-five years,

he is now professor emeritus.

“I wanted to know everything

that all those other artists

knew, so I took a double

major, and it was a blast.

It was fun because I was

doing what I had wanted to

do all my life.”

—Arvie Smith, artist

54 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016


artist in residence

LOCAL HABIT

OPPOSITE An artist to the

core, Smith has a flair for color.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP Smith

built an addition onto his NE

Portland home to make room

for a full studio. His work often

parallels historical imagery with

present-day conflict. Smith’s

paintings are bold, with many

layers. One of the sculptures in

Smith’s art collection.

He dismisses the racism of the receptionist

more than a half-century ago as a sign of the

times. “This was in the ’50s, and that’s how

people talked then,” Smith said in his home

studio in northeast Portland. “It destroyed

me. I didn’t know what to do about that.”

Themes of racial oppression and injustice

fuel Smith’s work to this day. His paintings

are bold in both color and subject-matter,

replete with images of black people in cartoons,

advertising, entertainment, art and

contemporary pop culture. Some of the

characters in his paintings are inspired

by minstrel and vaudeville, shows such as

“Amos and Andy,” and comics of “Dagwood

and Blondie” ilk. Smith’s paintings confront

stereotypes, inequality, brutality and atrocities

that he believes are as much a part of

history as they are relevant today.

Born in 1938, Smith lived the first decade

of his life in a tiny rural town outside of Jasper,

Texas, a town with a violent history of

racial conflict. He lived on a big farm with

his mom, siblings, grandparents and a greatgrandmother

who had been born a slave.

One day, Smith made a copper tooling—a

type of metal art—of his horse and gave it to

his great-grandmother. “She was just ecstatic,”

he said. He thinks he must have received

an extra piece of pie for his work because,

from that point on, he was hooked on art.

His mother moved to LA after divorcing

Smith’s dad, and when Smith was about 12

years old, he moved to LA after his mom

had settled in. Going from a town with one

gas station that doubled as a post office to

south central LA was a bit of an adjustment,

to say the least. “But you survive, you get

into it,” Smith said. “Without having a dad

around, you get into the gang thing. You

were either prey or a predator, that’s just

the way it was.”

MORE ONLINE View more of Smith’s work at 1859magazine.com/artist

MARCH | APRIL 2016 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 55


LOCAL HABIT

artist in residence

“We be lovin’ it” exemplifies Smith’s confrontation of racial stereotypes in popular culture.

Through high school, he stuck with art.

He designed football and basketball posters,

along with jackets for gangs. After

graduating and getting turned away from

his first attempt at attending art school,

Smith went to UCLA and became a counselor.

His counseling career is what eventually

brought him to Portland, where, on the

way to work every day, he passed the Pacific

Northwest College of Art.

In 1982, with encouragement from his

wife, Julie, he applied to PNCA and got in.

“I wanted to know everything that all those

other artists knew,” Smith said, “so I took a

double major, and it was a blast. I was doing

what I had wanted to do all my life.”

Ever since, Smith has been a force in the art

world, gaining national recognition, exhibiting

his work in museums and galleries around

the world, studying in Italy and working with

kids in the Portland community.

A huge recognition of his achievements

came in 2015, when the Oregon Art Education

Association (OAEA) awarded Smith

for Distinguished Service Outside the

Profession. He has been an artist in residence

and teacher since 1994 at SEI (Self-

Enhancement Incorporated), a Portland

nonprofit supporting at-risk urban youth; a

board member for KoFalen, a cultural center

and art school in Mali; and helped youth

at the Donald E. Long Juvenile Center create

five murals called “Project Hope.”

“I think that I have a talent,” Smith said

about his motivation for painting. “I know I

can make a lot of money doing portraits …

but it’s got to be more than that. I think it

would be a waste because the world we live

in has a history, and we define ourselves by

that history. I want to make an impact on

that—maybe I will, maybe I won’t.”

56 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016


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LOCAL HABIT

oregon storytellers

+

oregon

storytellers

BILL

OAKLEY

TV writer and producer

The Simpsons, Mission Hill, Portlandia

concepted, directed and

photographed by Andy Batt

Q: What do you do to get past

your creative blocks?

A: I walk—sometimes for miles and

miles and sometimes just as far as the

kitchen. It always works. Maybe it’s

something about resetting your point

of view or just getting your blood

flowing. Nietzsche, who I’m not normally

a big fan of, said, “All truly great

thoughts are conceived by walking,”

and it may be his wisest quote.

Q: How do you hold onto an idea that

feels like it will slip out of your grasp?

A: I don’t. I think an idea slipping from

your grasp is your subconscious telling

you to change the subject.

58 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016

MORE ONLINE More insights at 1859magazine.com/storytellers


TOP: Edward Sheriff Curtis, Assiniboin Mother and Child (detail), 1926, plate 632 from the portfolio The North American Indian, volume 10, The Kwakiutl, photogravure; BOTTOM: Wendy Red Star, Untitled, 2015, Courtesy of artist.

CONTEMPORARY

NATIVE PHOTOGRAPHERS

EDWARD CURTIS LEGACY

AND

THE

FEBRUARY 6 – MAY 8

Zig Jackson

Wendy Red Star

Will Wilson

portlandartmuseum.org


LOCAL HABIT

from where I stand

Silver Lake

Angel Roscoe

as told to Mackenzie Wilson

photos by Meg Roussos

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT Angel (left) and Jamie Roscoe

co-own Cowboy Dinner Tree. They serve whole chickens and

thirty-ounce steaks to hungry customers. Angel stirs a giant

vat of baked beans. Guests often write their name(s) and

date they visited on a dollar bill and tack it to the wall—the

wall gets so crowded that the Roscoes take all the money

down once a year and donate it to charity.

A LOT OF PEOPLE fall in love with the

simple way of life out here. Our restaurant

is a couple of miles outside of town in Silver

Lake. To us, Lake County is the most beautiful

spot in Oregon.

I’ve been working at the Cowboy Dinner

Tree since I was 14 years old and it’s where

I met my husband, Jamie. My parents, Don

and Connie Ramage, bought Cowboy Dinner

Tree in 2007. When they were ready to

retire in 2012, Jamie and I took over.

Jamie was celebrating his birthday at

Cowboy Dinner Tree when we met in 2005.

At the time, I was working as a dental assistant

in Bend, so I was just helping out that

weekend. He ordered the steak and I guess

you could say it was love at first sight—we

got married that same year. Now we have

three beautiful kids, Wade, 6, Jack, 8, and

Dani, 11, who help us at the restaurant.

Regulars like seeing our whole family when

they come in for dinner; and by regulars, I

mean, they come in once a month. There’s

so much food, you wouldn’t want to come

every weekend; we serve whole chickens

and thirty-ounce steaks.

We like the way of life out here and like

to share it with people. It’s one of the best

areas to see the sun rise and set because

the terrain is wide open. We get a lot of

people who come out just to look at the

stars; there’re no lights here to hide them,

it’s so rural.

I can’t imagine moving back into a town

or city, but it would be nice to have a doctor’s

office closer than La Pine. Here we

are though, living at the edge of the mountains

with millions of acres right out our

front door. We can go do about anything

we want, any day of the week ... when the

restaurant isn’t open. It allows us to make a

living out here, but if we didn’t have it, we

wouldn’t move. As long as you’re ready to

get your hands dirty, there’s always work in

Lake County.

60 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016

MORE ONLINE View an extended gallery at 1859magazine.com/fwis


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the Oregon Coast Aquarium, or climb all 114 steps of the

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LOCAL HABIT

sound off

Grazing Rights

On January 2, Oregon became headline news. An armed anti-government rancher from Nevada drove up

to Harney County to protest the imprisonment of two ranchers convicted of setting fire to federal land.

Claiming to have received orders from God, Ammon Bundy, along with other armed militia members,

took over the otherwise tranquil Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in protest. Post-standoff, one militiaman

is dead and twenty-five others face felony charges. Many of the people of rural Harney County,

however, were not in lock step with the Bundy-led ideology. Ironically, this area of the country is, in many

ways, the picture of progressive cooperation between locals and federal programs. A rancher whose land

borders the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge explains.

illustration by Karen Eland

Gary Marshall

Co-owner (along with his wife, Georgia) of Broken Circle Company, an organic livestock

ranch which borders the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge

THE USE OF PUBLIC LANDS for grazing

is not a right but rather a permitted landuse

agreement.

The concept of grazing rights descended

from the English concept of the commons,

and has never been codified in United

States law. The perceived rights gained

strength in the early times of our nation, including

during the settling of the West with

its vast amount of open land. In the mid- to

late-nineteenth century, as the population

of the western United States increased,

conflicts occurred as the rangelands deteriorated

with overuse.

In 1934, the Taylor Grazing Act was

passed that “provides for the regulation

of grazing on the public lands to improve

rangeland conditions and regulate their

use.” This act changed an approach to land

treatment that was producing harsh effects

on the resources, as well as human abuses.

It provides for “permitted” use of lands

designated as available for livestock grazing,

which now include Forest Service managed

lands as well as Bureau of Land Management

administered lands.

As a permitted grazer of public lands,

I not only receive the use of the forage

but I also have access to an entire team of

professionals (biologist, ecologists, environmentalist,

monitors, etc.). These individuals

assist in making decisions that move

rangeland health toward mutual objectives

for multi-land use.

If a relationship of trust and open communication

between stakeholders and all

parties involved is established, then plans are

developed—resulting in a healthier ecosystem,

economic growth and happier people.

The best example of cooperation between

local and federal entities is that of the High

Desert Partnership. We have worked collaboratively

for many years to achieve some

good things for Harney County. Among

them is the fifteen-year plan for the Malheur

National Wildlife Refuge (called the

Comprehensive Conservation Plan), a forest

initiative called Harney County Restoration

Collaborative (HCRC) and the Harney

Basin Wetlands Initiative (HBWI).

HBWI has recently been chosen by the

Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board

as a recipient in its Focus Investment

Partnership program. This is a $6 million

grant over three biennium directed toward

improving habitat for migratory birds.

The burden of creating a better outcome

for public land practices and processes

is upon all stakeholders. While there are

ample opportunities for improvement of

federal lands in the West, those problems

cannot be laid upon the practices of permitted

grazing, because in fact, permitting

works very well.

62 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016

Karen Eland painted Gary’s portrait with Lights Out Stout from Worthy Brewing in Bend.


LOCAL HABIT

musician

RICHARD SWIFT

written by Phil Nelson

RICHARD SWIFT’S MUSICAL WORLD is

sprawling. In addition to releasing numerous

solo albums, he’s produced well-received

albums for artists such as Damien

Jurado, Foxygen, The Mynabirds and

Guster, to name a few. This is all to say

nothing of his membership in revered indie

band, The Shins, joining The Black Keys as

their touring bassist or starting The Arcs

with Dan Auerbach of The Black Keys.

Swift’s solo albums run the gamut from

the scuzzy surf rock of Zombie Boogie to

the upbeat Nilsson-esque territory of A

Song For Milton Feher. He sums up this creative

breadth with, “I play every day, so I’ve

just built up that musical muscle.”

Expect more collaborative music from

Swift this year as well as a new, deeply personal

solo album. “I think it’s some of the

bluntest work I’ve done, and it feels right

to get it off my chest I suppose, even if just

for my cathartic enjoyment,” said Swift.

64 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016

MORE ONLINE For more of Richard Swift, visit 1859magazine.com/music


VENTURES

66 Startup 68 What I’m Working On 70 My Workspace 72 Into the Soul 74 Game Changers

Startup

Where Every Trail Connects

written by Kimberly Bowker

photos by Talia Galvin

Co-founders Jereme Monteau and Ryan Branciforte “collect” spatial data in an open space.

THERE ARE COUNTLESS REASONS

to step outside. Perhaps it’s camping with

the family, disc golfing over a lunch break,

climbing that mountain on the bucket list

or just sitting by a river. While low-tech

has continually offered new ways to experience

the outdoors (just think compasses and

tents), Trailhead Labs has taken outdoor accessibility

to the next level.

Implementing today’s technology, Trailhead

Labs allows parks-and-recreation

agencies, along with partnering organizations,

to create interactive maps and mobile

applications that enable people to get

outside. Jereme Monteau and Ryan Branciforte,

outdoor enthusiasts and friends who

co-founded the company three years ago

in San Francisco, are now moving to Bend.

They are excited for the change, and to continue

growing a company that supports a

healthier world.

“We definitely want to have a big, positive

impact,” said Monteau, the company’s chief

technology officer, “but we are on a trajectory

that is a lifestyle change. Oregon feels

like a place which celebrates that.”

At its core, Trailhead Labs is an outdoor

technology company helping to get more

people outside. Monteau and Branciforte

feel that being active outdoors and having

access to green spaces improves their own

lives and cultivates an appreciation for public

land. It is something they want to share

with everyone.

The company designs core technological

platforms that can be customized for

different needs, and can be updated over

time. Parks-and-recreation agencies, with

thousands of locations in the country,

comprise many of Trailhead Lab’s fifteen

customers. Other clients include partnering

nonprofits that support and advocate

for parks, as well as government agencies

such as the Forest Service.

“All these people have the same interest of

doing things outside, and maintaining

that resource to have access to

it,” said Monteau.

66 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016


CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT Intertwine Alliance in

Portland worked with Trailhead Labs to build a map,

which integrates information from twenty-eight agencies

that manage parks and trails around the Portland

area. Trailhead Labs co-founders in the Oregon

Badlands Wilderness.

Trailhead Lab supports an open data and

open source structure, which allows developers

and agencies to use the same information

and sometimes all work on the same

map. Layering multiple sources of information

on one map makes it easier for people

to get outside, or at least to get outside in

new ways.

“Sometimes technology enables you to

get outside to experience the outdoors,” said

Monteau. “Sometimes we experience the

outdoors with technology. There is room for

all of this.”

Intertwine Alliance in Portland worked

with Trailhead Labs to build a map, which

integrates information from twenty-eight

agencies that manage parks and trails around

the Portland area. Rather than having to

search different outlets to know how to get

to a destination and what to expect, it is all in

one place. Such convenience makes exploring

the outdoors easier for all.

“Trailhead Labs has offered us a way to

generate our map, provide us with an interface

that makes it really easy for us to use,

and to keep that map up to date,” said Michael

Wetter, executive director of Intertwine

Alliance. “And it allows us to have our

partners work on the map, so we are literally

all working on the same page together.”

Parks and outdoor spaces are common

ground that bring the community together,

said Wetter. It is possible to witness all kinds

of life on trails, offering a place for people to

share the same path.

This spring, Intertwine Alliance will

launch a mobile application made with Trailhead

Labs. The app, Daycation, intends to

connect people to nearby outdoor experiences

and adventures. Users can check-in,

upload information, and learn what is happening

nearby. The app even facilitates a dialogue

between the professional community

and the user, so park rangers or naturalists

can communicate via the technology.

Trailhead Labs helps people navigate outside

for longer periods of time and in safer

ways. The founders are also in the process of

collecting data detailing how people use the

outdoors. In the future, such information

could aid agencies in marketing campaigns

and efficiently improving spaces for a particular

use. The company is also looking at ways

to combine various activities into one outing.

Trailhead Labs expects to grow, and from

its new location in Bend. The outdoor technology

company aspires to create a better

environment for everybody, by helping people

to step outside and be part of green space.

“Having all the information in one place,”

said Monteau, “lets people take all kinds of

new adventures.”

“Sometimes technology

enables you to get

outside to experience

the outdoors.”

—Jereme Monteau

TRAILHEAD LABS

• Designs core

technological platforms

to create interactive

maps and mobile

applications that enable

people to get outside

• Supports an open

data and open source

structure

• Collects data detailing

how people use the

outdoors

MARCH | APRIL 2016 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 67


VENTURES

what I’m working on

Seth

San Filippo

Founder, Urban Lumber Co.

interview by Felisa Rogers

Seth San Filippo’s story is about as Oregon as

you can get. Born on a hippie commune in the

hills above Roseburg, he learned woodworking

skills as a kid while helping his dad restore old

houses. As a teenager, he began experimenting

with building his own skateboards and started

a custom longboard company. Now 35, San

Filippo lives in the Eugene area, where he crafts

furniture from sustainably harvested wood.

Although his business, Urban Lumber Company,

now has three locations, San Filippo and his staff

of ten keep the focus on custom projects and

sustainable practices. His interests in forestry

and craftsmanship honor Oregon tradition and

sustainability.

Chris Laswell

Seth San Filippo, second from left, and crew.

What inspired you to start Urban

Lumber Company?

While looking for good lumber for my

skateboards, I began to notice some nice

city trees being taken down and cut up for

firewood. I ended up making a connection

with the contracted city arborist, and

I bought a crane truck. After stockpiling a

lifetime supply of lumber for skateboards,

I decided to start Urban Lumber Company

to pursue my dream of building furniture

full time.

How do you source your wood?

Our wood comes from locally salvaged

city trees. We have our own tree service

but also work with other arborists,

cities, parks and homeowners. When a

tree comes down in a storm, or if it’s

dead or hazardous, we pick up the big

logs with our crane truck and bring

them back to our facility for milling.

We mill, kiln dry and plane all of

our lumber in house.

What projects are you working on

right now?

Right now we’re working on a group of tables

and benches for a cocktail bar in California.

We’re using wood from the decks

of two WWII cargo ships that were sunk

in 1950. The wood’s been on the bottom of

the ocean for sixty years, which has given

it an incredibly wild color and character.

What inspires you creatively?

I’m inspired by the natural beauty of trees

and their wood. I like to let the wood do the

talking, so I try to choose pieces of wood

that lend themselves best to the project at

hand. I also love design and am inspired by

many styles—from the clean, curved lines

found in Japanese architecture to the industrial

design elements of machinery and

automobiles from the ’40s and ’50s.

Why Springfield?

Springfield was built as a lumber town. In

fact, Urban Lumber Company is located

in the historic Booth Kelly Mill building

that started it all. It’s a perfect fit for our

business, and we’re inspired by the wood

products history oozing from the walls

we work within. Springfield is the place to

come to “get stuff done,” and I’ve always

loved the blue-collar work ethic and the

can-do attitude of the city.

Can you describe a favorite project?

My favorite projects are the largest, most

oddball projects. We’re known for building

custom pieces that no one else can or

wants to take on, like an eighty-foot sectional

sofa or the table we just finished for

an advertising agency in San Francisco. It’s

six feet wide and twenty-five feet long,

with a jet-black, burnt finish, whole length

brass inlay, and custom steel plate bases

that house electrical components. The

size of the table and the fact that it needed

to be hand-carried to the third floor of a

historic downtown building made it fun

and challenging to build and deliver.

68 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016


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VENTURES

my workspace

Given Back

Bird Houses

Florence

written by Anna Bird

The Fishers started making birdhouses that replicate

bird habitats in the wild when birds on their property

weren’t attracted to their store-bought birdhouses.

“To convince a bird to move into one of my

birdhouses, it has to be just as good as one of their

own or better,” said Amen Fisher.

Given Back birdhouses

are constructed out of

found natural materials

such as dead wood,

driftwood, moss, cones

and downed branches.

Maria and Amen Fisher

founded Given Back Bird

Houses in Florence in 2009.

Since then, they have made

around 5,000 one-of-a-kind,

handmade birdhouses.

When birds, such as woodpeckers,

make cavities in trees,

they seek sapless trees because

sap has sugar in it, which can

grow germs, bacteria, fungus

and mold. The key, the Fishers

found, was to build their bird

houses out of similar dead,

sapless wood.

People can watch the Fishers

make their birdhouses, while

learning the techniques and

key components, at their

working museum in Florence’s

Historic Old Town.

Eugene Pavlov

70 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016

MORE ONLINE For more on Given Back Bird Houses, visit 1859magazine.com/workspace


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VENTURES

into the soul

Lucky Bear

Soap Co.

How 1,500 pounds of bull

inspired a business

written by Lori Tobias

AS A VEGETARIAN, in her Tillamook

school full of farmers, Skyler Veek was

considered the “weird one,” she said. “It’s always

been, ‘Oh, there’s a hurt animal. Give

it to Skyler.’” So it was no surprise to anyone

when in 2009, Veek found a baby bull

left for dead in a ditch, and took it home.

Back then, Veek had no idea that her rescue

would change her life and, consequently,

turn the bull, christened Lucky Bear, into

something of a community mascot.

“He’s kind of getting famous,” Veek said.

“People are always dropping off pumpkins

and leftover vegetables. Little treats for a

1,500-pound animal really add up.”

Things add up in more ways than one.

That was one of the first lessons Veek learned

in her early days of caring for Lucky Bear.

Bulls are expensive.

“I needed a fundraiser for Lucky,” she said. “I

had to build a barn and fencing and that was

a few thousand dollars. Just his food and bedding

cost $300 a month during the winter.”

So Veek, who had been studying essential

oils for over a decade and has a passion for

art, combined her skills, learned to make

soap and Lucky Bear Soap Co. was born.

Today, Veek sells her soaps, massage oils,

aromatherapy sprays and lotions from a

Food for Skyler Veek’s rescue bull can cost up to $300 per month.

storefront in downtown Tillamook. All of

her products are free of synthetic preservatives,

petroleum, parabens, silicone, fragrance

oils, and plastic, and of course, there

is no animal testing.

Her company was a Martha Stewart American

Made nominee in 2013 and 2015, and

most recently, Veek was nominated for the

Small Business of the Year award by the Tillamook

Area Chamber of Commerce. Her

Etsy store has received more than 33,000

views from visitors in eighty-four countries,

seven of which she’s shipped to. Her Lucky

Bear Soap Manly Mint organic beard oil

placed in the top ten in a contest sponsored

by a magazine produced in Spain, and three

years later, she’s still shipping beard oil to

that country.

It’s no small feat for a mother of three who

is essentially a company of one.

“I’m a one-woman-show,” said Veek. “I do

it all—ordering, making, designing, cutting,

wrapping, shipping. In the summer,

my daughter works with me. She’s 12, and

she’s amazing. And my mom comes in and

makes soap about twice a week.”

Veek carries more than 100 different

products in the small shop, which can be

intimidating to first-time visitors, she said.

That’s when Veek brings out the Lucky

Bear story, which is also on the package of

every bar of soap.

“People love the story,” said Veek. “As soon

as I show the picture of Lucky, as soon as

they hear the story, they say ‘Oh wow, I have

a friend who would love this story.’ They

can relate to rescuing an animal. Lucky is

not an easy pet to care for. He could live to

be 30 years old so we could be together a

long time. It’s a lot of heavy lifting. But he’s

a good education tool for kids, adults, and

farmers, and he’s a blessing in my life.”

Peter Mahar

72 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016

MORE ONLINE See more photos of Lucky Bear Soap Co. at 1859magazine.com/soul


VENTURES

game changers + biz briefs

Africa Bridge

written by Lee DiSanti

Gary Grossman

IT TAKES A VILLAGE to

raise a child. In Tanzania—an

African country roughly three

times the size of Oregon—

people in remote villages, hobbled

by poverty and AIDS, take

the sentiment literally.

“People who have nothing will

take in a homeless child, and

that is the biggest risk a poor

family can take,” said Tanzanian

native-turned-Oregonian, Barry

Childs, 70. “It means they have

another mouth to feed when

they can hardly feed the mouths

that are already present.”

In 2000, Childs founded Africa

Bridge—a Portland-based

nonprofit that helps vulnerable

children who are extremely

poor, malnourished, orphaned,

abandoned, marginalized or

HIV positive—by helping individual

families by empowering

whole villages.

Childs grew up trekking

through Tanzania’s distant villages

with his father, a botanist.

While the elder Childs

taught agricultural practices,

the younger learned games,

languages and culture among

village children.

He left Tanzania in 1969

to pursue an education and a

career, then returned thirtyfive

years later to experience

a country rife with poverty

and epidemic. Yet, Childs saw

strength in the commitment to

protecting and caring for children

within the communities.

“I didn’t know how, but I

knew I had to make a difference,”

he said.

When conceptualizing Africa

Bridge, Childs interviewed

Africans from all walks of life.

One man, a South African

“Zulu-Jew” doctor, made a

lasting impression.

He told Childs that every

dollar that came to aid Africa,

came with a Western agenda.

“People in countries that send

money decide how to spend

money, but have no context

of what the realities are,” said

Childs. “What makes sense

abroad may not make sense in

Africa.”

He believes that Tanzanian

children need a voice in the organization’s

programs.

“When I first came up with

the idea, my buddy thought I

emerged from a lunatic asylum,”

Childs said.

Africa Bridge first interviews

at-risk children before it enters

new villages.

“Children know what’s going

on in the community, and they

are transparent,” he said.

The organization layers aid

efforts. It partners with Tanzanian

government committees

to identify vulnerable areas

and provide immediate social

services. It also establishes agricultural

co-ops to help families

and economies.

In the dairy co-op, families receive

American-Tanzanian hybrid

cows, capable of producing four

times the milk of a local variety.

“A family receives immediate

sustenance from the milk,”

explained Alex Chester, 34, the

organization’s finance and operations

manager.

Families then sell excess milk

for income.

“We can transform children’s

lives by transforming the families

and communities that take

them in,” said Childs.

GETTING INVOLVED

Africa Bridge’s mission is to

empower Tanzanian families

to protect, support, and care

for vulnerable children by

helping villages implement

sustainable social services

and economic solutions.

How you can help:

DONATE

VOLUNTEER

INVOLVE STUDENTS through

the “This is My School” program.

africabridge.org

74 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016


Take a long walk on the beach.

Relax,

Rejuvenate,

Reconnect...

in Bandon by the Sea.

Photo by Wood Sabold

For a complete list of activities, events,

lodging, and restaurants go to

www.bandon.com


BUZZ MARTIN

“Buzz was the

spar tree on the

hill. There’s no

one to touch him,

and there never

will be again.”

written by

Amy Doan

76 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016


BUZZ MARTIN

Martin, a rough-looking man who told

rough stories, is now considered the poet

laureate of the logging world.

With a gravelly voice telling

tales of whistle-punks and

hooktenders, cork boots and

mollies, Martin’s songs describe felling

Oregon timber and a way of life that’s

all but disappeared. He left behind a

treasure of songs about the danger, discomfort

and homesickness of high-lead

logging. But they’re not crying-intoyour-beer

tunes. There’s usually humor

and always pride, as in these lines from

one of Buzz’s biggest hits:

They come home at night so doggone

tired, bruised and cut and sore

Get up the next morning with a big

old grin

And go right back out for more

To the same steep, muddy hillsides

they were cussing the day before.

– “(Where There Walks a Logger)

There Walks a Man” – 1968,

Ripcord Records

Buzz’s talent would carry him all the way

from those muddy Oregon hillsides to

the Grand Ole Opry’s Ryman Auditorium

in Nashville. In the end, bruised but

not embittered by a record business that

didn’t always treat him well, he returned

to the peace of his beloved woods.

Lloyd Earl Martin was born in 1928

in a hop shack in Coon Holler, Oregon,

a tiny settlement outside Stayton. His

childhood nickname, Buster, got shortened

to Buzz.

His father worked for the railroad, and

money was tight. The Depression only

increased the strain. “My father didn’t

like to talk about his childhood,” said

Buzz’s son Steve Martin, 63, of Lebanon,

Oregon. “Bits came out in his songs, but

he never dwelt on the negative.”

In one song Buzz remembers living

under a shake roof “with holes you

could fling a cat through.” In “Always

Plenty of Water (1974, Ranwood),” he

recalled hunting for bottles in a ditch

“just to buy an ice cream bar.” But in

the chorus, which could be a motto for

any web-footed Oregonian, he said that

growing up poor made him a better

man: “Some kids learn to feel the rain,

And others just get wet.”

When Buzz was 13, he went completely

blind from cataracts. Suddenly,

sound was his primary link to the world.

“He would sit quietly for hours by the

window, listening,” said his younger sister,

Lora Callahan, 84, of Florence, Oregon.

She now realizes that during those

long, dark days he was telling himself

stories in his head.

A friend helped send Buzz to the

Oregon School for the Blind in Salem.

He was living there when both of his

parents died. It was also in this school

where, during a volunteer class, he first

picked up a guitar.

When Buzz was 15 he had a corneal

transplant that gave him 20/20 vision

for the rest of his life. Always a fan of a

lumberjack’s tall tale, he joked that the

corneas had been those of a death-row

inmate’s. The story could be at least partially

true; many transplants at the time

came from prisoners.

He moved in with his older sister, Nellie,

and her logger husband, Bill Woosley,

in Five Rivers, Oregon, near the Siuslaw

National Forest. Timber was in high demand

after the war, and young Buzz “followed

Bill into the woods,” said Lora.

First he worked as a whistle punk,

blowing the steam whistle that told everyone

where to go. The job typically

went to the youngest, smallest crewmember.

He didn’t stay small long as he

grew into a burly man with biceps seventeen

inches around. By his late teens,

he’d become a skilled cutter and climber

who could run every piece of equipment

from the Cat (Caterpillar bulldozer) to

the Giant LeTourneau (logstacker).

It was grueling, dangerous work. One

errant step, one bad kick of the chainsaw

could mean death. But logging had

its joys, too —camaraderie, fresh air, and

views all the way to the ocean from a

perch where a man could feel like he was

just about at the top of the world.

There was no electricity in Five Rivers

then, but the family made sure their

battery-operated radio was ready for

Saturday —Grand Ole Opry night. Buzz

became enthralled by Roy Acuff, Bill

Munroe, Gene Autry and Tex Ritter.

Later, and most importantly, he’d hear

Johnny Cash.

“Johnny Cash was always the number

one, the idol,” said his son Steve.

Bill Woosley was a musician who

made his own banjos and guitars, so

with his and Nellie’s encouragement,

Buzz honed his guitar-playing and singing.

He was a solid picker but his voice

was his best instrument—an appealing

fusion of Johnny Cash and John Wayne.

He began to join the after-hours sing-

78 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016


BUZZ MARTIN

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT A portrait

taken of Buzz as he rose toward fame. Buzz

singing in logging territory. Buzz writing

songs. Buzz (middle) near a Model A, which

was an inspiration for on of his songs.

MARCH | APRIL 2016 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 79


BUZZ MARTIN

“The only difference

between me and Buzz is that

he’s singing about lumberjacks

and I’m singing about cotton pickers.”

- Johnny Cash

80 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016


BUZZ MARTIN

ing in camp, carrying on an oral tradition

dating back hundreds of years, to when

loggers first swapped poems and tales of

Paul Bunyan and Babe the Blue Ox.

The crowds were rowdy and

heavy-drinking. Buzz proved a natural at

hooking his audience, getting to punch

lines quickly, punctuating clever lyrics

with a chuckle that never felt forced.

On rare days off Buzz began courting

Lela Erickson, a neighbor who shared

his love of the outdoors. They rode their

horses deep into the woods together,

and Buzz nicknamed her “Biscuit.” In

1948, when Lela was 17 and Buzz was

20, they married. The next year they

had a daughter, the first of five children.

With a large family to support, Buzz

began talking seriously about making a

living as an entertainer. He had a natural

writing talent that brought a Steinbeckian

cast of characters to life–Big

Jack, Big Jim and Swampy.

“He was that rarest of things–a completely

honest man,” said his friend

Dale Haslet, 79, of Waldport. “There

really was this crotchety old guy

named Swampy who lived up at camp.

He really did use bacon rind to start

his green Model A, like in ‘Little Ole

Model A.’”

Buzz played local dancehalls and clubs

but drove log trucks to make money.

Then in 1963, at 35, he got his big

break. He performed on Portland’s

“Channel 2 Hoedown” and host Buddy

Simmons helped Buzz record his first

seven-inch.

The A single was “Sick of Settin’

Chokers”—a heartfelt song about a

weary logger. Like many of his recordings,

it opened with Buzz talking, friend

to friend. The B side was “Whistle Punk

Pete”—an irresistibly catchy tune about

a whistle-punk who realizes his ambition

of becoming hooktender, or boss,

when he hooks up his wife’s girdle. Both

quickly broke into regional Top 20s.

“You just had to tap your toe to

those songs,” said Dick Bond, former

program director for KGAY in Salem.

“And he looked like a logger—rolled-up

flannel shirtsleeves, giant mutton-chop

sideburns, the whole deal.”

Buzz recorded his debut album,

There Walks a Man with Ripcord Records

in 1968 in Vancouver, Washington.

It sold 250,000 copies, according to

his son Steve.

In 1969, Johnny Cash was playing

Portland’s Memorial Coliseum and

Buzz met him backstage, shakily playing

“Butterin’ Up Biscuit,” a cheeky tune

about his wife. Cash was so impressed

he invited him to appear on ABC’s “The

Johnny Cash Show” in 1971. It was


BUZZ MARTIN

filmed at the Ryman Auditorium during

the Grand Ole Opry and Cash said, The

only difference between me and Buzz is

that he’s singing about lumberjacks and

I’m singing about cotton pickers.”

“That was the high point,” said Steve.

“That meant everything to him.” It seemed

a major record deal was within reach.

But the segment never aired. And while

there were flirtations with major labels

after that, a few meetings with big-time

agents, nothing came of them. Buzz’s early

1970s albums sold decently, but money

was always tight, and nobody seems quite

sure where the royalties went.

“My father came out of the woods

green as a gourd,” said Steve. “He was

an honest man, and he assumed that

everybody else was like him. But he

never complained.”

Trying to “compete with the big

boys,” as Steve put it, Buzz recorded

an album called Solid Gold in 1976.

From the opening of the album, when

a nerdy male voice announces, “Ladies

and gentleman, the only singing logger

in captivity!” to the finale of “America

the Beautiful,” the songs seem unnatural,

contrived. It’s the only time Buzz’s

chuckle seems forced. Solid Gold was

recorded as a faux live album, with an

applause track and Buzz bantering with

phantom audience members.

By the late 1970s, the failure of Solid

Gold was compounded by the demise of

traditional logging. Not only was logging

a dirty word in most of the country, but

many local loggers were out of work.

Buzz’s music no longer fit the times.

As Buzz’s career waned, he played

mostly spaghetti feeds and trade shows.

He made some money sponsoring

chainsaw companies and toured with

his family as his backing band, calling

them “The Chips Off the Old Block.”

In 1979, he sold his music rights and

left the recording business for good.

He went to Alaska with Biscuit to log

full time again, trucking, running heavy

machinery, and sometimes singing for

the crew. By most accounts, he was

happy again. In “Goin’ Home” (1969,

Ripcord), he’d foreshadowed his return

to the woods:

I miss the sight of the sun coming

up at the start of each new day

And the morning mist as it rolls

and twists and moves out down

the bay

While the coffee brews I’ll lace my

cork shoes and get ready for a day

in the woods

Where the work is hard

and I can sweat off some lard

And get back to feeling good

In 1983, Buzz was scouting locations

for a hunting expedition on Chichagof

Island, Alaska when he drowned in a

tidepool. Friends believe he tripped and

hit his head. He was 55.

Steve recently bought the rights

to his father’s catalog and is hoping

to record the songs he was writing in

Alaska. Choking back tears, he played

one—a sweet, catchy tune about a tree

planter called “Joanie.”

What Steve hopes is that people

will rediscover his father’s original

forty-four songs. There are four in the

Smithsonian, and you can hear “Sick

of Settin’ Chokers” in the bar scene of

Sometimes a Great Notion, but until recently

it’s been hard to find Buzz Martin

music outside of eBay.

Steve has made twenty tracks available

on cdbaby.com. Zach Bryson, a

distant relative, covers the music with

his Portland band and said a new generation

is discovering Buzz.

“After the set, people always come up

and ask me about him or tell me how

their parents or grandparents used to play

his records,” said Bryson. “I want to shine

a light on this music—it’s just so good.”

“While the coffee brews I’ll lace

my cork shoes and get ready for

a day in the woods.”

82 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016


BUZZ MARTIN

Steve Martin, Buzz Martin’s son.

Talia Galvin

MARCH | APRIL 2016 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 83


ESCAPING THE COLD

Escaping the Cold

5 Getaways

to

Oregon’s

warmest

locales

written by Vanessa Salvia

Susan Creek Falls is one of

more than a dozen falls

within an hour of Roseburg.

Jamey 84 Davidsmeyer 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016


ESCAPING THE COLD

If you don’t like the weather, wait five minutes, to paraphrase

Mark Twain. He spoke those words about New England, but

the saying is equally true for our state. Even newcomers quickly

learn to expect weather that changes as soon as we put on (or

take off) our jacket. No matter how much we may look forward

to winter, there comes a point when the view is nothing but cold

and uninviting. Luckily, no matter where you are in the state,

when you yearn to get away you can revise that old adage to

read: If you don’t like the weather, drive a few miles.

While spring getaways in Oregon may not be as sunny as

Oaxaca, there are “banana belt” locations throughout the

state where the temperatures can be nearly springlike, even in

winter. It’s all about geography—elevation changes, primarily—

that influence temperature and precipitation on both sides of

the coast and Cascade mountain ranges. Several cities around

the state, such as Medford, 150 miles inland from the south

coast, and Hermiston, 275 miles inland from the mouth of the

Columbia River, are both on the eastern side of a rain shadow

formed by the Cascade Range, so both are much drier, and

sunnier, than the Willamette Valley.

Roseburg, nestled in a spur of the western Cascades in the

southern part of the state, rarely accumulates snow, and the

Pelton Dam area on the Deschutes River near Warm Springs sees

fewer than ten inches of precipitation a year. Even Brookings,

which sits right on the largest and deepest ocean in the world,

has a pronounced banana belt climate that can make it tens of

degrees warmer than many other parts of the state all year-round.

If you’re ready to hang up your snow shovel for a while and go

somewhere to reacquaint yourself with the lemon-yellow sun,

read on.

5

2

ROSEBURG

WATERFALLS AND WINERIES

3

1

4

1If you’re looking for

relatively warm spring

conditions with very

little snowfall, and you

want to avoid strong coastal

winds, Roseburg is a good

place, said forecaster and incident

meteorologist Noel Keene

with the Medford Weather

Forecast Office.

Roseburg is only 525 feet

above sea level, which generally

keeps the snow well above

sights

Douglas County Museum

umpquavalleymuseums.org

lodging

Hokanson’s Guest House

Downtown Roseburg bed and

breakfast in a historic Victorian

manor built in 1882

hokansonsguesthouse.com

Delfino Vineyards Guest Cottage

Cozy cottage situated in

a 160-acre vineyard

delfinovineyards.com

dining

Brix Grill

On Facebook or call 541.440.4901

Salud Restaurant & Brewery

saludroseburg.com

town. Roseburg is also separated

from the Willamette Valley,

where cold air tends to pool.

“The terrain around Roseburg,

which makes for beautiful

scenery, essentially isolates it

from all but the coldest Arctic

air outbreaks,” said Keene.

The Roseburg area is surrounded

by more than a dozen

waterfalls. Drive up Highway

138 about an hour to the

trailhead for Susan Creek Falls,

which climbs to just under

1,000 feet of elevation. “The

.8-mile trail is accessible for

most people and ends in a waterfall

dropping fifty feet from

the Umpqua River over mossy

cliffs,” said Rachael Miller, with

the Roseburg Chamber.

At Deadline Falls, twenty-two

miles from town down Highway

138, water flows over a

series of small basalt outcroppings,

where salmon leap the

falls as they migrate upstream

from May to October. “You’re

not likely to see the jumping

fish this time of year,” said Miller,

“but it’s still a great hike.”

Big fish can be viewed crossing

the Winchester fish ladder

all year. Oregon Department

of Fish and Wildlife maintains

a fish counting station at Winchester

Dam not far from Roseburg

off exit 129 from Interstate

5. The Winchester Dam was

built in November 1890 and is

on the National Register of Historical

Places. “You’re beneath

the water’s level so you can see

up close to these huge fish,” said

Miller. In January 2015, more

than 3,000 fish, mostly winter

steelhead, were observed crossing

the fish ladder.

In January, Wine Enthusiast

Magazine named Southern

Oregon one of the “10 Best

Wine Travel Destinations of

2016,” thanks in part to the

twenty-plus wineries in and

around Roseburg. Local wineries

won twenty-eight medals in

the 2016 San Francisco Chronicle

wine competition out of a

total of 7,162 entries.

The state’s largest collection

of natural history artifacts is on

display at the Douglas County

Museum, along with the state’s

second-largest collection of historic

photographs. More than

7,500 items tell the story of the

past and present of the Umpqua

River Valley, along with more

than 24,000 images going back

to the mid-nineteenth century.

Miller recommends starting

your day with breakfast at

Brix Grill, where they often

offer a pear, bacon and blue

cheese omelet. “As weird as it

sounds,” she said, “it is absolutely

sublime.”

For your Friday or Saturday

evening nightlife, visit Salud

Restaurant & Brewery, which

serves up Latin-inspired tapas

and entrées. “If you’re lucky,

Faith will be bartending,” said

Miller. “Faith makes the most

scrumptious concoctions.” If she

can’t tell, or you’re not sure what

you’re in the mood for, this intuitive

bartender will ask a couple

of questions and be able to make

your drink dreams come true.

MARCH | APRIL 2016 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 85


ESCAPING THE COLD

MICROCLIMATE

EXPLAINED: BROOKINGS

On a typical mid-January day, the

high in Redmond is 42 degrees

and the low is 23. There may be a

dusting of snow that increases as

the sun begins to set. In Brookings,

however, the average January high

is 55 and the low is 42, despite its

location on the consistently cold

waters of the Pacific Ocean. This

“banana belt” climate is most

pronounced in Brookings, but

many other spots around the state

experience winters that are higher

and drier than the average.

Kathie Dello, deputy director of

the state climate office in Corvallis,

explained that Brookings is in the

“elbow” of the rumpled landscape

where California and Oregon

meet, at the foot of the Klamath

Mountains.

“You have mountains directly to

the east and you have the Chetco

River, which is oriented roughly

to the northeast, so you have this

great set-up for high-pressure,”

she said. “And you have winds

blowing from the east over those

mountains that downslope into

the Chetco River basin.”

High-pressure air presses down

onto the earth, unlike stormy

weather, which results from

low-pressure systems. Descending

air always tends to become

warmer, so Brookings is bathed

in warm air that barely notices its

proximity to the mighty Pacific.

The effect takes place year-round,

and in fact, on July 8, 2008,

Brookings recorded a high of 108

degrees, the highest temperature

in the state that day.

Just a bit inland, the rain and

snow shadow along the Oregon

Cascades is a “textbook example,”

according to Dello. “We have the

very wet Willamette Valley and

the Cascade foothills, then you

go somewhere like Sisters or

Bend and they get a quarter of

the precip we do,” she said. “You

have these systems that move in

off the ocean, they rain out over

the land then they encounter the

mountains that they need to get

up and over. They rain out, then

you get this dry, warm air that

compresses and descends and

there’s no more moisture left in it

at that point.”

BROOKINGS

OREGON REDWOODS AND HIGH TEMPERATURES

3“In Brookings there

isn’t really winter, so

nothing is different,”

said Janelle Frazier,

who now lives in Eugene but

grew up in the town that might

have Oregon’s most unchanging

weather. January temperatures

have been known to hit

the 70s. Brookings is so warm

that bulbs bloom in February,

but that does come with a fair

amount of rain and accompanying

cloud cover and fog.

Because the bay faces south,

it avoids a lot of the wind

that scours other long, open

stretches of ocean beaches.

“Brookings can, at times, be

the warmest location in Oregon

despite it being adjacent

to the consistently cold Pacific

Ocean waters,” explained

Keene. “Anywhere south of

Cape Blanco is, on average,

warmer than locations north

of the cape, especially in the

summer and fall months. River

canyons, such as the Chetco

River drainage, funnel air

toward the coast from inland,

and this air warms as it descends

down the canyon toward

the coast.”

Brookings is less than thirty

miles from California’s Redwood

National Park, and has its

own forest of the tallest trees in

the world. The Redwood Nature

Trail winds through 800-yearold

redwoods. Oregon Redwoods

Trail is a 1.7-mile-loop

that is wheelchair accessible

and is populated with younger

redwood specimens.

The Samuel H. Boardman

State Scenic Corridor is twelve

miles of forested and sandy

coastline. “It offers beach combing,

of course, but also miles of

coastal trail and spectacular

and unique ocean views,” said

Frazier. On your way to the trail,

stop by to see the Blake Monterey

Cypress, the second largest

Monterey in the world and the

largest in Oregon. Planted in

1857, it has grown to more than

130 feet tall with a thirty-fivefoot

circumference.

sightseeing

Redwood Nature Loop in Alfred

A. Loeb State Park

Loeb State Park offers a rental cabin.

oregonstateparks.org

Samuel H. Boardman State Scenic

Corridor

oregonstateparks.org

Oregon Redwoods Trail

Signs on Highway 101 direct you to

the trailhead, five miles south of

Brookings.

The Blake Monterey Cypress

15461 Museum Road, next to the

Chetco Valley Historical Society

Museum

Brookings can, at

times, be the warmest

location in Oregon.

Claudia Kuenkel

86 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016


ESCAPING THE COLD

HERMISTON

TROPHY WALLEYE AND LOCAL BREWS

2“I don’t think it is

widely known that the

weather is nicer here,”

said Phyllis Danielson,

owner of Stokes Landing

Bed and Breakfast in Irrigon,

fifteen miles from Hermiston.

The landscape in Hermiston,

which skims the northern border

of our state, gets only ten

inches of precipitation yearly.

The desert grassland landscape

is much different than the verdant,

foggy Willamette Valley.

“Unlike in the valley, you can

see a long way because there are

not a lot of evergreen trees in the

way,” Danielson said. “I grew up

in the Portland area and when I

first moved to this area in 1979, I

thought, ‘Where have I landed?’

because it is so different from

the west side of the state. But it

absolutely grows on you.”

Stokes Landing is located

right on the banks of the Columbia

River. A wildlife refuge

spans both sides of the water

here, offering rich birdwatching.

The twelve-mile-long Columbia

River Heritage Trail parallels the

waterway from Umatilla to Irrigon

and on to Boardman. Unimproved

and paved sections allow

you to walk, bicycle, or horseback

right along the river, passing

interpretive panels marking

“Sand Island,” where Lewis and

Clark, Sacagawea, her French

trapper husband, their infant

son and the Corps of Discovery

camped with native people harvesting

clams in 1805.

Kayaking is a year-round

sport here, and the stretch of the

Columbia between Boardman

and Umatilla offers trophy walleye

fishing—some of the greatest

walleye water in the world,

second only to the Great Lakes.

If you stay somewhere along

the Heritage Trail, walk it to

the River Lodge and Grill in

Boardman, where you can dine

in a log lodge right on the water.

The family-friendly Hermiston

Brewing Company serves

its own roster of beers out of

a historic 1940s building that

was built as a Plymouth dealership.

Irrigon is opening its own

visitor center in March.

sights

Irrigon Marina Park

Highway 730 to 10th Street,

then north to the river’s edge

ci.irrigon.or.us/marina-park

lodging

Stokes Landing Bed & Breakfast

541.922.3857

dining

River Lodge and Grill

riverlodgeandgrill.com

Hermiston Brewing Company

hermistonbrewing

company.com

Jimmy M

Big sky abound along

the Columbia River

Heritage Trail.

MARCH | APRIL 2016 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 87


ESCAPING THE COLD

MEDFORD

CHEESES, BOOKS AND PLATEAUS

4

The Rogue Valley’s

Medford is generally

a sweet spot for mild

spring conditions.

The valley as a whole rarely

gets snow, although winter

mornings can bring freezing

fog. “While Medford isn’t

knee-deep in snowfall, storm

systems typically dump a lot

of snow in the mountains, and

one can travel an hour or less to

reach some of the white stuff,”

MADRAS/PELTON DAM

MINIMAL RAIN, MAXIMUM RECREATION

5

Pelton

Dam sees an

average of 9.85 inches

of precipitation per

year compared to an

estimated 100 inches at Mount

Jefferson, just twenty-five miles

west, said the National Weather

Service’s Michael Murphy. The

dam, owned by Portland General

Electric, holds back the waters

of the Deschutes River to create

Lake Simtustus. On the edge of

this lake is Pelton Park, open for

day-use, including fishing, yearround.

The campground offers

sixty-seven tent sites, along with

“yomes,” a cross between a yurt

and a dome, equipped with futons

to sleep four. The lake has

a 10-mph speed limit, so it’s a

laid-back site for fishing, canoeing,

and kayaking anytime.

Just north of Pelton Park is the

Pelton Wildlife Overlook, a perfect

spot to view migratory birds

along with ducks, geese, herons,

eagles and other birds of prey.

“There are trails all over this

country that people use during

the winter months,” said Helen

Houts, administrative assistant

for the Madras Chamber, just

thirteen miles from the dam.

“This area looks different than

said Medford’s forecaster Shad

Keene. Indeed, Crater Lake, just

seventy-five miles to the northeast,

averages forty-four feet

of snowfall yearly compared to

Medford’s 4.1 inches.

“High terrain to the south,

west, north and east squeezes

out much of the moisture

from storm systems before

it can reach Medford,” said

Keene. “That’s why Medford’s

the driest location west of the

the western part of the state but

I wouldn’t trade it for anything.”

Kah-Nee-Ta Resort & Spa in

Warm Springs is on the Warm

Springs Indian Reservation, just

thirty minutes from the dam.

The nearby Museum at Warm

Springs holds a large collection

of plateau American Indian artifacts,

including noteworthy

paintings, sculpture, masks,

ceremonial clothing, ritual implements

and beadwork.

Madras is also home to the

Erickson Aircraft Collection, a

private collection started by Jack

Erickson in 1983. The Erickson

collection is growing and currently

holds more than twenty

rare aircraft, most of which are

still in flying condition, including

the P-38 Lightning, P-51

Mustang, Ki43 Hayabusa and

B-17 Flying Fortress.

sightseeing

Erickson Aircraft Collection

ericksoncollection.com

Museum at Warm Springs

museumatwarmsprings.org

Pelton Park

portlandgeneral.com/parks

lodging & dining

Kah-Nee-Ta Resort

www.kahneeta.com

Cascades in Oregon. It features

just more than eighteen

inches of precipitation a year,

compared to Grants Pass (only

thirty miles away) which averages

thirty inches of precipitation

a year.”

If you do happen to visit

Medford on a soggy day, pass

some time at Village Books,

where owner Gary Guthmuller

stocks a store full of

Pelton Dam holds back the

waters of the Deschutes River

to create Lake Simtustus.

pre-owned books along with a

good selection of vinyl records

and CDs in all genres. “Medford

is centered where you can

do a lot,” said Guthmuller, who

moved to Medford ten years

ago when he bought the bookstore.

“Central Point, Jacksonville,

Grants Pass and Ashland

are not far away. And a lot of

seniors do retire here because

the weather is so mild.”

88 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016


ESCAPING THE COLD

Rogue Creamery, in Central

Point, has a cheese shop offering

beer, wine, bread, crackers,

meats, and, of course, samples

and sales of Rogue’s delicious,

award-winning cheeses. Stock up

on snacks before heading to hike

at Upper Table Rock or Lower

Table Rock, two prominent volcanic

plateaus that are easily seen

and accessed from Central Point,

just five miles from Medford.

The rocks feature unique habitat

including oak savannah and rare

wildflowers.

After hiking, the Frau Kemmling

Schoolhaus Brewhaus in

Jacksonville is just ten minutes

away. Since opening in fall of

2010, the Brewhaus has become a

popular place for schnitzel, brats,

pretzels and German beers. If

American food hits the spot,

Medford is home to In-N-Out

Burger’s only Oregon location.

Sleep off the food and drink in

Waverly Cottage, a Queen Annestyle

cottage for rent in downtown

Medford. Guests get the

entire cottage to themselves. The

home is on the National Historic

Register and is smack in the middle

of Medford’s historic district.

The home itself is filled with period

items and furniture and feels

like sleeping in a museum.

sights

Village Books

villagebooks.biz

In-N-Out Burger, Medford

in-n-out.com

lodging

Waverly Cottage

waverlycottage.net

dining

Frau Kemmling Schoolhaus

Brewhaus, Jacksonville

fraukemmling.com

Rogue Creamery

roguecreamery.com

Keven Kochan

MARCH | APRIL 2016 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 89


GALLERY

PNW FIRE

LOOKOUTS

Photos provided by

U.S. Forest Service

It’s not every day that you get a

360-degree view of the forest.

That was the idea, of course,

when the U.S. Forest Service

began building fire lookout

towers after a slew of devestating

fires hit the western states

in 1910. It was part of a larger

effort to aid in early fire detection.

At one point, there were

reportedly more than 8,000

fire lookouts in the country

and every fire season, lookout

operators would report fires

using whatever technology

they had at the time. In 1911,

USFS forester William Bushnell

Osborne, Jr. invented a “firefinder”

in Oregon. The instrument

used a rotating steel disc with

attached sighting mechanisms

to pinpoint coordinates.

For more photos and info about booking a

lookout, visit 1859magazine.com/firelookouts

90 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2016


GALLERY

Gifford Pinchot National Forest

JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2016 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 91


Black Rock, Umpqua National Forest

GALLERY

Forest Service Lookout, Mt. Hood

92 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2016


Oakgrove Lookout, Mt. Hood National Forest

Lookout Tree, Fremont National Forest

Red Mountain Lookout

Brush Mountain Lookout

Sisters Lookout, Deschutes National Forest

Steel Lookout, Whitman National Forest

Forest Service Lookout, Mt. Hood

JANUARY | FEBRUARY 2016 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 93


MAINSTREAM GREEN

mainstream

green

written by Amy Faust

photos by Cameron Zegers

94 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016


MAINSTREAM GREEN

MARCH | APRIL 2016 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 95


MAINSTREAM GREEN

96 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016


MAINSTREAM GREEN

On an October morning last fall, eager

customers lined up outside stores such

as Gorge Greenery in Hood River, Beaver

Bowls in Corvallis and The Joint in

Salem. When around 200 medical marijuana

dispensaries throughout the state

opened their doors to recreational users,

thousands of adults streamed in, showed

identification and bought cannabis legally

for the first time. Lines were long, but as

one customer outside Bloom Well in Bend

told its owner, “I’ve waited for thirty-five

years, I can wait another thirty-five minutes.”

At the end of the day, sales exceeded

$3 million statewide, and by the end of the

week, Oregonians had bought more product

than Colorado’s and Washington’s first

weeks combined.

Not everyone in the state is excited about

Measure 91, which legalized marijuana. In

fact, thanks to a legislative compromise,

counties who did not vote to support the

legalization measure can—and are—opting

out of allowing recreational dispensaries

to open within their boundaries.

In the remaining counties, brisk sales can

be attributed to a new crop of customers

who are either rediscovering the drug after

years of abstaining or “coming out” after

years of using it quietly to avoid controversy.

“Not only are sales up about fourfold,”

said Bloom Well’s owner Jeremy Kwit, “our

clientele is more diverse than we ever anticipated—socioeconomically,

ethnically, agewise

and otherwise.”

For those interested in partaking, there

are still limits to what you can purchase

and where.

Currently, you can buy only from medical

dispensaries, though hundreds of purely

recreational storefronts will likely be opening

later this year. For now, you can purchase

only “flower,” or buds, which means

no edibles, no topicals and no concentrates

without a medical card. The variety of

strains and the myriad ways to explore them

have never been more diverse or legal.

The dispensary experience varies wildly,

from the “head shop”-style dens that

service old-school “stoners” to modernist

spaces that look more like boutiques for

trendy eyewear. Due to strict regulations,

however, all share a few key characteristics.

You will be greeted by a receptionist, remain

in a separate waiting area until you’ve

been signed in, and then be ushered into a

space that, while drenched in the pungent

smell of potent buds, does not accommodate

touching or trying the product. You’ll

be served by a “budtender” who will ask a

few questions about your needs and interests

and then help you navigate the astonishing

variety of options with names such

as “Grandaddy Purple,” “Dog Walker” and

“Obama Kush.”

Unlike the product of old, today’s cannabis

is hybridized and refined into many

categories and subcategories with different

properties and uses. Having trouble sleeping?

Your budtender might suggest a strain

with a high CBD content. (Short for Cannabidiol,

CBD is a part of the plant that is

purported to provide less of a “high” and

more of a relaxing effect, making it popular

with medical patients.) Want to giggle and

have a good time at a dinner party? Perhaps

you will be steered toward something

with a higher THC (tetrahydrocannabinol)

content, which is typically the source of the

more psychedelic “high” associated with

pot from the old days.

Another difference between ’70s pot and

today’s cannabis is the potency. Clatsop

County District Attorney Josh Marquis,

who opposed Measure 91, wants to make it

clear most marijuana in the ’70s had THC

levels of about 2 percent, versus today’s

strains that can hit levels upwards of 30

percent. “If you compare that to a pharmaceutical

drug,” he said, “you’re talking about

a [massive] increase in potency.” Marquis is

not so concerned for the adults who smoke

casually at home; he’s worried about the

younger, inexperienced users. “When they

get high, they go from zero to sixty.”

According to Jeremy Plumb, Willamette

Week’s “Budtender of the Year” for 2015, it

doesn’t have to be that way. His dispensary

Farma, in Portland, takes cannabis categorization

even farther into the realm of science,

testing each strain for various levels

of properties (including eight THC levels)

and labeling them accordingly. Plumb is

a passionate bio-nerd who throws around

tongue-twisting terms—beta myrcene,

sesquiterpenes, anti-anxiolytics—with

ease and authority. Like many cannabis

entrepreneurs and activists, he is driven by

the desire to provide more targeted benefits

to his medical patients, and to help

adults enjoy a more refined recreational

experience. “We want you as a patient and

The variety of strains and the

myriad ways to explore them

have never been more diverse

or adult-friendly.

as a consumer to be able to intentionally

select different effects,” said Plumb, “and

to become very sophisticated as to which

compounds, which doses and which delivery

systems work for you.”

This being Oregon, the cannabis industry

here is bullish on many of the same qualities

promoted in our renowned food and

wine cultures: locally grown, pesticide-free,

obsessively sourced. While cannabis cannot

be labeled as organic (the FDA does

not recognize it as a crop), a certification

process called “clean green” serves the same

purpose. There’s even “veganically” grown

cannabis that uses no animal products as

fertilizer. It’s not hard to imagine the role

of cannabis evolving to a point where connoisseurs

serve up rare strains at dinner

parties and expound on the virtues of “sungrown”

versus indoor crops.

While it’s now perfectly legal to show up

MARCH | APRIL 2016 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 97


MAINSTREAM GREEN

at your book club meeting bearing weed

instead of a bottle of wine, many regular

users acknowledge that they still feel a stigma

attached to the whole culture. “Everyone

knows somebody who used cannabis

and turned out to be a loser,” said Kwit.

“Correlation is not causation.” Anne Marie

Luthro is a professional shopper insights

consultant, a recreational user and an advocate

for the “normalization” of cannabis.

“For most people, ‘pot’ is still a four-letterword,

but ‘pill’ is not.”

“Kathy” is an adult in her fifties who decided

to give cannabis a shot once it became

legal. “I told the budtender that the

last time I smoked it was probably not too

long after the first Star Wars movie came

out, and I was not that into it.” She tried

the strain he suggested, sat down in front

of the TV with her dog and “had an absolute

hoot.” Kathy is, in many ways, an apt

example of these early days of legalized

weed—she wants to hide her identity to

prevent her adult son from knowing that

she has smoked the plant.

But as “Prohibition era” shame and secrecy

wane, local entrepreneurs are creating

new ways for the curious to re-enter

the market. Josh Jardine Taylor is a “cannabis

concierge” who sets up visiting bands

with vaporizers and “swag bags” of local

product that await them backstage. (Snoop

It’s not hard to imagine

the role of cannabis evolving

to a point where foodie-like

connoisseurs serve up rare

strains at dinner parties

and expound on the virtues

of “sungrown” versus

indoor crops.

Dogg appreciated his green gift.) Taylor

now focuses increasingly on “responsibly

integrating cannabis into people’s lives.”

His “Cannabis 101” events, which are held

in homes and businesses, help novices navigate

the often overwhelming new culture

and terminology, and teach them to ingest

without smoking by vaporizing, which allows

for more measured intake. “For people

who haven’t smoked since the ’60s or

’80s, this is radically different than taking

a monster bong hit, getting extremely high

and having the house reek like weed,” said

Taylor. Many of his customers are what

he calls “AARP age” people who are “just

tickled that they can finally talk about it.

Everyone has questions.”

This year, Taylor is planning a series of

events called “Puff, Puff, Pour,” in which

various cannabis strains will be paired with

local spirits or beers for maximum enjoyment.

Farm-to-table dinners incorporating

food pairings are also on the horizon, as

well as “viper vacations.” (Picture a group

of out-of-towners flying in, being chauffeured

around the state to the finest wineries,

learning all about “terroir” and other

terminology from growers, even helping

with a harvest at a venerable third-generation

Southern Oregon farm. Now replace

wine with cannabis.) “The way we are doing

things here in Oregon is based much

more on the craft beer and wine model

than the large-scale, hydroponic, chemical-soaked

brands you might find elsewhere,”

said Taylor.

Glossary

Cannabis For those in

the industry, this is the

only way to refer to their

product. Not weed, not

pot, not even marijuana.

You’re not a pothead, you’re

a “cannabis user.”

Flower The legal term for

what used to be more casually

called “buds,” flower

is the part of the cannabis

plant that is harvested and

sold for recreational and

medicinal purposes.

Budtender The person

behind the counter at the

dispensary who provides

advice about and access

to the product. A good

“budtender” should be

extremely knowledgable

and a great listener, as they

play a diagnostic role in the

process. (Always tip your

budtender.)

Pre-roll Joints are now

called pre-rolls. They typically

cost about $8 each.

Sativa/Indica Technically,

these are two

kinds of cannabis grown

in two different climates.

Colloquially, these terms

are commonly used as

descriptors to distinguish

the effect of a particular

strain. “Sativa” indicates

a more focusing and euphoric

high, while “Indica”

suggests a more calming

and relaxing feeling.

THC/CBD The most

talked-about compounds in

the cannabis plant, as new

strains are created (and

often hyped) for their levels

of either tetrahydrocannabinol

(THC) or Cannabidiol

(CBD). While higher

CBD product is generally

considered more relaxing

(and a huge breakthrough

for medical patients), there

is still much to be learned

about the exact effect of

these two compounds.

Terpines The aromatic

compounds that give

cannabis strains distinctive

flavors and smells.

Vaping Using a vaporizer, a

hand-held device that heats

up the flower and extracts

the cannabinoids without

burning or creating smoke.

Budtenders suggest this as

the best delivery method

for people who want to

start slowly and control

their intake.

98 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016

MORE ONLINE For more, visit 1859magazine.com/cannabis


The White

Tora Bora

Gorilla Glue 4

Super Buckeye

Lucid Dream

Silver Surfer

Gypsy

Obama Kush

Copper Chem Pheno 2


MAINSTREAM GREEN

Very Punny

Like hair salons, doggie daycares and Thai

restaurants, some dispensaries can’t resist

word play. Here are a few favorites:

Grateful Meds (Portland, Springfield)

Best Buds (Portland)

Cannabliss & Co (Eugene and

Portland)

Cannacea (Portland)

Gramsterdam (Albany)

Pipe Dreams (Lincoln City)

The Grass Shack (Portland)

Stone Age Republic (Grants Pass)

Yer Best Bud (Portland)

La Cannaisseur (Portland)

Growing ReLeaf (Beaverton)

In areas of Southern Oregon where cannabis

farming dates decades back into the black market

days, legalization has brought on a mixed

bag of changes. As growers transition into

the legal market, their product must pass the

pesticide-level tests required for sale in a dispensary.

Courtney Zehring of Tokie Farms in

Jackson County says many old-school growers

who used to think she was an “idiot” for farming

so sustainably are now asking for advice.

“Testing isn’t going anywhere,” she said. “If you

want to keep playing, you need to transition.”

According to Zehring, the big challenges facing

rural growers now are navigating the new

county-generated regulations, some of which

“feel punitive,” and fending off the big investors

who want to come in, snap up land and “turn us

all into sharecroppers.” For now, she is excited

about “having more support, more resources

and more open communication.”

The regulations that have arrived with Oregon’s

“green rush” have given birth to a host of

other cannabis-related businesses as well. CannaGuard

is a company specializing in security

for grow operations, since state law requires

that their crops, many of which are indoors and

in urban areas, be guarded with a high level of

surveillance equipment. Marijuana Business

Daily lists a dozen labs statewide that perform

the mandatory tests on pesticide and THC/CBD

levels, which must be included on all product

labeling. Realtors such as Expanse Commercial

have carved out a niche finding retail space for

dispensaries, whose numbers will have increased

statewide by around 300 before the end of the

year. (There are currently three times more cannabis

shops in Portland than liquor stores.)

The next few years will be crucial in the future

of Oregon’s recreational marijuana program.

Until the dust settles on huge issues

such as regulation, taxation, zoning and product

accessibility, it’s not yet clear whether the

hundreds of new dispensaries and the industry

that is growing up around them will thrive

or wither. As a grower of medical marijuana

in Montana ten years ago, Zehring watched

“over-regulation annihilate a program that

had been a model for other states.” If current

tax laws hold up, profit margins will remain

relatively slim at dispensaries, reducing the

flood of new businesses to a trickle. But for

now most entrepreneurs seem optimistic

about this opportunity to do cannabis the

Oregon way. “Oregon has the best craftspeople,

the most diverse genotypes, and an entire

cohesive culture that is distinct and different,”

said Plumb. “We are curators. We represent

the best ethics. This is what we do.”

All equipment, plants and flowers were curated by

Joshua Taylor with oregonscannabisconcierge.com.

Thanks also to Steve Bailey, Green Bodhi, Chalice

Farms, 7 Points Oregon and Hifi Farms for loaning out

their cannabis for our photo shoot.


FOOD & HOME

102 Farm to Table 106 Oregon Recipes 108 Home Grown Chef 110 Design

Cheddar by

the Sea

written by Sophia McDonald

photos by Talia Galvin

FOR ALMOST A CENTURY, Bandon was

known for its delicious cheese. A proliferation

of local dairies made it a natural place

to create cheddar and other cheesy delights.

In 2003, Bandon Cheese, the town’s last

and largest cheesemaker, shut down. It left

the southern Oregon coastal community

without a dairy processor for the first time

since the 1880s. Now, Bandon is making its

way back onto the turophile’s map with Face

Rock Creamery, which opened in 2013.

Although the business is new, it is wellknown

in the community. Brad Sinko,

head cheesemaker, is the son of Joe Sinko,

the last local to own Bandon Cheese. The

younger Sinko was managing the company

when the Tillamook County Creamery Association

(makers of Tillamook Cheese)

bought it in 2000.

The buyout was friendly. Tillamook intended

to keep Bandon Cheese open and

make it their organic label. Then a new CEO

came in, and plans changed. They shut down

the cheese factory in 2003. Within a year, all

physical signs of the business became intangible

memories. “The building had been a

cheese factory since the early 1900s and all of

a sudden, it was gone,” Sinko said. “They literally

tore it down and left a gravel parking lot.”

After that, Sinko spent three months consulting

at a Guatemalan cheese factory. Near

the end of his stint, he took a call from an

entrepreneur in Seattle who wanted to start a

cheese business but had no experience.

Sinko was the first employee at

Beecher’s Handmade Cheese and

LEFT One of the workers at the dairy farm where Face

Rock Creamery gets all of its milk. NEXT PAGE, CLOCK-

WISE FROM TOP LEFT Cow milker machine. A young calf

at the dairy. Greg Drobot, Sinko’s business partner. Round

block of cheese at Face Rock Creamery.

102 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016


FOOD & HOME

farm to table

Face Rock Creamery’s milk all comes from one dairy farm, located fifteen miles away.

played a large role in its subsequent success.

He invented Flagsheep, a semi-hard

cow’s milk cheese that became the company’s

flagship brand. Flagsheep won Best

of Show from the American Cheese Society

in 2012 and helped establish Beecher’s as a

top brand in culinary circles.

Sinko was riding high from that victory

when he got a call from someone with a familiar

area code. Bandon businessmen Daniel

Graham and Greg Drobot were interested

in building a new cheese factory on the site

of the old one. They asked for his opinion on

their plans for Face Rock Creamery.

Sinko said he was initially skeptical that

the new cheese factory would be successful.

As the young business grew, though, he

continued to offer advice. Soon Sinko’s dad

approached the new owners with a proposal—“Offer

Brad a job and see if he’ll take it,’”

Sinko recalled of his father’s conversation.

“They offered me less than I was making at

Beecher’s … but I took it.”

As he walked past the gleaming stainless

steel tables on Face Rock’s production floor,

Sinko said he now understands why he

came back for Face Rock Creamery. “When

I got back here, you could see a new skip in

people’s step,” Sinko said. “They were pretty

happy to have a cheese factory again.”

During Face Rock’s first year, Sinko didn’t

have any aged cheese, so he sent Vampire

Slayer cheese curds to the American

Cheese Society’s contest. They took first

place in that category. The awards continue

to pile up every year.

Face Rock’s cheddars are its most popular

item. Each forty-pound block of cheese is

aged for twelve to twenty-four months and

hand flipped every day, said Sinko.

Face Rock is also known for its fromage

blanc and produces cranberry honey, apricot

honey and garlic olive-flavored cheese.

Many of these ingredients are sourced

from local producers, and all of Face Rock’s

milk all comes from one dairy farm, located

fifteen miles away. In fact, the primary limiting

factor of the company’s growth, Sinko

said, is its dairy partner’s ability to expand

with them. Face Rock has even purchased

more cows for the family-owned farm to

increase its capacity.

Sue Hayes, chef and owner at Alloro

Wine Bar and Restaurant in Bandon, is

one of the locals who enjoys cooking with

Face Rock Creamery cheese. She shared the

restaurant’s recipe for au gratin potatoes,

a hearty side dish that includes Face Rock

cheddar cheese.

Executive chef AJ Voytko at Portland’s

comfort food den, The Original, finds good

use of Face Rock cheese curds by serving

poutine alongside short ribs cooked in

red wine. For dessert, The Original offers

its spin on the traditional apple pie with a

crumb and cheddar topping.

104 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016


FOOD & HOME

recipes

Recipe

photos by Heidi Weiss-Hoffman

Crumb and Cheddar Apple Pie

PORTLAND | The Original

originaldinerant.com | Jeremy Intille

Filling:

3 pounds cored apples cut into 12 pieces,

skin on

3.2 ounces grated white cheddar

2 ½ ounces brown sugar

0.7 ounces corn starch

½ ounces tapioca flour

⅛ teaspoon of thyme or rosemary

8 passes of fresh cinnamon stick with

microplane

3 passes of orange zest with microplane

Pinch of salt

Place apples and cheese in a large bowl. Combine

all dry ingredients together and sprinkle

on top of apples. Mix together with hands. Let

stand for 10 minutes.

Crust:

12 ounces all-purpose flour

2 tablespoons sugar

¼ teaspoon salt

8 ounces chilled butter, grated

2 ounces grated white cheddar

4 ounces ice water

Place flour, sugar and salt in a mixing bowl with

a paddle attachment. Stir together just for a

few seconds. Add butter and cheese. Mix until

butter breaks down a bit, and is pea size. With

mixer on, add ice water. You might need more

water depending on flour. Mix until dough

starts to come together but still looks shaggy.

Place dough on a floured surface and finish

mixing by hand. With a rolling pin, roll dough

out to a 1/4 inch thickness in a rectangle

shape. Fold into three (like a letter), rotate 180

degrees and roll out again. Do this three times

in total. Wrap with cling wrap and let rest for

one hour in fridge.

Depending on the size of your pie tin, you

will want an ounce of dough per inch of the

pie tin. Roll out until about 1 inch larger than

the pie tin. Once rolled out, fold round in half

and place in pie tin. Unfold and press crust into

the corners of the tin. Press firmly to ensure

that there are no air pockets.

To finish the edge, tuck the crust under

itself and press together. You can crimp or

leave as is. Let chill before baking.

Topping:

4.1 ounces brown sugar

4.1 ounces sugar

5.8 ounces all-purpose flour

Pinch of salt

2.1 ounces white cheddar, grated

1.1 ounces rolled oats

4.6 ounces butter, chilled and grated

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Place all dry ingredients in a large mixing bowl

with a paddle attachment. Mix until combined.

Add butter and mix for a few seconds. With

mixer on, add vanilla. Mix until it starts to

come together and looks crumbly. On a baking

pan, spread out and let chill until ready to use.

Assembly:

Place apple filling in chilled pie shell and bake

at 325°F for 15 minutes. After 15 minutes,

remove pie and top with streusel and bake for

another 20 minutes, or until golden brown.

Let cool slightly before cutting. Add ice cream,

because why wouldn’t you?

106 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016

MORE ONLINE For more cheese recipes visit 1859magazine.com/recipes


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FOOD & HOME

home grown chef

The Cheese

Apprentice

Home Grown Chef

written by Thor Erickson

A FEW YEARS BACK, I had a job

as the chef at a restaurant in Bend.

About a week after I started, I was

preparing for dinner service when

a man walked through the back

door. He was wearing white rubber

boots and carried a small ice chest.

With purpose, he headed straight

for the walk-in refrigerator. About

twenty minutes passed and he was

still in there, amid the bustle of

line-cooks going in and out of the

fridge. When he finally emerged, I

introduced myself and asked him

what he was doing. His name was Pierre and he was one of our

cheese suppliers, dropping off an order. “Why were you in there

for so long?” I asked. “I was looking at all of your other cheese,”

he said, and walked out the door. Over the next few months, I

got to know Pierre. He was an American with Franco-Belgian lineage

and a “strictly business” demeanor. He made wonderful goat

cheese. I found myself using his cheese in many ways—it fueled

my creativity. I started to flavor his chèvre with applewood smoke.

Pierre was always curious how we used his cheese, but I was worried

that he may not approve of my latest effort.

One day he caught me red-handed. I was pulling the chèvre

from the smoker. I opened one of the cheesecloth-wrapped cylinders

of smoked cheese and gave him a sample. He nodded and

walked away without a word. A day later, he called me. “That

smoked cheese was fantastic,” he said, with an unusually upbeat

tone. “You must show me how to do that.” I told Pierre that if he

taught me to make goat cheese, I would show him how to smoke

it. A few months later, I was an apprentice cheesemaker in the

morning, and running a busy kitchen at night. Through that apprenticeship,

Pierre and I developed “Thor’s Special Smoked”

chèvre. This dressing is inspired by that experience.

Rob Kerr

Heidi Weiss-Hoffman

Smoked Bleu Cheese Dressing

1859’s Home Grown Chef Thor Erickson

2 ounces Rogue Creamery smokey blue cheese, crumbled

¼ cup buttermilk

¼ cup sour cream

¼ cup mayonnaise

Juice of ¼ lemon, or to taste

Coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper

In a small bowl, stir to combine all ingredients. Pour over salad or roasted

vegetables, or use as a dip. Keep leftovers refrigerated for up to one week.

108 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016

MORE ONLINE Video: How to make the perfect baguette 1859magazine.com/homegrownchef


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FOOD & HOME

design

Vintage Flair

written by

Melissa Dalton

Two Portland kitchens

reveal their homes’ historic roots

Forget the sofa or the dining room color scheme. More than any

other room, the kitchen defines the rest of the house. These two

remodels incorporate historic details and thoughtful material choices

to pack on the personality.

110 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016


design

FOOD & HOME

A RANCH REBORN

photos by Jeff Amram

FRIENDSHIP CAN PROVE fertile ground for

creative collaboration. Just ask Joe Mansfield. In

2009, Mansfield, a digital artist and laser engraver,

partnered with his friend (and neighbor) to cofound

Grovemade, a Portland-based workshop

that produces handmade metal and wood office

accessories and tableware. When Mansfield

needed to remodel his kitchen five years later, he

turned to another longtime friend, cabinetmaker

George Ramos, who specializes in period-appropriate

woodwork. “I’d always wanted an excuse

to work with George,” said Mansfield. His 1952

ranch-style house had formerly been a rental,

the kitchen muddled with cheap finishes. So the

pair joined with architect Marty Buckenmeyer to

brainstorm a modern redesign that would reference

the home’s original architecture.

To start, Buckenmeyer reworked the layout

to improve the room’s flow and modified window

positions to better capture light and views.

The signature corner windows were kept, and

a large slider to the backyard added. “The idea

behind ranch houses was that you could reach

out into the landscape from the inside,” said

Buckenmeyer. Next, Ramos installed cabinets

with solid walnut faces—their color echoing

the existing mahogany woodwork. With

attention to detail, the slabs were cut so that

the grain pattern is continuous across separate

units. The matching walnut range hood was

an idea proposed by Mansfield that Ramos

executed with mathematical precision. White

quartz counters and a tile backsplash balance

the wood tones and bounce light around.

Additional bespoke elements came from

Mansfield. These include the design of the

pendant lights, a laser-engraved heat register

in the toe kick, and leather and brass cabinet

hardware. Now the space is a testament to the

rewards of collaborating with good friends.

“We were challenging each other and elevating

each other’s ideas,” said Mansfield.

“It’s really satisfying to see that in the

finished product.”

MARCH | APRIL 2016 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 111


FOOD & HOME

design

A CLEVER CRAFTSMAN

photos by KuDa Photography

ALTHOUGH THE OPEN CONCEPT floor

plan is all the rage these days, complete with a

kitchen at its center, it’s not the best choice for

every home or owner. Consider the 1908 Craftsman

bungalow belonging to Leta Norton. “This

being an old house, every room is its own space,

and I wanted to keep that style,” said Norton.

“And if you have dishes in the sink, no one has

to see them!” Norton trained as a chef at the

Oregon Culinary Institute and has worked in

several restaurants, so she knew that her home’s

kitchen could function better. The evidence of a

poorly executed ’90s remodel was everywhere—

from the cracked counters to the stove jammed

up against the wall. In 2015, Norton teamed up

with Libby and Greg Holah of Holah Design

+ Architecture for a renovation that would

improve the room’s utility while maintaining

the home’s integrity. “We like to do modern

upgrades that feel like they belong to the era of

the house,” Libby Holah said.

First, the Holahs removed a non-functional

chimney and butler’s pantry to free up space

in the modest footprint. Now, a long counter

accommodates a generous farmhouse sink, a

six-burner stove and adjoining workspaces. Additionally,

they installed a recessed bank of wall

ovens, an efficient floor-to-ceiling pantry and a

prep island. The latter is topped in butcher block

sealed with a food-safe finish, so Norton can cut

directly on it. “I wanted to show that it’s been

used and loved,” she said. Other finishes were

locally sourced and contribute to the room’s historic

feel. These include custom Shaker cabinets,

reclaimed Douglas fir counters from Talent, Oregon,

and the earthenware backsplash tile from

Ann Sacks. A cheerful golden Marmoleum floor

is easy under the cook’s feet. Norton is thrilled

with the result. “The kitchen is my Zen place,”

she said. “It’s really nice not to feel frustrated or

cramped anymore.”

112 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016


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FOOD & HOME

design

Designer

Spotlight:

Sarah

Phipps

interview by Melissa Dalton

AS A LONGTIME LOVER of old homes

and decorating with salvage, designer Sarah

Phipps enjoys giving neglected houses new

life. “It’s a challenge,” she said. “And a fun puzzle

to figure out.” Here, she shares a kitchen

redo that she did for a larger remodel of a 1912

Bend triplex, as well as her top tip for getting

the Vintage vibe right.

What did the space look like before?

Everything was battered and neglected.

All of the floors were covered with dirty,

ugly carpet. But underneath that was the

original wood flooring. And the trim on

the windows and doors were all original,

[as were many of the windows]. So I tried

to save all the Vintage details.

Tell me about the kitchen.

We kept the original cabinets, and I just

cleaned them and painted them because

they were in good shape. I kept all the

wood floors. Then I added the tile backsplash.

The countertops are Corian because

I was trying to use a material that

was more budget-friendly but also durable

and easy to clean. And I didn’t want it to

jar with the Vintage quality of the house.

To make it feel more Vintage, we had them

make a deep, integrated sink and route out

the drainboard beside it.

Joseph Eastburn

What about the appliances?

The client wanted new appliances [for

easy upkeep]. The Smeg refrigerator has a

smaller profile. The range and dishwasher

are both from the GE Artistry series,

which is a good price point. They have a

good combination of modern and Vintage

styling, which is what I was going for in the

whole place.

Any tips for people wanting to do

something similar?

Before you get started, one of the most

important things is to take a moment and

breathe. Don’t just start ripping everything

out. Stop and very carefully walk through

and look at the space. Often I find a cheap

material has been installed and preserved

the Vintage material beneath it. Look for

the original details because those things

are almost impossible or ridiculously expensive

to replace.

Can you give me an example?

It might cost just as much to refinish an

existing wood floor as it does to put a new

one on top. But know that the wood from

60 or 70 years ago was old-growth wood.

It had a lot more personality and character.

You’re not going to be able to replace

that. You literally cannot go out and buy

that wood anymore. I think that even if

things are a little rough around the edges,

that roughness is what makes things have

soul. There’s something you can feel that

radiates off of them. So, try to save that and

not just gloss over everything. The kneejerk

reaction is to go in and to make everything

brand new, but brand new is not

always better.

114 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016


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Finex Cast Iron Skillets

An American original, reimagined

written by Melissa Dalton

LIKE MANY AVID HOME COOKS, Mike Whitehead just wanted a good skillet.

Around 2011, his wife had challenged him to toss his non-stick cookware. In search of replacements, Whitehead turned

to cast iron. He found modern models to be poorly made, so he started collecting Vintage cookware on Ebay, until that got

expensive. “I’m pathologically curious,” said Whitehead. “I’m the guy who asks questions.” He wondered, “What can I do to

improve something that hadn’t been touched for 150 years?”

By 2012, Whitehead was working as an engineering program manager at Leupold & Stevens in Portland. In his spare time,

he tinkered with a new skillet design, mainly by reverse-engineering the pans in his collection. Then he collaborated with

industrial designer David Lewin to refine his ideas. The resulting skillet is an octagon shape. “I tried a bunch of different

shapes, and it had the best functional advantage,” said Whitehead, as the octagon creates six natural pour spouts. Inspired by

traditional wood stoves, the handle is wrapped with a stainless steel spring for faster cooling. The pan’s interior is smoothed

using a CNC machine for easy food release. A 2013 Kickstarter campaign provided enough start-up capital for production, and

today, Whitehead’s creation is nationally distributed. The quest for a better pan has become the reinvention of an American

heirloom. “I love making something that’s going to last longer than I am,” said Whitehead.

FINEX Cast Iron Cookware Co.

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116 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016


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OUTDOORS

118 Adventures 124 Athlete Profile 135 Oregon Postcard

Four Trips

for the History Buff

written by Allison Miles

In Oregon, history and adventure are one in the

same. History aficionados and outdoor enthusiasts

will find common ground across the state, from

Astoria to John Day, Baker City and Joseph. Just don’t

forget to take a break for a beer.

ASTORIA

Although Astoria is well known today as the film location of the classic ’80s movie, The

Goonies, the small coastal town was put on the map much earlier. Astoria is, in fact, the

oldest American settlement west of the Rocky Mountains. Perched at the northwestern corner

of the state near the mouth of the Columbia River, Astoria boasts a history as rich and

stormy as the waters churning just off its coast. At different points in time, Astoria has been

called both “the most wicked place on earth” and “a bustling, booming, hell-raising town.”

After the Lewis and Clark Expedition spent a treacherous winter at nearby Fort Clatsop

in 1805 and 1806, a wealthy New York fur trader named John Jacob Astor saw potential

in the location for a trading outpost and sent two parties to the site. In 1811, the

parties established Fort Astor, but John Jacob Astor himself never actually visited Astoria.

During the War of 1812, Astor’s fur traders sold the post to the British, which they

renamed Fort George. Though the war ended in 1815, the British did not completely

abandon Astoria until 1846.

Through the years, Astoria has witnessed shipwrecks, a Japanese invasion, the rising

career of Clark Gable, the infamous dark period when sailors were commonly “Shanghaid”—and

the riot that ultimately eliminated the gruesome practice. The best way to

experience Astoria’s intriguing and tumultuous history is to visit the town and its surrounding

historical sites, including the 125-foot Astoria Column, offering panoramas of

the surrounding Columbia River, Young’s Bay, the Coast Range and the Pacific Ocean.

Fort Stevens State Park, a former military defense

station, now hosts wildlife, beaches, trails, forests,

sand dunes and the Peter Iredale shipwreck. Carrying

on the famous monikers, the 35,000-acre Lewis

and Clark National Wildlife Refuge and the Lewis and

Clark National Historical Park (which commemorates

the expedition) are must sees. When all of this

history has worked up your thirst, head over to Fort

George Brewery and ask for a pint of 1811 Lager, the

Official Bicentennial Beer of Astoria, and then peruse

the quaint shops and hip cafés downtown.

INTERESTING FACT

John Jacob Astor IV, the

great-grandson of Astoria’s

founder, intended to

attend Astoria’s centennial

celebration in 1911, but he

perished on the Titanic

during its tragic sinking.

118 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016


adventures

OUTDOORS

Alamy

MARCH | APRIL 2016 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 119


OUTDOORS

adventures

Russ Roca

Cycling the Oregon Scenic Bikeway.

BAKER CITY

Established in the 1860s, Baker City was

named for United States Senator Edward

D. Baker, who was killed in 1861 while

leading the Union Army into combat and

is the only sitting senator to have been

killed in military engagement. The town

grew slowly until 1884, when the Oregon

Short Line Railroad came to Baker City,

bringing growth and trade. By 1900, Baker

City grew to become the largest city

between Salt Lake City and Portland and

a thriving trade center for the region. An

emblem of the wild west and pioneering

days, Baker City offers no shortage of

history, and with the Blue Mountains to

the west and the Wallowa Mountains to

the east, the area provides an abundance

of adventure.

Within Baker City itself, you could

spend a day or a long weekend exploring

the town’s roots. The Historic Walking

Tour will take you to many of the 130

historical sites, at least half of which are

masonry buildings built between 1870

and 1915. Particularly noteworthy are

the nine-story Baker City Tower, dating

back to 1929, and the tallest building in

Oregon east of the Cascade Mountain

Range, as well as the Geiser Grand Hotel,

built in 1889, where legend has it you can

see bullet holes in the walls—a testament

to the wild past. Don’t leave without visiting

the Baker Heritage Museum, formerly

the Oregon Trail Regional Museum, a

33,000-square-foot building that houses

cultural and wildlife exhibits, as well as

ruts that remain in place from pioneer

wagons. Afterward, quench your thirst

at Barley Brown’s Brew Pub with any of

their twenty-two beers on tap, including a

number of award-winners.

Once you’ve had your fill of history lessons

and craft beer, it’s best to head for

the hills. The Elkhorn Mountains (part of

the Blue Mountain Range), to the west,

offer granite peaks, alpine lakes, camping,

hiking, backpacking, biking and skiing

during the winter.

INTERESTING FACT

The cannon presently on the east

lawn of the county courthouse

courtyard was believed to be from

the Imperial Japanese Army.

JOHN DAY

John Day started with a homestead in

1862 and grew slowly and steadily until

the turn of the century. In the early days,

it was largely populated by Chinese immigrants,

who had come to the area during

the gold rush, and by residents of Canyon

City who were displaced by a series of fires

between 1870 and 1898. A trading post

dating to the 1860s was purchased in 1887

by two Chinese immigrants, Lung On and

Ing Hay, who turned it into a general store

and community center that thrived until

the 1940s. In the 1970s, the building was

converted into a museum and today, it’s a

National Historic Landmark and a wellpreserved

record of a nineteenth-century

Chinese apothecary.

The town sits along an Oregon Scenic

Bikeway and a Transamerica bike touring

route at the junction of Routes 26 and 395.

It also serves as a jumping off point to the

John Day Fossil Beds National Monument

to the west, the Strawberry Mountains

to the south, and the Blue Mountains to

the east. Before leaving town, however,

it’s worthwhile to make a stop at the local

watering hole, The Dirty Shame Saloon.

120 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016


OUTDOORS

adventures

Preserved within the colorful rock of the

John Day basin is a record of changing life

and landscapes that spans more than forty

million years. Scenic drives and hikes at

three separate units, as well as exhibits and

a working lab at the Thomas Condon Paleontology

Center, bring the science to life as

visitors explore Oregon’s prehistoric past.

INTERESTING FACT

The town of John Day was named for

the John Day River, which was in turn

named after a member of John Jacob

Astor’s 1811 Expedition.

Hiking in the Wallowa Mountains.

JOSEPH

Coined the “Little Switzerland of America,”

Joseph sits amid the Wallowa Mountains in

the northeastern corner of Oregon, bordering

the state’s largest natural wilderness areas.

Layers of snowcapped granite peaks sit at

the edge of the small western town, cradling

alpine lakes, moraines, massive canyons, and

forests teeming with elk, wolves and other

wildlife. Nearby, Hells Canyon comprises

one of the wildest places in Oregon.

Once a cherished home of the Nez Perce

people, the beautiful land holds a tragic

history. Under pressure to move onto a reservation

in the late nineteenth-century, the

Nez Perce fled toward Canada with more

than 2,000 U.S. Army soldiers in pursuit.

In 1887, just forty miles from the Canadian

border, suffering thousands of casualties,

including women and children, Nez Perce

leader Chief Joseph surrendered, saying, “...

Hear me, my chiefs, I am tired. My heart

is sick and sad. From where the sun now

stands, I will fight no more forever.”

The Wallowa Band Nez Perce Interpretive

Trail, a Nez Perce National Historical

Park, tells the story of the Nez Perce natives

and other cultures in the area. In July,

the Tamkaliks Celebration honors the Nez

Perce heritage in the Wallowa Valley with a

friendship feast and powwow. Beyond the

interpretive center, the town of Joseph celebrates

art, Western and Native culture and

history with events throughout the year.

Before heading out to explore, stop

by Arrowhead Chocolates for made-toorder

coffee and small-batch treats. For

libations, Mutiny Brewing and Embers

Brew House in Joseph and Terminal

Leon Werdinger

Gravity Brewing in nearby Enterprise offer

plenty of craft beer options. If you’re

feeling adventurous, swing by the Stein

micro-distillery to sample handcrafted

whiskeys and other liquors.

INTERESTING FACT

Joseph, originally called Silver Lake

and then Lake City, formally named

itself after Nez Perce Chief Joseph

in 1880.

122 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016


OUTDOORS

athlete profile

Brianne

Theisen-Eaton

SPORT Heptathlon

HOMETOWN Eugene

AGE 24

interview by Kevin Max

photo by Terry Manier

When did you become

interested in the heptathlon?

In the fall of 2004. At the time

I was doing hurdles, long jump,

triple jump, 100m and 200m. I was

average at all of them. My coach

said to me, “Brianne, I think if you

do the heptathlon, which adds the

high jump, shot put, javelin, and

800m, you could be world-class;

you could compete at the World

Youth Championships in Morocco

next summer.” I was sold, and

although I didn’t enjoy the throwing

and the 800m very much, if it

meant traveling the world to different

meets, it was for me.

Do you recall your early goals?

My biggest goal in high school

was to get a scholarship to an

NCAA Division 1 school. I didn’t

think of anything past that. The

Olympics weren’t on my radar,

they actually didn’t even interest

me. When my high school friends

would ask if I wanted to go to the

Olympics some day, I’d say, “Nah,

that’s way too much work.”

How’s your training going for Rio?

It’s going well. The Olympic year

is fun because all of the hard

work has already been done,

we’re spending this year competing

a lot and really fine tuning and

sharpening all of the events.

What advice can you give

to aspiring heptathletes?

I think the most important thing

that I was told when I started my

career as a heptathlete was to try

not to think of the heptathlon

as one solid event, but as seven

different events. Sometimes if

you wake up on the morning of a

heptathlon competition and you

think, “Wow, okay, I have to do

seven events and do well in all of

them”—that can seem really overwhelming.

Instead, I think of them

one at a time. Taking the days one

event at a time is important.

In the London Games, you finished

11th. What are

your expectations for Rio?

Expectations are tough. You

can’t expect a final result (a gold

medal) because there are so

many uncontrollables: How your

competitors do, how the weather

is, how you feel that day, etc.

Therefore, my expectations are

that I go into the competition

confident and focused and ready

to give myself the best possible

chance at winning that gold, to do

everything to the best of my ability

on those two days to win the

gold. That means mentally being

focused as well, not stressing myself

out, controlling the negative

thoughts, and just having fun.

But of course any athlete who is

probably approaching his or her

last games and is hitting the peak

of their career is going to say they

want to win the gold.

Is it cheating, really, having Ashton

Eaton as your husband and

training partner?

Haha! I definitely feel like it’s a big

advantage. Cheating? No. I was

just on the ball, got to him first.

In all seriousness though, it does

really help having him as a part

of my team. He knows what I go

through, he knows my goals, he

knows what’s going to help me

get better and he respects my

lifestyle.

124 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016


Monthly

Beginning

July 2016


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Quality Outdoor Wear

Just east of downtown:

126 NE Franklin Ave

Bend, OR 97701 541.318.4868

NEW SHOW DAILY AT SUNSET BAY

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800-824-8486

www.OregonsAdventureCoast.com


Explore Guide

Oregon’s Regional Guide to Dining Lodging Recreation

128

129

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131

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PORTLAND

GORGE

EASTERN OREGON

WILLAMETTE VALLEY

EUGENE

OREGON COAST

SOUTHERN OREGON

CENTRAL OREGON

EASTERN OREGON IS THAT

hidden gem of a place that you

only share with best friends. It

rolls out, wide open, and in the

spring it surrounds you with new

life, beauty, and fun. There are

not many places left that feel as

untouched as this region. From

catching site of the birds returning

on Great Pacific Flyway, to

laughing at the antics of newborn

calves and baby lambs. At the end

of the day, a hand-crafted beer,

wine or locally sourced spirit goes

perfectly with chocolates made

right here. Come taste the Old

West out East this spring. Just

don’t tell everyone!

#easternoregon

VisitEasternOregon.com

more online

Looking for sushi in Seaside? Peruvian

cuisine in Portland? Theater in

Ashland? A vacation home in Bend?

Our online guides cover all that

Oregon has to offer. Get your venue or

event noticed in 1859’s Explore Guide.

1859MAGAZINE.COM


EXPLORE PORTLAND

KANANI PEARL SPA

Inspired by Hawaiian traditions of natural

healing, Kanani Pearl Spa offers a

return to the scents of the islands with

papaya-pineapple body polish, island

espresso mud wrap and ginger lime

lomilomi massage. Kanani specializes

in corrective and healthy aging facials

from Epicuren, Naturopathica and IS

Clinical, as well as premiere waxing

services. Endermologie by LPG is used for detoxification and cellulite management.

Kanani boutique spa integrates therapy and relaxation. Come let the waterfalls

of Kanani Pearl return you to your island dreams.

503.242.5500 1111 NW Marshall St. kananipearl.com

LAURELHURST MARKET

At the gates of the Laurelhurst neighborhood

and just three minutes from downtown,

Laurelhurst Market offers a distinctly

Portland steakhouse experience. Drawing

from its in-house butcher shop, Laurelhurst's

seasonal menu focuses on sustainably-raised

meats with cuts not found at the traditional

steakhouse. Named one of Bon Appetit's

Best New Restaurants in 2010, it has been

at the forefront of Portland's growing dining

scene, while providing an atmosphere for

special occasions and families.

503.206.3097 3155 E Burnside St. laurelhurstmarket.com

OTTO’S SAUSAGE KITCHEN

For more than eighty years, Otto’s

Sausage Kitchen has been using

the same traditional recipes and

handcrafted techniques to make

delicious high-quality sausage. The

secrets to Otto’s sausages are in

the handcrafted artisan techniques,

recipes and, of course, the one-of-akind

smokehouse—with each secret

handed down for four generations.

Every sausage is gluten free, with highquality

beef, pork or chicken. See for yourself what Otto’s has to offer. For those who

are unable to visit, check out Otto's e-store to buy your favorite sausages or apparel.

503.771.6714 4138 SE Woodstock Blvd. ottossausage.com

BOYS FORT

Located in the heart of downtown

Portland, Boys Fort is a wondrous

emporium filled with one-of-a-kind

goods from more than 100 local

craftspeople. From gin n' tonicscented

mustache wax to handcrafted

furniture, Boys Fort has a little

of something for everyone. Explore

the selection of bags, jewelry, leather

goods, knives, letterpress, toiletries,

furnishings, lighting, local authors, art and much more. Building better forts since

2011. Just voted Portland's Best Men's Boutique by Willamette Week.

503.567.1015 902 SW Morrison St. boysfort.com

PARAGON

Enjoy American brasserie-style

cuisine, tempting house-made

desserts and signature cocktails

at this lively and sophisticated

neighborhood restaurant. The

approachable cuisine is grounded

in the familiar with new twists

and variations that keep things

interesting. Located in the heart of

the historic Pearl District, Paragon’s

décor reflects the airy, spacious

style of the surrounding art galleries.

503.833.5060 1309 NW Hoyt St. paragonrestaurant.com

THE HEATHMAN LODGE

Designed to express the beauty

and spirit of the Pacific Northwest,

The Heathman Lodge brings the

splendor of the outdoors into

the city of Vancouver. The rustic

charm of its mountain-like retreat,

enhanced by modern urban

amenities and exceptional service,

creates a lodging atmosphere that

is peaceful and productive. There are 182 lodge-styled guestrooms, four-star

dining in Hudson’s Bar & Grill, an indoor pool and a fireside lounge.

Hair M Studio

Hair W Studio

HAIR M|W

Experience the difference at Hair

M|W in the Pearl District. Treat

yourself or put a gift card under the

tree for one of M|W's pampering

services or packages. Hair M|W

offers a wide selection of services

including men & women's hair

services, facials, make-up, waxing,

eyelash extensions, straight razor

shaves and massages. Take your

pick at hairM-W.com/1859.

We take giving great service seriously.

Named Best Color Salon by

Portland Monthly and recognized

as a Top 200 Salon Nationwide by

Salon Today Magazine for Customer

Service. Our guests enjoy many

perks including complimentary

microbrews on tap, wine,

champagne, and locally roasted

coffee; complimentary polish

changes, neck trims and bang

trims; as well as validated parking

and a rewards program to give you

complimentary services as a thank

you for your business.

360.254.3100 7801 NE Greenwood Dr., Vancouver heathmanlodge.com

128 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016

503.715.2884 1015 NW Lovejoy St. hairM-W.com

For more information on events, go to 1859magazine.com/events


EXPLORE THE GORGE + MT. HOOD

HOOD RIVER HOTEL

Tap the heart of the Gorge. Lovingly

restored, the hundred-year-old hotel

delivers New World amenities with Old

World charm. Inside and out, the pulse of

Hood River begins here. Walk to five winetasting

rooms. Shop artisan jewelers, high

fashion and fine art. Savor craft beer and

dining delights. Choose your toy for kiting,

sailing, fishing, biking or floating. Ride

the rails. Stroll to a river. Tour an orchard,

waterfall or volcanic peak—starting here.

800.386.1859 102 Oak Ave., Hood River hoodriverhotel.com

BEST WESTERN PLUS HOOD

RIVER INN AND RIVERSIDE

The Hood River Inn is the perfect base

for winter recreation with affordable Mt.

Hood Meadows ski packages and Hood

River fun. Situated on the Columbia River

shoreline, the Inn features a riverfront

pool, spas and fitness amenities. Riverside

offers some of the best food in the

Gorge, plus amazing Happy Hours at Cebu

Lounge. Full-service hospitality and a variety

of accommodations.

800.828.7873 1108 E. Marina Way, Hood River hoodriverinn.com

MT. HOOD MEADOWS

Stay in Hood River, ski Mt. Hood

Meadows and save big! With access to

2,777 vertical feet of runs and a thriving

culinary and shopping scene, Hood

River is the perfect base camp to Mt

Hood Meadows. Special deals available

to visitors who stay at participating

Hood River lodging facilities. No

blackout dates thru April 2016. 3-outof-5-day

adult lift pass Adult Lift Pass - $99. More than 50% off or 1-day for just

$49. Three-time learn to ski or Ride Package - $99 Includes 3 lift tickets, 3 lessons

and free rentals each day. Single-day Junior Lift Pass - $30

CELILO RESTAURANT

Located in the heart of downtown Hood

River, Celilo offers Pacific Northwest

cuisine with fresh, locally-grown products.

The dining room is a perfect blend of

sophistication and comfort, created by

local artists and craftsmen. The menu is

complemented by an extensive wine list

and full bar. Join Celilo for daily happy hour

specials, and check the website for special

wine dinners and cooking class events.

Open seven days a week for lunch from

11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. and dinner from 5 p.m.,

year-round.

541.386.5710 16 Oak St., Hood River celilorestaurant.com

BRIDGESIDE

Stunning views next to the Bridge of the

Gods—Bridgeside (formerly Charburger)

still serves tasty char-broiled burgers

plus an extensive menu of breakfast

items, chowders, fish and chips, a fresh

salad bar, sandwiches, and desserts. New

name, new management, but historic

charm and Western artifacts remain.

Serving breakfast, lunch, and dinner (and

did we mention views?) Amentities include

gift shop, special event room and

terrace.

541.374.8477 Exit 44 off I-84, Cascade Locks bridgesidedining.com

DOPPIO COFFEE

Relax on Doppio Coffee's outdoor patio, right in the

heart of downtown. Enjoy a hand-crafted espresso

or latte made with locally roasted, fair trade and organic

coffee. Serving breakfast and lunch all day, including

panini, salads, smoothies, and fresh baked

goods. Several vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free

options are available, complemented with local

beers on tap, and local wines by the glass or bottle.

Wi-fi is free, and the patio is dog friendly. Doppio

strives to source organic and local products. Open

daily at 7 a.m.

hoodriver.org/ski-hood

EXPLORE EASTERN OREGON

SUMMER LAKE HOT SPRINGS

Summer Lake Hot Springs is in the Oregon

Outback, two hours southeast of Bend on

Highway 31. Natural hot mineral springs flow

into outdoor rock pools and into the historic

bathhouse at 113 degrees. High desert

activities include wildlife viewing, hiking,

mountain biking, fly-fishing and stargazing.

Accommodations include cozy geothermal

heated cabins, a guest house, and RV and camping sites. Heal your body and soul

at Summer Lake.

541.943.3931 Milepost 92, Hwy. 31, Paisley summerlakehotsprings.com

541.386.3000 310 Oak St., Hood River doppiohoodriver.com

VISIT EASTERN OREGON

Eastern Oregon is that hidden gem of a place that you

only share with best friends. From skiing and riding

the 8,000-foot peaks of Anthony Lakes Mountain

Resort, to touching the night skies via snowmobile,

or snowshoe. At the end of the day, a hand-crafted

beer paired with local beef makes for a perfect

‘cozy-cation’. With two of Oregon’s 7 Wonders—the

Wallowas and the Painted Hills—Eastern Oregon

invites you to come explore winter, but just don’t tell

everyone!

VisitEasternOregon.com

To list your business in 1859’s Explore Guide, please contact Monica Butler

847.501.0462 | monica@statehoodmedia.com

MARCH | APRIL 2016 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 129


EXPLORE WILLAMETTE VALLEY

OREGON GARDEN RESORT

This fall, escape to the Oregon

Garden Resort in historic Silverton,

overlooking the stunning, 80-acre

Oregon Garden. During your stay,

stroll the Garden, relax in the spa,

take a dip in the pool and enjoy

live music nightly. In addition, each

Wednesday enjoy wine tasting in

the Garden and on Thursdays watch

a movie outdoors! Guest rooms are

nestled in a series of cottages, each ready to greet you with a private patio and

fireplace. Pet-friendly rooms are available. The Resort looks forward to welcoming

you this autumn!

503.874.2500 895 West Main St., Silverton oregongardenresort.com

R. STUART & CO.

R. Stuart & Co. is housed in a converted granary

in downtown McMinnville. It’s here that they

gather carefully selected fruit from some of

the best vineyards in the state. Staying true

to the fruit, owner Rob Stuart produces wines

that are graceful, honest and warm. R. Stuart

makes pinot noir and pinot gris, as well as

other specialty wines—including an Oregon

sparkling wine. Everyday wines are bottled with

the Big Fire label. Sample these wines at the R.

Stuart Wine Bar in downtown McMinnville, the

perfect setting for pairing R. Stuart wines with good food and good friends.

866.472.8614 528 NE Third St., McMinnville rstuartandco.com

ARBORBROOK

VINEYARDS

Welcome to Oregon wine country!

While the skies may still be grey,

the reds and whites you'll find in

our tasting room are bright and

shining. And the smiles that greet

you are, as well. Join us for a taste

or a glass and take a few moments

to relax and soak up the beauty of

our area.

Open weekdays 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and weekends 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

503.538.0959 17770 NE Calkins Ln., Newberg arborbrookwines.com

130 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016

ADELSHEIM VINEYARD

For more than forty years, Adelsheim

Vineyard has been carefully cultivating

vineyards and making wines

sustainably in the Willamette Valley.

It is dedicated to consistently producing

wines crafted in a style that

centers on elegance, complexity, and

richness of flavor and texture. Visit

the tasting room for a variety of

exclusive single-vineyard pinot noirs

that can be found only at the winery.

Open 7 days a week, 11 a.m. - 4 p.m.

503.538.3652 16800 NE Calkins Ln., Newberg adelsheim.com

THE GRAND HOTEL AND

BENTLEY'S GRILL

The Grand Hotel and Bentley's Grill,

Salem’s premiere hotel, fine-dining

restaurant, and bar and lounge, has

an elegant downtown atmosphere.

With 193 beautifully appointed

guest rooms, The Grand offers every

visitor comfortable elegance. Enjoy

all the wonders of downtown Salem

by staying right in the heart of it

all. Complimentary underground

parking, hot breakfast buffet, highspeed

wireless internet, indoor pool

and spa, and more await your arrival.

The menu at Bentley’s Grill serves

Northwest ingredients with dishes

that include fresh seasonal seafood,

artfully presented salads, choice

steaks, brick-oven artisan pizzas

and rotisserie-tender chicken. Enjoy

more than 200 varieties of wine, a

hundred of which are from Oregon.

Bentley's staff is outstanding

at serving guests, ranging from

professionals to families.

503.540.7800 The Grand Hotel grandhotelsalem.com

503.779.1660 Bentley's 201 Liberty St., Salem bentleysgrill.com

REX HILL

REX HILL has been making elegant

pinot noir for over thirty years in Oregon's

Willamette Valley. Now owned

by the families of A to Z Wineworks,

the landmark winery welcomes visitors

to its historic tasting room daily

where they can explore the Essence

Table, sustainable gardens and estate

vineyard farmed to biodynamic tenets.

The winery itself is LIVE and B

Corp certified.

503.538.0666 30835 N. Hwy 99W, Newberg rexhill.com

CANA’S FEAST WINERY

Rooted in the coastal foothills

in Carlton, Oregon, you’ll find

a winery with a down-to-earth

approach to what they do. The

staff is relaxed but knowledgeable,

the hospitality is genuine, and

the view is enviable. The winery

partners with some of the most

respected growers in the region

to produce beautiful wines that

are expressive of variety and place. Check out Cana’s Feast Winery online or visit

their tasting room to enjoy a diverse selection of uncommon wines.

503.852.0002 750 W Lincoln St., Carlton canasfeastwinery.com

For more information on events, go to 1859magazine.com/events


EXPLORE EUGENE

FALLING SKY

Falling Sky Brewing “raises the bar to

become the best brewpub in Oregon.”

There are many factors into determining

the best brewpub, with the top two

obviously being beer and food; an excellent

brewpub must do both exceptionally.

While most brewpubs try to please a wider

audience with American pub grub like

burgers and pizza, Falling Sky has upped the ante with a second location, offering

a menu made up of all house baked, cured, smoked, fermented and brined food

running the gamut from Jewish deli classics to American BBQ and Middle Eastern.

Falling Sky Brewing House & Gastro-Pub 541.505.7096 1334 Oak Alley

Falling Sky Pour House Delicatessen 541.653.9167 790 Blair Blvd

Falling Sky Pizzeria & Public House Opening June 2016 EMU, U of O

JORDAN SCHNITZER MUSEUM OF ART

The University of Oregon's Jordan Schnitzer

Museum of Art is a premier Pacific Northwest

museum for exhibitions and collections of historic

and contemporary art based in a major university

setting. The JSMA features significant collections

in galleries devoted to art from China, Japan,

Korea, the Americas and Europe as well as galleries

for changing exhibitions. The JSMA is the only

academic museum in Oregon accredited by the

American Alliance of Museums.

541.346.3027 1430 Johnson Ln., U of O Campus jsma.uoregon.edu

BEPPE & GIANNI'S

TRATTORIA

Consistently rated Eugene’s best Italian

restaurant by residents and local

publications, Beppe & Gianni's Trattoria

has been serving authentic Italian

cuisine since 1998. Located next to

the University of Oregon campus, the

restaurant is famous for its fresh pastas

(be sure to ask about the specials),

hearty entrées and extensive wine

selection. Beppe & Gianni’s is open for dinner seven days a week, and updated

menus can be found on its website.

541.683.6661 1646 E. 19th Ave., Eugene beppeandgiannis.net

MUSEUM OF NATURAL AND

CULTURAL HISTORY

Explore 15,000 years of Oregon culture

and 300 million years of Northwest natural

history—from the sabertooth salmon to

10,000-year-old sandals recovered from

an Oregon desert cave. Learn to think

like a scientist in the laboratory. Discover

19th century Oregon at the archaeology

exhibit. Open Tuesday through Sunday, 11

a.m. to 5 p.m. Illustrated exhibit talks, 2

p.m. daily. Adults $5; seniors and youth $3; families $10. Free admission on the

first Friday of the month.

541.346.3024 1680 E 15th Ave., Eugene natural-history.uoregon.edu

OFF THE WAFFLE

So, what are Liège waffles, and who

is Off the Waffle? With locations in

Portland & Eugene, Off the Waffle is a

place where waffles delight and excite,

confuse you yet provide you with the

answers you're looking for, and hold

your hand while floating on a rainbow

of sweet, delicious waffley bliss.

Off the Waffle sources locally and

organically, and offer great gluten-free

options. Check out their weekly waffle

giveaways on Facebook!

541.515.6926 2540 Willamette St., Eugene Offthewaffle.com

SWEET LIFE PATISSERIE

A favorite spot to satisfy late-night dessert

cravings, Sweet Life Patisserie makes cakes,

pies, and desserts completely from scratch,

using both traditional French and classic

American recipes. The long display cases are

packed with whole cakes, desserts by the

slice and breakfast pastries. Adept baristas

will steam up a latte with locally roasted

organic espresso or brew a pot of organic

tea to go with your dessert. Gluten-free and

vegan options.

541.683.5676 755 Monroe St., Eugene sweetlifedesserts.com

TACOVORE

Tacovore is Eugene’s newest casual fun spot for

Mexican street food and drinks in the Whit. It

focuses on using sustainably sourced meats

from the Pacific Northwest and offer a wide array

of vegetarian dishes to satisfy the herbivores in

your party. Using quality local ingredients, the

norm at Tacovore is create a menu infused with

loads of flavor and adding amazing salsas that

go from mild to en fuego. Tacovore boasts the

best fresh squeezed margaritas in town and has

an extensive selection of tequila that some say is

the best in Oregon.

OREGON ELECTRIC STATION

With exceptional steaks and seafood, and a

welcoming atmosphere, OES is like no other

place in the Pacific Northwest. Originally a

railway station, now a classic and celebrated

restaurant in downtown Eugene. Enjoy

an inviting bar and lounge with timeless

cocktails. Explore dishes from savory to

sweet and dine over filets, rib-eyes, king

salmon and the region’s best prime rib.

There’s an exceptional wine list, too.

Make your reservation today. Oregon

Electric Station. This is Your Place.

OES

541.735.3518 530 Blair Blvd., Eugene tacovorepnw.com

To list your business in 1859’s Explore Guide, please contact Monica Butler

847.501.0462 | monica@statehoodmedia.com

541.485.4444 27 E 5th Ave, Eugene www.oesrestaurant.com

MARCH | APRIL 2016 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 131


EXPLORE OREGON COAST

CANNON BEACH

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

With a variety of exceptional vacation rentals,

Cannon Beach Property Management has

been providing guests a “home away from

home” on the scenic Oregon Coast since

1986. Its properties include spectacular

oceanfront and ocean view homes, charming

cottages close to the beach and convenient

condominiums close to town. Focusing on

creating an unforgettable experience, CBPM

provides all the extra touches to make a vacation perfect. Come celebrate a

special occasion, make family memories, or indulge in a romantic retreat here at

the beach. CBPM has the perfect place to stay!

503.463.2021 3188 S. Hemlock St., Cannon Beach cbpm.com

SHEARWATER INN

The Shearwater Inn is the

perfect combination of beach

charm and casual elegance.

Guests will enjoy ocean-view

rooms, gas fireplaces, decks,

complimentary continental

breakfast delivered to their

room, daily wine social, free

Wi-Fi, hot tub and easy beach

access. Many dog-friendly

rooms are available. Visit this hotel with its ideal location in the heart of Lincoln

City at the D’River overlooking the ocean.

HALLMARK INNS

& RESORTS

No matter the season, there is

always a reason to celebrate at

Hallmark Oceanfront Resorts.

Located in Cannon Beach and

Newport, these oceanfront

properties are perfect for a

relaxing romantic getaway

or a fun vacation with the family, including your furry friends. Take in the

panoramic ocean views from your balcony, curl up next to the cozy fireplace, or

take a dip in the indoor saltwater pool. The opportunities are endless. Come see

what makes Hallmark the perfect location for your year-round escape.

855-283-0103 744 SW Elizabeth St., Newport www.hallmarkinns.com

1400 South Hemlock St., Cannon Beach

SANDLAND ADVENTURES

Experience the Oregon Dunes

and Family Fun Park at Sandland

Adventures. Offering tours of the

dunes since 1987, professional

drivers will show you a great

time while you travel across an

impressive natural wonder of

endless shifting sand. Choose an

exhilarating dune ride on Sandrails

or a relaxing tour on the Giant Dune

Buggies. Large or small groups can

be accommodated on either tour.

541. 994.4121 120 Inlet Ct, Lincoln City www.theshearwaterinn.com 541.997.8087 85366 US-101, Florence www.sandland.com

FREED GALLERY

Freed Gallery was built as a showcase for art.

The soaring 18-foot ceiling, the tall corner

windows and the graceful curved staircase

envelop the space in a quiet, elegant

manner. It invites and challenges the artist

to bring the best canvas, extraordinary

sculpture, unusual metal work, exciting

shaped clay, glistening ceramics, wood

turned as if created from stone, glass of

breathtaking hues and design, functional

furniture as art and one-of-a-kind jewelry.

Situated across from the Siletz Bay (a

National Wildlife Preserve), this gallery on

the incredible Oregon Coast is designed for

the artist, the local residents, anyone on

vacation and those who consider the coast

their second home.

541.994.5600 6119 SW Hwy. 101, Lincoln City freedgallery.com

132 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016

CANNON BEACH HOTEL

Cannon Beach Hotel Lodgings—four

classic, small inns near Haystack Rock.

The Cannon Beach Hotel, practicing

the art of hospitality since 1914, is one

of the oldest on the Oregon Coast.

Updated with custom furnishings and

bedding, plush towels, and original art, it

welcomes you with style and grace. Cozy

elegance includes a blazing lobby fire, arm chairs, and hot beverages. Rooms include

claw-foot tubs, fireplaces, four-poster beds, custom mattresses, and a breakfast you

won't forget. A seasonal cafe adjoins the lobby from March to November.

503.436.1392

EMBARCADERO RESORT

HOTEL & MARINA

1116 S. Hemlock St., Cannon Beach

cannonbeachhotellodgings.com

Spend a few days in resort style comfort.

The Embarcadero Resort is located on

the Historic Bay Front in Newport. Every

guestroom and suite has a spectacular

view of Yaquina Bay and Marina. Enjoy

our Indoor Saltwater Pool, Outdoor

Spas, All Day dining in the Waterfront

Grille & Lounge, Private Saunas, Private

Crab Dock, 233 slip Marina, Crab Boat rentals, 4,500 square feet of meeting and

banquet space. Spend the night or stay the week. Call for our Winter BOGO Special

or visit Embarcadero’s website.

800.547.4779 1000 SE Bay Blvd., Newport embarcaderoresort.com

For more information on events, go to 1859magazine.com/events


EXPLORE SOUTHERN OREGON

CENTENNIAL GOLF CLUB

This scenic 400-acre, eighteen-hole

golf course in Medford has mountain

views and a classic design by golf course

architect and Oregon native John Fought.

For years, Mail Tribune readers have voted

it #1 in Southern Oregon, and it was voted

#6 in the U.S. by GolfWorld readers. It

has five tee settings, a full practice facility

and delicious dining at Centennial Grille

overlooking the eighteenth hole. This

is the perfect venue for tournaments,

weddings, events and getaways.

877.893.4653 1900 N. Phoenix Rd., Medford centennialgolfclub.com

TAPROCK GRILL

Set on the banks of the Rogue River

in a lovely log cabin-style building,

Taprock Northwest Grill is a popular local

restaurant and bar that scooped the

title of Best Restaurant in Grants Pass

in 2013, 2014 and 2015 for the Southern

Oregon Magazine Reader's Choice awards.

Taprock features seasonal ingredients,

sourced locally from the vast farmland

and waters of the great Pacific Northwest with dishes such as herb roasted prime

rib and cedar wrapped wild Alaskan sockeye salmon accompanied by Pacific

Northwest wines and brews. Dine while taking in the scenic river views.

541.955.5998 971 SE 6th St., Grants Pass www.taprock.com

DANCIN VINEYARDS

DANCIN Vineyards is a familyowned,

artisan producer of

pinot noir, chardonnay, syrah

and port located just above the

Gold Rush-inspired community

of Jacksonville. The tasting

room, situated among the vines

and koi pond, offers views of

Table Rocks, Mt. McLoughlin

and the Rogue Valley. It is a

place where wines are served tableside with harmonious food pairings. Come

experience the genuine hospitality, community and relaxation of DANCIN today!

541.245.1133 4477 South Stage Rd., Medford dancinvineyards.com

THE PEERLESS HOTEL

RESTAURANT & BAR

A lively and sophisticated neighborhood restaurant

and bar in the heart of Ashland’s Historic

Railroad District. Dine casually in the stylish bar,

fireside in the intimate dining room or al fresco in

the courtyard gardens. Enjoy small plates, gourmet

burgers, steaks, seafood and vegetarian entrées

that capture the flavors of the season. The

extensive wine list is focused on bottles that are

handcrafted in the Northwest. Stay at the beautifully

restored Peerless Hotel, listed on the National

Register of Historic Places.

541.488.6067 265 4th St., Ashland peerlessrestaurant.com

To list your business in 1859’s Explore Guide, please contact Monica Butler

847.501.0462 | monica@statehoodmedia.com

JACKSONVILLE INN

The Jacksonville Inn offers elegance in a historic

setting with an award-winning gourmet restaurant,

a connoisseur’s wine cellar with more than 2,000

wines, luxurious hotel accommodations, and

honeymoon cottages—the "suites extraordinare"

where three of the last four presidents, including

George W. Bush and former First Lady Laura,

stayed. Enjoy jetted tubs and steam showers,

entertainment centers, fireplaces, wet bars, kingsize

canopy beds and private garden patios.

Reservations include a full breakfast. The inn is

located at the gateway to the Applegate Valley

Wine Trail.

541.899.1900 175 E California St., Jacksonville jacksonvilleinn.com

ASHLAND FOOD CO-OP

Nestled in the beautiful Rogue Valley

in Southern Oregon, Ashland Food

Cooperative is the region's first and

only certified organic retailer. The

Co-op has provided healthy, organic

food to the community for more

than forty years. AFC is dedicated to

providing the best customer service

and highest quality local, organic and

non-GMO foods possible, as well as a

selection of high quality and organic gourmet specialty foods, local wines and beers.

AFC is a food adventure every day.

541.482.2237 237 N. First St. Ashland ashlandfood.coop

THE CHATEAU AT THE OREGON

CAVES NATIONAL MONUMENT

Cool cave, warm hearth. En route between the

California Redwoods and Crater Lake, this National

Historic Landmark offers rustic charm

and friendly, attentive staff. Experience tours of

capacious marble caverns ranging from family-friendly

to adventurous. Explore hiking trails

to alpine lakes and discover nearby wineries and

attractions. Find lodging, fine dining, a regional

artisan gift gallery and an authentic 1930s-style

café. Your host: Oregon Caves Outfitters, a National

Park Service authorized concessioner.

541.592.3400 20000 Caves Hwy., Cave Junction oregoncaveschateau.com

DEL RIO VINEYARDS

Located along the Rogue River, Del Rio

Vineyards, once home to the Rock Point

Hotel, provides a warm and welcoming

atmosphere for sipping premium estate

wines. The Del Rio Vineyards tasting

room includes a wonderful view of it's

200-acre vineyard. Open seven days a

week from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., the vineyard

is right off I-5, exit 43. Come see the

tasting room and bucolic grounds.

541.855.2062 52 N River Rd., Gold Hill delriovineyards.com

MARCH | APRIL 2016 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 133


EXPLORE CENTRAL OREGON

SISTERS COUNTRY

Come experience the hospitality

of the Old West. Take a stroll

through Sisters and explore

the one-of-a-kind boutiques,

galleries, antique stores, book

shops and restaurants. Visit

with the store owners and find

that unique souvenir, special

gift or inspiration for your next

project. Let the kids play in the

park and explore the trails right from town. Every day is a special day in Sisters.

ART IN THE HIGH DESERT

Art in the High Desert is a signature event that

brings over 110 nationally acclaimed, handpicked

visual artists to the heart of Bend,

Oregon, in the Old Mill District. Celebrating

their 9th year, Art in the High Desert was

recently recognized as one of the top 12

shows in the country. For three days you can

visit with, see and buy original art from some

of the top artists in North America. This is a

fine art and craft show not to be missed!

August 26-28, 2016

541.549.0251 sisterscountry.com

PAINTED LAND-ESCAPES

Let your mind wander into a

painting, perhaps your favorite

place on Oregon’s Eastside.

Imagine that moment in time and

visualize an escape into nature

hanging on your wall as a painted

memory of feelings and place.

View Norma Holmes original landescapes

at Mockingbird Gallery

in downtown Bend, Oregon and

prints at the Sisters Gallery and

Frame Shop in Sisters.

541.588.6493 normaholmes.com

FIN & FIRE

From its humble roots, Fin & Fire has grown into

Central Oregon’s premier destination fly-fishing

shop. Brands such as Sage, Winston, Simms,

Hatch and Patagonia are just some of what

you’ll find inside. As Redmond’s only fly-fishing

outfitter, Fin & Fire serves as the gateway to the

Lower Deschutes and Crooked rivers, offering

full- and half-day guided trips. Add in a growler

fill station with thirty-six rotating taps and a full

line of Traeger smokers, and it adds up to more

than just a fly shop. It’s a way of life.

866.275.2810 1604 S. Hwy. 97, Redmond finandfire.com

SUMMER LAKE HOT SPRINGS

Summer Lake Hot Springs is in the Oregon

Outback, two hours southeast of Bend on

Highway 31. Natural hot mineral springs

flow into outdoor rock pools and into the

historic bathhouse at 113 degrees. High

desert activities include wildlife viewing,

hiking, mountain biking, fly-fishing and

stargazing. Accommodations include cozy

geothermal heated cabins, a guest house,

and RV and camping sites. Heal your body

and soul at Summer Lake.

541.943.3931 Milepost 92, Hwy. 31, Paisley summerlakehotsprings.com

134 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016

artinthehighdesert.com 541.322.6272

MOUNT BACHELOR

VILLAGE RESORT

Mount Bachelor Village Resort is

located minutes from downtown

Bend and the Old Mill District

shops on the road to Mt. Bachelor.

Nestled among the pines on the

ridge above the Deschutes River,

the resort offers a variety of nightly

accommodations (river view

condominiums, standard hotel-rooms, ski house condominiums and vacation homes).

Distinguishing features include access to the Deschutes River Trail, outdoor hot tubs,

seasonal pools, cruiser bikes and complimentary access to the Athletic Club of Bend.

877.514.2391 19717 Mt. Bachelor Dr., Bend mtbachelorvillage.com

CASCARA VACATION

RENTALS

Sunriver offers thousands of acres

of outdoor activities such as biking,

golf, and tennis along with dining,

shopping and entertainment in

the remodeled Village. Cascara

Vacation Rentals helps you enjoy

all the benefits of Sunriver with a

wide selection of homes, condos

and cabins in Sunriver and Caldera

Springs—many with free, unlimited

SHARC access. Reward Yourself. Come Explore Sunriver.

800.530.1130 57100 Beaver Dr., Sunriver cascaravacations.com

CASCADE LAKES BREWING CO.

Located in the heart of Bend’s westside recreation

mecca, Cascade Lakes Brewing Company

Lodge is the top spot for après ski, mountain

bike and golf in Bend. The Lodge has some of

the best handcrafted beers in a town known for

its microbrew scene, with popular choices such

as the Blonde Bombshell and HopSmack IPA.

Both the bar and the restaurant have multiple

flat-screen televisions with sports and events

rolling seven days a week from 11:30 a.m. until 11:30 p.m. Enjoy dinner, craft brews,

happy hour, billiards and darts. Located on the way down from Mt. Bachelor at the

Colorado and Century Drive roundabout.

541.388.4998 1441 SW Chandler Ave., Bend cascadelakes.com

For more information on events, go to 1859magazine.com/events


oregon postCard

OUTDOORS

Migration, with a view

A beautiful view of Mt. Hood, seen from Scappoose, Oregon and captured by

Maria Echaniz. This area is one of Echaniz’s favorite places because of its proximity

to Portland and breathtaking views.

Oregon Postcard

Send us your Oregon photos

and win an 1859 T-shirt

Go to 1859magazine.com/postcard to

submit your Oregon photo. The winning

photo will also appear in the next issue

of 1859 Oregon’s Magazine.

MARCH | APRIL 2016 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE 135


1859 MAPPED

The points of interest below are culled from

stories and events in this edition of 1859.

Astoria

Seaside •

Cannon Beach •

Pacific City

Lincoln City

101

26

Tillamook

18

30

Portland

99W

Salem

5

205

Gresham

22

Gov't

Camp

26

Hood River

The

Dalles

Maupin

197

97

84

395

11

Milton-Freewater

Pendleton

La Grande

82

84

Baker City

Joseph

Newport

101

20

Corvallis

5

Albany

20

20

Sisters

Madras

126 Prineville

Redmond

26

John Day

26

84

Florence

126

Eugene

Springfield

58

Oakridge

Bend

Sunriver

20

Burns

395

20

Ontario

Coos Bay

97

78

Bandon

Roseburg

31

395

95

5

Brookings

101

Grants Pass

Jacksonville

Medford

199

Ashland

97

Klamath Falls

Paisley

Lakeview

95

Around Oregon

Dining

Outdoors

Escaping the Cold

Travel Planner [pg. 42]

A friendly village vibe awaits those

who want to find a slower pace on

Oregon’s remote southern coast in

Brookings.

Travel Spotlight [pg. 48]

Stop by the nautical-themed Lighthouse

Inn and Bar in Portland.

Road Reconsidered [pg. 50]

Highway 20 is the longest highway

in the United States, and its

terminus is Newport.

Hotel deLuxe, Portland

Restaurant Beck, Depoe Bay

Aqua Seafood, Corvallis

Solstice Woodfire Café and Bar,

Hood River

Cannon Beach Hardware &

Public House, Cannon Beach

The Barn Light, Eugene

Thai Pepper, Ashland

Joseph

Astoria

Baker City

John Day

Brookings

Medford

Hermiston

Roseburg

Madras

From Where I Stand [pg. 60]

Angel Roscoe and her husband

own the bucket-list-worthy Cowboy

Dinner Tree in Silver Lake.

136 1859 OREGON’S MAGAZINE MARCH | APRIL 2016


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