27.06.2017 Views

1859 Summer 2009

1859 Summer 2009

1859 Summer 2009

SHOW MORE
SHOW LESS

Create successful ePaper yourself

Turn your PDF publications into a flip-book with our unique Google optimized e-Paper software.

Oregon's Best

Green Energy The Marionberry

Boutique Hotels on Tribal Lands Martini & More

Oregon's25

25

SUMMER25

Musts

>>PLUS

Columbia Sportswear

Gert Boyle's Top 5

Sustainable Design

Meets Edgy Architecture

The Man Who Leads

OHSU’s Search for the Cure

SUMMER 2009

$4.95US

1 8 5 9 M A G A Z I N E . C O M


WHERE DO YOU GO FOR INSPIRATION?

YOU CAN FIND IDEAS FOR TILE AND STONEWORK

ALL OVER THE WORLD. OR YOU CAN FIND IT ALL AT UNITED TILE. HUGE SELECTION, DESIGN HELP AND FRESH IDEAS.

SOUTH SEATTLE

RENTON

3001 EAST VALLEY RD

(425) 251-5290

NORTH SEATTLE

EVERETT

11520 AIRPORT RD

(425) 212-3295

PORTLAND

3145 NW YEON

(503) 231-4959

BEND

THE OLD MILL MARKETPLACE

550 INDUSTRIAL WAY, #24

(541) 388-0830


Welcome to the Top

Editor

Kevin Max

publisher

Heather Huston Johnson

Creative Director

Anouk Tapper

Trail Map

Front Cover

2007-08

executive editor

Sarah Max

Contributing writers

Cathy Carroll, Nichole Patrick, Lisa Pounders, Libby Tucker,

Elizabeth Van Brocklin, Bob Woodward

Intern extraordinaire

Elizabeth Van Brocklin

Contributing photographers

Bob Woodward, Brent McGregor, Diane Stevenson,

Rick Schafer, Boone Speed

w w w. T i m b e r l i n e L o d g e . c o m

circulation manager

Ross Johnson

Advertising Department

Sonja Aldrich

Ty Hildebrand

Jamie Hildebrand

Hayley Elshire

Published by

Deschutes Media, LLC

550 Industrial Way, Suite 24

Bend, OR 97702

541.550.7081/fax 541.306.6510

C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

Subscribe to 1859 Oregon's Magazine

online at 1859magazine.com

Send letters to letters@1859magazine.com

1859 Oregon's Magazine uses all Oregon writers, photographers

and is printed on FSC Certified paper from West Linn, Oregon.

We make local habit.

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any

means, electronically or mechanically, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and

retrieval system, without the express written permission of Deschutes Media, LLC. Articles and photographs

appearing in 1859 Oregon's Magazine may not be reproduced in whole or in part without the

express written consent of the publisher. 1859 Oregon's Magazine and Deschutes Media are not responsible

for the return of unsolicited materials. The views and opinions expressed in these articles are not

necessarily those of 1859 Oregon's Magazine, Deschutes Media, or its employees, staff or management.


The criterium stage of the Cascade Cycling Classic in downtown Bend is a spectator treat and one of the oldest proving grounds for cycling's budding talent. (7.21-26)

Summer in Oregon

A regional glimpse into summer's events and attractions

wow, a rodeo and crafts. See "Slash and Earn"

(page 30) on the Tribes' ambitious plan for sustainable

energy production.

Willamette Valley

Celebrate Oregon’s 150th birthday bash (8.28-

9.07) at the Oregon State Fair in Salem with

carnival games and rides, and music from Pink

Martini, the Doobie Brothers and Reba McEntire.

Beer, bikes and bomb-ass trails in Oakridge

with Mountain Bike Oregon (7.17-19 and

8.21-23). The International Pinot Noir Celebration

(7.24-26) at Linfield College, and Mt. Angel

Octoberfest's (9.17-20) biergarten and folk music

highlight the wine-to-beer migration in the

Valley. Keep your eyes open for the September

debut of the Allison Inn & Spa in Newberg,

which will make a fine back-to-school gift for

any wine lover.

Southern Oregon

London has the Globe Theatre. The Pacific

Northwest has the Oregon Shakespeare Festival,

which includes Henry VIII, Much Ado

About Nothing and Don Quixote on the Elizabethan

Stage (June-October). Jump up to historic

Jacksonville in July for the Britt Music Fest's

contemporary tunes of Son Volt, Cowboy Junkies,

James Taylor, Blues Traveler and on into August

for its classical concert series. Culture in

extremis can lead to gluteus extremis. The 13-

mile uphill run, Mt. Ashland Hillclimb (8.01),

is one way to achieve gluteus minimis. Over the

pass, the Klamath Tribes celebrate their 23rd

Annual Restoration Celebration with a pow-

Portland Metro

Seeing tap dancer Savion Glover is reason

enough to check out the Oregon Bach Festival

(through 7.11). From stage to the big outdoor

screen, Flicks on the Bricks at Pioneer

Courthouse Square kicks off summer Fridays

with Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (7.10)

and ends with Anchorman (8.14). For festivals

and music: the Bastille Day Festival (7.11) in

Jamison Square Park and PDX Pop Now! (7.24-

26) in southeast Portland. For hot hotels in the

area, see 1859's "Treat and Retreat," (page 40).

The Thunderbirds and fireworks take to the air

in Hillsboro, for the Oregon International Air

Show (8.28-30).

12 1859magazine.com summer 09


Photo courtesy Oregon Shakespeare Festival

Although festivals

earn the spotlight in

summer, there are

other great things to do.

Around the State

takes you there.

[top left] Don Quixote plays at Ashland's Oregon Shakespeare Festival. [top middle] The Pendleton Roundup brands its 100th anniversary this year. [top right] Pinot growers

and drinkers in the Willamette Valley. [bottom left] Keep Portland weird, but keep Eugene even weirder at the Saturday Market. [bottom right] The Mt. Hood Jazz Festival in

its 28th year.

Mt. Hood/The Gorge

Discover la vie provençal at Hood River's Lavender

Festival (7.11-12) in Oregon's most aromatic

festival. The Timberline Mountain Music

Series returns on Wednesdays with the Freak

Mountain Ramblers and others at the outdoor

amphitheater (8.05-9.02). The Hood River Fruit

Loop Cherry Celebration strewn over 35 miles

of berry country is also worth a taste (7.11-12).

Eastern Oregon

The Cascade Range divides eastern and western

Oregon, but the Pendleton Round-Up (9.16-

19) brings both cultures together in the 100-

year tradition, one of the largest rodeos in the

world. Git yerself to The Rainbow (est. 1893),

Pendleton's oldest continuously open and operated

bar. Still farther east in Oregon's outback

is Hells Canyon Mule Days (9.11-13) with a

mule show, cowboy poets, pit BBQ dinner, and

Western art. Baker City celebrates pioneerera

music in the Oregon Trail Music Festival

(7.11-12). Don't forgo the Oregon Trail Interpretive

Center in Baker City, where (9.12-13)

you can learn blacksmithing. If blue skies and

the blues are your bag, hit Crossing the Blues

La Grande Summer Festival (8.21-22), with a

midnight movie.

The Coast

Coos Bay hosts the ocean, wine, food and music

at the Oregon Coast Music Festival (7.11-24);

the Blackberry Arts Festival (8.22-23). Follow

on with cheese at the 100th anniversary

celebration of Tillamook cheese (8.01). And

what would the beach be without the Seaside

Beach Volleyball Tournament (8.07-8). Guys,

practice Speedo restraint. ... Unless you can run

like Pre at the Prefontaine Memorial 10k Run

(9.19) at Coos Bay. In the Scandinavian north

coast, hit the oldest settlement in the West

(8.12-16) for the Astoria Regatta. The Cannery

Pier Hotel and the downtown Elliot are two

retreats that will float your boat. The Oregon

Coast Aquarium in Newport has a new exhibit

that brings together some of the most bizarre

underwater life with colorful blown glass.

Central Oregon

The Cascade Cycling Classic (7.21-26), the longest

standing stage-race in America, is great for

spectators; and the Haulin Aspen full and half

marathons (8.09) on singletrack is a must for

trail runners. The top summer events in Sisters

are the world class Sisters Outdoor Quilt Show

(7.11) and Sisters Folk Festival (9.11-13), which

brings in top regional and national acts. For kids

and other hungry minds, head over to see the

world's rarest and largest bats at The Live Bat

Experience at the High Desert Museum (7.13-

7.19). Downtown favorite Merenda is now 900

Wall, the same good food and wine but at a more

reasonable price. And Zydeco Kitchen, with its

upscale comfort food, is now downtown at 919

Bond Street.

summer 09 1859 oregon's magazine 13


Sound Off

Illustrations by Paul Harris

The Great Tax Debate

Oregon is one of five states that has no sales tax, thus making this topic a biennial favorite

when the state budget is in critical condition. State services typically ride the boom/bust

cycle with the two-legged property and income tax. Oregon Democrats and Republicans

alike have argued for a more stable tax base to fund our public school system, which is

often the biggest loser. A sales tax may never happen in this state, but the debate continues

to shape this debate for 1859.

Mark Thoma

mthoma@uoregon.edu

Jay Kushner

portlandGOP@gmail.com

Oregon should consider adding a sales tax to its mix of revenue sources.

First, the cost of state services is expected to increase in the future, so

simply keeping government at its present size will require new sources of

revenue. A sales tax is one possibility.

Second, to the extent that

adding a sales tax

broadens the tax

base, the average

tax rate required

to raise a given

amount of

revenue will

be lower. This

benefits existing

taxpayers no matter

what size government

we have.

Third, a big problem

in Oregon is the variation

in revenues as state

conditions change, and,

though the evidence on

this is mixed, a state

The people of Oregon have voted no on a sales tax nine times through

the ballot. Still, politicians continue to promote a state sales tax. There is

always a need to be filled somewhere, and a gaggle of economists on the

state payroll will catalog them with dismal predictions of disaster. But

the real disaster is the sales tax itself.

Having no sales tax is Oregon’s comparative advantage in competing

with other states. Oregon is

one of only five states that

does not have a

sales tax. The retail benefits

are obvious.

The comparative

advantage helps us

in winning manufacturing

plants and

jobs. With the cost

of building a plant in

Oregon 8 percent less

than in neighboring

states, a billion-dollar

semi-conductor factory

has an $80 million

savings. No sales tax attracts

the plant and the jobs.

14 1859magazine.com summer 09


sales tax may provide a more stable revenue source than income and

property taxes.

Fourth, the revenue instability problem can be solved with an adequately

sized rainy day fund, but the politics of the state’s “kicker law” have not

allowed this to happen. Adding a state sales tax is an opportunity to break

this political logjam and establish the rainy day fund that we need.

Fifth, taxing consumption encourages saving while taxing income discourages

work, so replacing income taxes with a sales tax increases the

incentive to work and save, both of which encourage economic growth.

Sixth, visitors use state resources while they are here, and other states

don’t hesitate to take our money when we visit them, so why not impose

a sales tax and return the favor?

Seventh, income is taxed differently depending upon the source (e.g. capital

gains are taxed less than labor income) and that distorts incentives. A

sales tax overcomes this problem.

Finally, the biggest problem with a sales tax is that it is regressive. However,

this can be addressed by exempting necessities, and by adjusting

other taxes and transfers to compensate.

Mark Thoma is a University of Oregon economics professor.

Sales tax is regressive. Poor people, wage earners, fixed income citizens

pay a larger percentage of their money on sales tax than the wealthy.

I have always been puzzled that Democratic politicians are the chief

advocates of a sales tax which hurts the “most vulnerable” people they

claim to protect.

A sales tax costs you more for everything. It’s not just the groceries and

the cup of coffee. Cars cost more, house renovations cost more, energy

costs more and entertainment costs more. Consequently the overall

state GDP declines, and our people live less well.

A sales tax always goes up. It may start as 1 or 2 percent, but once established,

it can be raised promiscuously by legislators.

A sales tax has a local disadvantage. Under most sales tax regimes, cities

and counties get a portion of the revenue. Cities compete ferociously to

attract shopping centers and big box retail stores because of the sales tax

revenue they bring. This is a disaster for small business and for urban

planning.

Jay Kushner is chairman of the Multnomah County Republicans

Is this as

GOOD

gets?

as it


The Road Reconsidered

Sunset Highway/Highway 26

The ROAD Reconsidered explores sections of Oregon roads and

rivers through history, geology and ecology TO make your next trip

more enlightened.

Seaside



Vernonia

Because it leads west and


other fallacies...

Portland's beach gangway, Sunset Highway,

was originally called Wolf Creek Highway,

as construction by WPA began in 1933 and

was completed in 1949. In 1946, Wolf Creek

Highway was renamed Sunset Highway, not

because it leads west, as most Oregonians

assume, but for the sunset emblem worn by

the 41st Infantry Division, based in Portland.

This division was the first of U.S. troops to

deploy in WW II, after the Japanese attack on

Pearl Harbor. (Oregon Historical Society)

What monkeys don't know …

The Oregon Zoo sits atop Mount Sylvan, a

dormant shield volcano—a low profile volcano

that erupts with fluid basaltic lava.

(In Search of Ancient Oregon)

Life beyond Earth?

Alien ships have an affinity for American

farms and crops. And so it was that in June

1994, The Oregonian reported, hundreds of

people with cameras and video cams flocked

to a crop circle just west of the exit for 185th

Avenue off Sunset Highway to record what

some called a UFO landing spot.

The storied life of Joseph Meek

Meek drove one of the first wagon trains down

the Oregon Trail in 1840, and actively pursued

statehood for Oregon, then a provisional government.

In 1847, he led a delegation overland

to Washington, D.C., where he petitioned his

cousin's husband, President James Polk, for Oregon

statehood. In 1848, President Polk appointed

Meek the new territory's federal marshal. Married

to three Indian women in succession, Meek's

half-Indian children were treated as outsiders by

the society he helped orchestrate. (Washington

County Museum, Winnifred Herrschaft)

Sagging real estate

The first Washington County jail was built by New

York transplant William Brown around 1853. The

undersized 16-by-12-foot wooden jail was built for

$1,175 ($192/square foot) and sold 17 years later for $75

in gold coin, or 40 cents per square foot. It's now on

display at the Washington County Museum.

First Inhabitants?

The Kalapuya Indian tribe was estimated to be about

15,000 strong and lived in this region in the early

to mid 19th century. This tribe raised to an art- and

trade-form the making of cakes from camas flowers,

which they sold at regional events. Experts with fire,

they also burned fields for productivity and hunted

deer by encircling them with fire rings. (Washington

County Museum, Sonja Gray)

Shelled

In Vernonia, geologists found fossils of turtles

estimated to be 40 million years old.

(Roadside Geology of Oregon)

16 1859magazine.com summer 09


Suggest a road or

river for The Road

Reconsidered at

1859magazine.com



Construction of Sunset Highway in October 1936

(City of Portland Archives)



Portland

Fallen giant

The Klootchy Creek Giant sitka, in Klootchy

Creek Park just southeast of Seaside, Oregon

on Hwy 26, was the largest sitka spruce in

the country at 216 feet tall

and 56 feet around! The

first known documentation

of this towering tree

was noted in the journal

of Meriwether Lewis on

Tuesday, February 4, 1806.

On December 2, 2007, a

windstorm snapped the

tree along an old lightning

scar, cutting it down

to 80 feet but leaving it

alive to nurse more giant

sitkas. Klootchy Creek Giant

was the first Oregon

Heritage Tree. (Lewisand-

ClarkTrail.com, Oregon

Travel Information Council) The sitka spruce as it now stands.

Photo courtesy Oregon Travel Information Council


Summer25

Musts

Ride, drive, float, walk, listen, surf and hike

... welcome to base camp Oregon

Brent McGregor

18 1859magazine.com summer 09


y Bob Woodward

Outdooregon

Oregon's greatest asset

is its diversity of outdoor

recreation possibilities.

Limiting any Oregon

must-do list to 25 items isn't an easy

task. A hundred would be more like

it. That noted, these 25 outings are

the essentials. If you haven't done

any of them, you've got your work

cut out for you. If you've done some

of them, you'll find some interesting

pursuits that you may not have considered.

Every summer, find two or

three major outings and enjoy them

to the fullest. So whether you walk,

gawk, hike, ride, surf or paddle, you'll

go home from any Oregon outdoor

experience the better for it.


Sea Lion Caves, Florence

The height of a 12-story building and

the length of a football field, the sea

lion cave north of Florence is a hulking

treasure of groaning mammals.

summer 09 1859 oregon's magazine 19


Toketee Falls, North Umpqua

One of the most beautiful of the 15 waterfalls

located along the North Umpqua Scenic Byway.

Cascading over a basalt formation, the falls are

four-tenths of a mile over a pathway and stairs

to a viewing platform.

Diane Stevenson


Outdooregon

SAND PLAY

Riding a dune buggy, hiking the 10 miles of unobstructed beach, frolicking

on the sands of the Oregon Dunes National Recreation Area are

but three of many attractions near the quaint seaside town of Florence.

Others include the sea lion caves north of Florence and the historic

Heceta Head Lighthouse.

WHITEWATER/CLEAR WATER

Take crystal clear cold water, mix in verdant riverside foliage and

bright sun, and you have whitewater rafting on the North Umpqua

River. It's a drop-pool river with the rush of each rapid followed by

calm waters and time to sightsee.

HIGH LAKES DRIFTER

With snow-covered mountains serving as a backdrop, Central Oregon's

forested, clear water High Cascade Lakes offer a myriad of

paddle opportunities for kayakers and canoeists. Good campgrounds,

fishing and photo ops are bonuses.

BE A CULTURE VULTURE

From Shakespearean drama performed outside to new plays and classic

revivals done indoors, musical theater, fine restaurants, and a bucolic

setting, Ashland delivers theater and aprés-theater in spades. And

for a change of pace from Ashland’s Oregon Shakespeare Festival,

head over to nearby Jacksonville for music—classical to jazz, blues and

folk—in the Britt Festival’s outdoor amphitheater.

Photo courtesy Oregon Shakespeare Festival


The outdoor theater in Ashland,

where the Bard himself is always in

season and in vogue.


At Elk Lake and with South Sister

behind, rugged beauty is the norm in

the Cascade High Lakes.

Mike Houska

summer 09 1859 oregon's magazine 21


Outdooregon

SINGLETRACK NIRVANA

Considered a classic by mountain bike riders nationwide, the McKenzie

River Trail follows the river for 26 miles through a dense oldgrowth

forest and past spectacular Sahalie and Koosah Falls. While

the trail is technically challenging at its start, it moderates and finishes

easy and fast.

CASTING TO REDSIDES

Cutting through Oregon's dry side east of the Cascades, the Deschutes

River gets its name from its many falls but its reputation from its

hard-fighting native "Redside" rainbow trout. Single-day to multi-day

fly-fishing float trips take anglers into the heart of the river's steep

walled basaltic column cliffs.

LINKING UP

The closest thing to true Scottish links golfing in America is Bandon

Dunes on the southern Oregon coast near Bandon. Here the wind

howls and each shot demands steely reserve. Designed by Scotsman

David McLay Kidd, Bandon Dunes is for walking with a caddy.

Companion courses (Pacific Dunes, Bandon Trails and Old McDonald)

make for equally impressive play.

Bob Woodward



The McKenzie River Trail is a

mountain biking rite of passage.

The famed Bandon Dunes golf

course on the southern coast of

Oregon is renown Scotsman David

McLay Kidd's American opus.

Mike Houska


Mike Houska

Central Oregon's Deschutes River is among the

nation's top fly-fishing destinations.


Yaquina Head Lighthouse

This 93-foot tower, on Newport's shoreline, took one

year to build and used more than 370,000 bricks. Be

prepared to climb 114 steps when you visit.

Paula Watts


Outdooregon

TROLLING ASTORIA

Once dubbed "The San Francisco of the north"

for its hills and colorful Victorian-style houses,

Astoria is rich with history. Ride the trolley

to the Columbia River Maritime Museum,

watch cargo ships from a riverside hotel room,

experience incredible dining and then hike to

the Columbia Column and feel like Lewis and

Clark might have on their first viewing of the

Pacific Ocean.

A ROUGISH HIKE

Days on the trail and nights in lodge comfort

make hiking the 44-mile Rogue River Trail

truly memorable. The trail parallels the Wild

and Scenic Rogue and can be done in four leisurely

days. Raft-supported camping is another

possibility. And if hiking doesn't appeal, raft

the river and stay in lodges or camp.

MAKING A LOOP

Starting and finishing in historic Frenchglen,

the Steens Mountain Loop Road wends its way

through the waterfowl and songbird rich Malheur

National Wildlife Refuge, past Fish Lake

and then across the mountain's broad spine.

To the east the Alvord Desert fans out to the

horizon almost a mile below, while to the west,

Big and Little Indian gorges carve deep into the

landscape.

A CASE OF QUILT

For one July weekend every year, the town of

Sisters transforms itself into a quilter's paradise.

Quilt-makers from all over the world

descend on the town to display outdoors

some 1,200 quilts, sell them, attend seminars

on quiltmaking and pass along the lore of this

folk art.

HANGING TEN

Surfing and Oregon actually do go together,

especially at Cape Kiwanda in Pacific City.

Popular with long- and short-boarders, the

cape break also attracts kayak surfers. The

Pelican Pub and Brewery is a great beachfront

destination for the land-lubbers, who

would rather watch surfers from a safe

distance.

where's waldo?

Considered one of the world's clearest bodies

of water, Waldo Lake is special to sailors,

kayakers and canoeists. For mountain bikers

and hikers, the 16-mile trail around the lake is

challenging but the camping is easy.

Varicose Vein experts for the Northwest

Did you know...

Symptoms like leg pain, swelling and skin discoloration around

the ankles can indicate a serious but treatable varicose vein

condition? Our advanced technology can treat varicose veins

with a non-surgical procedure that requires no hospitalization

and is often covered by insurance and Medicare.

Call today for a consultation 541-382-VEIN, or visit bendvein.com

varicose veins

spider veins

facial veins

Edward Boyle MD and Andrew Jones MD

Board Certified surgeons and our region's top vein specialists 2200 NE Neff Rd, Suite 204 Bend, OR, 97701


Camping in the Wallowas

The Wallowas and Wallowa Lake are great nature

retreats without the crowds in Oregon's outback.

Mike Houska


Outdooregon

ART wALKING JOSEPH

Beneath the rampart of the Wallowa Mountains,

Joseph has, on first impression, the

look of a typical one-horse Western town.

A walk around reveals art galleries and

foundries and the realization that this is

one art-centric town. Apart from art, there's

camping at majestic Wallowa Lake, rafting

Hell's Canyon and quenching your thirst with

ales at the Terminal Gravity microbrewery in

nearby Enterprise.

MOUNTAIN BIKING THE HOOd

Singletrack trails that snake through a dense

old-growth forest and run alongside roaring

streams arriving at vistas of snow-capped

Mount Hood make for some of Oregon's most

memorable mountain biking. Circumnavigating

Oregon's signature volcanic peak is now

also possible via a system of huts.

BACKPACK THE SKY LAKES

Nearly 117,000 acres of high alpine country

dotted with lakes make up the Sky Lakes

Wilderness northeast of Ashland. Near

volcanic Mount McLaughlin, the Wilderness

is accessible to day hikers but best experienced

on multi-day lake-to-lake backpacking

sojourns.

CYCLE THROUGH HISTORY

Cycling from La Grande to Baker City the

"back way" along State Highway 203 takes

riders through historic Union with its stately

old Victorian homes and National Historical

Register downtown buildings, and along

Catherine Creek past Medical Springs and

Hot Lake in the core of Oregon's historic gold

mining country.

wINE BY BIKE

Not that long ago Oregon burst on the worldwide

wine scene with prize winning Pinot

noirs. Now the state’s number of varietals and

wineries has grown. Touring the rolling hills

of the wine country by bicycle allows for more

time to drink in the scenery not to mention the

fruits of the winemaker's labor.

GET A GRIP AT SMITH ROCK

In the early 1980s, Smith Rock was a littleknown

Central Oregon rock formation home

to the new “sport” climbing style. Fame came

quickly as short technical routes became

popular. That popularity has not faded as

climbers have put up routes for all abilities on

Smith Rock's welded tuff.


Caption for Image or Action

Painted Hills Caption

Part of the John Day Fossil Beds, Painted Hills

gets its colorful layers from laterite soil that

formed in floodplain deposits.

Paula Watts


Outdooregon

STRUMMING ALONG

Old time fiddlin' and pickin' are what July's

Wheeler County Bluegrass in Fossil Festival

is all about. The event is free and when not

playing or listening, the nearby John Day

Fossil Beds and the Painted Hills are worth

a visit.

BIRDING BY BOAT

A sure way to get close to incredible numbers

of waterfowl is to paddle the marked,

self-guided canoe/kayak trails on the Upper

Klamath National Wildlife Refuge and the

Klamath Forest National Wildlife refuge. Both

are famous for waterfowl and hundreds of

other species of avian life.

TUMBLING WATERS

Along a short stretch of the historic Columbia

River Gorge Highway 30 (just off I-84) are a series

of pristine waterfalls. Make a short walk to

Horsetail, Wahkeena and Latourell falls or take

a long hike alongside Bridal Veil and spectacular

620-foot Multnomah Falls.

SURFING THE GORGE

As summer winds howl up and down the

Columbia River Gorge, it becomes a worldwide

windsurfing and kiteboarding mecca. And what

better place for post-river outings than laidback,

friendly Hood River.

AGE OF AQUARIUS REVISITED

Tie-dye maybe be out of style most places

but, in Eugene, during the April to November

regular Saturday Markets, it's a high fashion

statement. The market features crafts, music,

food, locally grown produce and, what else,

hipster apparel.

PUB CRAWL PORTLAND

The heart and soul of the American microbrewery

revolution, Portland's lively local

beer-making scene and its products are best

sampled on a well-planned evening pub crawl.

That, or make a daytime tour to see what it

takes to make a craft brew.

Visit Bob Woodward's

blog at 1859magazine.

com/recreation to

chat about the Oregon

outdoors and tell us

about your "must-do"

summer agenda.

Live wild animals. 1880s pioneers. The spirit of the West. It’s closer than you think.

open daily 9-5 | five minutes south of bend | 59800 s. hwy 97 | 541-382-4754 | highdesertmuseum.org


Caption for Image or Action

Painted Hills

Part of the John Day Fossil Beds, Painted Hills

gets its colorful layers from laterite soil that

formed in floodplain deposits.

Paula Watts


So many things to do.

So many sunny days to do them.

Skiing. Golfing. Hiking. Biking. Fly-fishing. White water rafting. Whatever you and your family

are into, you’ll find it in Central Oregon. Blessed with 300 sunny days a year, Central Oregon is

renowned for its outdoor recreation. And like any world-class destination, it has the resorts,

gourmet dining, and indulgent day spas to back it up. Get more adventure for your money.

And go on the Greatest Vacation on Earth. Get our free 88-page Official Visitors Guide by

calling 800-800-8334 or go to VisitCentralOregon.com for more information.

everything under the sun.


Features Summer 2009

18

25 Summer Musts

From fly-fishing the top Rainbow trout spots

in the country to backpacking into the majestic

Sky Lakes Wilderness and popping into otherworldly

ocean caves of sea lions at the coast,

there's a good life's worth of adventure here.

by Bob Woodward

30

Slash and Earn

The Klamath Tribes in Southern Oregon

struck a crucial milestone in regaining a fraction

of the millions of acres of tribal lands that they

have lost in treaties over the past 150 years.

Their ambitious plans in forest management and

renewable energy have the eyes and ears of the

state and federal energy elite.

by LiBBy Tucker

40

Treat and Retreat

It's all about the journey ... unless your resting

point is the better story. 1859 trolls the state

for lodging retreats with unparalleled

character, history and comfort.

by Sarah Max

on the cover:

Mule Canyon on the Rogue River

© Matthew L. Maloney

28


Inside this Issue

18 56 64

8

12

14

16

18

50

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

AROUND THE STATE

At a glance, the events, festivals, races

and shows you don't want to miss this

summer

SOUND OFF

Two perspectives on Oregon's elusive

sales tax

THE ROAD RECONSIDERED

sunset Highway: It's not what you

think. recent and ancient history, and

geology help us reconsider our next trip

to the beach

OUTDOOREGON

Compelling adventures for the ambitious

and the not-so-ambitious

WHAT I'M WORKING ON

Harvard snubbed his research; OHsu

embraced it. Now Dr. Brian Druker is

the preeminent hope behind a cure

52

56

62

64

82

FROM WHERE I STAND

union, Oregon through the eyes of

an insider

DESIGN

Design and sustainability meet in this

high desert modern home

ARTIST IN RESIDENCE

Paul Harris explores walnut ink

HOME GROWN

The marionberry: from farm to table,

and from savory to martini

TOP 5

Columbia sportswear's ma Boyle

and what she can't live without

IN THIS ISSUE ON

1859MAGAZINE.COM

CALENDARS

& GETAWAY GUIDES

70 Central Oregon

72 The Coast

74 eastern Oregon

75 mt. Hood/The Gorge

76 Portland metro

78 southern Oregon

80 Willamette Valley

Feature: The U.S. Senator from Oregon who was served as a Democrat, Republican and Independent

calendar: Summer festivals, concerts and events happening across the state

directories: Statewide guides for Real Estate . Restaurants . Shopping . Travel . Recreation

6 1859magazine.com summer 09


Welcome

to Oregon's Magazine

Welcome to the premier issue

of 1859 Oregon’s Magazine.

There are few places in

this world can you surf the

ocean, hike behind waterfalls in a temperate

rain forest, ski in a high alpine setting and

raft through desert canyons all within a sixhour

drive. In Oregon, you can. 1859 Oregon's

Magazine captures what it truly means to live,

work and play in Oregon by making us intellectual,

recreational, historical and culinary

tourists in our own state.

Through striking photography and engaging

editorial content, 1859 will hike into the

backcountry, delve into the lives of innovators,

stomp grapes in the Willamette Valley and

blow the dust off Oregon history.

In our first issue, we encounter the Klamath Tribes of Chiloquin

who are striving for energy independence through a sustainable

biomass project and whose success has tribal, statewide

and national implications. In “The Road Reconsidered,” we reintroduce

you to our roads and rivers with historical, geological

and cultural facts that bring these stretches alive and awaken the

Clark W. Griswold in all of us.

“From Where I Stand” takes us to the Grand Ronde Valley in

the northeast to learn a little about Union, Oregon from the perspective

of one of its keenest observers. Travel continues with our

choice of some of the best hotels, inns and lodges throughout

the state in “Treat and Retreat.”

The issue closes with an Oregon icon, the legendary Ma Boyle.

In our “Top 5,” Oregon’s First Lady of Frozen Challenges and Columbia

Sportswear’s chairwoman, Gert Boyle, opens up with a

surprising list of the five things she can’t live without.

We have also put considerable time and attention into our

comprehensive website, 1859magazine.com, a marketplace of

ideas, culture, travel and recreation. The website content, you'll

find, is different but complementary to the magazine.

The 1859 team has had loads of fun working on a project in

which we passionately believe. We hope you will join us in this

fascinating journey around our state by subscribing to Oregon's

magazine at www.1859magazine.com.

If you're out and about, you can find 1859 in Whole Foods

Markets, Barnes & Noble, Borders and independent bookstores

from California to Oregon and Washington.

You can also hook up with us in your area during the 1859

summer roll-out tour. Go to our website for the summer schedule,

or find us on Twitter @1859magazine.

Kevin MAx, Editor

8 1859magazine.com summer 09


Welcome to the Top

Editor

Kevin Max

publisher

Heather Huston Johnson

Trail Map

Front Cover

2007-08

Creative Director

Anouk Tapper

executive editor

Sarah Max

Contributing writers

Cathy Carroll, Nichole Patrick, Lisa Pounders, Libby Tucker,

Elizabeth Van Brocklin, Bob Woodward

Intern extraordinaire

Elizabeth Van Brocklin

w w w. T i m b e r l i n e L o d g e . c o m

Contributing photographers

Bob Woodward, Brent McGregor, Diane Stevenson,

Rick Schafer, Boone Speed

circulation manager

Ross Johnson

C

M

Oregon’s

cataract

specialists

Advertising Department

Sonja Aldrich

Ty Hildebrand

Jamie Hildebrand

Hayley Elshire

Published by

Deschutes Media, LLC

550 Industrial Way, Suite 24

Bend, OR 97702

541.550.7081/fax 541.306.6510

Subscribe to 1859 Oregon's Magazine

online at 1859magazine.com

Send letters to letters@1859magazine.com

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

1859 Oregon's Magazine uses all Oregon writers, photographers

and is printed on FSC Certified paper from West Linn, Oregon.

We make local habit.

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any

means, electronically or mechanically, including photocopy, recording or any information storage and

retrieval system, without the express written permission of Deschutes Media, LLC. Articles and photographs

appearing in 1859 Oregon's Magazine may not be reproduced in whole or in part without the

express written consent of the publisher. 1859 Oregon's Magazine and Deschutes Media are not responsible

for the return of unsolicited materials. The views and opinions expressed in these articles are not

necessarily those of 1859 Oregon's Magazine, Deschutes Media, or its employees, staff or management.


Slash

and

EarnThe Klamath

Tribes

forge a new path to sustainable energy production

in what could become the working model

for biomass in the West

30 1859magazine.com summer 09


written by

photographs by

Libby Tucker

Boone Speed

Out of the Woods

Will Hatcher of the Klamath Tribes contemplates

a bold scheme that would bring green energy and

sustainable jobs.


Small Diameter, Big Hopes

The future site of the Giiwas Green Energy Park, which the Tribes hope

will become a biomass solution to forest management and provide

sustainable energy.

Along milepost 224 heading north

Winema National Forest. After 80 years of

through Klamath County, sits an abandoned

sawmill that’s become the hope for

economic revitalization in south central

Oregon and perhaps a sustainable energy

paradigm throughout the western states.

The dilapidated sawmill is a curious sight among the millions of acres

of trees in the adjacent Fremont-Winema National Forest. Lodgepole

pine trees, an invasive species here, grow thick around a smattering of

Ponderosa pines, and the stands are choked to the canopy with foliage.

Twenty-five miles south, another isolated lot near Chiloquin comprises

some of the few remaining acres still owned by the Klamath

Tribes after the loss of their reservation through a treaty with the federal

government more than 50 years ago. In his office at the tribal administration

building, natural resources director Will Hatcher stands

near a wall-sized map of Klamath County and traces his finger along the

former boundary of his ancestral lands. The Klamath, Modoc and Yahooskin

people, now known collectively as the Klamath Tribes, owned

880,000 acres, nearly the whole map, until Congress terminated the

Tribe’s status in 1956 and liquidated the Klamath Reservation. Now,

even after regaining its status in 1986, the Tribes own only a few thousand

acres, including the old mill site, less than a fingertip of property.

About 14 percent of the Klamath Reservation was sold by the federal

government to private logging companies, while the rest became

selective logging and fire suppression, the

forest harbors few old-growth Ponderosa

stands, is overgrown with lodgepole pines,

and is vulnerable to wildfires and disease.

What’s left isn’t worth harvesting, and most

of the region’s sawmills have closed. Still, the

mill site is the center of the Klamath Tribe’s

impressive strategy to regain economic selfsufficiency.

"We’re trying to create a marketetable

solution for the problem with the forests around here locally and

throughout the West: too many small-diameter trees that have no

commercial value,” says Hatcher. “Those trees are creating huge problems

for our forests.” Hatcher grew up in the Klamath Basin and began

his career in forest management nearly 40 years ago with the U.S. Forest

Service. He’s now overseeing the Tribes’ plan to restore the forest.

The Tribes hope to buy back all of the former reservation lands,

starting with the 108-acre Crater Lake Mill Site that they bought last

November. Here they plan to build the Giiwas Green Energy Park, an

industrial operation to collect biomass from overgrown forestlands,

and use it to fuel a cogeneration plant and wood products business.

This project could serve as a model for other rural communities and

Native American tribes, and help open federal lands to a renewable

source of energy. The plan would create about 35 jobs for tribal members

and other county residents collecting woody biomass in the forest,

operating the plant, and manufacturing wood chips, firewood,

small posts and poles, according to the South Central Oregon Economic

Development District.

summer 09 1859 oregon's magazine 33


“The Tribes have been the biggest loser

in the basin for 150 years,” says James Honey,

a Klamath Basin program director with Sustainable

Northwest, a nonprofit involved in

negotiating a settlement agreement with the

Tribes over water rights in the Klamath Basin.

“We need to provide new economic opportunities

for tribal and rural people.”

a model for the West

THE SITUATION IS FAMILIAR THROUGHOUT THE WESTERN

United States where boarded-up sawmills or those left idle during the

recent economic downturn are found near vast swaths of public lands

on which overgrown forests have become vulnerable to wildfires and

disease. Fire spreads quickly in the underbrush and up into the midsized

trees, which act as a ladder that spreads the fire into the highest

level of the canopy and grills the most mature trees. By removing

the smaller trees and some of the undergrowth leftover from logging

– known as “slash” – forest managers can help prevent catastrophic

wildfires and restore healthy tree growth. The Forest Service, however,

doesn’t have the budget to restore all federal forestland, and there’s simply

no financial gain to harvesting the small-diameter wood.

“We’ve got forest slums on our hands,” says David Sjoding, a renewable

resources specialist with the Washington State University Extension

Energy Program, a group working with Northwest Congressional

leaders to develop forest management plans that incorporate tree thinning

for renewable energy development.

Biomass produced on forest lands in the western U.S. has the potential

to generate some 2,230 megawatts of renewable energy, or about

the equivalent of the energy produced by four typical coal-fired power

plants, according to the Western Governors’ Association. Biomass is

essentially solar energy stored in plants. It is burned to heat water to

create steam that then drives a turbine and generates electricity that

can be used on site or sold to utilities. The excess heat can also supplant

coal and natural gas in wood products manufacturing, such as paper

mills and pulp, in a process called cogeneration. Generating power from

“We’re trying to create a

marketable solution for the

problem with the forests

around here locally and

throughout the West: too

many small-diameter

trees that have no

commercial value.”

WILL HATCHER, NATURAL RESOURCES

DIRECTOR FOR THE KLAMATH TRIBES

biomass still releases carbon dioxide into the

atmosphere, and so the U.S. and international

carbon markets consider biomass “green” energy

only if plants are grown to recapture the

carbon dioxide and replace the biomass that

is combusted.

Burning wood is one the oldest forms of

energy production but, as a commercial venture,

biomass plants are largely untested. To justify a significant investment

in new equipment, training and land, biomass developers need to

be sure the forest holds enough woody residue to provide a fuel supply

for at least 20 years. In 2007, an Oregon Department of Energy study

found 1.1 million acres of forest eligible for restoration within 75 miles

of Klamath Falls, 27 miles south of Chiloquin, with a potential for producing

150 megawatts of electricity and creating 900 jobs in the area.

But the numbers are only an estimate. It’s unclear exactly how much

biomass forestland can produce or even how to sustainably manage a

forest in order to guarantee future supplies.

“My problem is, I don’t trust experts; our ignorance exceeds our

knowledge in anything, be it love, or energy or the way we interact with

the natural world,” says Tom Chester, director of the Renewable Energy

Center at the Oregon Institute of Technology in Klamath Falls. The Renewable

Energy Center is working with the Klamath Tribes to develop a

feasibility study for the Giiwas project. “Maybe we need to thin forests,

but do we know that for sure? I see the world in gray.”

Despite the uncertainty and risk, tribes and rural communities

throughout the West that had been considering renewable energy projects

are now rushing to file applications for federal funding to turn existing

and abandoned sawmills into biomass projects, says Bob Middleton,

director of the Office of Energy and Economic Development for the U.S.

Bureau of Indian Affairs. He estimates the number of tribes requesting

his department’s assistance in developing biomass facilities has doubled

since last year. Renewable energy development is a funding priority in

federal budgets under the new Obama administration. A three-year

extension of tax credits for renewable energy projects is included in

the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to spur job creation and

summer 09 1859 oregon's magazine 35


“Pairing forest restoration with electricity production

from biomass is a solution that provides a 'double

opportunity' for economic development.”

Bob Middleton, director of the Office of Energy and eConomic

DeveloPMent for the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs

Power Generations

Amelia Louriero, 58, and Marcie

Fischer, 14, of the Klamath Tribes.

Louriero returned to Klamath Falls

years after her parents had moved

her and her siblings to San Francisco

for work. She is optimistic about

jobs in the Tribes' biomass project.

Marcie Fischer, too, hopes there are

enough jobs for her to stay close to

her Klamath Falls home.

combat climate change. Pairing forest restoration with electricity production

from biomass is a solution that provides a “double opportunity”

for economic development, Middleton says.

“You do fuels reduction to decrease the forest fire danger but use

that slash to drive a biomass plant, either for local cogeneration or to

generate some electricity,” says Middleton. “But the economics really depend

on how much land you have. You need adequate fuel stocks within

25 to 30 miles of your operation.”

Communities historically centered on forest products and located

close to public lands are ideal candidates for biomass projects. The

Warm Springs and Umatilla tribes in Oregon and the town of Lakeview,

100 miles southeast of Chiloquin in Lake County, all have biomass

plants in the works. They’re starting to reverse the decades-long

consolidation of small, locally-owned mills that were bought by large

timber companies aiming to maximize profits with harvests of mature

trees. The rural economies are returning to an old model of smaller

scale, locally-owned mills and small power plants close to where the

energy is used, right on the land, according to Sustainable Northwest.

36 1859magazine.com summer 09


1826 First contact with European settlers

when Peter Skeen Ogden led a group of Hudson

Bay fur trappers through the area. During this

era, all of the Tribes’ food, clothing, and shelter

came from the land.

1864 The Klamath Tribes entered into

the Treaty of 1864 with the U.S., ceding

approximately 20 million acres of land and reserving approximately

2.5 million acres of land as the Klamath Reservation. Due to erroneous

surveys and other land cessions, the land base was reduced to 1.1 million

acres. Later 220,000 acres were lost to the Dawes Act allotment process.

1873 The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the Tribes could not harvest

timber on their lands. The court ruled that the timber belonged to the

United States.

1953 Congress passed House Concurrent Resolution 108 calling for the

termination of federal relations and services with all Indian tribes in the

United States.

1954 Congress passed Public Law 587, ending federal supervision

and services to the Klamath Tribes, though the Tribes rejected the

Termination Act. Congress liquidated all tribal assets including the land

and divided the proceeds from the sale to the members of the Tribe

who chose to withdraw. The reservation lands were acquired by the

United States to establish the Winema National Forest. Approximately

1/7 of the land was sold to private interests.

1973 The Tribes file Kimball v. Callahan to reaffirm their right to hunt,

fish, trap, and gather on former reservation lands. As a result of the

Tribes’ success in this lawsuit, the U.S. Forest Service changed its timber

harvest practices to consider fish and wildlife habitat.

1986 Public Law 99-398 restores the Klamath Tribes’ rights as a

federally recognized Indian tribe. The Tribes develop an economic

development plan centered on the return of all former reservation

lands owned by the federal government and establish an economic

development commission to assist with the venture.

1997 The Tribes first economic development project, Kla-Mo-Ya Casino,

opens near Chiloquin.

2000 The Tribes complete their economic self-sufficiency plan,

choosing forest management as the centerpiece of their effort.

2008 Klamath Tribes purchase the Crater Lake Mill Site for the

development of the Giiwas Green Enterprise Park.

2008 Tribes sign an option agreement to buy the 90,000-acre Mazama

Tree Farm on former Klamath Reservation lands.

Klamath Tribes

Timeline

Sources: The Klamath Tribes Economic Self-Sufficiency Plan;

Klamath Heartlands: A Guide to the Klamath Reservation Forest Plan


“The potential of that site is enormous. Acquiring

it gives the Tribes a huge opportunity to start

creating a forest-based economy once again."

Jeff Mitchell, Klamath Tribes chairman

and economic development manager

A Plan to Buy Land

The plan is riSKier for the Klamath Tribes, which is

the only Oregon tribe that owns virtually no land and the only tribe in

the United States with a national forest on its former reservation. In

Klamath County, where 80 percent of the land is forested, the Tribes

are surrounded by land they can’t legally harvest without a stewardship

contract from the Forest Service. The 2004 Tribal Forest Protection

Act allows tribes to sign contracts with the Forest Service, but only if

they own land that borders directly on federal forestlands. The Klamath

Tribes’ plan hinges on its ability to buy enough land to stage a trial, but

also to recruit and train personnel.

“The project is simple in concept but complicated to implement,”

says Larry Swan, a forest products and economic development specialist

with the Fremont-Winema National Forest. “The Tribes need to

build their management capacity and business experience—not to mention,

someone’s gotta fund it.”

Just across the highway from the proposed Giiwas Green Energy

Park site is the 90,000-acre Mazama Tree Farm, a privately-owned commercial

logging site in the northwest corner of the former Klamath Reservation

with a 50-mile border with federal forestland – a good-sized

plot on Hatcher’s map. Owner Fidelity National Financial, a real estate

investment trust, has largely cleared the land of merchantable timber,

and the company is now in negotiations to sell the land back to the

Klamath Tribes. The deal is part of the Klamath Basin settlement agreement

in which the federal government has agreed to give the Klamath

Tribes $21 million toward the purchase of the Mazama tract in exchange

for concessions on the Tribes’ water rights. The Tribes have until

this fall to finalize the deal or the property hits the open market.

“The potential of that site is enormous,” says Jeff Mitchell, Klamath

Tribes chairman and the driving force behind its economic development

effort. “Acquiring it gives the Tribes a huge opportunity to start

creating a forest-based economy once again.”

Regaining a significant portion of the former ancestral lands would

provide a foundation for the Tribes’ new biomass-based economy, but

it’s just one more step needed to meet their long-term goal of achieving

self-sufficiency. Restoring the forest to harvest sawmill lumber would

take about 40 years, and collecting a sustainable supply of biomass will

take 20 to 25 years of forest growth. The Tribes must “think and plan

generationally,” says Hatcher. A new $1.4 million recovery act grant announced

by the Forest Service in May will help train tribal members in

forest thinning and establish management crews. The money will help

build the Tribes’ capacity to bid on federal forest stewardship contracts

while they work out the financing to grow their own land base.

To the Tribes, the purchase of the Mazama Tree Farm and the development

of the Giiwas Green Enterprise Park also represent something

bigger. Employment with the Tribes is limited right now to work at the

tribal administrative offices, at one of the health clinics or at the Tribes’

Kla-Mo-Ya casino.

With the return of their ancestral lands, which are considered a gift

from their creator, gmoc’am’c, and the center of their spiritual and cultural

identity, the Klamath Tribes can once again work in the forest as

their ancestors did. They can help restore the forests to a healthier condition

and contribute to a modern economy that’s creating new markets

for sustainable wood products and generating renewable

energy.

Hatcher asks, “How can a sovereign nation exist

without land?”


Travel is our way of acquiring our own

stories to tell—extending and enriching

our autobiographies. From the stately

peaks of the Wallowa Mountains to Oregon’s

free-spirited coast, Oregon holds a tome’s

worth of chapters to make your own. But as any

seasoned traveler knows, where you stay is as

much a part of the experience as the sites you see

and the people you meet.

That’s where these storied hotels, lodges and inns

come in.

Some of these properties, such as the Tu Tu’ Tun

Lodge or Black Walnut Inn, indulge guests with

world-class hospitality in out-of-this-world locations.

The Timberline Lodge and the Ashland

Springs Hotel ooze Oregon history, while the Cannery

Pier Hotel and McMenamin’s Old St. Francis

School offer top-notch lodging in novel locations.

One thing that you’re guaranteed with these 12

hotels is a unique, comfortable experience that

promises to set the scene for your next Oregon

adventure.

40 1859magazine.com summer 09

Cannery Pier Hotel

The hotel, which opened in 2005, pays tribute to its

heritage with a rich photographical history of Astoria’s

unsung heroes of the gillnet fishing industry.


Treat

and

Retreatthat

Oregon hotels

become the story

written by

SARAh MAX


“Pairing forest restoration with electricity production

from biomass is a solution that provides a 'double

opportunity' for economic development.”

Bob Middleton, director of the Office of Energy and eConomic

DeveloPMent for the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs

Power Generations

Amelia Louriero, 58, and Marcie

Fischer, 14, of the Klamath Tribes.

Louriero returned to Klamath Falls

years after her parents had moved

her and her siblings to San Francisco

for work. She is optimistic about

jobs in the Tribes' biomass project.

Marcie Fischer, too, hopes there are

enough jobs for her to stay close to

her Klamath Falls home.

combat climate change. Pairing forest restoration with electricity production

from biomass is a solution that provides a “double opportunity”

for economic development, Middleton says.

“You do fuels reduction to decrease the forest fire danger but use

that slash to drive a biomass plant, either for local cogeneration or to

generate some electricity,” says Middleton. “But the economics really depend

on how much land you have. You need adequate fuel stocks within

25 to 30 miles of your operation.”

Communities historically centered on forest products and located

close to public lands are ideal candidates for biomass projects. The

Warm Springs and Umatilla tribes in Oregon and the town of Lakeview,

100 miles southeast of Chiloquin in Lake County, all have biomass

plants in the works. They’re starting to reverse the decades-long

consolidation of small, locally-owned mills that were bought by large

timber companies aiming to maximize profits with harvests of mature

trees. The rural economies are returning to an old model of smaller

scale, locally-owned mills and small power plants close to where the

energy is used, right on the land, according to Sustainable Northwest.

36 1859magazine.com summer 09


McMenamin's Old St. Francis School

Be sure to pack your bathing suit. Father

Luke wouldn’t approve of skinny dipping in

the indoor soaking pool.

FivePine Lodge

The lodge’s Shibui Spa is a destination

of its own. The 6,000-square-foot

sanctuary houses nine treatment

rooms, a thermal soaking tub, Swedish

sauna and a 120-year-old Buddha.

Cannery Pier Hotel Astoria

Architect and Astoria native Robert “Jake” Jacob spent 14 years designing

and building this 46-room boutique hotel on a 100-year-old

pier that was once the site of the Union Fish Cannery (where Jacob’s

father worked in the 1970s). The hotel, which opened in 2005, pays

tribute to that heritage with rich photographical history of Astoria’s

unsung heroes of the gillnet fishing industry. (A thin volume that

tells the history of the area and of the cannery, Fins, Finns and Astorians

by Greg Jacob, is well worth picking up in the gift shop if it’s

not already in your room.) Guests of the Cannery Pier enjoy such

amenities as en-suite fireplaces, claw-foot bath tubs and private

balconies offering some of the best views of the four-mile Astoria-

Megler Bridge and the massive tankers huffing up the mouth of the

Columbia channel. Most rooms in the hotel hover directly over the

Pacific inlet waters, giving guests the feeling of being in the quarters

of a luxury liner sans seasickness. Although downtown Astoria is an

easy walk, the trip is more fun on one of the hotel’s cruiser bikes, or

in a chauffeured ride in its 1939 Buick or 1946 Cadillac.

Info: 888.325.4996/cannerypierhotel.com

McMenamin’s Old St. Francis School Bend

Snoozing in class is encouraged in this 1936 Catholic schoolhouse

turned destination hotel, pub, brewery and movie theater in downtown

Bend. Its parochial past is widely displayed in photographs,

murals and memorabilia. Overnight guests bunk down in one of 19

cozy guestrooms–most of which were once classrooms–or rent one

of four peripheral cottages. Be sure to pack your bathing suit. Father

Luke wouldn’t approve of skinny dipping in the indoor soaking pool.

Info: 877.661.4228/mcmenamins.com

FivePine Lodge Sisters

Rustic luxury is the name of the game at FivePine Lodge, a 35-acre

retreat straddling the town of Sisters and the Deschutes National

Forest. The two-year-old lodge is the brainchild of Bill and Zoe

Willits and their son, Greg, who set out to build a “sustainable

campus” that promotes health, balance and adventure. Stay in one

of the eight cozy rooms in the main lodge or opt for one of the 24

detached cottage suites tucked among towering Ponderosa pines.

Handmade Mission-style furniture, fireplaces, waterfall tubs and

plush pillowtop beds come standard in every room. Walk to downtown

Sisters to explore shops and restaurants or hop on the Peterson

Ridge Trail for 17 miles of single-track mountain biking, hiking

or trail running. Guests have full access to the Sisters Athletic

Club, which includes an indoor lap pool, hot tub and full workout

facilities. The lodge’s Shibui Spa is a destination of its own.

The 6,000-square-foot sanctuary houses nine treatment rooms, a

thermal soaking tub, a Swedish sauna and a 120-year-old Buddha.

Info: 866.974.5900/fivepinelodge.com

Hotel Modera Portland

Opened in 2008, this 174-room hotel near Portland’s historic South

Park Blocks is a case study in urban renewal. What was once a

run-down Days Inn is now a Mid-Century Modern boutique hotel

that is as hospitable as it is hip. Guest provisions include plush

linens, Italian toiletries and cozy bathrobes. One of the property’s

best features is its outdoor zen-like courtyard with a 63-foot-long

leafy living wall tucked between the lobby and the new Nel Centro

restaurant. Info: 877.484.1084/hotelmodera.com

See icon index on page 48

42 1859magazine.com summer 09


Hotel Modera

The lobby of Hotel Modera has a clean

and modern look. You can walk to any

event from here, but you might just want

to hang out in the outdoor zen courtyard.


44 1859magazine.com summer 09

Ashland Springs Hotel

While all of the historic features, such as the original

terrazzo floors and Mica chandeliers, put the hotel on the

National Register of Historic Places, the hotel’s 70 rooms

are continuously updated and stocked with such creature

comforts as Italy’s fine Frette linens, flat-screen televisions,

and Gilchrist & Soames bath products.


The Nines

And while no one would guess

at first sight, the luxuriously

appointed hotel may soon be one

of only a handful of U.S. hotels to

obtain a silver LEED rating from

the U.S. Green Building Council.

Ashland Springs Hotel Ashland

When it was built in 1925, the nine-story Lithia Springs Hotel, as

it was called then, was the tallest building between Portland and

San Francisco and a popular stopping point for well-heeled travelers.

The hotel, which is just steps from the renown Oregon Shakespeare

Festival, changed hands many times over the next 70 years and was

shuttered in 1997. Then in 1998, Ashland residents Doug and Becky

Neuman bought the building and spent two years restoring the Oregon

landmark to its original grandeur–with some modern additions.

While all of the historic features, such as the original terrazzo

floors and Mica chandeliers, put the hotel on the National Register

of Historic Places, the hotel’s 70 rooms are continuously updated and

stocked with such creature comforts as Italy’s fine Frette linens, flatscreen

televisions, and Gilchrist & Soames bath products. The hotel’s

Larks-Home Kitchen Cuisine specializes in “farm to table” comfort

food including homemade meatloaf and maple-glazed pork chops.

Info: 888.795.4545/ashlandspringshotel.com

The Nines Portland

The top nine floors of the historic Meier & Frank department store

building across from Pioneer Square is an unlikely location for one of

Portland’s most posh hotels, and that’s just the point. This 331-room

hotel, which opened in late 2008 following a $115 million renovation,

is full of surprises. Its lobby resides inside a sunny seven-story

atrium sunk in the middle of this block-long building, giving guests

of the interior rooms an ideal perch for people-watching. The rooms

pair Louis XVI-inspired armchairs with modern faux-leather headboards

and linens. And while no one would guess at first sight, the

luxuriously appointed property may soon be one of only a handful of

U.S. hotels to obtain a silver LeeD rating from the U.S. Green Building

Council. Even the art has a story to tell; no mass-produced prints on

these walls. Nationally-renowned arts manager, Paige Powell, commissioned

local artists to sculpt and paint original artwork displayed

throughout the hotel.

Info: 877.229.9995/starwoodhotels.com/thenines

summer 09 1859 oregon's magazine 45


The Black Walnut Inn & Vineyard

The nine-suite inn melds Old-World artistry with

all the accoutrements of a modern boutique hotel

and the ambience of a working winery.

Timberline Lodge

Set up base camp in a bunk room, enjoy a romantic getaway in a

fireplace suite or invite the whole family for a weekend at the Silcox

Hut, a 24-person cabin located above the lodge at 7,000 feet.

The Black Walnut Inn & Vineyard Dundee

In 2002, native Oregonians Karen and Neal Utz collaborated with their

son, Portland Culinary Institute-trained chef Kris Utz, to build this

Tuscan-style villa, which sits on 42 acres of private forest, orchards

and vineyards in the Red Hills of Dundee. The nine-suite inn melds

Old-World artistry with all the accoutrements of a modern boutique

hotel and ambience of a working winery. (Next year marks the first

release of the Black Walnut Inn & Vineyards' Pinot noir.) Guests are

treated to gourmet breakfasts, afternoon refreshments and awe-inspiring

views. Despite its private setting, the inn is an ideal jumpingoff

point for touring Willamette Valley’s wine country. There are more

than 100 wineries within a 20-minute drive.

Info: 866.429.4114/blackwalnut-inn.com

46 1859magazine.com summer 09


The Bronze Antler

Bed & Breakfast

After a morning feast

that might include

farm-fresh eggs, onions

sautéed with apples

and caraway seeds, and

tomatoes with herbs de

Provence, visitors can

wander Joseph’s art

galleries and boutiques,

hike to nearby Wallowa

Lake or hop on the

Wallowa Lake Tramway

for a 3,700-foot climb up

Mt. Howard.

Photo Marcus Berg

Timberline Lodge Government Camp

Movie buffs know this National Historic Landmark as the exterior set

for the 1980 thriller “The Shining,” and history buffs know it as one

of the more ambitious projects to come out of Franklin D. Roosevelt's

New Deal. Yet, the 1930s-era lodge, with its rough-cut stones and exposed

timbers, is impressive even without the back story. Set up base

camp in a bunk room, enjoy a romantic getaway in a fireplace suite or

invite the whole family for a weekend at the Silcox Hut, a 24-person

cabin located above the lodge at 7,000 feet. Wednesdays throughout

August, you can catch the free Timberline Mountain Music Series

with some of the West’s best bluegrass and folk performers.

Info: 503.272.3311/timberlinelodge.com

The Bronze Antler Bed & Breakfast Joseph

Innkeepers Heather Tyreman and Bill Finney like to say their 1925

Craftsman bungalow is a “no frills” bed and breakfast. The reason:

no lace. While the inn may be short on chintz, it isn’t lacking in

amenities. Its four suites are softened with down comforters and

pillows, high-thread-count linens and soaking tubs. Napping, says

Tyreman, is a favorite pastime among guests. That isn’t, however, for

lack of other things to do. After a morning feast that might include

farm-fresh eggs, onions sautéed with apples and caraway seeds,

and tomatoes with herbes de Provence, visitors can wander Joseph’s

art galleries and boutiques, hike to nearby Wallowa Lake or hop on

the Wallowa Lake Tramway for a 3,700-foot climb up Mt. Howard.

After a day out and about, refuel with the inn’s signature Guittard

chocolate fudge brownies.

Info: 866.520.9769/bronzeantler.com 12+

summer 09 1859 oregon's magazine 47


Hotel Modera

The lobby of Hotel Modera has a clean

and modern look. You can walk to any

event from here, but you might just want

to hang out in the outdoor zen courtyard.


Ashland Springs Hotel

While all of the historic features, such as the original

terrazzo floors and Mica chandeliers, put the hotel on the

National Register of Historic Places, the hotel’s 70 rooms

are continuously updated and stocked with such creature

comforts as Italy’s fine Frette linens, flat-screen televisions,

and Gilchrist & Soames bath products.


Stephanie Inn

The calming effect

of the ocean can be

greatly enhanced at

the Stephanie Inn's

new spa.

Stephanie Inn Cannon Beach

Just steps from the beach and with up-close views of the 250-foothigh

Haystack Rock, the Stephanie Inn has long been one of the

places to stay on the Oregon coast. And a recent $5 million headto-toe

update makes this classic Cannon Beach getaway that much

more compelling. All 41 of the inn’s rooms and suites have been

revamped with new décor and fully-renovated bathrooms. Another

notable addition: The hotel’s new spa includes two treatment rooms,

each with steam shower, Finnish sauna and jetted soaking tub. A

good place to curl up with a book and a glass of wine, the inn’s renowned

reading room was renovated for comfort.

Info: 800.633.3466/stephanie-inn.com 12+

Excelsior Inn Eugene

In 1993, Chef Maurizio Paparo revamped this circa 1912 University

of Oregon sorority house into a European-style restaurant and

inn. Paparo, who is a stickler for using local ingredients in his native

Italian cuisine, also pulled in local artists to create the stained

glass and iron work that add authenticity to the Excelsior’s Old

World décor. The inn’s 14 rooms, meanwhile, are decked out with

marble and tile bathrooms, cherry furniture and soft linens. The

effect is classic yet comfortable, like a good home-cooked meal.

Info: 800.321.6963/excelsiorinn.com

Tu Tu' Tun Lodge gold beach

The Tu Tu' Tun Lodge (pronounced too-TOOT-in) takes its name

from the indigenous Tututni, known as the "people by the water."

And, no doubt, a visit to this retreat on Rogue River–where Chinook

salmon run in the spring and fall, and steelhead run in the

summer and winter–is all about the water. All of the lodge’s 16

rooms and two suites have river views, and many have fireplaces

and outdoor soaking tubs. A hot breakfast du jour, as well as a

hearty spread of homemade muffins, granola and local berries,

awaits guests in the morning. In the evening, you can partake in

the lodge’s own take on a Northwest Indian “potlatch,” which is

likely to include a mesquite-grilled catch of the day and the inn’s

signature hot lemon-cranberry popovers. There’s more to the

lodge, of course, than eating and sleeping. Take one of the lodge’s

sea kayaks to explore the Rogue on your own, or hire a guide and

head upstream into the Wild and Scenic section of the river, which

is not only home to some of the best fly-fishing in the country, it’s

a great place to spy eagles, osprey, otters and the occasional bear.

Info: 800.864.6357/tututun.com

Historic hotel Restaurant Complimentary breakfast

Fitness center 12+ Kids age 12 and older

City/Cultural

Outdoorsy Swimming pool Evening wine

Spa Beach Pet friendly

48 1859magazine.com summer 09


Tu Tu' Tun Lodge

A visit to this retreat on the Rogue River –

where Chinook salmon run in the spring and

fall, and steelhead run in the summer and

winter – is all about the water.


What I'm Working On interview by Kevin Max photo by Rick Schafer

A Heretical Mind

once Known As An UnorthodoX cAncer reseArcher, ohsU's dr. BriAn drUKer

hAs Become centrAl to cAncer therApy And the hope For A cUre

Brian Druker runs up the steep approach of Marquam

Hill to OHSU nearly every morning from his home in

southwest Portland. For many Oregonians, this feat

alone would be a daunting task. For the 54-year-old doctor,

whose fringe approach to leukemia research is now the center

of the search for a cure, running is the transportation mode that

keeps his brain most active.

Dr. Druker, now the director of the Knight Cancer Institute

at Oregon Health Sciences University, left Harvard University,

where he was an instructor and researcher, for Portland in

1993. At OHSU, Druker revolutionized cancer treatment with

his targeted therapy encapsulated in $3-billion-a-year Gleevec,

which all but cured chronic myeloid leukemia and threw open

the doors to developing new therapies for other types of cancer.

With a generous gift of $100 million from Nike's Phil and

Penny Knight in October 2008, Druker's aim now is to recruit

the top researchers to OHSU, to discover more targeted treatments

for cancer, to create a biotech infrastructure to test and

commercialize billion-dollar drugs and to put Oregon at the

center of the cure.

1859's editor, Kevin Max, caught up with Dr. Druker to talk

about these implications for cancer patients and for Oregon.

50 1859magazine.com SUMMER 09


Did you always know you had a

vocation for medicine?

it’s one of those areas where i thought i'd end up,

if i were really honest with myself. There was a lot

of pressure in my family for someone to end up in

medicine. i was the youngest of four, and none of

the other siblings went into medicine.

What brought you to OHSU?

There were several factors. With recruiting,

there’s the push and the pull. The push was that

at harvard, the administration didn’t believe in

the approach i was taking, so there wasn’t much

of a future for me there. i started looking for

a place with a commitment to cancer research

and a great place to live. grover Bagby, then the

director of ohSu’s nascent Cancer institute,

believed in what i was doing.

Tell me about the life of Gleevec since

it came out commercially in 2001. What

has changed?

The most important aspect is that patients with

this kind of leukemia had a three- to five-year

life expectancy. gleevec took a disease that was

fatal and now 95% of patients taking gleevec are

alive and well at five years. The average life expectancy

of these patients is 30 years. The most

important thing about this is that it has saved

hundreds of thousands of lives and completely

transformed the way we think about cancer.

Cancer treatment centers used to treat everything

with various different kinds of painful

chemotherapy. after gleevec, everything they

have in their arsenal is a targeted therapy. it has

completely changed the way that every major

drug company thinks about cancer.

What does the $100 million Knight gift

do for OHSU?

This will transform our ability to care for cancer

patients in oregon and transform our research

capabilities. The reality is that a breakthrough

like gleevec has a global impact and can save

hundreds of thousands of lives. our goal is to

create an environment where these types of

breakthroughs become commonplace.

You have a wish list of your own.

What else would you consider crucial

but yet absent in the formation of a

top cancer institute?

We still need more people, and over the next five

to 10 years, you’ll see an influx of talent into oregon

because of the Knight gift. But, i view the

Knight gift as a beginning not an end. We will

still need more funding to accomplish our goals,

and as people see our progress, i am certain that

they will want to be part of our winning team.

What i’d also like to see is the biotech industry

growing in parallel with the Knight institute to

help us develop and commercialize our research.

What are you currently working on?

our own research is focused on three areas.

a small percentage of patients have become

resistant to gleevec, and we’re working on

developing new treatments for those patients.

also, gleevec is able to control leukemia

as long as people stay on this therapy

but unable to eradicate it outright. We’re

thinking about whether there is something

we can add to gleevec to make it a true cure.

lastly, it took 25 years to identify the target

for gleevec. We now have the ability to identify

new targets in other leukemias in two to

three months. if you can identify a target, it

allows you to develop a drug like gleevec to

alleviate and eradicate it.

gleevec is a $3-billion-a-year-drug. imagine

what we could do identifying molecular targets

in two to three months, then developing

drugs like gleevec to target these abnormalities,

and what 20 drugs like gleevec would

mean for oregon.

You’re also working in some role with

Portland venture capitalist John Hull in

his new early-stage fund, Marquam Hill

Capital. What is the goal of that fund?

We have an opportunity to do something that’s

unique. Typically, biotech companies license

ideas or technologies from universities for commercialization,

but there is very little interaction

between the company and the university.

“If we’re set up with the right infrastructure,

There could be 20 Gleevecs coming out of

OHSU, not just one. That’s real leveraging.”

imagine instead if you established a set of companies

that collaborated closely with our cancer

institute, working on projects that would assist

the cancer institute with the commercialization

process. as an example, if our lab identifies

a new target for cancer therapy, the biotech

company would then develop a drug that my lab

could test and our cancer institute would run

the initial clinical trials.

drug discovery and clinical trials require tens of

millions of dollars. no university can fund that.

That’s best done by private industry, but we can

partner with industry to make this happen more

quickly, efficiently and economically.

Your gift lies in research. Why not spend

all your time in lab?

The way that i view it is the way former ohSu

president Peter Kohler used to introduce

me: “This is Brian druker, and he discovered

gleevec, and we think he’s got another gleevec

in him.” My mission is to recruit other scientists

and give them the resources and support

to revolutionize cancer treatments. if we’re set

up with the right infrastructure, there could be

20 gleevecs coming out of ohSu, not just one.

That’s real leveraging.

SUMMER 09 1859 OREGON'S MAGAZINE 51


From Where I Stand

written and photrgaphed by Bob Woodward

Union, Oregon

An insider's perspective on small-town Oregon in the Grande Ronde vAlley

Sue Briggs loves Union. “It's the mix of people, the sense of safety, the look

and feel of the place and the slow pace of life that make this town so wonderful," she says.

Located in the Grande Ronde Valley between the Blue Mountains to the west and the

Wallowas to the east, Union is small-town America.

"I know the appeal of the

natural surroundings

here, with the Wallowa

and Blue mountains,

and Hell's Canyon so

close by. But even more

so, I appreciate the fact

that Union is in Eastern

Oregon's banana belt."

Sue Briggs

Geologists muse that many of the rocky features west of Union were created between 13 and

14 years million ago, when lava shot through cinder cones on the western side of the Wallowa

Mountains. Lava flowed slowly leaving behind grey layered monuments and fertile volcanic soil

for farming.

Modern history of the Grande Ronde Valley found the Nez Perce and Umatilla tribes trading

goods along the Oregon Trail. After it was founded in 1862, the town continued its reputation

as a trade hub for goods, with supplies bound for Baker City miners coming off boats on the

Columbia River.

Today, Union (population 1,960) is called "The City of Victorian Heritage" after its cluster of

Victorian era homes along Main Street. Classic brick buildings in its downtown core area, like

the Union Hotel and the bus barn at the end of Main Street, are listed on the National Register of

Historic Buildings making Union quintessential small town Oregon.

Briggs, who lives two doors down from the historic post office in a house built in 1879, has

been a local for more than four decades. She served as Union's mayor (its first female mayor)

from 1992 to 2000, and is currently on the city council, and the town's economic development

and tourism committees.

Attracted by the town's obvious charm, retirees are Union’s primary growth hormone. “Prior

to this, the last influx of new people was during the late '70s early '80s real estate boom in Cali-


U N I O N

Did you know Union ...

Was founded in 1862, getting its name from

local support for the Union Army cause

during the Civil War.

Is home to the 102-year-old Eastern Oregon

Livestock Show and Rodeo, the longest

continuous running event of its type in the

state.

Is called "The City of Victorian Heritage"

for its stately old homes and well-kept

graveyard.

Alternated with La Grande as the Union

County seat until 1905 when La Grande

became the permanent seat.

Is a main stop on Highway 203, aka the

"back way", between La Grande and Baker

City and one of Oregon's most scenic road

bike routes.

Is home to the National Historical Register

listed Union Hotel, a little spooky at times,

whose annual haunted house Halloween

event draws thousands of participants from

across Oregon.

52 1859magazine.com summer 09


Tu Tu' Tun Lodge

A visit to this retreat on the Rogue River –

where Chinook salmon run in the spring and

fall, and steelhead run in the summer and

winter – is all about the water.


Crater Lake NP

Location: Northeast Oregon in the

Grande Ronde Valley, between the

Blue and Wallowa mountains

Population: 1,960

Industry: Farming, government,

manufacturing, retail, Internet-based

companies

Median household income: $28,529

Median home price: $110,400

Cost of living: 22% lower than U.S. average

Recreation: Hiking, fishing, mountain/road biking, horseback riding

What to do: Wander the Union County Museum; ride horseback,

camp and fish at Catherine Creek State Park; windsurf at Thief Valley

Reservoir; kick back at the historic Hot Lake Springs Resort; ski at

Anthony Lakes Mountain Resort or the Meacham Divide Cross-

Country Ski Area

Sources: PSU Population Research Center, National Relocation

@ 919 Bond

Private dining at 919 Bond

Learn, Socialize, Relax

Cooking Classes Included

Live Music Available

fornia when people sold out there for outrageous prices and moved here

to enjoy small town living,” Briggs notes.

Oregon's ethic of innovation and sustainability is pervasive, even in

the tiny, remote Union. Today, the treated effluent from its sewage treatment

plant is used to water the grass of its new Buffalo Peak golf course,

formerly a town dump.

Buffalo Peak is but one example of how Union is changing. “We have

wireless Internet, and with it has come a group of small Internet-based

companies with home offices as far away as Florida,” says Briggs.

But even as new businesses come to town, the community is still anchored

by its traditional farming operations, sawmills and small manufacturing

companies.

The valley is also a compelling tourist attraction. Visitors often tour

the Union County Museum for its popular “Cowboys Now and Then”

displays, dine at Briggs' favorite, the historic Union Hotel and camp out

at Catherine Creek State Park just outside town on Highway 203.

Two new eateries will offer more options to locals and groups like

Cycle Oregon, the week-long September tour of 2,000 cyclists, which

often puts Union on its biking itinerary.

The wider Gande Ronde Valley is a recreation hotspot for top-notch

fishing, rafting, kayaking, horseback riding and hiking.

“I know the appeal of the natural surroundings here, with the Wallowa

and Blue mountains, and Hell's Canyon so close by,” says Briggs.

“But even more so, I appreciate the fact that Union is in Eastern Oregon's

banana belt. We get less fog than surrounding areas, and only

one week of intense heat and intense cold a year. A person can live very

nicely here without ever wanting to leave town. And that's what I like

best about my home town of Union.”

[prior page] Historic downtown; Sue Briggs; Victorian homes in Union

[left clockwise] Union County Museum window; Carnegie library;

gazebo outfitted for Memorial Day; Union resident Stuart Zaugg

and his Model T Ford; a barn detail; a reunion at Catherine Creek

State Park

See Lisa on Cooking Central Oregon Style (On-Demand)

www.lisaglickman.com 541.633.7087

History & Heritage Meet HigH tecHnology

Use our Statewide Interactive Heritage Map to...

Find beautiful trees, informative markers and nearby amenities

Plan Your Historic Adventure! www.oregontic.com

at travel information council we’re all about connections.


Life Edge

Where public

and private domains meet,

a Bend home

on the

56 1859magazine.com summer 09


y Stephanie Boyle Mays

Design

On the western edge of Bend,

where forest and old burn areas

converge, and where a city

park and a private subdivision

meet, sits a modern house nestled into a hill, sheltered against the wind

but open to the sun and mountain views.

“This house is all about siting,” says Christian Gladu, the home’s designer.

“The unspoken rule of the project was answering the question:

How does the house fit into the landscape?”

Gladu collaborated with homeowner Jeff Pickhardt to build the

house. Pickhardt, a partner in Taylor Pickhardt Development, and

Gladu had worked together on other projects and shared the same set

of design priorities. Owner of The Bungalow Company in Bend, Gladu

has worked on custom-home and stock-plan projects in almost every

state. He has also written two books on the bungalow style.

Gladu and Pickhardt set out to design and build an energy efficient

house from materials found in the Northwest. The 4,000-square-foot

house with three bedrooms and 3½-bathrooms was built in 2007, has

photovoltaic panels that provide electricity, heat water, power the radiant

floor heating system and is tied to the grid. In addition, it is built

of insulated concrete forms that not only provide better insulation but

also help absorb sound.

Clad in stucco, rock and Douglas fir, contemporary shapes and angles

are softened by the use of materials endemic to Oregon. Blurring

lines between materials and style, and indoors and outdoors were additional

goals of the designer and homeowner, according to Pickhardt.

SUMMer 09 1859magazine.com 57


Design

One of the greatest

challenges of the

project was making

sure the home

would evolve to meet

Pickhardt’s needs.

A stone wall opens to an interior courtyard that provides a transition

to the front door.

Flexibility was key to the home’s construction. Before the drawings

were put to paper, Gladu drove a stake into the ground and determined

where rooms would be located based on the site orientation. Even then,

there were no guarantees. “Jeff called when they were pouring the footings

and said it didn’t quite line up on Mt. Bachelor, so we dragged those

forms for the bedroom wing around so you could get that view dead on,”

recalls Gladu.

Beyond the flexibility of design, there was the flexibility of use. One

of the greatest challenges of the project was making sure the home

would evolve to meet Pickhardt’s needs. “In the middle of all this, he got

married and started a family. It was interesting to know where he was

going even though he, himself, didn’t know,” says Gladu, “I kept asking

him, 'Where is the Big Wheel going to be parked?'”

In the end, the success of the project is its function for the Pickhardt

family. The attention on materials, efficiency, siting and flexibility is subservient

to that crucial goal. “It’s really simple living,” says Pickhardt,

“and easy to live with and live in.”

Book List

Gladu's design must reads

Books by Christian Gladu

Cradle to Cradle

Remaking the Way We Remake Things

by William McDonough and Michael

Braungart (North Point Press, 2002)

Earth the Sequel

The Race to Reinvent Energy and Stop

Global Warming by Miriam Horn and

Fred Krupp (W.W. Norton & Co., 2009)

The New Bungalow by

Matt Bialecki, Christian Gladu, Jill

Kessenich and Jim McCord (Gibbs

Smith, 2008)

Small Bungalows by Christian

Gladu and Ross Chandler (Gibbs

Smith, 2007)

Bungalow Plans by Christian

Gladu and Christin Gladu (Gibbs

Smith, 2002)

Available at

1859magazine.com/marketplace

A stainless steel circular staircase, built by a local welding company,

leads up to the studio and down to the media room. The master

bath is behind the bedroom and uses the same materials as the rest

of the house to provide continuity in design. Out of view is a cedar

Japanese-style soaking tub.

58 1859magazine.com summer 09


An Asian-style bench is paired with the kitchen’s floating island

in another example of a traditional and modern blending.


Design

An interior courtyard is off the kitchen and behind the library.

All the building’s roof tails were cut by Breedlove Guitars on a

massive router used in the construction of guitars. The designer and

homeowner used Douglas fir paneling on all the walls. Combined

with the fir beamed and paneled ceiling, the wood gives the house

a boat-like feel.

Design Resources

Design

Christian Gladu

541.312.2674

www.thebungalowcompany.com

Builder

Jeff Pickhardt

Taylor Pickhardt Development, LLC

541.318.5735

Concrete

Jason Lindsey

541.749.8110

Heating and Cooling

Cascade Sunworks

503.297.5781 - Portland

541.548.7887 - Redmond

www.sun-works.com

Plaster Walls

American Clay

866.404.1634

www.americanclay.com

Roof Tails

Breedlove Guitars

541.385.8339

www.breedloveguitars.com

Spiral Staircase

Creative Welding

541.408.4985

Stonework

Dave sChuler Masonry

503.706.2872

Tile

Baptista Tile

541.382.9130

www.baptistatile.com

60 1859magazine.com summer 09


Design

Five Lessons from Gladu

If you’re contemplating building a house or an addition,

here are five guidelines you should follow

1. Evaluate your site. Consider the wind, the light and other elements

at different times of day to get a sense of how the house

will function and how you will live in a home on that land.

2. Don’t be afraid to build smaller. Look at functions rather

than rooms. A home office doesn’t need to be big; it can consist

of built-in shelves and a counter for a computer by a window

with a fabulous view. You can save 200 square feet that way.

3. Remember that houses are evolutionary. Be flexible

about how your living situation might change. Consider

the needs, for example, of starting a family, of working at

home, or of becoming an empty-nester or retiree.

4. Spend money on energy efficiency. While you could circle

back later, it’s a lot easier to incorporate energy efficiency

in the design from the beginning. Orient the house with

solar in mind, make sure the roof faces the right way. Deep

overhangs allow solar gain in the winter, and provide

shade in the summer and can save substantial year-round

energy costs.

5. Build your house. A lot of people build with the thought

of a house's eventual sale, but you will be living there

now. Don’t be afraid to make it your own. Someday, if you

sell, there will be someone else out there who shares your

values and will buy it.










ive ive ive ive

n. an award-winning, full-service landscape

designer and contractor specializing in outdoor kitchens,

fireplaces, water features, swimming pools, casitas,

patios and custom faux rock.

An affiliate of OGM, Inc, LCB 5813

LANDSCAPE DESIGNS BY KEVIN SCHAFFER

ARTISAN DESIGN CENTER 20700 CARMEN LOOP #100, BEND 541.383.2551 ARTISANBEND.COM

HUFF RESIDENCE, CENTRAL OREGON ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN: JIM ROZEWSKI GENERAL CONTRACTOR: MELROSE CONSTRUCTION PHOTOGRAPHY: KRISTI ECKBERG


Artist in Residence by Lisa Pounders illustrations by Paul Harris

Paul

Harris

walnut ink and the Lure of

simpler Times

As long as he can remember, Paul Harris has had a

passion for doodling and drawing. A Central Oregon native,

Harris left the state for a short time to attend college. Returning

in 2000 with a teaching degree, he worked first at Mount

Bachelor Academy and now fills in as the science teacher at Crook County

Middle School. Though he enjoys teaching, his passion is art.

Currently he's inspired by an obsession for desert life and the romantic

lure of simpler but tougher times. “I’m infatuated with walnut

drawing ink,” he says. “It’s a natural ink that behaves more like watercolor

than, say, India ink.” The characteristic sepia-tones of walnut ink

imbue each piece with an old-fashioned weathered look—precisely the

effect Harris seeks. “I want to transport you back to a time of simpler

pleasures and the manual labor lifestyle.” His subject matter includes

weathered tractors, old ghost towns and faces that time and labor made

stern. The drawings evoke a nostalgic mood while depicting the rugged

environment and its inhabitants.

Harris lives in Prineville with his wife and four daughters in a house

he built by hand. The upper floor is devoted to his painting and drawing.

Along with teaching and family time, Harris pursues his artistic muse

either at 4 in the morning or after 9 at night. “When I start to work, I

lock myself away up there and don’t come out for hours.”

62 1859magazine.com summer 09


"I want to transport

you back to a time

of simpler pleasures

and the manual labor

lifestyle."

summer 09 1859magazine.com 63


Home Grown

by Cathy Carroll

The

Marionberry

Oregon's native son, the marionberry shows its pedigree

with a burst of versatility

Bred at Oregon State University,

the marionberry is named after Marion

County, where it was tested extensively in

the 1940s and '50s before being introduced

commercially in 1956.

There are faster and more modern alternatives,

but Leonard Heidt, 60, still prefers to plant his

marionberry vines by hand.

“I’m up and down on my knees for 1,500 of

those,” he says. “What else would I do?" This is how I started.

I decided I didn’t want to be a 'pickup [truck] farmer' – a

farmer who drives around. I like working in the ground too

much.”

Introduced by George F. Waldo, who worked for the U.S.

Department of Agriculture in Corvallis, the marionberry has

been called the “cabernet of blackberries” for its complex, rich

earthy flavor. This particular berry also has an Oregon heritage.

Bred at Oregon State University, the marionberry is named after

Marion County, where it was tested extensively in the 1940s

and '50s before being introduced commercially in 1956.

Sixteen years after the marionberry was introduced, Heidt,

then 23, bought 35 acres in Mt. Angel and began growing loganberries,

strawberries and other varieties. Those berries

weren’t profitable, and they were prone to diseases and harvesting

problems. The standout was the marionberry.

“I like the way they pick and the flavor of them,” Heidt says.

“They are high quality berries as far as blackberries go.”

On this day in May, Heidt pauses in the field, surrounded by

the hand-planted bushes. “Everybody looks for the ideal dream

life, and this is mine,” says Heidt. “Some people like to fish and

golf. I don’t.”

After growing marionberries for 36 years, Heidt knows the

optimal time and temperature for berry picking: touch a berry

and it drops from the plant. In your mouth, the ripe marionberry

bursts with a sublime balance of tartness and sweetness.

Come July, these berries ripen to a deep purple. Heidt works

nearly `round-the-clock six days a week.

It’s the apex of his year – and a continuum of his life’s work.

It brings with it, however, some anxiety, says Heidt’s wife,

Joann, 57.

“We call it ‘Pms’—pre-marion season, because it gets kind

of tense, waiting those last few weeks before you pick,” she says.

64 1859magazine.com summer 09


From Our Farms

"I like the way they

pick and the flavor of

them. They are highquality

berries as far as

blackberries go."

Leonard Heidt,

Marionberry grower

Diane Stevenson

“You’ve got to figure out when to go—not too soon, because you could do

damage to the berries that come later, and you can’t wait too long. If it starts

raining, you’ve got mold, so you’re always watching the weather.”

During picking season, nearly every day in July for the past three-and-ahalf

decades, Heidt starts around 2 a.m., when the temperature dips just below

50 degrees and a fine dew covers the fruit. The berries have cooled from

the prior day’s heat, and they are at their plumpest and ready for harvesting.

For the next six hours, he uses a specially designed berry-picking machine,

racing against the rising mercury. Once the temperature reaches 70 degrees,

the fruit won’t drop off easily and are prone to getting damaged and mushy.

Heidt, like several area growers, sells his berries to a Salem processing

facility called Willamette Valley Fruit Company. This processor freezes the

fruit within 24 hours of being picked, and then sells it to big industrial food

companies such as Marie Callenders and Dole across the country and to

markets from Seattle to San Francisco. The berries are often found in the

frozen food sections of stores like Zupan’s Markets, Whole Foods Market,

and in Harry & David pies, says Dave Dunn, general manager of the Willamette

Valley Fruit Company.

As the cuisine of the Pacific Northwest has gained attention across

America, so has the marionberry. Paley's Place, a restaurant in Portland, has

received national acclaim for its cuisine featuring Pacific Northwest ingredients.

Owner and chef, Vitaly Paley, says that when marionberries are in

season, he uses them in desserts such as tres leches with marionberries and

maple-glazed almonds (go to www.1859magazine.com/dining for Paley's

recipe for tres leches with marionberries), and again in sauces for local venison,

elk, squab, quail, duck and rabbit.

“The marionberry adds a wonderful note when cooking,” says Paley. “It

has the same sweetness of a blueberry but has more of a backbone. It has the

acidity to counteract the sweetness.”

Combined in a liqueur, the marionberry can also sweeten a dry champagne.

Paley adds a few tablespoons of a marionberry liqueur to champagne

in creating a marionberry kir royale, or to sparkling wine to make a marionberry

kir.

“Add a twist of lemon and it’s a wonderfully refreshing summer cocktail.”

In Oregon's Restaurants

"The marionberry adds a wonderful

note when cooking. It has the same

sweetness of a blueberry but has more

of a backbone. It has the acidity to

counteract the sweetness. "

Vitaly Paley, owner and chef of

Paley's Place, a Portland restaurant


"I want to transport

you back to a time

of simpler pleasures

and the manual labor

lifestyle."

summer 09 1859magazine.com 63


Home Grown Recipes

Bella:

A Marionberry Martini

from "minT" in PorTlanD

4 lemon quarters, cut in the middle of the

flesh down to but not through the rind

superfine sugar

1 cup vodka

1 ounce triple sec

1 ounce fresh lemon juice

1 ounce simple syrup

1 ounce marionberry puree

Simple syrup:

in a saucepan, heat 2 cups sugar and 2 cups

water. cover and simmer for 2 minutes, until

sugar dissolves. when the syrup is cool, pour it

into a glass jar with a lid. keeps in refrigerator

up to to 6 months.

Prepare four 9-ounce martini glasses:

rub the cut lemon around the rims, moistening

a 1-inch-wide band. sprinkle the sugar on a

small plate and coat the rims. chill the glasses

until serving time.

Marionberry puree:

1 cup whole marionberries, fresh or thawed

frozen. Process berries in food processor until

smooth. strain through a fine mesh sieve to remove

seeds. Yields 1/2 cup puree. can be kept

in the refrigerator for 3-4 days or can be frozen

for up to 1 month.

Make and Shake:

fill a martini shaker with ice and add the

vodka, triple sec, lemon juice, simple syrup and

marionberry puree. shake robustly for 10 seconds

and strain into glasses. serve immediately.

You can make superfine sugar by processing

granulated sugar in a food processor or blender

for 1 minute.


Home Grown Recipes

Roasted Duck in a

Hazelnut Marionberry Pond

from lisa glickman,

1859's homegrown chef

When she sees duck on a menu, especially

paired with a sweet and fruity sauce, 1859's

Home Grown Chef looks no further. Try this

easy recipe with two of Oregon's most famous

locals—marionberries and hazelnuts.

For the rub:

1 teaspoon sweet paprika

1 teaspoon ground ginger

¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper

½ teaspoon ground coriander

½ teaspoon ground cumin

¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon

½ teaspoon ground cardomom

salt and freshly ground pepper

¼ cup extra virgin olive oil

2 boneless duck breasts

For the sauce

1 medium shallot diced

2 tablespoons hazelnut liqueur

(such as Frangelico)

1 cup quality chicken stock

1 cup fresh marionberries

(or 1 cup Willamette Valley Farms

frozen marionberries thawed)

1 tablespoon pure maple syrup

1 teaspoon balsamic vinegar

2 tablespoons quality unsalted butter

For garnish

2 tablespoons chopped roasted hazelnuts

Additional whole marionberries

duck from your kitchen Most home chefs don’t use duck either because they think

duck is an exotic ingredient, or that they can't make it at home. It's neither exotic nor tough to

make in this easy recipe from the 1859's very own Home Grown Chef.

Preheat oven to 350°. Using a sharp knife,

score the skin of the duck in a crisscross pattern

being careful not to cut into the meat. Mix

together the rub ingredients and olive oil in a

small bowl. Using a pastry brush, paint the rub

on both side of the duck.

Place the breasts skin-side-down in a cold

heavy duty stainless steel pan. Turn heat to

medium. Slowly pan-sear the breast (about 8

minutes) until most of the duck fat is rendered

and the skin is crispy and browned. Turn the

breasts; place pan in oven and roast for another

5-8 minutes (less if you like your duck rare). Remove

duck from pan and tent with foil.

Place pan back on stove top. Remove all but

two tablespoons of the duck fat. Add shallots

and sauté until tender (1-2 minutes). Add hazelnut

liqueur, chicken stock, maple syrup, berries

and vinegar and reduce by half.

Strain sauce into a small saucepan and return

to heat. Mount sauce with butter using

little bits at a time. Adjust seasoning.

Make a pool of sauce in center of each serving

plate. Slice duck and place in pool of sauce.

Drizzle duck with extra sauce, sprinkle with

chopped hazelnuts and garnish with whole

marionberries.

Serves 2

summer 09 1859magazine.com 67


Home Grown Recipes

Marionberry Pie

from the RimRock Inn

Enterprise, Oregon

This classic Oregon dessert is best enjoyed

on the deck of the RimRock Inn, overlooking

Joseph Canyon in Eastern Oregon. But the

pie will taste just as good without the view,

baked fresh in your kitchen.

Pie Filling

5 ½ cups fresh or frozen,

whole marionberries, no sugar added

1 cup sugar

¼ cup corn starch

1 teaspoon cinnamon

Crust

2 cups all-purpose flour

1 teaspoon salt

2/3 cup shortening

4 teaspoons ice water

Traditional Bliss When baked, marionberries hold their shape and firmness very well, making

for a delightful combination of fruity crunch with sugary sweetness. From A Chef's Bounty, Celebrating

Oregon's Cuisine.

Mix all the pie filling ingredients together in

a bowl. Sift together the flour and salt. Using a

pastry cutter or two knives, blend the shortening

and flour together until mixture is crumbly.

Stir in cold water, adding just enough for the

dough to hold together so it forms a smooth

ball. Preheat oven to 425°.

Refrigerate the dough for one hour for easier

handling. Divide the dough and roll out on

a lightly floured board to make crust for a (9-

inch) two-crust pie or two (9-inch) crusts.

Roll the dough about 2 inches larger than

the diameter of the pan. Drape the crust over

the rolling pin and ease it into the pan, fitting it

against the bottom and sides. The crust should

overlap the edge of the pan, about one-halfinch.

Turn the crust under and shape the edge,

using your fingers to create a fluted or pleated

edge.

Fill the dough-lined pie pan with berries.

Combine the sugar, cornstarch and cinnamon

in a small bowl. Pour the cornstarch mixture

over the top of the berries. Roll out the other

piece of dough and place on top of the pie for

the top crust. Pinch together the edges of the

bottom crust and top crust around the pie. Cut

vents in the top of the pie. Place it in the oven

and bake for 20 minutes and then reduce the

oven temperature to 350° and continue baking

for about 30-35 minutes, or until the pastry is

golden brown.

68 1859magazine.com summer 09


Home Grown Chef

The Home Grown Chef

some chefs are all about credentials, medals, awards and plaudits. for 1859's home

grown chef, lisa glickman, it's all about the meal and the memories.

in this issue, the home grown chef prepared her favorite poultry, roast duck, in a

hazelnut marionberry pond. By experimenting and improvising in the kitchen, lisa

created a savory sauce that nicely complemented the duck without overpowering it.

it wasn't until she spontaneously pulled maple syrup and balsamic vinegar into the

sauce, that the taste really exploded.

lisa's cooking is inspired by cuisines from around the world and by produce from

oregon. lisa learned her trade by cooking for friends and family, and then graduated

to become an instructor for in good Taste, a Portland gourmet store where

she taught a variety of classes, as well as assisted celebrity chefs like corey schreiber

(wildwood), Paul klitsie (fratelli) and hugh carpenter (Pacific flavors).

There is no single dimension to lisa's menus. she is an eclectic chef, who can cook

great meals from around the world.

Visit our home grown chef's blog to work with lisa on the right menu for your

next dinner party or to talk about everyday good cooking. find the home grown

chef at 1859magazine.com/dining.

Summer in the Willamette Valley, a great time to go wine tasting! Home to

more than 180 wineries and tasting rooms. Request a copy of our touring

guide and map at www.willamettewines.com.

Check our website often for updates about events during 150 Days of Wine in

the Willamette Valley! DON’T MISS; Red, White & True Oregon Wines,

July 4-5, Discover the Wines of McMinnville AVA, July 18 and

Chehalem Mountain Winegrowers event, Sept. 5-7.


Getaway Guide

Central Oregon

Event Calendar

CENTRAL OREGON

7.09-8.13

MUNCH AND MUSIC

every Thursday night, featuring the best of

national and regional musical entertainment,

20 food booths, and arts & crafts vendors.

Bend; munchandmusic.com

7.11

SISTERS OUTDOOR QUILT SHOW

more than 1,200 splendidly hand-sewn quilts

will be on display throughout the town.

sisters; sistersoutdoorquiltshow.org

7.11-7.12

BEND SUMMER FESTIVAL

Downtown Bend's much-loved production of

music, art, food and fun.

Bend; bendsummerfestival.com

7.13-7.19

THE LIVE BAT EXPERIENCE

some of the rarest bats up close in masters

of the Night: The True story of Bats.

High Desert museum; highdesertmuseum.org

7.17-7.18

SAGEBRUSH CLASSIC

Play 18-holes at the Broken Top Club golf

course and indulge as celebrity chefs from

around the world prepare a gourmet meal

for your alimentary pleasure.

Bend; sagebrush.org

7.18-7.19

deschutes dash

swimmers, cyclists and runners compete

in triathlons or duathlons; including a Kid's

splash & Dash and a new youth triathlon.

Bend; freshairsports.com

7.21-7.26

BEND MEMORIAL CLINIC CASCADE

CYCLING CLASSIC

An elite stage race set against a backdrop

of stunning Central Oregon. register or just

come to watch! Bend; mbsef.org

mckay cottaGe restaurant, Bend

Fresh ingredients, attention to detail and great service

make mcKay Cottage restaurant one of Bend's favorite

breakfast and lunch destinations. Warm muffins,

homemade scones, cinnamon rolls and pecan sticky

buns along with freshly baked desserts greet you at

the door. Award winning food and service await inside.

541.383.2697 themckaycottage.com

Jen's Garden, sisters

In the cute town of sisters, Jen's Garden is an intimate

cottage with wonderful French cuisine, fresh

local ingredients and an extensive wine list. Thursday

through sunday enjoy the five-course dinner.

541.549.2699 intimatecottagecuisine.com

900 Wall, Bend

Formerly merenda, this upscale downtown restaurant

and bar is the center of Bend buzz. surf

and turf with a Pacific Northwest ethic, the new

900 Wall is more affordable than its predecessor.

many wines by the glass and a full bar.

541.323.6295 900wall.com

cascade lakes BreWinG comPany lodGe, Bend

The top spot for the post-mountain bike ride and aprés

ski, The Lodge has some of the best craft beers in a

town known for microbrews. The Blonde Bombshell

goes nicely with an ambitious pub-grub menu. Bar

and restaurant with pool, darts and large screen TVs.

541.388.4998 cascadelakes.com

lara house, Bend

Lara House Lodge, a 1910 Craftsman in downtown

Bend, offers a luxurious experience for adults seeking

a romantic getaway. Located in a historic neighborhood,

the six-room lodge overlooks Drake Park

and the Deschutes river.

541.388.4064 larahouse.com

>> Recreation Guide for Central Oregon

at 1859magazine.com

70 1859magazine.com summer 09


Central Oregon

Getaway Guide

Pine ridGe inn, Bend

Daily hot breakfasts and nightly wine receptions are

staples at this cozy gem in Bend. situated on a bluff

overlooking the Deschutes river canyon, just outside

the city center and on the road to mt. Bachelor ski

area, Pine ridge Inn is at the heart of recreation in

Central Oregon.

800.600.4095 pineridgeinn.com

lake creek lodGe, camP sherman

coG Wild, Bend

Vacation cabins on the pristine metolius river and

surrounded by the Deschutes National Forest, Lake

Creek Lodge is a true get-away from life's bustle.

Nearly 20 cabins with full amenities including kitchens

and washer/dryers make for longer stays and

more relaxation.

541.595.6331 lakecreeklodge.com

old mill shoPPinG district, Bend

Bend’s unique shopping, dining, entertainment and

working experience. Located on land along the Deschutes

river that formerly housed one of the world’s largest sawmill

operations, the Old mill District now has more than

49 businesses including such national retailers as Banana

republic, reI, Victoria’s secret and the Gap.

Bike hundreds of miles of single-track in Central Oregon

and go Cog Wild. In Oregon's mountain bike

mecca, Cog Wild Bicycle Tours offers a range of halfday

to multi-day tours, and Bike & Brewery Weekends

for all levels of riders. Also one-day tours for

individuals and groups.

541.385.7002 cogwild.com

seVenth mountain resort, Bend

Location. Location. Vacation. seventh mountain resort

is on the edge of the Deschutes National Forest

in Bend, the heartland of Oregon's outdoor adventureland.

rafting, horseback riding, swimming and

close to skiing at mt. Bachelor, the resort is Grand

Central station for Central Oregon sports.

800.452.6210 seventhmountain.com

Event Calendar

CENTRAL OREGON

7.31-8.01

CASCADE LAKES RELAY

A 216-mile, 12-person run from Diamond

Lake resort to Bend's Northwest Crossing.

Composed of 36 legs varying in length.

Diamond Lake resort/Northwest Crossing,

Bend; cascadelakesrelay.com

8.09

HAULIN’ ASPEN TRAIL MARATHON

A race with fast single track, Forest service

roads, cool valleys and incredible views.

Bend; freshairsports.com

8.09

CELTIC FESTIVAL AND SCOTTISH

HIGHLAND GAMES

scottish games, Celtic dancers, children's

activities, fine Celtic wares, food and pub.

madras; hdcs.net

8.12-8.22

SUNRIVER MUSIC FESTIVAL

Performances of classical music held in

beautiful Central Oregon at the sunriver

resort.

sunriver resort; sunrivermusic.org

8.23-9.04

MUNCH AND MOVIES

Gather Thursday evenings in Drake Park for

music and food, and then relax for a movie

showing at dusk.

Bend; munchandmovies.com

8.17-8.23

2009 JELD-WEN TRADITION

Golf's greats converge on sunriver for a PGA

Champions Tournament for a $2.7 million

purse. Crosswater Club at sunriver resort;

jeld-wentradition.com

8.28-8.30

ART IN THE HIGH DESERT

Browse a spectrum of ceramics, glasswork,

painting, photography, sculpture, jewelry,

glass, wood, and furniture on the banks of

the Deschutes. Bend; artinthehighdesert.com

541.312.0131 theoldmill.com

summer 09 1859magazine.com 71

>> Real Estate Guide for Central Oregon

at 1859magazine.com


Getaway Guide

The Coast

Event Calendar

THE COAST

7.11–7.25

OREGON COAST MUSIC FESTIVAL

Come enjoy wine, food and music for the 31st

year of this celebration. Coos Bay; oregonsadventurecoast.com

7.17-7.18

NORTH BEND JULY JUBILEE

Street fair, historical home tour, car show,

Back Alley Bash and much more at various

locations throughout this birthday weekend.

North Bend; oregonsadventurecoast.com

8.01

TILLAMOOK CHEESE TURNS 100

Say cheese! Come enjoy a full day of festivities

and fun! Sample tasty cheeses, ice cream, and

wine & cheese pairings.

Tillamook; tillamookcheese.com

8.07-8.09

BEACH VOLLEYBALL TOURNAMENT

Seaside hosts the largest amateur beach volleyball

tournament in the country for the 28th

year. More than 650 teams travel from far and

wide to play on 90 courts.

Seaside; seasidebeachvolleyball.com

8.15-8.16

CHARLESTON SEAFOOD FESTIVAL

Live music from country to jazz, carnival

games, arts and crafts, food, beer garden, harbor

tours and a Coast Guard open house.

Charleston; oregonsadventurecoast.com

8.15-8.16

ROCKAWAY BEACH ARTS AND CRAFTS

FESTIVAL

Peruse whimsical items from tie-dye clothing

to bird houses, woven baskets to exquisite

jewelry, and dog beds to handmade leather

belts. Rockaway Beach; 503.355.8108

8.22-8.23

BLACKBERRY ARTS FESTIVAL

Fine art, weaving, woodworking, and jewelry

and blackberry creations in honor of Oregon’s

150th birthday.

Coos Bay; oregonsadventurecoast.com

>> Travel Guide for the Coast

at 1859magazine.com

OCEAN LODGE, CANNON BEACH

The Ocean Lodge is the place where simple fun and

nostalgic pleasures come together. In Cannon Beach,

the Ocean Lodge gives you the opportunity to walk

out onto your deck, feel the sea mist and watch the

breakers crash into Haystack Rock and over the pristine

sands of Cannon Beach.

888.777.4047 theoceanlodge.com

PELICAN PUB & BREWERY, PACIFIC CITY

Two words for you: beachfront microbrewery. Soak

in picture-perfect views of Haystack Rock, sample

award-winning ales and fuel up on fresh seafood,

gourmet pizza and killer sandwiches.

503.965.7007 pelicanbrewery.com

72 1859magazine.com SUMMER 09

SALISHAN RESORT, GLENEDEN BEACH

Enjoy the ambiance of fireplaces, take in the natural

surroundings from your private balcony, or get some

rest on luxury pillow-top bedding in one of 205 guest

rooms. The resort’s par 71 course, winds through old

growth timber on the front nine and offers linksstyle

play on the back nine.

800.452.2300 salishan.com

BANDON INN, BANDON

Located on a bluff, the Bandon Inn overlooks Old

Town Bandon, the marina, Coquille River and the

Pacific Ocean. Miles of stunning beaches, beautiful

sunsets, world-class golf and fine local dining all

come together to make your stay at Bandon Inn a

memorable experience.

800.526.0209 bandoninn.com

OVERLEAF LODGE, YACHATS

Every room has an ocean view at this fantastic lodge.

Nightly accommodation includes continental breakfast

featuring fresh baked items, cereal, fruit, egg

dishes, juices, coffee and teas. Guests also enjoy free

use of Overleaf spa facilities, including the soaking

pool, hot tub, steam rooms and saunas.

800.338.0507 overleaflodge.com


The Coast

Getaway Guide

CANNON BEACH CAFÉ, CANNON BEACH

Tasty tropical fare, classic comfort food and original

cocktails make the Cannon Beach Café one of

the hottest hangouts in town. The Café, just steps

from the beach in the historic Cannon Beach Hotel,

is open for breakfast, lunch, dinner and every treat

in between.

503.436.2729 cannonbeachcafe.com

HOTEL ELLIOTT, ASTORIA

Welcome to Hotel Elliott, Astoria’s premier boutique

hotel. Featuring 32 uniquely restored rooms and

suites, this historic five-story hotel has undergone a

dramatic three-year renovation that weds early 20th

Century elegance and contemporary amenities—from

cedar-lined closets to heated stone floors in each bath.

877.378.1924 hotelelliott.com

MO'S RESTAURANTS

No visit to the Oregon Coast is complete without a

bowl of Mo’s famous clam chowder. The late

Mo Niemi opened the original location in Newport

in 1946 and eventually opened annexes in Cannon

Beach, Florence, Lincoln City and Otter Rock.

WHALE WATCHING, DEPOE BAY

Gray Whales are often feeding close to shore

near Depoe Bay in summer. Oregon Parks and

Recreation Department park rangers are ready to

answer your questions and help you find whales to

watch at the Whale Watching Center in Depoe Bay.

541.765-3304 whalespoken.org

SANDPINES GOLF LINKS, FLORENCE

Nestled amidst wind-swept sand dunes and towering

pines, Sandpines Golf Links is a breathtaking location

for coastal golf. The Rees Jones designed course was

honored as the "Best New Public Course in America" in

1993. Sandpines also recently received a 4½ star rating

from Golf Digest's list of "Places to Play in the USA."

800.917.4653 sandpines.com

Event Calendar

THE COAST

8.28-8.30

23RD ANNUAL SHOREBIRD FESTIVAL

Observe shorebird migration on the scenic

south coast. Bring binoculars and venture to

the best birding spots in Bandon and Coos

Bay. Charleston; oregonsadventurecoast.com

8.28-8.29

NIKE'S HOOD TO COAST RELAY

“The Mother of All Relays,” a 197-mile route

from Mt. Hood to the Oregon coast. Race

with a team or come to the finish line at Seaside

and cheer the runners in their final leg.

Seaside; hoodtocoast.com

9.11-9.13

BANDON CRANBERRY FESTIVAL

Join the Bandon community to celebrate the

harvest of the Cranberry Capital of the West

Coast. Blessing of the harvest, crafts, food,

music, wine, street fair, Queen’s Coronation,

Grand Parade, Lions BBQ, Bandon Dunes Golf

Challenge, and the Cranberry Bowl.

Bandon; 541.347.9616

9.12

MILL-LUCK SALMON CELEBRATION

An outdoor celebration of Native American

and Coquille Tribal culture. Attend a traditional

salmon bake, watch dance and drum

performances, partake in canoe races, peruse

craft booths, and more.

North Bend; themillcasino.com

9.19

PREFONTAINE MEMORIAL RUN

Steve Prefontaine, one of America’s greatest

distance runners, is honored each year at this

challenging 10k road race across one of his

old training courses, with its finish line at the

high school track where he first competed.

Coos Bay; prefontainerun.com

9.19

INDIAN STYLE SALMON BAKE

Bring the whole family and have your salmon

prepared over an open fire. Then watch Indian

dancers while you enjoy your fish.

Depoe Bay; depoebaychamber.org

541.265.2979 moschowder.com

SUMMER 09 1859magazine.com 73

>> Dining Guide for the Coast

at 1859magazine.com


Getaway Guide

Eastern Oregon

Event Calendar

EASTERN OREGON

7.11-7.12

OREGON TRAIL MUSIC FESTIVAL

Celebration of 19th century pioneer-era

music, along with contemporary tunes to

honor Oregon’s pioneer history. A special

presentation will feature acoustic and traditional

instruments, dancing, and opportunities

to sing and play along with featured

musicians at the National Historic Oregon

Trail Interpretive Center.

Baker City; blm.gov/or/oregontrail

7.25

NORTH POWDER HUCKLEBERRY FESTIVAL

The locals plan for this all year, picking the

their secret huckleberry patches, and then

preparing all sorts of purple delights. There

is a Purple Berry Parade, crafts, story telling,

dessert contest & tasting, dog agility contest

and lawn mower races.

North Powder; 800.848.9969

8.21-8.22

CROSSING THE BLUES SUMMER FESTIVAL

Celebrate all forms of art during this great

outdoor event. Hear excellent music, shop,

art booths, then catch a movie at midnight.

La Grande; crossingtheblues.com

9.11-9.13

HELLS CANYON MULE DAYS

Mule Show with events and games for every

age and skill level. Cowboy poets, pit BBQ

dinner, quilt show, mule and horse sale,

non-motorized parade, vendors, exhibitors

and Western Art on The Green.

Wallowa Fairgrounds, Enterprise; 541.426.3271

HELL'S CANYON RAFTING

WALLOWA LAKE LODGE, JOSEPH

Rustic and cozy, the Wallowa Lake Lodge was built

in the 1920s but is updated for comfort in one of

Oregon's most remote corners. It has 22 rooms and

eight cabins, and all are different. Breakfast and dinner

served daily.

541.432.9821 wallowalakelodge.com

Raft the incredibly gorgeous Hell's Canyon on a trip

down the Snake River. Big Horn sheep and petroglyphs

are just two discoveries that will take you

back in time and back to nature.

TAMÁSTSLIKT CULTURAL INSTITUTE, PENDLETON

Tamástslikt Cultural Institute’s Living Culture Village, a vibrant,

living display of traditional housing forms and Tribal

crafts and culture, is open to visitors June-Oct. From ancient

pit houses to more recent tipis, the village will include

trained interpreters to explain traditional crafts. Tamástslikt

is open 9-5 daily throughout the summer.

541.966.9748 tamastslikt.org

HISTORIC BALCH HOTEL, DUFUR

Hand-built by area craftsmen in 1907, the historic

Balch Hotel is furnished with period décor, and surrounded

by rolling farming fields of golden wheat

and green alfalfa. Enjoy nearby activities, including

local area wineries, museums, golf, hiking, shopping,

biking, rafting and fishing.

541.667.2277 balchhotel.com

9.16-9.19

PENDLETON ROUND-UP

One of the 10 largest rodeos in the world,

the Pendleton Roundup is an Oregon classic.

Featuring every bronco’s favorite events, from

bareback riding, saddle bronc and calf roping

to team roping, steer wrestling and bull riding.

Don’t forget to attend the Westward Ho!

Parade and watch the Happy Canyon Indian

Pageant. Pendleton; pendletonroundup.com

541.785.3352 hellscanyonadventures.com

CALDERAS RESTAURANT, JOSEPH

Where art meets food in Joseph. The best steak in

town is served over a hand-carved bar. Calderas

owner and artist, Nancy Young Lincoln, also shows

her incredible talent for fused-glass throughout.

541.432.0585 calderasofjoseph.com

>> Lodging Guide for Eastern Oregon

at 1859magazine.com

74 1859magazine.com SUMMER 09


HOOD RIVER HOTEL, HOOD RIVER

Dating to 1913, Hood River Hotel has been fully restored

to its original glory offering river-view rooms

and spacious suites with antiques and European

charm. Specializing in romantic getaways, the Hood

River Hotel is a wonderful place to kick back with

your companion.

541.386.1900 hoodriverhotel.com

Mt. Hood/The Gorge

SIXTH STREET BISTRO, HOOD RIVER

A full-service restaurant offering the best the Northwest

has to offer. Using local ranches, farms and forage

and regional, seasonal produce whenever possible

to provide the best experience for our customers.

A dozen microbrews on tap, an extensive wine list

and a full bar.

541.386.5737 sixthstreetbistro.com

Getaway Guide

Event Calendar

MT. HOOD/THE GORGE

7.09

SANDY MOUNTAIN FESTIVAL PARADE

More than 100 entries, this parade attracts

some 10,000 spectators. The parade theme

this year is Sasquatch Celebrates Oregon's

Sesquicentennial. Music and feast to follow.

Sandy; sandymountainfestival.org

7.11-7.12

HOOD RIVER COUNTY FRUIT LOOP

CHERRY CELEBRATION

Oregon is berry country. Celebrate delicious

Oregon cherry season with activities for the

entire family. Hood River farms offer many

varieties of fresh-picked and u-pick cherries,

wines, lavender, jams and other berry treats.

Find a spot to picnic and feast.

Hood River; hoodriverfruitloop.com

MCMENAMINS EDGEFIELD, TROUTDALE

McMenamins Edgefield was once the historic 1911

county poor farm and is today a 74-acre estate with a

hotel, restaurants, pubs, par-3 golf, a distillery, winery

and tasting room, spa, soaking pool and more.

Enjoy original artwork, gardens and live music during

your daytrip or overnight visit.

503.669.8810 mcmenamins.com

DOUBLE MOUNTAIN BREWERY,

HOOD RIVER

7.11-7.12

MT. HOOD OREGON TRAIL QUILT SHOW

This family-oriented event commemorates

the heritage of Oregon’s quilting traditions

with hand-sewn Oregon Trail quilts on display.

Rhododendron; 503.622.4798

7.11-7.19

LAVENDER FESTIVAL

Discover la vie provençal in the Gorge. Pick

your own lavender or buy pre-made lavender

products. Fresh flowers and hand-painted art

also for sale. Hood River; lavendervalley.com

Matt Swihart and Charlie Devereux

founded Double Mountain

in 2007 with a clear mission: make great craft beer to satisfy the hardcore aficionados

and the more casual craft beer drinker, all in the same glass. Double Mountain’s beers are

unfiltered and long-aged to deliver maximum flavor and character.

541.387.0042 doublemountainbrewery.com

CELILO RESTAURANT, HOOD RIVER

Celilo Restaurant and Bar brings in locally grown

produce for a fresh dining experience of seafood and

pasta complemented by an extensive wine list. Located

in downtown Hood River, Celilo regularly features

farmer, winemaker and special dinner events.

7.11

JAMMIN’ JULY STREET FESTIVAL

Festival activities, music, and sidewalk sales

in historic downtown The Dalles.

The Dalles; thedalleschamber.com

8.05-9.02 WEDNESDAYS

TIMBERLINE MOUNTAIN MUSIC SERIES

Billed as Free Music to the People, the Timberline

Mountain Music Series brings great

acts to stage, including the Freak Mountain

Ramblers. The amphitheater at Timberline

Lodge; timberlinelodge.com

541.386.5710 celilorestaurant.com

SUMMER 09 1859magazine.com 75

>> Marketplace for Mt. Hood/The Gorge products

at 1859magazine.com


Getaway Guide

Portland Metro

Event Calendar

PORTLAND METRO

6.17-8.02

ZOO CONCERTS

Outstanding performances by world-class

musicians, delicious food, and beautiful

summer evenings.

Oregon Zoo; oregonzoo.org/concerts

PALEY'S PLACE

Paley’s Place offers fresh, seasonal and creative flavors

from the Pacific Northwest. Chef and owner, Vitaly

Paley, creates classics with French and Northwest traditions,

using ingredients from local farmers. Kimberly

Paley oversees an extensive wine list with local and

European favorites.

503.243.2403 paleysplace.net

7.10, 7.24, 8.07, 8.14

FLICKS ON THE BRICKS at Pioneer Courthouse

Square's summer of outdoor movies.

Portland; pioneercourthousesquare.org

7.11

BASTILLE DAY FESTIVAL

Bienvenue à Portland! Celebrate this holiday

in the Parisian way with wine, food, music,

art and sport in Portland’s Pearl District.

afportland.org

7.18

PORTLAND HIGHLAND GAMES

Scottish Highland music, dancing, piping and

drumming competitions, athletics, and Scottish

dining with beer, bangers and mash.

Mt. Hood Community College: phga.org

7.23-7.26

OREGON BREWERS FESTIVAL

Choose from more than 80 different craft

beers from around the country. Live music

and food vendors will accompany your brew.

Tom McCall Waterfront Park; oregonbrewfest.com

7.24-7.26

ARTSPLASH

Art lovers flock to this juried art show and sale

on the lakefront of Tualatin Commons.

Tualatin; ci.tualatin.or.us/community/arts

7.24-7.26

PDX POP NOW!

The independent music festival dedicated to

expanding participation in Portland music

offering free shows by local artists.

Portland, pdxpopnow.com

OREGON MUSEUM OF SCIENCE AND INDUSTRY

OMSI is 219,000 square feet of brain-powered fun!

Bring science to life with hundreds of interactive exhibits

where you can experience an earthquake, take

part in lab demonstrations, see a movie in the Omnimax

Dome Theater, explore the universe in the planetarium

and tour a real submarine.

503.797.4000 omsi.edu

THE GOVERNOR HOTEL

AVALON HOTEL & SPA

Set at the edge of the new South Waterfront District

on Portland’s serene Willamette River, this luxury

boutique hotel and spa basks in the glow of the city's

lights just minutes from downtown. With its spa services,

the Avalon wraps guests in the sophistication

and warm hospitality of the Pacific Northwest.

503.802.5800 avalonhotelandspa.com

The luxurious Governor Hotel in downtown Portland

boasts 100 years of superb hospitality and service.

The newly remodeled Governor is one of the true

historic landmarks of the Pacific Northwest—combining

ambiance and modern convenience. Located

near Portland's theaters, restaurants and shopping.

503.224.3400 governorhotel.com

HEATHMAN HOTEL

Celebrated for its art of service, Portland’s sophisticated

Heathman Hotel offers an inspiring blend of natural

elegance and modern lifestyle. One of the “World’s

Best Places to Stay,” says Condé Nast Traveler, the

Heathman is Portland’s perfect destination for meetings,

events, conferences, banquets and gala affairs.

503.241.4100 heathmanhotel.com

>> Dining Guide for Portland Metro

at 1859magazine.com

76 1859magazine.com SUMMER 09


Portland Metro

Getaway Guide

ZEPPO

An upscale casual Italian restaurant located in downtown

Lake Oswego. The cuisine is fresh, inventive and sure to

please. Enjoy the daily home-made soup selections, delicious

lunch entrees and an impressive dinner menu including specialties

like sea scallops, roasted lamb shank, flank & crab grill,

veal florentine, grilled salmon, and Tuscan beef stew.

503.675.2726 zepporestaurant.com

MIO SUSHI

JAKE'S FAMOUS CRAWFISH

Enjoy salmon roasted on a cedar plank, Oregon Dungeness

crab, Chinook salmon stuffed with crab, great pastas

and excellent steaks, not to mention cocktails made with

fresh-squeezed juices. Considered one of the top 10 seafood

restaurants in the country, Jake's Famous Crawfish

has been a Portland landmark for more than a century.

503.226.1419 mccormickandschmicks.com

HOTEL MONACO

Step through the doors of Hotel Monaco Portland

and be welcomed into a world of unique luxury right

in downtown Portland. Inspired by Anglo-Chinois

style, renowned designer Cheryl Rowley recently

transformed this 1912 architectural masterpiece into

a space of whimsy, color and life.

503.222.0001 monaco-portland.com

This popular Japanese eatery offers an extensive

menu of traditional and creative fusion dishes that

are sure to please kids, non-fish eaters and sushi

veterans alike. Chefs incorporate the local flavors

and products of the Pacific Northwest. A casual and

friendly atmosphere for quality dining.

503.286.5123 miosushi.com

JAPANESE GARDEN

Nestled in the West Hills, the Portland Japanese Garden

is a haven of tranquil beauty that has been proclaimed

one the most authentic Japanese gardens outside of

Japan. The grounds exhibit five distinct styles: natural

garden, sand and stone garden, strolling pond garden,

flat garden and tea garden —all peaceful spaces.

503.223.1321 japanesegarden.com

SUMMER 09 1859magazine.com 77

Event Calendar

PORTLAND METRO

7.30, 8.27, 9.24

LAST THURSDAY ON ALBERTA

The last Thursday of every month, all galleries,

restaurants and shops of Alberta Street

open their doors for an evening of art.

Alberta Street; artonalberta.org

8.01-9.07

WEDNESDAYS AND SATURDAYS

PORTLAND FARMERS MARKET

Wednesdays at the South Park Blocks

between SW Salmon & Main; Saturdays at

PSU. portlandfarmersmarket.org

8.01-9.07

SHAKESPEARE-IN-THE-PARKS

Works of Shakespeare to life in Portland

parks on Thursday, Friday and Saturday evenings.

Portland; portlandactors.com

8.07-8.09

THE BITE OF OREGON

Tour the flavors of two dozen top restaurants

and 30 fine wineries. biteoforegon.com

8.09

PROVIDENCE BRIDGE PEDAL

Seize this opportunity to bike over all of

Portland’s bridges. Rides of 14, 24, and 38

miles. providence.org/bridgepedal/index.asp

8.16

INDIA FESTIVAL

A glimpse of India culture, history and

people. Pioneer Courthouse Square; icaportland.org/events/india-festival-2009

8.28-8.30

OREGON INTERNATIONAL AIR SHOW

U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds, the U.S. Army

Golden Knights, fireworks and performances.

Hillsboro; oregonairshow.com

9.03-9.13

TIME-BASED ART FESTIVAL

The Portland Institute for Contemporary Art’s

exposition of contemporary performance,

dance, film, music, new media and visual arts.

pica.org

>> Real Estate Guide for Portland Metro

at 1859magazine.com


Getaway Guide

Willamette Valley

Event Calendar

WILLAMETTE VALLEY

7.10-7.12

OREGON COUNTRY FAIR

Flower children, odd entertainment, food,

creative wares and an eco-friendly ethos.

Veneta; oregoncountryfair.org

7.17-7.19

SALEM ART FAIR FESTIVAL

200 talented artists, live music and performances.

salem; 503.581.2228

7.17-7.19 AND 8.21-8.23

MOUNTAIN BIKE OREGON

spend the day riding through beautiful trails

and relax with free beer nightly in the beer

garden. Oakridge; mtbikeoregon.com

7.24-7.26

INTERNATIONAL PINOT NOIR CELEBRATION

An irresistible event for Pinot noir devotees

with master of ceremonies Jancis robinson and

famed winemaker François millet.

Linfield College, mcminnville; ipnc.org

7.31-8.02

THE OREGON JAMBOREE

Country music and camping festival in Oregon’s

"Home sweet Home" of country music.

sweet Home; oregonjamboree.com

7.31-8.02

WILLAMETTE RIVER FESTIVAL

A BBQ cook-off, pie & rib eating contests, live entertainment

and more. Albany; albanyvisitors.com

8.13-8.16

SCANDINAVIAN FESTIVAL

A smorgasbord of authentic scandinavian

foods and music and dancing.

Junction City; scandinavianfestival.com

8.15

ALBANY CRITERIUM BIKE RACE

Historic downtown Albany hosts a fast and

exciting criterium bike race.

Albany; albanyvisitors.com

CAMPBELL HOUSE, EUGENE

Built in 1892, the historic Campbell House is as

elegant as it is classic. eat at the formal dining room

or walk to nearby restaurants and events at the

Hult Center.

541.343.2258 campbellhouse.com

BROOKSIDE INN, DUNDEE

It's all about the food and the wine at this winecountry

inn. A series of winemakers dinners are

preapred by top chefs in the region. The suites are

Northwest charm with a touch of Asian style and the

feel of egyptian cotton.

503.852.4433 Brooksideinn-oregon.com

PONZI WINE BAR

Located in downtown Dundee, the Ponzi Wine Bar

offers an opportunity to taste wines from more than

140 top Oregon vintners. Flights are available, as well

as wine by the glass, bottle or case. The wine bar also

offers microbrews on draught, Italian coffee, appetizers,

and information on wine and touring.

503.554.1500 ponziwinebar.com

ANNE AMIE VINEYARDS, CARLTON

Pinot reigns supreme at Anne Amie Vineyards with Pinot

noir, Pinot gris and Pinot blanc forming the heart of our

production. A vineyard and winery tour is offered at 11 a.m.

daily with reservation (Wednesday through sunday). The

tour is followed by a private tasting of select wines which

include reserve tasting and an Oregon Pinot noir glass.

503.864.2991 anneamie.com

BEPPE & GIANNI'S TRATTORIA, EUGENE

Voted eugene’s best Italian restaurant for the past

eight years, family-owned Beppe & Gianni’s dishes

up delicious pasta made fresh every day. Offering an

extended Italian wine list and a friendly atmosphere,

this eatery is committed to using only the best local

ingredients in their alimentary creations.

541.683.6661 beppeandgiannis.net

>> Dining Guide for Willamette Valley

at 1859magazine.com

78 1859magazine.com summer 09


Willamette Valley

Getaway Guide

PUDDIN' RIVER CHOCOLATES & WINEBAR, CANBY

Willamette Valley's favorite for european-style chocolates,

specialty desserts and gifts; quaint bistro dining for lunch

and dinner featuring locally-grown produce, wines, and

beer; catering for parties and special events. New offerings

include wine tastings, cooking classes, theme music

nights, happy hour appetizers and guest musicians.

503.263.2626 www.puddinriver.com

PHOENIX GRAND HOTEL, SALEM

Adjoining the salem Conference Center and Bentley’s Grill,

the Phoenix Grand Hotel brings Grand hospitality to salem’s

historic downtown. Featuring 193 beautifully appointed guest

rooms and suites, it offers complimentary hot breakfasts buffet,

high speed internet and underground parking.

503.540.7800 phoenixgrandhotel.com

MARCHÉ, EUGENE

Fresh seasonal foods from the local market, or

marché, served in wonderful French cuisine. This restaurant,

in downtown eugene, has all the trimmings

and ambience of a classic French bistro.

KING ESTATE WINERY, EUGENE

King estate, founded in 1991 by the King family, is

a leading Oregon producer of Pinot gris and Pinot

noir. The 1,033-acre estate is certified organic. King

estate's restaurant and Wine Bar features wine tasting,

winery tours and fine dining, with a menu of

estate-grown and locally grown organic ingredients.

541.942.9874 kingestate.com

WILD PEAR RESTAURANT, SALEM

specializing in Northwest Cuisine with Asian & european

influences. Dishes are made from scratch with

local ingredients by creative chefs. Located in the

heart of downtown salem, in a beautifully restored

circa 1880 building, Wild Pear is the favorite lunch

spot among hip salemites and beyond.

503.378.7515 wildpearcatering.com

Event Calendar

WILLAMETTE VALLEY

8.28-9.07

OREGON STATE FAIR

Oregon’s 150th brings in Pink martini, reba

mcentire and the Doobie Brothers.

salem; oregonstatefair.org

9.17-9.20

MT. ANGEL OKTOBERFEST

Germanic mt. Angel is the perfect town to

host Oregon’s oldest and most beloved folk

festival. mount Angel; oktoberfest.org

9.19-9.20

OREGON GRAPE STOMP CHAMPIONSHIP

Wine-making beneath the soles of your

own two feet. Form your own teams of

two—one stomper and one swabber have

at it. Turner; willamettevalleyvineyards.com

9.19-9.20

SHREWSBURY RENAISSANCE FAIRE

“Teaching History Through Faire Play,” brings

history to life through an educational village.

modeled on the era of shakespeare and

elizabeth I, and set in the historic renaissance

of 1558 to 1603. Kings Valley; shrewfaire.com

9.26

CIDER SQUEEZE AND HARVEST FESTIVAL

Bring your own apples or squeeze theirs.

Fresh cider, pie & ice cream, games and

activities for kids and live music.

eagle Creek; philipfosterfarm.com

9.26-9.27

CORVALLIS FALL FESTIVAL

Continuous music, 170 artist booths, a fine

arts showcase and wine tasting . Headline

acts include soul, blues, funk and African

musicians. Central Park, Corvallis;

corvallisfallfestival.com

9.26-9.27

GRAPE STOMPING FESTIVAL

Come see who squishes the most juice while

stomping to some lively Bavarian music.

Canby; stjosefswinery.com

541.342.3612 marcherestaurant.com

summer 09 1859magazine.com 79

>> Travel Guide for Willamette Valley

at 1859magazine.com


Top 5

Gert Boyle

5Live Without.

Top

Gert Boyle, 85, was born in Germany, fled the Nazi regime with her family and landed in Portland,

where her father founded the Columbia Hat Company in 1938. After her husband, Neal, died in

1970, Boyle took over the failing company and grew Columbia Sportswear to a billion dollar baby

by 2004. Now an international icon, Columbia Sportswear Company’s chairwoman and Oregon’s

First Lady of Feist, Ma Boyle, shares with 1859 Oregon's Magazine her Top 5 Things She Can’t

Things Gert Boyle

can't live without

PB&J sandwiches

Grandkids

Paycheck

Col. Sanders

Starbucks

80 1859magazine.com summer 09


Getaway Guide

Southern Oregon

Event Calendar

SOUTHERN OREGON

ALL SUMMER

OREGON SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL

The jewel of theater in the Northwest presents

Henry VIII, much Ado about Nothing

and Don Quixote.

Ashland; www.osfashland.org

THROUGH SEPTEMBER

BRITT FESTIVALS

Presenting dozens of summer concerts that

feature world-renowned artists of pop, rock,

country, jazz, classical, bluegrass and folk

music. James Taylor, Pink martini, Crosby,

stills & Nash, sheryl Crow, Blondie, Wilco,

and Diana Krall. Jacksonville; brittfest.org

7.11

SISKIYOU OUTBACK TRAIL RUN

High above the rogue Valley, the siskiyou

Outback Trail run. Distances of either 15k or

50k along the Pacific Crest Trail.

Ashland; mtashland.com

7.23-8.03

OREGON MUSICAL THEATRE FESTIVAL

see 23 live performances of three different

shows on three stages in one magnificent

location at umpqua Community College.

roseburg; oregonmtf.com

8.01

MT. ASHLAND HILLCLIMB RUN

This 13.3-mile event from Lithia Park to mt.

Ashland’s summit gains more than one vertical

mile. Ashland; mtashland.com

8.08-8.08

ANNUAL SHADY COVE RIVER ARTWALK

75 artists and original crafters, music and

food along the rogue river at the Cove.

shady Cove; shadycove.net

8.15

CRATER LAKE CENTURY RIDE

The 100-mile Century ride climbs 3,000 feet

to the rim. Crater Lake rim; craterlakecentury.com

SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL, ASHLAND

Ashland is the stage that never sleeps, unless it's

part of a dramatic act. The best regional theater in

the Northwest, the festival's summer lineup includes:

Henry VIII, much Ado About Nothing and Don Quixote.

541.482.4331 osfashland.com

WEASKU INN, GRANTS PASS

ASHLAND SPRINGS HOTEL

An elegantly restored historic landmark in the heart

of downtown Ashland, next to Oregon shakespeare

Festival theatres offers 70 tastefully appointed guest

rooms, an english garden, a banquet/conference space

and delicious food. Its restaurant, Larks, celebrates Oregon's

farms, orchards, vineyards & chocolatiers.

541.488.1700 ashlandspringshotel.com

LELA’S CAFÉ, ASHLAND

set on the banks of the Wild and scenic rogue river,

Weashku Inn had been a Hollywood darling, with

visits from Clark Gable, Carole Lombard and Walt

Disney. A decade ago, the inn's five rooms and 11

riverfront cabins underwent a renovation that puts

luxury into the wilderness.

541.471.8000 weaskuinn.com

romantic and charming with a casual and graceful French

Bistro ambiance, Lela’s cuisine is simple but elegant combining

classic French preparation techniques with fresh ingredients

from the Pacific Northwest. The menu features

locally grown and seasonal products from the abundant

farms, dairies and vineyards of the rogue Valley.

541.482.1702 lelascafe.com

JACKSONVILLE INN

Located in a National Historic Landmark town, the Jacksonville

Inn offers eight elegantly decorated hotel rooms,

modernized for comfort with whirlpool tubs, steam showers,

air-conditioning, and four luxurious honeymoon cottages

that cater to romance and privacy. The gourmet dinner

house has a selection of more than 2,000 wines.

800.321.9344 jacksonvilleinn.com

>> Lodging Guide for Southern Oregon

at 1859magazine.com

78 1859magazine.com summer 09


Southern Oregon

Getaway Guide

CRATER LAKE LODGE, CRATER LAKE

Truly a grand Northwest lodge, the historic 71-room

Crater Lake Lodge originally opened in 1915 and is located

on the edge of the caldera overlooking Crater

Lake. renovated in 1995, the Lodge offers an atmosphere

reminiscent of the 1920s and immerses visitors

in its rustic charm.

888.774.2728 craterlakelodges.com

CHATEAULIN RESTAURANT FRANÇAIS, ASHLAND

Walk into Chateaulin and you'll be transported to

Lyon, France. Whether you go for the award-winning

wine list, the three-course prix fixe dinner, the classic

martinis from the bar, or the French cuisine and

atmosphere, you'll be happy you did.

541.482.2264 chateaulin.com

BRITT FESTIVAL, JACKSONVILLE

The Northwest’s premier outdoor music and performing

arts festival features world renown artists

who perform under the stars in a natural hillside

amphitheater of unparalleled beauty, just three

blocks from downtown historic Jacksonville.

800.882.7488 brittfest.org

4 DAUGHTERS IRISH PUB, MEDFORD

This pub is a family owned and operated restaurant

bringing an authentic Irish experience to downtown

medford. Offering a light n' lively atmosphere, Irish

drinks and fare, plus live music five nights a week,

4 Daughters is southern Oregon's best spot for the

tastes and sounds of the Old eire.

541.779.4455 4daughtersirishpub.com

HELLGATE JETBOAT EXCURSIONS

spectacular jet boat trips on the Wild and scenic

rogue river and the famous Hellgate Canyon. safe

and fun for all ages. Five trips to choose from. Prices

range from $37 - $62. Brunch, lunch and dinner trips

all stop at the OK Corral for a family style BBQ.

Event Calendar

SOUTHERN OREGON

8.15

9TH ANNUAL BRATS BREWS & BLUES EVENT

An afternoon of blues, microbrew sampling

and a German bratwurst dinner at the Yacht

Club at Klamath Lake. Great blues bands to

entertain you while enjoying the breeze off the

lake. Klamath Falls; 541.892.8207

8.15

HENRY GOES WINE

A family friendly event. Live music, various

food vendors and numerous activities for

kids of all ages. Also enjoy the umpqua Valley

salmon and pork rib BBQ.

umpqua; henryestate.com

8.21-8.23

KLAMATH TRIBES RESTORATION

CELEBRATION

The celebration includes a rodeo, powwow,

arts and crafts, and great food.

Chiloquin; klamathtribes.org

9.05-9.06

A TASTE OF HARRY & DAVID

southern Oregon's premier food and wine

event. An extravaganza of food and wine to

tantalize your senses. The event features live

music, with more than 50 sampling stations,

specials, sales and more.

medford; harryanddavid.com

9.12-9.19

CYCLE OREGON

“The Best Bike ride in America,” is 400 miles

through the mythical state of Jefferson, a

region of southern Oregon and northern

California. southern Oregon; cycleoregon.com

10.03-10.04

ART ALONG THE ROGUE

Featuring nationally known street painters

creating huge pastel chalk drawings on the

street, alongside 40-50 regional artists & students.

A musical showcase highlights some of

the region's top groups, blues to bluegrass and

funk to folk.

Grants Pass; artalongtherogue.com

800.648.4874 hellgate.com

summer 09 1859magazine.com 79

>> Recreation Guide for Southern Oregon

at 1859magazine.com


Getaway Guide

Willamette Valley

Event Calendar

WILLAMETTE VALLEY

7.10-7.12

OREGON COUNTRY FAIR

Flower children, odd entertainment, food,

creative wares and an eco-friendly ethos.

Veneta; oregoncountryfair.org

7.17-7.19

SALEM ART FAIR FESTIVAL

200 talented artists, live music and performances.

salem; 503.581.2228

7.17-7.19 AND 8.21-8.23

MOUNTAIN BIKE OREGON

spend the day riding through beautiful trails

and relax with free beer nightly in the beer

garden. Oakridge; mtbikeoregon.com

7.24-7.26

INTERNATIONAL PINOT NOIR CELEBRATION

An irresistible event for Pinot noir devotees

with master of ceremonies Jancis robinson and

famed winemaker François millet.

Linfield College, mcminnville; ipnc.org

7.31-8.02

THE OREGON JAMBOREE

Country music and camping festival in Oregon’s

"Home sweet Home" of country music.

sweet Home; oregonjamboree.com

7.31-8.02

WILLAMETTE RIVER FESTIVAL

A BBQ cook-off, pie & rib eating contests, live entertainment

and more. Albany; albanyvisitors.com

8.13-8.16

SCANDINAVIAN FESTIVAL

A smorgasbord of authentic scandinavian

foods and music and dancing.

Junction City; scandinavianfestival.com

8.15

ALBANY CRITERIUM BIKE RACE

Historic downtown Albany hosts a fast and

exciting criterium bike race.

Albany; albanyvisitors.com

PONZI WINE BAR

Located in downtown Dundee, the Ponzi Wine Bar

offers an opportunity to taste wines from more than

140 top Oregon vintners. Flights are available, as well

as wine by the glass, bottle or case. The wine bar also

offers microbrews on draught, Italian coffee, appetizers,

and information on wine and touring.

503.554.1500 ponziwinebar.com

CAMPBELL HOUSE, EUGENE

Built in 1892, the historic Campbell House is as

elegant as it is classic. eat at the formal dining room

or walk to nearby restaurants and events at the

Hult Center.

541.343.2258 campbellhouse.com

BROOKSIDE INN, DUNDEE

It's all about the food and the wine at this winecountry

inn. A series of winemakers dinners are

preapred by top chefs in the region. The suites are

Northwest charm with a touch of Asian style and the

feel of egyptian cotton.

503.852.4433 Brooksideinn-oregon.com

ANNE AMIE VINEYARDS, CARLTON

Pinot reigns supreme at Anne Amie Vineyards with Pinot

noir, Pinot gris and Pinot blanc forming the heart of our

production. A vineyard and winery tour is offered at 11 a.m.

daily with reservation (Wednesday through sunday). The

tour is followed by a private tasting of select wines which

include reserve tasting and an Oregon Pinot noir glass.

503.864.2991 anneamie.com

BEPPE & GIANNI'S TRATTORIA, EUGENE

Voted eugene’s best Italian restaurant for the past

eight years, family-owned Beppe & Gianni’s dishes

up delicious pasta made fresh every day. Offering an

extended Italian wine list and a friendly atmosphere,

this eatery is committed to using only the best local

ingredients in their alimentary creations.

541.683.6661 beppeandgiannis.net

>> Dining Guide for Willamette Valley

at 1859magazine.com

80 1859magazine.com summer 09


Willamette Valley

Getaway Guide

PUDDIN' RIVER CHOCOLATES & WINEBAR, CANBY

Willamette Valley's favorite for european-style chocolates,

specialty desserts and gifts; quaint bistro dining for lunch

and dinner featuring locally-grown produce, wines, and

beer; catering for parties and special events. New offerings

include wine tastings, cooking classes, theme music

nights, happy hour appetizers and guest musicians.

503.263.2626 www.puddinriver.com

PHOENIX GRAND HOTEL, SALEM

Adjoining the salem Conference Center and Bentley’s Grill,

the Phoenix Grand Hotel brings Grand hospitality to salem’s

historic downtown. Featuring 193 beautifully appointed guest

rooms and suites, it offers complimentary hot breakfasts buffet,

high speed internet and underground parking.

503.540.7800 phoenixgrandhotel.com

MARCHÉ, EUGENE

Fresh seasonal foods from the local market, or

marché, served in wonderful French cuisine. This restaurant,

in downtown eugene, has all the trimmings

and ambience of a classic French bistro.

KING ESTATE WINERY, EUGENE

King estate, founded in 1991 by the King family, is

a leading Oregon producer of Pinot gris and Pinot

noir. The 1,033-acre estate is certified organic. King

estate's restaurant and Wine Bar features wine tasting,

winery tours and fine dining, with a menu of

estate-grown and locally grown organic ingredients.

541.942.9874 kingestate.com

WILD PEAR RESTAURANT, SALEM

specializing in Northwest Cuisine with Asian & european

influences. Dishes are made from scratch with

local ingredients by creative chefs. Located in the

heart of downtown salem, in a beautifully restored

circa 1880 building, Wild Pear is the favorite lunch

spot among hip salemites and beyond.

503.378.7515 wildpearcatering.com

Event Calendar

WILLAMETTE VALLEY

8.28-9.07

OREGON STATE FAIR

Oregon’s 150th brings in Pink martini, reba

mcentire and the Doobie Brothers.

salem; oregonstatefair.org

9.17-9.20

MT. ANGEL OKTOBERFEST

Germanic mt. Angel is the perfect town to

host Oregon’s oldest and most beloved folk

festival. mount Angel; oktoberfest.org

9.19-9.20

OREGON GRAPE STOMP CHAMPIONSHIP

Wine-making beneath the soles of your

own two feet. Form your own teams of

two—one stomper and one swabber have

at it. Turner; willamettevalleyvineyards.com

9.19-9.20

SHREWSBURY RENAISSANCE FAIRE

“Teaching History Through Faire Play,” brings

history to life through an educational village.

modeled on the era of shakespeare and

elizabeth I, and set in the historic renaissance

of 1558 to 1603. Kings Valley; shrewfaire.com

9.26

CIDER SQUEEZE AND HARVEST FESTIVAL

Bring your own apples or squeeze theirs.

Fresh cider, pie & ice cream, games and

activities for kids and live music.

eagle Creek; philipfosterfarm.com

9.26-9.27

CORVALLIS FALL FESTIVAL

Continuous music, 170 artist booths, a fine

arts showcase and wine tasting . Headline

acts include soul, blues, funk and African

musicians. Central Park, Corvallis;

corvallisfallfestival.com

9.26-9.27

GRAPE STOMPING FESTIVAL

Come see who squishes the most juice while

stomping to some lively Bavarian music.

Canby; stjosefswinery.com

541.342.3612 marcherestaurant.com

summer 09 1859magazine.com 81

>> Travel Guide for Willamette Valley

at 1859magazine.com


Top 5

Gert Boyle

5Live Without.

Top

Gert Boyle, 85, was born in Germany, fled the Nazi regime with her family and landed in Portland,

where her father founded the Columbia Hat Company in 1938. After her husband, Neal, died in

1970, Boyle took over the failing company and grew Columbia Sportswear to a billion dollar baby

by 2004. Now an international icon, Columbia Sportswear Company’s chairwoman and Oregon’s

First Lady of Feist, Ma Boyle, shares with 1859 Oregon's Magazine her Top 5 Things She Can’t

Things Gert Boyle

can't live without

PB&J sandwiches

Grandkids

Paycheck

Col. Sanders

Starbucks

82 1859magazine.com summer 09

Hooray! Your file is uploaded and ready to be published.

Saved successfully!

Ooh no, something went wrong!