Viva Lewes Issue #130 July 2017

VivaMagazines

VIVA LEWES

JULY 2017

#130


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PUTTING

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130

VIVALEWES

EDITORIAL

Your friends are on holiday, you’re bored of all your toys, you haven’t got a book to read, your

mum’s too busy to take you to the swimming pool. I can still remember that feeling of ennui

during long summer holidays when all I could think of to do was to watch kids’ TV. And there

was one show which rubbed it all in: Why Don’t You Just Switch Off Your Television Set and Go Out

and Do Something Less Boring Instead? The producers were obviously hoping you wouldn’t take

them literally until the end of the programme, during which spruced-up kid presenters suggested

all manner of activities you could take up to pass your time in a more creative manner.

Most of us, sadly, aren’t so time rich nowadays, but we can still take that worthy message to heart,

which is why we have used its title as our theme this July issue. In a way it encapsulates the ethos

we’ve always had here at Viva: our remit is to encourage people to go out and do some of the

stuff that’s being put on or offered by the movers and

shakers of the community, whether that’s a trip to

the new cinema, an art class, a political talk, a session

in the spanking new skate park, a nature walk on the

Downs, or whatever. The more people go out, the more

stuff will be put on for their benefit, and so on, in a

virtuous circle of get-up-and-go-ness. A simple message,

but an easy one to follow, and within these pages are a

host of possibilities. Enjoy the issue...

THE TEAM

.....................

EDITOR: Alex Leith alex@vivamagazines.com

SUB-EDITOR: David Jarman

STAFF WRITER / DESIGNER: Rebecca Cunningham rebecca@vivamagazines.com

ART DIRECTOR: Katie Moorman katie@vivamagazines.com

ADVERTISING: Sarah Hunnisett, Sarah Jane Lewis, Amanda Meynell advertising@vivamagazines.com

EDITORIAL / ADMIN ASSISTANT: Kelly Hill admin@vivamagazines.com

PUBLISHER: Becky Ramsden becky@vivamagazines.com

DISTRIBUTION: David Pardue distribution@vivamagazines.com

CONTRIBUTORS: Jacky Adams, Michael Blencowe, Sarah Boughton, Mark Bridge, Emma Chaplin,

Daniel Etherington, Mark Greco, Anita Hall, John Henty, Mat Homewood, Paul Austin Kelly,

Chloë King, Lizzie Lower, Carlotta Luke, Richard Madden, and Marcus Taylor

Viva Lewes is based at Pipe Passage, 151b High Street, Lewes, BN7 1XU, 01273 434567. Advertising 01273 488882


THE 'WHY DON'T YOU' ISSUE

CONTENTS

Bits and bobs.

8-25. Marc Greco explains his binocular cover,

multicolour-fingered Mary Sautter’s Lewes,

Carlotta Luke gets out and about, Viva Lewes

at No. 10, and the usual array of books and pubs

and bits and bobs.

Columns.

27-31. David Jarman at the movies, Chloë King

in Kent, and Mark Bridge on his no-springchicken

cat.

On this month.

33. Dreadzone play Lewes Live.

35. Ruth Kerr on the Paddock Singers, about to

noisily enjoy their 10th anniversary.

37. Commedia dell’arte on a village green near

you soon… yes, the Rude Mechanicals are back.

39. Iby Knill, 93-year-old Holocaust survivor, at

the Lewes Speakers’ Festival.

41. Art: Aure, one of an atelier-full of French

screen printers exhibiting in Rue des Pecheurs.

43

19

8

43. Art. Neil Gower’s extraordinary new

artwork for the just-published book As

Kingfishers Catch Fire.

45-49. Art and About… A fine Summer Show

at Martyrs’ Gallery, Sussex Downs artists at

Pelham House, and the Chalkies head down

the A27. Plus what’s on the gallery walls from

Hastings to Chichester.

51-55. Diary dates. What’s on where and when

including annual classics the Patina Parade,

and the Raft Race.

57. Classical music round-up, with Paul

Austin Kelly.

59-61. Gig guide. This is getting silly… The

Dickies are playing at the Con Club.

63-72. Free time. More stuff to do for the

U16s, including fêtes, fairs and Patina.

5


THE 'WHY DON'T YOU' ISSUE

Food.

75-81. A superb salad at the Back Yard

Café… and we try a Big Daddy's burger.

Plus green chutney made by Chloe from

Seven Sisters' Spices.

The way we work.

82-85. Aiste Saulyte, keeping as safe a

distance as possible, points her camera at

some of the region’s bee keepers, and asks

them: do you have an unusual use for

your honey?

93

82

96

Features.

86-99. Another jumble of features, as we

get out and about: Todd’s latest uphill

adventure, Michael Blencowe on moths,

Henty's heavenward hollyhocks, we

try facing a bowler called BOLA, the

new skateboard park and Middle Farm

director Helen Marsh’s trade secrets.

Inside left.

114. The Brighton Boys Brigade at Glynde

Swimming Pool, 1932.

VIVA DEADLINES

We plan each magazine six weeks ahead, with a mid-month

advertising/copy deadline. Please send details of planned events

to admin@vivamagazines.com, and for any advertising queries:

advertising@vivamagazines.com, or call 01273 434567.

Remember to recycle your Viva.

Every care has been taken to ensure the accuracy of our content.

Viva Lewes magazine cannot be held responsible for any omissions, errors

or alterations. The views expressed by columnists do not necessarily

represent the view of Viva Lewes.

Love me or recycle me. Illustration by Chloë King

6


THIS MONTH’S COVER ARTIST: MARK GRECO

This month’s cover was created by artist and nature

enthusiast Mark Greco. “It’s quite different from the

other covers I’ve done,” he says. “I initially played

around with a few ideas but decided on this simple

design as the image of a pair of binoculars epitomises

everything to me about being outside. I also wanted

the cover to have a ‘field book’ sort of feel to it - a

manual of what’s going on in and around Lewes.”

Mark uses a mixture of digital and manual techniques

to create his illustrations: “This design is purely digital

- all my screen prints start digitally anyway. Once I do

have my final design I print the final pieces by hand

which normally take one or two days to complete”.

Nature and wildlife have long been a source of inspiration

for his work. “In my spare time, I’ll often go

out walking with Watson, our Border Terrier, and I always

keep an eye out. The reason I love nature is that

it connects you with the environment as well as the

changing seasons.” His series A Natural History, and

the initial exhibition in 2011, sparked a collaboration

with local wildlife expert Michael Blencowe, and the

duo have been writing and illustrating our monthly

wildlife column since – even after Mark’s adventurous

move to south-west France 20 months ago.

“We settled in a beautiful place called Saint Antonin

Noble Val,” he says. “We chose it because it reminded

us of Lewes. It’s a very creative enclave and the

village is also surrounded by limestone plateaus so

we were really spoilt for wildlife too.” Mark joined

a printmaking atelier called ‘Hors Cadre’ and now

back in Lewes for the summer, he is bringing over a

selection of work from the association to exhibit at 2

Fisher Street.

“It’s really exciting because it’s going to be their first

show outside France. The work is a mixture of being

quite eccentric, challenging and funny. It’s going to

8


e a very interesting exhibition and I’m looking forward

to getting people’s reactions to it. One main reason for

curating it was that following some of the negativity

around the EU Referendum I wanted to do something

positive - something that was actually celebrating Europe.

So I thought, wouldn’t it be great to showcase

some of the fantastic work that I’ve seen from the people

I’ve been working with in France to celebrate both

our differences and our similarities?

“The idea of the atelier is about celebrating culture,

promoting artistic practice and working collaboratively.

The ethos is quite anti-elitist so it’s important that the art

produced is affordable and accessible. What we’re hoping

to do is to recreate the spirit of the atelier in the heart

of Lewes. None of the prints will be framed butsimply

hung. It starts on Bastille Day – the 14th of July – and

it’s only a three-day exhibition, but I think people might

be surprised at what they’ll see!”

markgrecodesign.com

9


FESTIVAL OF THE GARDEN:

THE CULTURE OF PLACE

FRI 28 & SAT 29 JULY

Curated by 8 times Chelsea gold medallist, Tom Stuart-Smith

Speakers include: Fergus Garrett, Tom Coward, Kim Wilkie, Rachel Warne,

Alys Fowler, Charlie Burrell, Peter Owen-Jones, Darren Clark and Mark Divall

Photo by Marcus Harper

10 wonderful events to choose from in the stunning setting of Charleston

£12 per event

£10 Friends and concessions

Plant stall and

free demonstrations

BOOKING NOW charleston.org.uk/festivalofthegarden 01323 815150


Photo by Alex Leith

MY LEWES: MARY SAUTTER

VOLUNTEER GARDENER

Are you local? I was born in Rottingdean, but I

loved coming to Lewes as a child. My father’s business,

Taylor’s of Rottingdean, had horse boxes and

worked a lot with the trainers in Lewes, so I would

often come over to see the horses.

So you rode? My mother wanted me to go to ballet

classes, which didn’t suit me, but as soon as I

got on a horse I never looked back. I used to compete

in gymkhanas with my friends, and of course

never really won much because our ponies weren’t

thoroughbred. So we started our own: we ran Rottingdean

Gymkhana for a few years, making our

own rosettes and trophies from egg cups.

When did you move to Lewes? In 1962. My late

husband Michael and I bought four derelict cottages,

which we converted into a house and a garden.

At the time I was a teacher and spent three years

teaching in Crawley. Around the same time I discovered

Julian Dawson’s Monday market in Lewes

and went about furnishing our house. This got

me into refurbishing pine furniture, and I realised

there was a business in it. I then opened a shop on

Station Street in what had been a Methodist chapel.

That went on for 30 years, from about 1973.

You’re running the garden project on Lewes

Station. How did that start up? I’d been fundraising

for the Friends of Lewes Victoria Hospital

for 45 years. I then retired and in June 2013 I heard

Ruth O’Keeffe was looking for volunteers to help

with the gardening at the station. It proved not to

be as simple as she thought - they wouldn’t give

lots of people access to the station all the time - so

I ended up running the project, first with Stephen

Catlin, and now with Jane Tyrer.

How do you fund it? As well as the 40 metres

of herbaceous border on Platform 3, we have 24

planters, and 10 troughs, which are all sponsored

by local businesses in the town. We have a lot of

support from local gardeners; Wyevale’s have been

very generous with compost and planting. We’ve

collected quite a lot of equipment; we’re lucky to

have a potting shed.

Where do you enjoy going out? I like Aqua, and

The Hearth. I regularly have lunch at the Lewes

Arms, which does good food. And I’ve been going

to the Panda Garden for many years.

Where would you live if not in Lewes? I love

Venice and go with a friend every year, but I

wouldn’t want to live there. Lewes is perfect for

me: you meet so many interesting people here. My

daughter lives round the corner from me, she is a

great cook and makes dinner every Sunday, so I get

to see a lot of her and my grand-daughters. I always

bring the pudding and a bottle of wine. Alex Leith

11


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Come along and pay us a visit; have lunch, join a class or simply experience

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Viva Lewes half page July 17.indd 1 12/06/2017 11:44


BITS AND BOBS

CHARITY BOX #16: CIRCLE OF LIFE REDISCOVERY

Tell us about Circle of Life Rediscovery. Access to nature is beneficial

for all of us and we want to make this available for everyone. So we

provide innovative nature immersion and outdoor learning in the form of

nature-based days and training. We do this in a beautiful ten-acre woodland

near Laughton, which is part of the new Vert Woodland Community.

Who do you work with? From nursery age through to adults. Our

funded work offers a variety of programmes for marginalised and disadvantaged

groups. Our flagship project works alongside the Child and

Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS) and the Family Intensive

Support Service to offer therapeutic and connecting work in nature.

How can people access you? There are many ways to get involved: from our Wild Day programme

for 7–11 year olds, to Forest Fawns (Family Play Group), to deepening your knowledge and understanding

of nature through day courses and longer trainings. These are for people who have an interest

in nature, but more specifically for those who work with children already. We offer schools a host of

outdoor learning opportunities, including camps, woodland days, Forest School Training, CPDs for

practitioners and volunteering.

What does it cost? Our funded work is free to participants, and the paid days and trainings range from

£7-£890 for the Forest School Level 3 training. Emma Chaplin interviewed Marina Robb

circleofliferediscovery.com / 01273 814226 / @outdoorteacher

T R E A T M E N T R O O M S

8A CLIFFE HIGH STREET,

LEWES, BN72AH

01273 488848

Beauty@browns-lewes.co.uk

www.browns-Lewes.co.uk

13


REAL ALE AND STEAM TRAIN

o could ask for anything more?

RAIL ALE

EVENINGS

21st July &

22nd September

See website for details

Bluebell Railway - One the bt family days out!

www.bluebell-railway.com | 01825 72080 | info@bluebell-railway.co.uk

The Bluebell Railway, Sheffield Park Station, East Sussex, TN22 3QL


PHOTO OF THE MONTH

ENCHANTED GARDENS

Nigel French took this picture of Southover

Grange, from near the Eastport Lane

entrance, using a DSLR camera, which he’d

had converted to infrared. “It’s a process a lot of

photographers go through when they upgrade

and they want their old camera to be useful

for a different purpose,” he says. Cameras have

infrared filters, he tells us, to make the images

they produce similar to what we see with the

naked eye. “You can have this filter removed

– the process costs about £250 – to produce

strange colours. Green is particularly affected;

foliage gets a very radiant look to it.” The image

produced is generally rather an unattractive mix

of hues, until it is converted to black and white,

in Photoshop – to demonstrate this Nigel sent

us the original, which certainly wouldn’t grace

this page. “Turning it black and white gives it

this snowy, ethereal quality,” he says. “I then

added a touch of sepia to it for the final effect.”

Nigel, an artist and photographer (you may

have come across his work during Artwave)

recently upgraded from a Canon 7D to a Canon

5DS, and had the former converted to infrared

mode. “The trouble is, I’m enjoying the effects

I’m getting with the old camera so much I’m

using it more than the new one,” he says.

Please send your pictures, taken in and around

Lewes, to photos@vivamagazines.com, or tweet

@VivaLewes, with comments on why and where

you took it, and your phone number. We’ll choose

our favourite for this page, which wins the photographer

£20, to be picked up from our office

after publication. Unless previously arranged,

we reserve the right to use all pictures in future

issues of Viva magazines or online.

15


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BITS AND BOBS

TOWN PLAQUE #28

Part in one hemisphere and part in the other, the grassy area between

Bell Lane and the Winterbourne stream is a real bonus for those living

at the western end of the town. It attracts dog-walkers, fans of a good

football kick-about with jerseys as goalposts and children (of all ages).

Occasional flooding has kept its grass lush and the tree belt opposite

offers some shelter. Easy access and its informal nature mean it can be

pretty much what you want it to be. The plaque tells us that we owe it

to the widow of an eminent Lewes magistrate, and that this land, gifted by her to the town before WW2,

is protected as a green space. Recent upgrading of the children’s play facilities makes it a regular stop for

many on their way home from school, but few know to whom they should be grateful. Marcus Taylor

LEWES IN NUMBERS: LEWES PRIORY

Lewes Priory was built over 200 years, lasted for 450 years and has remained a ruin for the last 480 years.

It was part of the Cluniac order, of which there were over 1,000 dependent houses in Europe, and was

the 1st in England. Building started in 1077 and continued under 16 successive priors until the church

towers were finally completed in 1268. These towers were 200 feet tall and topped a church larger than

Chichester Cathedral in size. At its peak there were around 100 monks at the Priory though by the end

of the 14th century the number had reduced to 24. The monks attended 8 church services daily as well as

providing hospitality for travellers, education for nobles’ sons and nursing care. Lewes Priory was razed to

the ground as a result of Henry VIII’s dissolution of the monasteries in 1537, when a demolition team of

18 completed the job in under 9 days. Sarah Boughton

GHOST PUB #32: THE ANCHOR, 101 SOUTH STREET

The Cliffe area was teeming with pubs during the nineteenth century. Much

trade arrived along the Ouse from Newhaven, and many beershops and inns were

opened up to wet the whistles of those arriving in their vessels. South Street had

seven pubs at one point, most with nautical names, and one of these was the Anchor

beershop, later known as the ‘Anchor Inn’. The Anchor had recently been

established when Edmund Levett arrived there from the Railway Inn at Hailsham

in the early 1860s. This was not a full-time job, however, and he also worked as

a farm labourer for John Crosskey at Southerham. William Blaber took over the

Anchor in 1874. He had been an ostler at the Swan Inn at Southover, and married

Martha Best in the summer of that year. Together they ran the pub for almost

twenty years. The Anchor’s last landlord was John Brooker. A man not to be messed with; when Edward

Tugwell assaulted John and his wife in 1901, John knocked Tugwell ‘out of the room with his fist’. Yet another

victim of the 1907 Lewes pub cull, the Anchor was one of two South Street pubs to go that year. John Brooker

took over the Fox Inn at Southerham, and the Anchor became a residential property. Just a few doors away

from the Snowdrop, the house is now called ‘The Old Anchor’. Mat Homewood

17


Lewes Speakers

Festival

2017

21st -23rd July 2017

at the All Saints Centre, Lewes

Listen to talks and ask questions of:

Polly Toynbee and David Walker, Terry Waite,

Kate Adie, Roy Hattersley, Jenni Murray,

Iby Knill, Jim Hoare, Coline Covington,

Lynn Knight, Peter Clark, Paul Beaver,

Tom Mangold, Alan Munro, Caroline Paige,

Harry Mount, Peter Conradi and Jonty Driver

Single Tickets: £12.50 for each individual talk

Early Bird Price: £9.50 if purchased before 20th of June

2017 Day/Festival Passes Available

Tickets/Info at:www.lewesspeakersfestival.com

Call the Box Office on: 0333 666 3366

In association with: The White Hart Hotel Lewes


BITS AND BOBS

LOCAL LITERATURE

If you haven’t been to the new Depot cinema yet, we urge you to go.

You’ll soon be back: we reckon it’s the best thing that’s happened round

here for years.

Funny to think that 83 years ago Lewesians were similarly excited about

an equally hi-tech state-of-the-art cinema opening its doors for the first

time. The story of the opening of the Odeon, on Cliffe High Street, is told in Screen Stories (£8.99), by Ruth

Thomson, alongside everything else you might care to know about the history of cinema in Lewes.

Subtitled ‘Lewes Goes to the Pictures’ it’s the fruit of years of research and tells of Lewes’ first cinema, the

short-lived County Theatre, opened in 1913, and its successor, the De Luxe on School Hill, which soon belied

its name, becoming a notorious flea pit. It’s a fine read, and beautifully illustrated: you can pick up a copy at the

Depot, the Tourist Office or from leweshistory.org.

Unicorn are taking us back in time, too, with three publications from the 30s and 40s reprinted in conjunction

with the Ravilious & Co exhibition at the Towner (all £10). Fifty-four Conceits, by Martin Armstrong, is a collection

of epigrams and epitaphs illustrated with Ravilious wood-engravings. The Pigeon Ace (1943) and The Little

White Bear (1945) are children’s picture books, set during WW2, written and illustrated by Ravilious’ Royal

College of Art colleague and good pal Enid Marx, whose work is also included in the Towner exhibition.

(For an interview with Neil Gower, well known to Viva readers and the graphic artist responsible for the lavish

images in the new Little, Brown book As Kingfishers Catch Fire, see pg 43.)

SUMMER

EVENTS AT

8 WEST STREET

ALFRISTON

01323 871222

BIRDS & BOOKS

Book launch and art exhibit

With Alex Preston and Neil Gower. Celebrate the publication of

the gorgeous new book As Kingfishers Catch Fire – an exploration

of birds and literature, highlighted by Neil’s paintings. The evening

includes talks by Alex and Neil as well as a show of original art

painted for the book.

6:30 for 7pm on Thursday 13 July, at Deans Place Hotel, Alfriston

Tickets - £5, including voucher for £5 off the price of the book

CRIME WRITERS IN CONVERSATION

Join Lesley Thomson (The Dog Walker, featuring Stella Darnell)

and Elly Griffiths (The Chalk Pit, featuring Ruth Galloway)

discussing their best-selling books in conversation with Lisa

Holloway.

4pm, Sunday 30 July at Old Chapel Centre, Alfriston. Tickets

£10, including refreshments and £5 off purchases at the event

Learn about other upcoming events at www.muchadobooks.com


Dine out this Summer

Enjoy the warm summer days & nights

with our seasonal specials & delicious à

la carte menu. Come & sample our salads

& wonderful sharing plates

The Old Courthouse, Lewes, BN7 2FS

Tel. 01273 470 763 | lewes@aqua-restaurant.com | www.aqua-restaurant.com

@aquaitalia

/aqua_restaurant

/aquaitaliarestaurant


PHOTOGRAPHY

CARLOTTA LUKE

OUT AND ABOUT

We gave Carlotta Luke our theme of ‘out and

about’… which pretty accurately describes her

photographic modus operandi. Here’s what she

came up with (clockwise from top left): Robert

Senior, Martin Freeman and Carmen Slijpen

at the grand opening of the Depot cinema;

refurbishment in progress at the Corn Exchange;

colourful armchairs in front of an open fire in

Southover Grange; the orangey cliffs as the sun

prepares to set at Birling Gap; and the newlyrefurbished

Ainsworth Room, back in use now

for wedding receptions at Southover Grange.

carlottaluke.com

21


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Established 1938

72-73 High Street, Lewes, BN7 1XG • 01273 474150

www.marstonbarrett.com

CLOCKS OF LEWES #8: RINGMER MILLENNIUM CLOCK

Mid-cricket season, and Ringmer

Green rings with the sound

of leather on willow. Look over

the Lewes Road and you'll find

another defining aspect of the

heart of the village: the millennium

clock.

There were various suggestions

for how to mark the big year.

Andrew Cooper, who had the

old Potters Field scrapyard and

now runs Ringmer Business Park,

proposed a clock.

Mr Cooper organised all the permissions as

well as coming up with ideas for a design, which

he discussed with artist Jim Tiller. The designs

were then used by brother Christopher Cooper

to make a wooden mock-up and also printed on

2,000 postcards, to sell to raise

funds. The total cost was £5,800.

Mr Cooper dug the footings by

hand in wet wintry weather at

Christmas 1999, with "one old

boy helping me", before pouring

the concrete for the footings. A

local bricklayer built the tower,

while Dennis Leister, a 60-year

veteran of Harper and Eede,

made a weather vane. Inside the

structure are "millennium secrets

in a little box".

If you stop to rest or check the time, you'll see

the four benches around the base memorialise

other locals. Even though it's less than two

decades old, the tower is a quintessential Ringmer

landmark. Daniel Etherington

Photo by Daniel Etherington

22


BITS AND BOBS

SPREAD THE WORD

First up, James McAuley took

this picture on June 9th outside

No 10 Downing Street, while

waiting to snap Theresa May

making her first post-electionresult

speech!

Meanwhile Jane Lee, of Church

Row, heeded our recent call to

participate in more extreme

sports. Having read her copy on

the plane, cover to cover, here

she is 1250m up a mountain

on a riding holiday in Kupres,

Bosnia. Her horse, Vana, she

reports 'struggled with the

language but was impressed by

the taste!'

Wendy Vince, from Horsted

Keynes, was taking it somewhat

easier and catching some shade

under her Viva in Corsica.

And finally, as if turning 30

wasn't exciting enough, Carly

Moorman took her copy of

VL129 with her to the Trevi

Fountain in Rome. Happy

Birthday Carly! LL

Going on hols this summer?

Don't forget to pack your

Viva! Send your pics to hello@

vivamagazines.com

23


BITS AND BOBS

WHERE DID YOU

GET THAT HAT?

The appearance of the sun and long

awaited warm weather means the end

of beanies, hoods and umbrellas and the

emergence of the sun hat. Irena and her

daughter Olivia were off for a day at the

Pells and looked wonderfully coordinated

in their straw fedoras (though in Olivia’s

case not so keen to show them off for

the camera). Both hats have travelled all

the way from Poland, from where Irena

originally moved to Lewes 11 years ago.

Kelly Hill

Science goes wild

22 – 23 July

Ten minutes’ drive from Haywards Heath

For details visit kew.org/wakehurst

25


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COLUMN

David Jarman

Cinema days

‘There were years when

I went to the cinema

almost every day and

maybe even twice a

day, and those were the

years between ’36 and

the war, the years of my

adolescence. It was a

time when the cinema

became the world for

me’.

That’s how Italo

Calvino begins his

A Cinema-Goer’s Autobiography, one of his five

‘memory exercises’, published by his widow in

1990 under the title La Strada di San Giovanni.

There have been similar times in my life. At

Cambridge there was the Arts Cinema and every

college seemed to have its own film club. There

was even a society devoted solely to showing

the films of the Marx Brothers. It was the only

society I joined. And so I could easily have seen a

couple of films a day; quite often I did. I came to

recognise other lonely cineastes as they emerged

from a showing, blinking in the daylight

to which they were becoming increasingly

unaccustomed.

When I started working in London in 1976, I

lived in Oakley Street. (In his autobiography the

journalist Michael Wharton, of ‘Peter Simple’

fame, describes Prince of Wales Drive, Battersea

as ‘one of those London streets, like certain

streets in Chelsea, Oakley Street or Redcliffe

Gardens, of which it is said that everybody has

lived there at one period of his life and some

people twice, once on the way up and once on

the way down’.) I used to walk over from Oakley

Street to see the frequent double features at

the Paris Pullman that started at eleven o’clock

in the evening. The Everyman Cinema in

Hampstead now

seems to show only

blockbusters, but

in the seventies the

programme was

far more diverse. I

remember trailing

up to Hampstead

four weeks running

to do justice to an

exhaustive Greta

Garbo season. The

Academy Cinema

in Oxford Street was another favourite. Marcel

Carné’s Les Enfants du Paradis seemed to come

round there every year. I saw it every time, but

recently my wife and youngest son watched

it on DVD. They both thought it was utterly

ridiculous.

And yet at other times of my life I’ve spent

months, even years not going anywhere near a

cinema. Early indications at the Depot suggest

this is going to change again. Six films I’ve seen

in the first seventeen days! And it was seeing a

new print of Fellini’s La Strada at the Depot that

prompted my rereading of Calvino’s essay which,

as the author admits, ‘Fellini himself recently

convinced me to write’.

Calvino and Fellini both grew up in seaside

towns, Fellini in Rimini, Calvino in San Remo

on the Ligurian coast. Their cinematic fellowfeeling

flourished, as Calvino explains, ‘because

behind all the wretchedness of the days in the

café, the walk to the pier, the friend who dresses

in women’s clothes and then gets drunk and

weeps, I recognise the unsatisfied youth of the

cinema-goer, of a provincial world that judges

itself in relation to the cinema, in a constant

comparison between itself and that other world

that is the cinema’.

27


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COLUMN

Chloë King

Delighted of Tunbridge Wells

Sometimes I need help getting

out of a rut, that’s why Mr, tired

of my pacing, writes me a list.

“You need to get out and do

something,” he says.

So he writes some stuff on

the back of an unopened bank

statement and leaves it on my

desk. I take this to be a hugely

romantic gesture. After all, if

you love someone, set them free.

‘1.’ he writes. ‘Get on the bus

going the wrong way.’

“What’s the wrong way?” I ask, as he sidles out the

door. Surely no direction is wrong if the purpose

of the trip is entirely open-ended?

“I don’t know,” he says, getting impatient.

“Tunbridge Wells?”

The 29 bus to Royal Tunbridge Wells stops on the

sunny side of the street. I’m waiting here, gazing

enviously at the Brighton passengers in their

comfortable shade. Still, I’m impressed my bus

pass takes me all the way to Kent.

According to Wikipedia, RTW is by reputation

the ‘archetypal conservative Middle England

town’. This makes it the ideal destination for

anyone worried that Lewes is going too far. I

haven’t been for years; I have only dim memories

of pale facades.

I downloaded several episodes of 99% Invisible

before I left, in preparation for ‘2. Listen to a

podcast and gaze out of the window.’ The first is

on Unpleasant Design, about spaces deliberately

adapted to deter people or behaviours.

What aspects of Lewes or Tunbridge Wells are

purposefully hostile, I wonder? This bench is

uncomfortable. An elderly lady asks if the bus is

due and I remove my headphones.

I am irritated by the interruption, but she

continues: she’s off to buy herself a treat, and her

enthusiasm is catching.

I realise my earphones are an

Unpleasant Design, offering

to spare me the inconvenience,

or pleasure, of unplanned

conversation.

On the bus now, rolling

through High Weald, listening

to Unseen Cities, about

species that thrive in urban

environments. The man in

front with his shirt off drinks

luminous green pop.

Did you know that pigeons secrete nutritious fluid

from a pouch in their throats, for their young to

suckle? I make note of ‘Pigeon Milk’, in answer to

‘3. Confuse me.’

Arriving in RTW, I walk from the station to the

Pantiles: a pedestrian street trimmed with Union

Jack bunting and lined with red-and-white striped

gazebos. The superficial attractiveness of an area

designed purely for spending: Middle England

characterised by its subtle form of segregation.

Brasseries serve al fresco classics to summery

ladies with immaculate highlights.

I read a Deborah Levy story recently, about a

woman who undergoes surgery to become a ‘lighthearted

woman,’ ‘a pretend woman,’ who looks

well and doesn’t say challenging things. ‘4.’ tells

me to indulge myself. Buy make up, chocolates.

Instead, I purchase a new lemon squeezer. I buy a

watermelon quarter, bread and salami and make

my way back up the hill to picnic in Calverley

Grounds. Friends sit in pairs with beer cans and

iPhones; a group gathers in memory of Jo Cox;

kids play games and eat ice cream.

‘5. Draw where you want to be’, says my list,

conveniently, and I take out my sketchbook. Did

he know I’d feel so fortunate, just to be outside,

being me?

Illustration by Chloë King

29


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COLUMN

Photo by Mark Bridge

East of Earwig

Life is en suite

"Oooh", says our grandson. At two years old, he's

not a man of many words. Fortunately, he imbues

his vocabulary with an amount of exaggerated

enthusiasm that would make even Kenneth Williams

blush. As a result, my wife and I know exactly

what he's talking about. All three of us have heard

an unexpected release of pressurised water. "Is

that the washing machine, grandpa?" asks my wife.

A quick investigation reveals the hissing to be of

animal rather than mechanical origin. Rupert the

cat has emptied his bladder onto a plastic bag in

the corner of the room. Don't tell me cats have no

sense of humour. I can think of no possible reason

he would’ve chosen a plastic bag except for the

comedic sound effect.

Young boy and old cat have become unlikely companions

in the past year. Not best friends - the disparity

in energy levels is too wide - but definitely

something warmer than tolerance. "Miaow" is one

of the more-used words in our grandson's lexicon,

usually accompanied by the presentation of a cat

biscuit. Yet the last few months have shown this

may not be a long-term relationship. These days

the cat often takes several seconds to stand up, before

walking like a badly operated remote-control

toy. Veterinary visits include talk of 'management'

rather than cure. And now it appears as though

Rupert's walnut-sized brain is also suffering the

effects of age-related problems. It seems likely that

he's forgotten his cat latrine under the hedge and

wants an indoor alternative. This could be the beginning

of a sad decline. My mother's told me that

I should hit her over the head with a rolling pin if

she loses her mental faculties. (I probably ought

to start wearing a rolling pin holster whenever I

visit, just in case she's ever confused about who

the Prime Minister is.) However, that sort of treatment

seems a bit harsh for dear little Rupert.

So, with the cat not going out, it's time for us

to make the effort. A trip to Ringmer's pet shop

yields a couple of low-tech plastic trays and a sack

of high-tech German cat litter. Apparently it's ecofriendly

and flushable, although Rupert won't be

doing the flushing himself.

That evening, my wife and I are sitting with

Rupert on the sofa. He's wedged himself between

us; a blatantly divisive act that would call for

the intervention of a cat psychologist in other

circumstances. After a while he tries to stand, but

without success. His eyes widen with distress. My

wife and I turn to look at each other. In her face I

see a mixture of emotions: love, sadness... and an

expression that looks more like frustration than

anything else. Eventually she speaks, not to the cat

but to me. "You're sitting on his tail."

Mark Bridge

31


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ON THIS MONTH: MUSIC

Dreadzone

Founder Greg Roberts

You famously teamed up with Mick Jones, formerly

of The Clash, in Big Audio Dynamite.

Were you influenced by punk music? I can’t

say that I was at all, although Mick Jones turned

out to be the biggest influence in my life. He remains

a good mate… we recorded the new album

in his studio, and we aim to collaborate again

soon. I grew up playing funk and reggae music,

that’s why I got the gig with Big Audio Dynamite;

he liked my groove.

Reviewers have found it difficult to pigeonhole

Dreadzone. The last I heard was ‘Dub/

reggae/trip/house/electronica’. Is this anywhere

near accurate? That’s as good as any I’ve

heard: on Wikipedia it even uses ‘folk’ as one of

the terms. The simplest one is to say ‘dub dance’.

We just call what we do ‘dread music’, like it’s our

own genre.

Tell us about the new album Dread Times…

It’s an album that explores a more dub and reggae

approach. It goes back to our roots but looks forward

as well. All the tracks work together well as

an album rather than just separate tunes. It’s also

a ‘top 40 album’ thanks to everyone who bought

it. I think it’s one of our best.

Pop music was more overtly political when

you started out, in the 80s, than it is now.

Would you call Dreadzone a politically

motivated band? Maybe in the beginning… I

was a lot younger and felt we had a duty to say

something. I realise now that is not always the

best approach: we still write stuff that is about

the social aspects but keep it ambiguous. An

instrumental track can be political just by using a

couple of samples.

John Peel was very inspired by your music.

Were you inspired by much of the music he

played? I did enjoy his shows. I loved his eclectic

approach and how he embraced dub and techno.

But his favourite band was The Fall which goes

right over my head, I must admit.

You are playing, as ever, in a lot of festivals

this summer. Do you get tired of the festival

circuit? Does the thrill of performing ever

wane? The thrill never wanes, because we always

try to keep it fresh, even though we’ve been playing

the same songs for the past 20 years. I like

spending the summer in fields with lots of people

connecting, dancing to music and being high.

What’s not to like?

Dublin, Manchester, Amsterdam… Lewes? Do

you know anything about the town? I know

nothing about it...*looks at Wikipedia* …hmm

best place to live in Sussex apparently. AL

Dreadzone are headlining day two of the Lewes

Live Festival, on Saturday 29th July. Ska band

Chainska headline the Friday bill. Other acts

include Gaz Brookfield, Cousin Avi, Karl Phillips

& the Rejects, The Dead Reds and Sam Walker.

Adult weekend pass (including camping) £45 from

Union Music Store, The Dorset, Resident Records

in Brighton or leweslive.com

33


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6

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ON THIS MONTH: MUSIC

Paddock Singers

Conductor Ruth Kerr

Photo by Katie van Dyke

Congratulations on your tenth anniversary!

What kind of music do you feel the Paddock

Singers excel at? I like to think we're incredibly

flexible. The great thing about the Paddock

Singers is that we can turn our hands to singing

choral evensong at Chichester Cathedral one

week, and flashmob style performances the next,

plus presenting our own themed concerts and

singing at local community events and concerts.

We sing an eclectic mix of repertoire, including

full works such as Vivaldi's Gloria and Pergolesi's

Stabat Mater, contemporary pop arrangements,

19th/20th century part-songs, plus new music

written specially for the choir by local composers.

How did you come to be involved? I originally

became involved as an accompanist and to cover

an occasional rehearsal for the previous conductor,

John Hancorn. John and I ran it jointly for a

while, and then John passed the baton solely to

me in 2012.

What are the advantages of an all-woman

choir as opposed to a mixed one? From a musical

perspective I particularly enjoy the close harmony

possibilities which an all-woman choir affords

and the sheer range of musical opportunities

which present themselves to a choir of this type

and size, but there's no doubt that there's a very

special atmosphere of engagement, fun, learning

and support in the Paddock Singers, which is

perhaps due to its all-woman demographic.

Does being a singer give you an advantage

conducting a choir? Yes, a huge advantage!

Being able to demonstrate how to sing a phrase

- including where to breathe, how to shape a

particular vowel, and just simply how to attach the

correct syllable to the right note - is enormously

helpful. I'm also particularly interested in helping

people feel more confident about singing, so being

able to sing along with them can really help

with this.

Do you find there are young composers today

writing well for female choirs? There are lots

of good people out there, but writing for a good,

amateur, women's choir is a pretty niche area - in

fact sourcing music for the choir is a never-ending

challenge and I'm very particular about the arrangements

and the repertoire we use... which is

why I've recently written some music specifically

for the choir myself. My skills were a little rusty

at first, but I've really enjoyed the creative process

and the Paddock have responded brilliantly.

What music do you relax to? Relax? What's

that? Only joking. It depends on my mood - I

mainly listen to classical music, but sometimes

only 1980s pop power ballads will do… PAK

The Paddock Singers perform ‘Vivaldi’s Gloria…

and other girls!’ on Sun 9th, at the All Saints Centre,

4.30pm, £10 (under 14s free)

35


䐀 漀 氀 瀀 栀 椀 渀 猀 伀 瀀 琀 漀 洀 攀 琀 爀 椀 猀 琀 猀 Ⰰ 䐀 漀 氀 瀀 栀 椀 渀 䠀 漀 甀 猀 攀 Ⰰ アパートアパート 䴀 甀 猀 琀 攀 爀 䜀 爀 攀 攀 渀 Ⰰ 䠀 愀 礀 眀 愀 爀 搀 猀 䠀 攀 愀 琀 栀 Ⰰ 刀 䠀 㘀 㐀 䄀 䰀

㐀 㐀 㐀 㐀 㔀 㐀 㠀 㠀 簀 眀 眀 眀 ⸀ 搀 漀 氀 瀀 栀 椀 渀 猀 漀 瀀 琀 漀 洀 攀 琀 爀 椀 猀 琀 猀 ⸀ 挀 漀 ⸀ 甀 欀

伀 瀀 攀 渀 椀 渀 最 琀 椀 洀 攀 猀 㨀 䴀 漀 渀 ⴀ 䘀 爀 椀 ⠀ 攀 砀 挀 ⸀ 圀 攀 搀 ⤀ 㤀 ⸀ ⴀ 㜀 ⸀アパート 圀 攀 搀 ☀ 匀 愀 琀 㤀 ⸀ ⴀアパート⸀


ON THIS MONTH: DRAMA

The Commercial Traveller

Pete ‘Rudes’ Talbot

The Eastbournebased

Rude Mechanicals

outdoor theatre

company was founded

in 1997. Their annual

tour of the south of

England ends at

Michelham Priory on

14th August. They will

be performing their

new play The Commercial

Traveller, set in

1924. We speak to the

man who wrote it, creative director Pete Talbot.

What can we expect from The Commercial

Traveller? As always, it’s a comedy, although there

are serious issues involved too. It’s a story about

love and money, but it’s also about the relationship

between the empowered and the disempowered.

We make fun of people in power and want people

to think, so there’s a political element. I studied

the very physical Italian commedia dell'arte, and

Rude Mechanicals productions are a contemporary

version of that. The Commercial Traveller is scripted

rather than improvised, although the script is always

in flux and can change during rehearsals. All six

actors are also musicians, and we have a principal

musician, so there’s lots of music. Instruments

include a double bass, clarinet, accordion, drums,

guitar, violin and a banjulele.

How did you come to be involved with open

air theatre? I was an English/Drama teacher for

21 years. I loved it, but left because I wanted to

start a theatre company. My approach to directing

is very similar to teaching; it’s all about getting the

best out of people. I toured in America with some

youth theatres, saw some commedia dell'arte on the

streets of New York and wanted to learn more, so

went to Italy to study

that. When we began

as a theatre company,

we did some Shakespearean

comedy for

a while to build up an

audience. Now I write

new plays every year.

How many times

have you performed

in Lewes? Twice every

year for 18 years, so

that’s 36 times now.

What’s the Grange like as a venue? It’s terrific.

We always get the biggest audiences in Lewes, we

have a great following. It’s the only place we put on

two shows. Lewes people are sophisticated - they

appreciate and understand what we do.

What’s the biggest challenge of your work? It’s

important that we get the right team together for

each tour. We spend a lot of time together, and not

everyone is available every year.

What do you enjoy the most? We’re rehearsing a

lot at the moment and I love working with people

who are creative, involved and on-the-ball.

Do you like being on the road? I love it.

How do you deal with the unintentional interruptions

of open air theatre in public spaces;

bell ringing, ambulance sirens… We don’t get

many problems with noise when we're performing

in Lewes. And once the audience is drawn into the

story, they don’t really notice.

Interview by Emma Chaplin

Sat 22nd, Sun 23rd, picnics from 6pm, performances

7.30pm, Grange Gardens (other performances in

various locations including Barcombe, Alfriston and

Plumpton Green) £16/15/12/9, family ticket £40,

therudemechanicaltheatre.co.uk / 01323 501260

37


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ON THIS MONTH: LITERATURE

Iby Knill

Holocaust survivor

Iby Knill, 93, wrote her memoir about her traumatic

wartime experiences - which included a spell in

Auschwitz-Birkenau - in her seventies. She married

a British Army officer after the war, and moved to

England. She supressed her memories: it was only

after her husband died nearly 40 years after the end

of the war that she decided to write the Holocaust

testimony The Woman Without a Number. She has

also written a memoir about her post-war years, The

Woman with Nine Lives.

Why did you decide to tell the story of your

ordeals during WW2 so late in your life? I

wanted a new life - without the traumas, although

they haunted me. My late husband knew about it

and was very supportive. Also, I did not want any of

my children to be under the threat of anti-semitism.

They only found out when they were adults - I

never told them any details.

Do you read other accounts about the Holocaust?

I never read about the memories of other

survivors, I want to be certain that what I write or

talk about contains only my own memories. But for

anybody wanting to read factual, unbiased accounts

I would strongly recommend any books by Ian

Kershaw.

Did writing about your experiences help you

overcome them? I don't think it helped. I write

and talk about them as if they had happened to

someone else [The Woman without a Number is

written in the third person]. Writing the book was

a long process: it took me three years and I had

support from my tutor on the MA course I was on,

and my friends. Writing the second memoir was

much easier.

You also write fictional short stories. Were you

ever tempted to turn your story into a novel?

No, because I had promised to only tell the facts.

Do you feel any bitterness about what has happened

to you? No, no bitterness. I have had a rich

and fulfilling life. My experiences and the way I

have dealt with them, the friends I have made, have

shaped my life. I’ve always tried to live one day at a

time and feel thankful that I can do that.

Other Holocaust survivors talk of ‘survivor’s

guilt’, is that something you have felt? Yes, I did

a long time ago. But I try not to do any harm and to

live in a way... I cannot really explain… I can justify

my survival?

What have you learnt from your wartime experiences

that you can pass on to the young people

today? That under the skin we are all the same,

that we need to accept and value diversity and that,

ultimately, each one of us can make a difference.

Interview by Alex Leith

Iby appears at the Lewes Speakers Festival, All Saints

Centre, Sun July 23rd, 1.30pm. Tickets £12.50. £70

weekend passes allow you to watch all 17 speakers,

including Roy Hattersley, Jenni Murray, Terry Waite

and Kate Adie. lewesspeakersfest.com

39


䄀 刀 吀

愀 琀 琀 栀 攀

䌀 唀 䈀 䔀

䜀 䄀 䰀 䰀 䔀 刀 夀

䐀 䤀 匀 䌀 伀 嘀 䔀 刀

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ON THIS MONTH: ART

Focus on: Au-delà des Etoiles, by Aure

Screen-print, 49 x 69 cms, £30

Is this image influenced by any

particular sci-fi film/story, or is it

completely from your imagination?

Yes, this image is a stylistic

representation of a film where the

extra-terrestrials attack the humans.

The alien is a mix of spider and

octopus, or devil fish. The world of

the cinema is part of my art.

What sort of process did you use?

The poster was screen-printed in

the workshop Hors Cadre, using

three specially mixed colours.

Can you tell us about your choice

of colours? The choice of colours

was inspired by comic books from

the era of Doctor Strange, Strange

Magazine, Magazine Pilot 1980, etc.

That’s why I often use tram lines

and halftones in my posters.

Did you use any digital packages

to generate the image or

is it hand drawn? No. It is drawn

by hand. I draw using fine pencils

because I like when there is a lot of

fine detail.

There’s a strong tradition of print

posters in France… which artists

have influenced your style? From

time to time, I like to draw inspiration

from old cinema posters, science

fiction and horror for example.

It looks like graphic novels have

been an influence too? I like most

of the underground graphic scene

for example: Dernier Cri (Marseille),

PaleFroi (Berlin), Arrache Toi un

Oeil (Paris), Presse Purée (Rennes),

Hors Cadre (Villefranche de Rouergue),

Le Cagibi (Lille), l'Imprimerie

Trace (Concots) etc...

Which decade is your

favourite for illustrations and

design, and why? I think that

the 50s were very well known

for graphic art. I think that a

lot of films were influenced by

science fiction novelists such as

Philip K Dick, Aldous Huxley

and Arthur C Clarke...

What’s your favourite art

gallery? The Arts Factory gallery

in Paris.

What artwork would you

take to your desert island? I’d

build a huge UFO in sand.

How do you feel about

exhibiting in Lewes? Are you

coming to the show? I feel

like a small grain of sand on

a vast beach. I would love to

come to Lewes but I don't have

a flying saucer!

Interview by Alex Leith

Aure’s print will be on show at

Art Without Borders, 2, Fisher

Street, Fri 14th - Sun 16th

41


Find us on High Street, Lewes

Call 01273 473 543

Or visit visionexpress.com

Conditions apply, ask in-store for details.


ART & LITERATURE

Neil Gower

As Kingfishers Catch Fire

Graphic artist Neil Gower

has to be one of Viva’s undisputed

favourites. His

portfolio includes work for

all the greats: Faber & Faber,

Penguin, Random House, The

New Yorker, Vanity Fair... and

yet the Brighton graduate’s

international success has not

deterred him from being the

most prolific cover artist for

Viva Lewes... so far he has 45

under his belt.

Neil’s latest project is by far

his most ambitious yet. As

Kingfishers Catch Fire is an illustrated

‘literary ornithology’

written and compiled by Alex Preston and published

by Little, Brown Book Group this July.

The delectable hardback volume contains 21 colour

plates, 50 monochrome illustrations, and a bespoke

endpaper design that would look just as slick on shirt

or tie. All these are hand-painted by Neil without

any digital wizardry.

“It’s for people who love birds,” he tells me over coffee.

“It’s for people who love beautiful writing, and

people who love beautiful books.”

As Kingfishers Catch Fire sits among a recent boom in

quality nature writing and unconventional memoir.

Author Alex Preston was a keen bird spotter as

a teen, but “when he realised that was not a way

to impress girls,” Neil says, “he kind of drove it

underground”.

The result was dozens of notebooks littered with

bird references collected while reading, and over

time, the concept for As

Kingfishers Catch Fire. Says

Neil: “It’s Alex’s life that is the

constant thread”.

The pair met when Neil was

asked to design the endpapers

for Alex’s novel In Love and

War. Alex knew he’d found

the person to make his next

book the art object it needed

to be. “It was a big leap of faith

for both of us,” says Neil. “I’d

never painted birds and he’d

never collaborated with an

artist.”

“Ornithological art is a noble

discipline with a long history,”

says Neil. “I knew I was walking into a minefield

in that regard… to do it properly, you need to get

everything technically right.”

Instead, Neil cast aside self-doubt and took an imaginative

approach. “I hoped that by concentrating on

how writers portray the bird, I’d come to something

accurate and faithful to its spirit.”

Neil’s final paintings represent each chapter’s ‘visual

centre of gravity’, which, he says, is revealed through

reading “in first gear”. I ask if there’s one quote that

sums up the book as a whole.

“My instinct leads me to the Snow Geese chapter,”

he says, “assuming it might be some heart-stopping

description of vast distance…” It isn’t, however. “It’s

a brief line from Mary Oliver’s Snow Geese - ‘Oh to

love what is lovely, and will not last.’”

Chloë King

neilgower.com

43


VALUATION DAY

Chinese Art and Jewellery

Tuesday 25 July, 10am to 4pm

Bonhams specialists will be at The Courtlands

Hotel to offer free and confidential advice on

items you may be considering selling at auction.

Martyrs’

Gallery

APPOINTMENTS

AND ENQUIRIES

01273 220000

hove@bonhams.com

VENUE

The Courtlands Hotel,

19-27 The Drive,

Hove BN3 3JE

Summer

Salon

2017

(Thursday to Sunday · 12 noon – 5pm)

Star Brewery · between Castle Ditch Lane and Fisher Street · Lewes · BN7 1YJ

EARLY KANGXI BRUSH POT, BITONG

Sold for £125,000

bonhams.com/hove

Prices shown include buyer’s premium. Details can be found at bonhams.com


ART

ART & ABOUT

In town this month

Lily Pichon Un avion dans le jungle

From the 5th, Pelham House will be

exhibiting work by young artists from

Sussex Downs College. Works by

up-and-coming creative talents who’ve

been studying for A-Levels in Fine Art,

Textiles, Graphic Design, Photography

and the Art & Design Double Award.

Until the 15th of August.

From the 17th, Chalk Gallery turn their focus coastward.

Brighton in Chalk is an exhibition of works inspired by

the seaside city. Everyone is welcome to join them on

Saturday the 22nd for a celebratory ‘seaside special’ from

12-4pm. The show continues until the 27th of August.

[chalkgallerylewes.co.uk]

This month’s cover artist Marc Greco,

formerly of Lewes and now of the south west

of France, is back for the summer with some

creative friends in tow. Art Without Borders

is a show of original, affordable, hand-made

screen-prints from Atelier Hors Cadre, a

printmaking collective based in Villefranche

de Rouergue, where Mark now does his

printing. Their first ever exhibition outside

France will recreate the unique collaborative

spirit of the Atelier at 2 Fisher Street. It

opens on Bastille Day - Friday 14th – and

continues until the 16th. See pgs 8 and 41.

[horscadre-impressions.com]

From the 8th, Martyrs’ Gallery

present their early Summer

Show, with a cross-section of

contemporary two and threedimensional

artworks selected by

a panel (including Viva’s editor)

and curated by gallery owner Alex

Grey. Of particular note is an

animation by Stewart Grainger,

in collaboration with Ray

Burnside, accompanied by works

from Shakespeare's Cymbeline,

set to music by Carol Sloman.

It’s about the displacement of

refugees into Europe, and it’s

strikingly powerful. Until the

30th, 12 noon–5pm, Thursday to

Sunday.

Lindsey Smith

Stewart Grainger (detail)

45


ART

Just down the road

What is it like to live with a hidden disability?

In the Hidden Project, a group of artists with

‘invisible disabilities’ like ME and autism have

been working with local arts charity Roots Experience

to articulate their reality. The result is

The Hubbub – a multi-sensory installation that

invites you to ‘touch, talk, think and feel’ your

way to a better understanding of what it’s like.

Find it at the Founders Room at the Dome

on the 8th and 9th. [brightondome.org]

I dream of icebergs by Adele Gibson Hollywood by Richard Denne

‘Seeing comes before

words’, is a quote

from the opening

words of John Berger’s

groundbreaking

1972 book Ways of

Seeing. It’s also the

title of, and ethos

behind, this year’s

MA Postgraduate

Fine Art Show at the University of Brighton. Open

to the public from the 8th until the 16th, the show

features painting, installation, photography, sculpture,

textiles, performance, video and sound-based work.

Open 10am–5pm every day, with an artist-led tour at

11am on Saturday 9th. 58-67 Grand Parade.

On Sunday the 9th, the Brunswick

Town Art Fair returns to Brunswick

Square Gardens in Brighton. Now in its

sixth year, this summer’s show features

affordable work by more than 50 local

artists and makers. The Regency Town

House will be open all day with an exhibition

of local landscape photographs by

Finn Hopson (curator of the Brighton &

Hove calendar) and the bold and graphic

pop-art images of Richard Denne, who

juggles traditional print-making processes,

digital technology and mixed media.

Open 11am–6pm (with afternoon teas

served in the dining room from 1pm).

Admission is free.

Out of town

© Sheila Donaldson Walters, 2017

Infinite

Spirals and

Joie de Vivre

continues

at Farleys

Gallery

featuring the

paintings of

Sheila Donaldson Walters, who was

a close friend and colleague of Roland

Penrose at the Institute of Contemporary

Arts. Sundays only until the 13th

August. [farleyshouseandgallery.co.uk]

47


Letting your house

is plain sailing with

Ashton Burkinshaw

Dedicated to lettings.

Open 6 days a week.

47 High Street, Lewes,

East Sussex, BN7 2DD

01273 471 477

lewes@ashtonburkinshaw.co.uk

www.ashtonburkinshaw.co.uk


ART

Out of town

The highly acclaimed Eric Ravilious exhibition continues at Towner

Gallery. Marking the 75th anniversary of his death, Ravilious & Co: The

Pattern of Friendship explores his relationships and collaborations with friends

and affiliates. Works by contemporaries including Paul and John Nash,

Enid Marx and Peggy Angus hang alongside pieces by Ravilious, telling a

chronological story of their overlapping and interweaving careers. Continues

until September.

Also at the gallery from the 22nd, Now, Today, Tomorrow and Always is the

second exhibition curated by Towner from the Arts Council Collection.

Selected pieces by 12 internationally renowned artists explore how popular culture has influenced recent

contemporary art. Film, photography, sculpture and installations focus on the ‘liberating, provocative and

seductive power of music and film’, and investigate themes such as subculture, fandom and individual,

collective and national identity. And the 2017 Sussex Open, with selected works from established and

emerging artists from both East and West Sussex, also opens on the 22nd. [townereastbourne.org.uk]

'Summer', 1926–7 © Estate of Tirzah Ravilious

Whilst Hokusai’s Great Wave is on show at the

British Museum, A Sussex Wave from Japan is at

Hastings Museum and Art Gallery, with prints of

Eric Slater featuring alongside those of his littleknown

mentor Arthur Rigden Read. Japanese

masters like Hokusai and Hiroshige inspired the

simpler arts and crafts woodcuts of Slater and

Rigden Read, as well as other British artists who

practised the craft between the wars. Until September

3rd. [hmag.org.uk] Meanwhile The Only

Way to Travel continues at Jerwood Gallery in

Hastings, where Sir Quentin Blake has had complete

freedom to explore themes that concern him.

His thoughts on mental health, the ‘squeezing of

creativity’ and the refugee crisis fill the walls of the

entire ground floor, totalling upwards of 100 works.

Until October. [jerwoodgallery.org]

Rough Sea 1929, colour woodcut by Eric Slater

‘John Minton painting resurfaces after

years spent in owner's shed,’ a Guardian

headline proclaimed last year. Minton,

a talented-but-troubled neo-romantic

who died aged 39, had given the painting

to a friend, who’d apparently ‘struggled

to find a wall large enough to hang it’.

The painting, Jamaican Village, went on

to sell for £293,000. Pallant House has

announced that it’ll be featured – its

‘first showing in a public institution since

1951’ – in their

new exhibition of

Minton’s paintings

and illustrations,

which marks the

centenary of his

birth. Until 1st Oct.

[pallant.org.uk]

Book illustration by John Minton

John Minton, Children by the Sea, 1945, oil on canvas, 94 x 76.1 cm,

Tate, London © Tate, London 2015 / Royal College of Art

49


10:20 Page 2

AKERS

RARY AND

L CRAFTS

x Guild

Gallery

th Wing

Grange

er Road

t Sussex

N7 1TP

7 days a

00 - 5.00

tmas Day

o: 292234

.uk

DESIGNER MAKERS

OF CONTEMPORARY AND

TRADITIONAL CRAFTS

Ceramics

Enamelling

Furniture

Glass

Jewellery

Knitwear

Leatherwork

Metalwork

Pewterwork

Silk Painting

Silversmithing

Textiles

Woodturning

Woodwork

Quilt Making

Live Craft

Demonstrations

Upper Dicker, Hailsham,

East Sussex BN27 3QS

Contemporary

EVENTS 2012

CRAFT SHOW

CONTEMPORARY

Michelham Priory

CRAFT 3 - SHOWS 6 August 2017

THROUGHOUT 10.30am - 5.00pm SUSSEX

www.thesussexguild.co.uk

www.thesussexguild.co.uk

Star Walk

Saturday 9th September 7pm

WAKEHURST

Ardingly, Haywards Heath, West Sussex, RH17 6TN

Join us beneath the stars as we take a walk to remember

this September. Enjoy a 4km sponsored stroll through

Wakehurst’s beautiful botanic gardens, and add to a

stunning sea of glistening lanterns as you pause halfway

to remember and celebrate the people you love.

Entry is £15 before 1st August and £18 thereafter.

Under 16s £5. Register at www.stpeter-stjames.org.uk

or call us on 01444 470713

starwalk@stpeter-stjames.org.uk

£15

Earlybird

Entry

Registered Charity Number: 1056114

Kindly sponsored by

Experience the extraordinary atmosphere of the Sussex home of the Surrealists

Lee Miller and Roland Penrose whose friends and guests included Picasso,

Leonora Carrington, Man Ray and Miró. We open to visitors on Sundays offering

50 minute guided tours, exhibitions in our gallery and a sculpture garden to explore.

Farleys House & Gallery

Muddles Green, Chiddingly

Cream Teas & Cake

East Sussex, BN8 6HW

Available from Sunday 9 July 2017

Tel: 01825 872 856

farleyshouseandgallery.co.uk

Open to visitors every Sunday from April - October

2017

11am - 4pm Sunday 23 July 2017

10.00 am - 3.30 pm

Keith Pettit Sculpture Carving Demonstration

50


JULY listings

SATURDAY 1

Positive Birth Meet-up. Free, monthly discussion

group helping parents-to-be to get informed,

and become positive and confident about birth.

Wickle, 10.30am, free.

SATURDAY 1 & SUNDAY 2

Film: Fences (12). Oscar winner starring Denzel

Washington and Viola Davis. All Saints, 5.45pm

(1st) and 7.30pm (2nd), from £5.

Film: 20th Century

Women (15). A single

mother raises her

son in the summer of

1979, with the help

of some unlikely role

models. All Saints, 8.30pm (1st) and 5pm (2nd),

from £5.

SATURDAY 1 – SATURDAY 8

Rise and Fall of Little Voice. Lewes Theatre

Club’s production of the 1992 play by Jim Cartwright.

Lewes Little Theatre, lewestheatre.org.

TUESDAY 4

The Group. Club for people aged 50+. A pub in

Lewes, 8pm, see thegroup.org.uk.

WEDNESDAY 5

How can we really change stuff? Transition

Town Lewes celebrates its 10th birthday with a

night of inspiring speakers, debate and live music.

The Depot, 7.30pm, £10 (£5 concessions).

THURSDAY 6

Comedy at the Con. Hal

Cruttenden and Dominic

Holland warm up for the

Edinburgh Fringe. Con Club,

7.30 for 8pm, £12.

Service of traditional choral evensong. Marking

the completion of Cliffe Church’s successful

restoration appeal. Thomas à Becket, 6pm.

FRIDAY 7

SUNDAY 2

Nevill Open

Gardens Trail. Opportunity

to explore

over a dozen private

gardens, community

allotments and

'Lewes Little Gardens'. All proceeds to Lewes

Victoria Hospital. 2pm-5pm, programmes available

from Mount Harry Stores (£3).

MONDAY 3

After the election what future for our

children's schools? Kevin Courtney, General

Secretary of the NUT, joins a Lewes Labour

Party event with teachers and parents discussing a

funding crisis affecting Primaries and Secondaries.

Phoenix Centre, 7.30pm, free.

Patina ‘Moving On’ parade. Procession of

sculptures, costumes and music created by primary

school children to mark their transition to

secondary school. See pg 69-72.

FRIDAY 7 – SUNDAY 9

Othello. Shakespearian tragedy performed by

SISATA Theatre. Lewes Castle grounds, 7pm-

9pm, £8/£10.

51


Proms 2017 VIVA Ad (128 x 94) AW.indd 1 24/05/2017 14:52

GLYNDE PLACE

CONCERT SERIES 2017

BBC Radio 3 New Generation Artists

Schumann Hindemith Schubert

Dinicu Vieuxtemps Paganini

Eivind Holtsmark Ringstad (viola)

with

Daniel Lebhardt (piano)

7pm, 29 July 2017

Tickets & info:

glyndeplace.co.uk

second annual

SHAKESPEARE

SUMMER

SCHOOL

MONDAY 7 th -

FRIDAY 11 th

AUGUST

2017

Under the

direction of

Jack Shepherd

based at

Fitzroy House

10 High Street

Lewes, East Sussex

BN7 2AD

ALL ENQUIRIES: Alison Grant

www.fitzroyhouselewes.com

E: fitzroyhouselewes@gmail.com

T: 07557340911

SSS 2017 A6 DS Viva.indd 1

Commercial Square Bonfire Society presents

SATURDAY 5th AUGUST

EVENT ORGANISED by COMMERCIAL SQUARE BONFIRE Ltd. REGISTERED in ENGLAND and WALES Number. 9022196

FEATURING THREE BANDS

Miracle Motown

The Brogues

Lewes, Glynde &

Beddingham Brass

• Afternoon start,

night-time finish

• Firework finale

• Licenced bar

• Barbecue food

• Side stalls

TICKETS

ADULTS: £8.00 in advance

£10.00 on the gate

CHILDREN - 5 to 16: £3.00

Under 5s - FREE

GATE OPENS - 3:00pm

PROUD SUPPORTERS of the

CSBS PROMS IN THE PADDOCK

17-May-17 11:19:39 A

TICKETS AVAILABLE ONLINE AT www.promsinthepaddock.co.uk

TICKETS ALSO AVAILABLE TO PURCHASE FROM THESE OUTLETS:

The Elephant and Castle • Tourist Information • Harveys Brewery shop • Richards Butchers


JULY listings (cont)

SUNDAY 9

Glynde, Firle and

Beddingham Garden

Trail. Over 12 gardens to

explore, with refreshments,

plants, produce

and sculpture trail.

11am-4pm, contact

01273858554 for info.

Lewes to Newhaven Raft Race. Theme: Britannia

Rules the Waves? 3-6pm. Contact lewesraftrace@gmail.com

for more info.

of birds and literature, featuring Neil’s paintings

(see pg 43). Deans Place Hotel Alfriston, 6.30 for

7pm, £5.

FRIDAY 14

Boys Beyond Borders. A cabaret performance

for Enthum House, a supported residence for

refugee boys. All Saints, 7.30 for 8pm, £10/£12

available from Lewes Live Literature,

07972037612 / leweslivelit.co.uk.

SATURDAY 15 & SUNDAY 16

MONDAY 10

Thomas Paine in Lewes. Lewes History Group

talk on Lewes’ internationally famous resident.

King’s Church building, 7 for 7.30pm, £2/£3.

TUESDAY 11

An Evening with Laurie Penny. Reading and

Q&A to celebrate the launch of her new book

Bitch Doctrine Essays for Dissenting Adults. Waterstones,

7.30pm, £5.

WEDNESDAY 12

Peggy Angus and British Women Artists. Talk

with author and curator Carolyn Trant in relation

to her forthcoming book Voyaging Out; British

Women Artists 1910–1960. The Keep, Moulsecoomb

2.30pm, £3.

Punch and Judy. Illustrated talk by Bertie Pearce

on the famous puppet character Punch. Uckfield

Civic Centre, 2.15pm, free.

THURSDAY 13

Comedy at the Con. George Egg and a special

guest star warm up for Edinburgh Fringe. Con

Club, 7.30 for 8pm, £12.

Birds and Books. Book launch and art exhibit

with Alex Preston and Neil Gower to celebrate

new book As Kingfishers Catch Fire, an exploration

Classic Vehicle Show. Classic domestic, agricultural

and military vehicles. Dogs welcome.

Michelham Priory, 10.30am-5pm, normal admission

applies.

THURS 13 – WED 23 AUGUST

Don Pasquale. Mariame Clément’s production

of Donizetti’s Don Pasquale, first seen on the 2011

Glyndebourne Tour returns. Glyndebourne,

times and prices vary, see glyndebourne.com.

SUNDAY 16

Family BBQ. Good food and music for all. Con

Club, 12pm-4pm, £5/£10.

THURSDAY 20

Comedy at the Con.

Katy Brand and Charlie

Baker warm up for the

Edinburgh Fringe. The

Con Club, 7.30pm for

8pm, £12.

53


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䰀 䤀 嘀 䔀 䴀 唀 匀 䤀 䌀 䈀 夀 ∀ 圀 伀 刀 䬀 䤀 一 倀 刀 伀 䜀 刀 䔀 匀 匀 ∀

䄀 䰀 伀 䌀 䄀 䰀 䨀 䄀 娀 娀 儀 唀 䤀 一 吀 䔀 吀 ℀

圀 䤀 一 吀 䤀 䌀 䬀 䔀 吀 匀 吀 伀 䜀 䰀 夀 一 䐀 䔀 䈀 伀 唀 刀 一 䔀 伀 刀

䄀 䈀 刀 䤀 䜀 䠀 吀 伀 一 ☀ 䠀 伀 嘀 䔀 䄀 䰀 䈀 䤀 伀 一 䴀 䄀 吀 䌀 䠀

54


JULY listings (cont)

FRIDAY 21

Thomas Cromwell and the Dissolution of the

Sussex Monasteries. A talk by Helen Poole. Anne

of Cleves House, 7.30pm, £5.

FRIDAY 21-SUNDAY 23

Lewes Speakers Festival. With guests including

Polly Toynbee, Iby Knill (see pg 39), David Walker,

Terry Waite, Kate Adie and many more. All Saints,

see lewesspeakersfestival.com for details.

The Wind in the Willows.

James Weisz (former Artistic

Director of 88 London Road)

directs this family musical.

Lewes Castle grounds, 7pm,

from £10. See pg 65.

Summer Serenade. Ringmer Flower Club Festival.

St Mary’s Church Ringmer, 10am-4pm daily, free

(donations welcome).

SATURDAY 22

Brighton in Chalk Seaside Special. Public event

as part of the Brighton-inspired exhibition. Chalk,

12pm-4pm.

Evening of Music in aid of St Peter and St James

Hospice. St Mary’s Church Ringmer, 7pm, free

(donations welcome).

SATURDAY 22 & SUNDAY 23

The Commercial Traveller. New play by the Rude

Mechanicals Theatre Co. See pg 37. Southover

Grange, 7.30pm (picnics from 6pm), £16 + conc.

SUNDAY 23

Flower Festival Choral Evensong. St Mary’s

Church Ringmer, 6.30pm, free.

WEDNESDAY 26

Step Back in Time – A History of the Argus.

Talk with local historian Paul Green. The Keep,

5.30pm, see thekeep.info.

WED 26 – SAT 26 AUGUST

La Clemenza di Tito. The third and final new

production of the season will mark the Glyndebourne

debut of the prominent German director

Claus Guth. Glyndebourne, times and prices vary,

see glyndebourne.com.

FRIDAY 28

Lewes Friday Food Market 7th Birthday. Food,

drink, music and a hamper raffle. Market Tower,

9.30am-1.30pm, free.

FRIDAY 28 & SATURDAY 29

Lewes Live. Two-day music festival with headliners

Chainska and Dreadzone. See pg 33. leweslive.com.

Festival of the Garden: The Culture of Place.

Series of talks addressing the question ‘What Makes

a Place?’ Charleston, see charleston.org.uk.

SATURDAY 29

Eivind Holtsmark Ringstad

Viola recital. With

piano accompanist Daniel

Lebhardt. Glynde Place,

7pm, £30 (under 16s £15).

Vintage Jazz Evening. Dr

Bone and the Surgeons of

Swing play. Newhaven Fort,

7pm-10pm, £10.

SUNDAY 30

Crime Writers in Conversation. Lesley Thomson

(The Dog Walker, featuring Stella Darnell) and Elly

Griffiths (The Chalk Pit, featuring Ruth Galloway)

discuss their best-selling books in conversation with

Lisa Holloway. The Old Chapel Centre Alfriston,

4pm, £10.

55


LEWES

FESTIVAL OF

SONG

2017

July 7th to 9th

A weekend of five concerts

St Anne’s Church, Lewes

Friday 7th July - 7.30pm

BANALITÉS - a French song recital

Saturday 8th July - 1pm

AN ENGLISH GARLAND -

Songs for a summer afternoon

Saturday 8th July - 7.30pm

NORDIC NOIR - a Scandinavian feast

Sunday 9th July - 1pm

SCHUBERT’S DIE SCHÖNE MÜLLERIN

SUNDAY 9th July - 7.30pm

TWO TALES, TWO TURNING POINTS

Mahler and Janacek

FESTIVAL PASS £60

ticket prices £15 (Saturday 1pm £12)

Under 16s half-price

BOOK ONLINE

www.lewesfestivalofsong.co.uk

or from Lewes Tourist Information Centre

01273 483448 lewes.tic@lewes.gov.uk

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST (2017)

PG 129mins

Saturday 1st 3pm

Live-action re-telling of the fairy-tale classic. Follow the

fantastic journey of Belle, a bright, beautiful and

independent young woman who is taken prisoner by a

beast in his castle. Despite her fears, she befriends the

castle's enchanted staff and learns to look beyond the

Beast's hideous exterior and realize the kind heart and

soul of the true Prince within.

FENCES

12 139mins

Saturday 1st 5.45pm & Sunday 2nd 7.30pm

OSCAR, BAFTA & GOLDEN GLOBE WINNER 2017

Best Supporting Actress (Viola Davis).

Also nominated for Best Film, Best Actor & Best

Screenplay. Denzel Washington directed and stars in this

adaptation of August Wilson's Pulitzer Prize-winning play,

about a black garbage collector named Troy Maxson in

1950s Pittsburgh. Bitter that baseball's colour barrier was

only broken after his own heyday in the Negro Leagues,

Maxson is prone to taking out his frustrations on his

loved ones. Both Washington and co-star Viola Davis

won Tony Awards for their performances in the 2010

revival of the play.

20TH CENTURY WOMEN

15 116mins

Saturday 1st 8.30pm & Sunday 2nd 5pm

During the summer of 1979, a Santa Barbara single

mom and boarding-house landlord decides the best way

she can parent her teenage son is to enlist her young

tenants - a quirky punk photographer, a mellow

handyman and her son's shrewd best friend - to serve

as role models in a changing world.

To keep up to date follow us on Twitter and Facebook!

www.lewesfestivalofsong.co.uk

Info & advance tickets from the All Saints

Centre Office, the Town Hall, High Street,

or www.filmatallsaints.com

All Saints Centre, Friars Walk, Lewes, BN7 2LE

01273 486391


CLASSICAL ROUND-UP

SATURDAY 1 ST

East Sussex Bach Choir will perform Rossini’s

Petite Messe Solennelle with soloists Yvonne Patrick,

Briony Lambert, Andrew Mackenzie Wicks and Ed

Hawkins. The conductor is John Hancorn (below).

7.30pm, St Anne's Church, £15 & £10

SATURDAY 8 TH

Brighton Festival Chorus’s summer concert comprises

Elgar’s Serenade for Strings, Vaughan Williams

An Oxford Elegy Bennett’s Letters to Lindbergh, Barber’s

Adagio and Gjello’s Sunrise Mass. The conductor

will be James Morgan.

7.30pm, Attenborough Centre, University of Sussex,

£18.50 or £12 for under 16s

Musicians of All Saints will perform Beethoven’s

Romance in G, op40, featuring violin soloist James

Wicks, John Hawkins’ Another Orpheus, Grieg’s Two

Elegiac Melodies and Haydn’s Symphony no 43 in E flat.

7.45pm, All Saints Centre, £12, concessions £9 (under

18s free)

East Sussex Community Choir’s programme will

feature John Rutter’s Requiem and Mozart’s Exultate

Jubilate, with soloists Catrin Woodruff, David Chapman

and Andrew Robinson. The band is the Corelli

Ensemble led by Maeve Jenkinson and conducted by

Nick Houghton.

7.30pm, Town Hall, £12

SUNDAY 2 ND

Baritone Andrew Robinson and pianist Nick

Houghton will perform music by Josquin des Prez,

Handel, Brahms, a bit of Papageno from The Magic

Flute and some Bernstein from On the Town.

3pm, St Michael’s Church, free

The Baroque Collective Singers will offer Tudor

madrigals and French and English part-songs by

Eric Whitacre, Britten, Hindemith and Janequin.

6.30pm, St Michael’s Church, £10 (under 16s free)

FRIDAY 7 TH - SUNDAY 9 TH

Lewes Festival of Song, brainchild of pianist Nancy

Cooley, is in its third year and will offer five concerts

over three days, featuring music by Schubert,

Mahler, Grieg, Janacek, Britten and others. Find

complete concert and artist information on their

website: lewesfestivalofsong.co.uk.

St Anne’s Church, £15, £12 or £60 for all 5

SUNDAY 9 TH

The Paddock Singers perform Vivaldi’s Gloria....

and other girls! See pg 35.

4.30pm, All Saints Centre, £10 (under 14s free)

SUNDAY 16 TH

Tenor Timothy Wilcox will give a recital of music

by Vaughan Williams, Holst, Rebecca Clark, Purcell,

Handel, Biber and Telemann. He will be accompanied

by violinist Toby Hawks, cellist Ethan Merrick

and harpsichordist Nick Milner-Gulland.

5pm, Hamsey Old Church, Offham

SATURDAY 22 ND

Lewes Chamber Choir’s workshop will explore

Purcell’s Funeral Music for Queen Mary and Singet

dem Herrn of Heinrich Schütz. Their accompaniment

will be provided by a brass quartet led by

Malcolm Warnes. Nick Houghton presides and

music will be provided.

10am to 5pm, St Michael’s Church, £20

THURSDAY 27 TH

London-born guitarist and composer Matthew Sear

will present a recital. No programme information is

available at this time.

1.10pm, St. Anne’s Church

Paul Austin Kelly

57


JUL

1

7

8

14

21

22

23

27

MUSIC NIGHTS

@ The Con Club

MUSA M’BOOB & XAM XAM

SHOWCASE OF WEST AFRICAN MUSIC

ELEVATORS BIG BAND

50’s INSPIRED RnB & BLUES

ZION TRAIN

MULTIMEDIA ACID-DUB COLLECTIVE

AYU FUNK PARTY

TIGHT HEAVY RHYTHMS & 70’s FUNK CLASSICS

CURST SONS

BLUEGRASS BLUES ROCKABILLY & A DASH OF HELLFIRE

LOOSE CABOOSE

WITH DJ’s RACHELLE PIPER AND MARTIN JACKSON

DICKIES

RED RAUCOUS & CHURCH OF EDEN

SAVOY FAMILY BAND

A CAJUN BARN PRESENTATION

SEE WEBSITE FOR ENTRY AND DETAILS

LEWES

FARMERS’

MARKET

A SLICE OF SUSSEX

1ST & 3RD SATURDAY OF EACH MONTH

CLIFFE PRECINCT 9am - 1pm

www.commoncause.org.uk


GIG GUIDE // JULY

GIG OF THE MONTH: THE DICKIES

Veterans and self-proclaimed ‘clown princes of punk’ The

Dickies are coming to the Con Club this July as part of their

40th anniversary tour. Most probably know them for their

catchy melodies, comical panache and (all too underrated) ability

not to take themselves too seriously. Formed in early 1977,

the group were amongst the first LA punk bands to score a

major label, and despite punk’s fluctuating popularity, they have

stood the test of time. Since the emergence of music streaming

services such as Spotify, the band now feel their energy is better

spent touring live than in the studio recording. This makes for a

show that is jam-packed with old time favourites, and a venue full of people who can sing (or shout) along to

the lyrics. Altogether now: “La la la…” Sun 23, Con Club, 7.30pm, £16.50 Kelly Hill

SATURDAY 1

Musa M’Boob & XamXam. West African

music. Con Club, 8pm, price TBC

Beergut 100. Rock covers. Lamb, 8pm, free

Discovery. Folk. Elly, 8pm, £6

Musa M'Boob & XamXam, Saturday 1st

SUNDAY 2

English Dance Tunes Session. Folk. Lamb,

12pm, free

The Market Street Band. Blues/jazz covers.

John Harvey Tavern, 3pm, free

MONDAY 3

Imogen Ryall. Jazz. Snowdrop, 8pm, free

TUESDAY 4

English Dance Tunes Session. Folk. John

Harvey Tavern, free

THURSDAY 6

Zoot Zazou. Vintage hot swing. Pelham Arms,

8.30pm, free

FRIDAY 7

Elevators Big Band. 50s Rythm ‘n’ Blues. Con

Club, 8pm, £5

The Mofos. Rock covers. The Lamb, 8pm, free

SATURDAY 8

Jim Glover & Chris Skinner. Folk. Ellie, 8pm, £6

Zion Train. Acid-dub duo. Con Club, 8pm, £13

Jacquemo. Ska. Lamb, 8pm, free

My Darling Clementine: In-store signing and

acoustic set. Union Music, 3pm, free (first come,

first served basis)

Zoot Zazou, Thursday 6th

59


Because every life is unique

…we are here to help you make your

farewell as personal and individual as possible,

and to support you in every way we can.

Inc. Cooper & Son

42 High Street, Lewes

01273 475 557

Also at: Uckfield • Seaford • Cross in Hand

www.cpjfield.co.uk


GIG GUIDE // JULY (CONT)

Summer Extravaganza. Full House, rock and pop

covers band, supported by senior Starfish bands.

Nevill Green, 6pm-10pm, £4/£5, more information

at njbs.co.uk

SUNDAY 9

Terry Seabrook (piano) & Geoff Simkins (sax).

Jazz. Depot café, 11am-1pm, free with brunch

MONDAY 10

Terry Seabrook Piano Trio. Jazz. Snowdrop,

8pm, free

The Savoy Family Band. Thursday 27th

FRIDAY 14

Ayu Funk Party. 70s funk. Con Club, 8pm, free

SATURDAY 15

The Reform Club. Pop/rock originals and covers.

Snowdrop, 9pm, free

Sally Ironmonger & Brian Carter. Folk (modern).

Elly, 8pm, £6

Groovestew. Mystery rock. Lamb, 8pm, free

SUNDAY 16

Jim Lauderdale & Angaleena Presley Double

Bill. Americana. All Saints, 7.30pm, £20 (£16

advance)

MONDAY 17

Simon Savage. Jazz sax. Snowdrop, 8pm, free

FRIDAY 21

The Curst Sons (right). Bluegrass/Blues. Con

Club, 8pm for 9pm, free

Toots & The Maytals. Ska/Reggae. De La Warr,

7pm, £29.50

SATURDAY 22

Unison Bends. Blues. Lamb, 8pm, free

Loose Caboose. DJs Rachelle Piper & Martin

Jackson. Con Club, 7.30pm-12am, £5

Bob ‘War Horse’ Fox. Folk (Newcastle Trad).

Elly, 8pm, £10

SUNDAY 23

The Dickies. US bubblegum punk. See Gig of

the Month

MONDAY 24

Alan Barnes & Alex Eberhard. Jazz. Snowdrop,

8pm, free

THURSDAY 27

The Savoy Family Band (above). Cajun. Con

Club, 7.30pm, £12

Bayou Seco. Cajun/Zydeco. Westgate, 8pm.

01273 478124 for tickets

Feral Fiddles (practice session). Folk. Royal

Oak, free

FRIDAY 28

KOLO. Pop-rock. Lamb, 8pm, free

SATURDAY 29

Bif Bam Pow! Pub Rock. Lamb, 8pm, free

Peter Collins. Folk & Misc. Elly, 8pm, £6

SUNDAY 30

Terry Daniels. More mystery rock. The Lamb,

4pm, free

MONDAY 31

Triversion. Jazz organ, guitar and drums, with

Terry Seabrook. Snowdrop, 8pm, free

The Curst Sons, Friday 21st

61


This is your

Journey

Down to Earth, caring and vibrant

co-ed Nursery and Prep School in

Lindfield, Sussex

For a private tour please call our registrar on 01444 483528.

www.greatwalstead.co.uk


FREETIME UNDER 16 êêêê

SATURDAY 1

SATURDAY 22 & SUNDAY 23

Film: Beauty and

the Beast (PG).

Live-action re-telling

of the classic fairytale.

All Saints, 3pm,

from £5.

story of the Princess and the Pea, with dressing

up and hands-on craft activities. Anne of Cleves

House, 1pm-4pm, price included in admission.

WEDNESDAY 26

Archaeology Day. Historical hands-on activities

for all ages. Michelham Priory, 8am-5pm, see

sussexpast.co.uk.

Kew Science Festival. Researchers from Kew

Gardens and Wakehurst showcase a week of

workshops, shows, tours and activities for all the

family. See pg 67. kew.org/wakehurst.

SUNDAY 23

Sunday Stories. Afternoon with a storyteller and

the opportunity to handle some artefacts, all ages

welcome. Lewes Castle, 2pm-4pm, price included

in admission.

MONDAY 24 – THURSDAY 27

Intrepid Theatre Summer Camp. Exploring

children's own story threads and then weaving

them together to create a play. Focus is on

performing arts and creative arts & crafts for

5-10 years. Times and prices vary, contact

intrepidrichard1@gmail.com.

MONDAY 24 – SUNDAY 3 SEPT

Wild Kids. Wide array of

woodland activities, where

children can immerse

themselves in nature.

Wakehurst, see kew.org/

wakehurstkids for more info.

TUESDAY 25

The Princess and the Pea. Drop in to hear the

Fêtes & Fairs

SATURDAY 1

Southover School Summer Fair. Southover

School, 12.30pm-3pm, £1 (kids free).

Kingston Village Fête. Behind the Juggs,

1pm-5pm, free.

South Malling Summer Fête. South

Malling Primary, 11.30am-2.30pm, £1.

SATURDAY 8

Summer Extravaganza. Nevill Green,

12pm-4.30pm, free (programme 30p).

SUNDAY 16

Lewes Borough Bonfire Society Fête.

Malling Playing Fields, from 12pm, £3.

SATURDAY 22

Summer Fun Day at Chailey Green, 1pm-

4pm, free.

SATURDAY 29

Lewes Kids and Family Summer Festival.

All Saints, various shows from 9am-4pm, see

lewesspeakersfestival.com.

Westmeston Summer Fayre. Westmeston

Parish Hall, 2pm-5pm, £2.50 (kids free).

63


FREETIME UNDER 16

êêêê

YOUNG PHOTO

OF THE MONTH

We liked this picture, by Lauren Eade, so

much that we decided to change the rules

of this competition to allow her in. Lauren,

you see, is 16 years old and while previously

we drew the line at that age, we thought

we’d change it to ‘sixteen or under’. “It’s a

picture of a deer I took on a trip to Knole

Park, the National Trust property in Kent,

for my dad’s birthday,” she tells us. Either

she had a very long lens, or that was a

more-than-averagely trusting deer; the

picture wins Lauren a £10 book token she

can claim, with proof of identity, at Bags of

Books. Sixteen or under? Send in your pictures to photos@vivamagazines.com, with a few words

saying when, where, and why you took it, and you, too, could feature on this page!

Steyning Grammar School

Day & Boarding in West Sussex

TOP 10% NATIONALLY

FOR STUDENT PROGRESS

STATE BOARDING

GIRLS & BOYS

DEVELOPING CHARACTER

SINCE 1614

Boarding Admissions open for September 2018 with places

for GCSE (13-16 yrs) and Sixth Form College (16-18 yrs)

For further information please contact us: sgsboarding@sgs.uk.net

BOARDING judged by

OFSTED as OUTSTANDING

Find us online

www.sgs.uk.net +44 (0)1903 817601

64


WIND IN THE WILLOWS êêêê

Kenneth Grahame's wonderful tale of Mole, Ratty, Badger and Mr Toad is coming to

Lewes Castle. We talk to director James Weisz.

How are you creating all those different locations plus Ratty's boat and Mr

Toad's car? In plenty of theatrical ways! That is always the most exciting challenge

in performing open air.

Are the actors wearing animal heads or make-up? Our cast all definitely need

make up. No-one wants to see them without, believe me.

How much of the famous picnic will there be? Well, Ratty does love his picnic and he'll definitely be

bringing one. The other animals don't get any of his scrummy food, but who knows, he might just share

some with his friends in Lewes.

Who in real life is most like Mr Toad would you say? Donald Trump? Richard Branson...? Let's keep

politics out of this, but I am sure everyone will recognise traits of certain well-known people.

Should people bring picnics, rugs and cushions? Absolutely, we love outdoor for its relaxed and welcoming

nature, but beware we have some very hungry animals on the prowl, those Weasels will eat anything and

never ever say "please".

Is it suitable for any age? Absolutely any age, the show is filled with music, comedy, slapstick, adventure

and a moral or two - something for everyone. EC 21st - 23rd July, 7-9pm with interval. Gates open at 6pm for

picnics. £12 / £10 U13s, student or senior / family £40 from ticketsource.co.uk/willows2017 or Castle ticket office

A summer of wonderful

woodland adventures

24 July – 3 September

Weekly woodland events and wonderful play spaces

For details visit kew.org/wakehurstkids

65


Singing, dancing

& acting classes

for 4-18 year olds,

where students

learn to embrace

life with creativity

and courage

for life’s little adventures

Children’s clothes 0-10yrs

New Spring & Summer Collection

194 High Street, Lewes, BN7 2NS

01273 476646

stagecoach.co.uk/lewes

lewes@stagecoach.co.uk

01273 504380

SHOES ON NOW: NEWHAVEN FORT êêêê

‘You’ve been here before you know,’ I tell my four year old as we head into

Newhaven Fort. He can’t remember it of course, which is just as well as he

was in utero at the time. But I digress…

There is much to like about Newhaven Fort, a Sussex heritage site which

aims to bring to life historical events, with an emphasis on World Wars I

and II. My children enjoyed looking behind the casement doors to discover

artefacts such as old unexploded bomb cases, menacing looking gas masks

and several displays of naval uniforms. For those who want, there’s a quiz to

complete, which sharpens the children’s attention as they try to locate the items on their sheet.

Another attraction of the Fort is the simulated Blitz experience which successfully recreates some of the

fear and uncertainty felt by people who lived through an air raid - great for my 11 year old but too scary

for my youngest who refused to go in. Instead he and I explored the underground tunnels, speaking in

creepy voices to scare one another.

Outside there’s plenty of space to run around in as well as field guns to look at on the cliff tops and the

working port to admire below. The playground, café and giftshop are all worth a look too. Parking is easy

and free and at only 20 minutes or so drive from Lewes, the Fort is definitely worth a visit. Jacky Adams

Further details can be found at: newhavenfort.org.uk. Price for a family of two adults and up to three children

is £19.99. Well behaved dogs are free.


STEFAN GATES: GASTRONAUT

êêêê

What is a gastronaut? A gastronaut is someone who finds

adventure in food - who sees their lunch not as fuel, but a source

of stories, science, morality, history, love, death and emotion.

Are you more scientist or chef? I’m a gastronaut! No, really

- the thing is that every cook is a scientist, even if they don’t

know it (or even if they don’t like the idea). Every time you

fry an egg you are dealing with extraordinarily complex protein-denaturing, every time you bake a cake

you are deploying some wonderful chemistry.

Can you tell us some of your wackier experiments? Frying eggs in hydrochloric acid (to mimic

what happens in your stomach), having liposuction to extract usable food additives from my body

matter, creating a real fart-producing machine in my kitchen (wife not happy), visiting Chernobyl to

investigate radiation and food (wife really flippin’ mad).

What’s your message? If you make food fascinating people will care more about it, and then they will

eat better. That’s why insects are an amazing tool for discussing food - and the issues around it such

as ecology, land use, water load, CO 2

load etc. Kids especially couldn’t care less about nutrition if you

tell them what they should and shouldn’t eat. But blow up 40 calories of milk powder in an enormous

fireball, and suddenly they care big time. AL

Stefan is appearing at the Kew Science Festival at Wakehurst, 22nd-23rd July, kew.org/wakehurst

With its excellent and imaginative approach, the Steiner Waldorf curriculum has

gained ever-widening recognition as a creative and compassionate alternative to

traditional avenues of education.

But just how does it feel to be a child in this environment, soaking up this

stimulating and rewarding teaching?

Find out for yourself...

Open Morning

Thursday 12th October 2017 - 08:30 - 13:00

www.michaelhall.co.uk

Kidbrooke Park, Priory Road, Forest Row. East Sussex, RH18 5JA

Tel: 01342 822275 - Registered Charity Number 307006

67


L ewe s

Kids and Family

Festival 2017

Where the whole family can enjoy:

Yoga for Kids and families, Brillo the Clown, The Fun

Science Show, The Family Magic Show with Robbie

Mills and ‘Magic’ the live bunny and a Family Disco with

party dances, games, competitions and prizes

29th July 2017 at the All Saints Centre

Single Tickets: £9 for each individual event

Early Bird Price: £8 if bought before 3rd July 2017

Day/Festival Passes Available

Tickets/Info at:

www.leweskidsandfamilyfestival.com

Call the Box Office on: 0333 666 3366

In association with: The White Hart Hotel Lewes


LIVE

Lewes High Street, School Hill, Cliffe Precinct, School Hill,

Market Street, Market Lane, Mount Pleasant.

Party in The Paddock from 1.40pm - 3 pm. Everyone welcome.

Involving over 700 children, parents, carers and teachers every year since 2002, Moving On is

Lewes’ unique and much-loved way of celebrating local children’s transition from primary to

secondary school and into adolescence.

This year’s “Wonders of Our World” theme is set to be a spectacular celebration of connections with

people and places around the globe, with the children’s interpretations of extraordinary natural

phenomena, iconic architecture and festivals from around the world.

Each school in the parade will represent one of the most popular and exciting places suggested by

the children and our local community. In May, after exciting presentations in each school of all the

destinations in the parade, there was much excitement as children found out which wonder of the

world had been picked at random for their school. Ever since, the whole area has been a hive of

activity, working with Patina artists on this mass arts project, learning carnival arts and creating the

costumes and sculptures for all to enjoy when the Moving On Parade comes to town on 7th July.


AMAZING

ARCTIC

AMAZING

ARCTIC

ARCTIC ARCTIC OCEAN OCEAN

PACIFIC PACIFIC SEA SEA

ALOHA

HAWAII

ALOHA

HAWAII

THE GREAT

AMERICAN

ROAD TRIP

NORTH NORTH AMERICA AMERICA

MEXICAN

DIA DE LOS

MEURTOS

THE GREAT

AMERICAN

ROAD TRIP

MEXICAN

DIA DE LOS

MEURTOS

PASSIONATE PASSIO

ABOUT PARISABOUT P

ATLANTIC ATLANTIC OCEAN OCEAN

THE DRAMT

OF VENICEO

CARNIVAL C

GORG

ANCIE

GREEC

AFRIC

BRILLIANT

BRAZIL

SOUTH SOUTH

AMERICA AMERICA

BRILLIANT

BRAZIL

The parade itself The is parade the culmination itself is the of culmination many months of many of activity months which of activity have included which have clay included people on clay people have

their travels popping their travels up around popping town up around and indeed town the and world, indeed an the international world, an international dance evening dance and an evening from and

informal survey informal of languages survey of spoken languages in the spoken Moving in On the area. Moving The results On area. revealed The results a very revealed impressive a very impressiv Patina

number of languages number of spoken languages in the spoken town and in the surrounding town and villages. surrounding villages.

Movin

Given the travel Given theme, travel people theme, near and people far have near also and been far have invited also to been write invited postcards to write with postcards messages with messa and c

of good luck and of good encouragement luck and encouragement for the children for as the they children make as the they next make big step the next in their big lives. step Patina

their lives. Pa


NATE

ARIS

AHE THE DRAMA DRAMA

F VENICE OF VENICE

CARNIVAL

EUROPE EUROPE

ASIA

ASIA

EOUS

NT

E

WALK LIKE WALK LIKE

AN EGYPTIANAN EGYPTIAN

ICA A

GORGEOUS

ANCIENT

GREECE

SPECTACULAR

INDIA

SPECTACULAR

INDIA

CHECKING CHECKING

OUT CHINESE OUT CHINESE

NEW YEAR NEW YEAR

JAPAN IN

THE SPRING

JAPAN IN

THE SPRING

NGORONGORO NGORONGORO

WILDLIFE WILDLIFE

WONDERS WONDERS

AWESOME

ISLANDS OF

INDONESIA

AWESOME

ISLANDS OF

INDONESIA

PACIFIC PACIFIC SEA SEA

MAD ABOUT MAD ABOUT

MADAGASCAR MADAGASCAR

INDIAN INDIAN OCEAN OCEAN

TRAVELS TRAVELS

DOWN UNDER DOWN UNDER

AUSTRALIA AUSTRALIA

on been overwhelmed have been overwhelmed by the wonderful by the response, wonderful including response, hundreds including of postcards hundreds coming of postcards in coming in

local an residents from local and residents from our and twin from towns our in twin France towns and in Germany. France and Any Germany. last cards Any can last be put cards in can the be put in the

e post box Patina the post Tourist box in Office! the Tourist Office!

g On is Moving just that On – very is just moving. that – very Why moving. not experience Why not the experience children’s the world children’s tour yourself world tour on 7 yourself July on 7 July

heer ges all and our kids cheer on, all as our they kids celebrate on, as they moving celebrate on to moving the next on stage to the of next their stage adventures. of their adventures.

tina


The Moving On Parade is very generously supported by the following organisations:

Congratulations to all our excellent primary schools and enormous thanks to our

wonderful Patina artists, Maia Eden, Michelle Martin-Dufaur, Nikki Gunson, Sandrine

Case, Sally Miller, Katie Griffiths, Dorothy Rosser.

Huge thanks to Emma Carlow, Michael Blencowe and our many dedicated volunteers,

especially our school reps, year 6 teachers, parents and carers, and Patina

trustees, the parents of Wallands School for fundraising above and beyond to help

others’ participation, Lewes New School for use of their premises for masterclasses,

the Lewes Railway Lands Wildlife Trust, The Rotary Club of Lewes, Artists Advisory

Panel, Peter Earl and his team of stewards, Starfish, Intersport, Lewes.co.uk for help

with our website, Viva Lewes, the Sussex Express, East Sussex Highways and East

Sussex Police, Martin Elliott, everyone who helped at Ditch the Detox and our Dream

Team football festival, Michelle Wilson of www.artofdance.co.uk and Collette

Goodwin of www.adultballet.org.uk and

everyone who helped at Dance Your

Socks Off, King’s Framers, Si’s Sounds,

Hannah’s Van, the staff at Lewes

Town Hall and Lewes Tourist Office,

the staff and pupils of Sussex Downs

College, John Harvey Tavern,

Waitrose and Tesco. We’d also like to

say a very big thank you to everyone

who hired our Christmas lanterns,

donated prizes for our raffles, helped

us to fundraise and participated in

our events.

Patina is an arts charity for young

people, co-ordinated by Caroline

Croft and Raphaella Sapir. To find out

more visit www.patinalewes.com

or come to see what we do on

Sunday 9th July at our post parade

exhibition.

PATINA

parents and teachers in the arts

LINKLATER PAVILION RAILWAY LANDS LEWES

SUNDAY JULY 9TH 12 TILL 4PM

LIVE

patinalewes.com facebook/Patina @patinalewes patinalewes


THE KITCHEN MAKER

VISIT OUR NEW

TEST KITCHEN IN LEWES

01273 486 177 INGLISHALL.COM


FOOD REVIEW

Backyard Café

When is a pie a pie?

“You’ll have to wait 15

minutes if you want

salad,” says the wellmannered

young guy

at Back Yard Café, the

new coffee-and-food

company that’s taken

over the café space in

the Needlemakers.

“Lunch isn’t served till

midday, and they’re

still making it.”

I say that’s no problem,

and tell him, mostly because all the tables

inside are full, that I’ll be sitting outside. I ask

for a flat white while I wait.

I’ve had their coffee before, and it’s good. They

roast their own, in Ditchling, and are planning

to set up a roaster on-site. They also do food:

a blackboard tells me of a number of different

panini on offer, as well as Higgidy pies of

various flavours. I choose bacon and cheese.

With the salad, that’s £8.95. “The salad better

be worth it,” I think. And the pie too: Higgidy

are a Shoreham company and I’ve heard people

enthuse about their wares, though I’m yet to try

one out.

They’ve dolled up the seating area outside, with

six new pub-style wooden tables, and three walls

of plants and trees screening you off from your

surroundings: it’s a yard in a car-park basically,

but they've done a good job of disguising

that. I manoeuvre myself into a spot in the sun

facing Wallis & Wallis, and wait. It’s election

day, there’s plenty to occupy me on my phone,

and anyway my brother rings, and Terry the

Needlemakers’ handyman’s at another table and

he’s always good for a bit of banter.

The coffee comes, plus a carafe of tap-water I’ve

asked for and, at

noon on the dot (I’m

an early luncher) the

main act arrives. If

I’d been with anyone,

no doubt the

old ‘when is a pie

a pie’ conversation

would have broken

out, as this one has

no top, and looks

more like a quiche.

The salad, though,

looks amazing. It’s abundant, taking up the rest of

the plate, and looks super healthy, too.

I come to the conclusion that the pie is a quiche:

the cheese is creamy and mild, and the pastry

of the soft, crumbly variety. It’s nice, without

being spectacularly nice. A tentative thumbs up,

I guess, to the guys in Shoreham.

The salad, though, is something really special.

I write down the ingredients in my notebook:

cherry tomatoes, plum tomatoes, peas, broad

beans, carrot, feta cheese, bulgar, courgette, nuts,

lemon zest, shredded cabbage, red onion, coriander

and sesame seeds. Unless there’s something

else I’ve forgotten about. Thirteen ingredients

in a salad? I’d never do that at home.

I’ve left half my coffee for afterwards. My

palate isn’t up to telling whether it’s washed

or Typica or whatever, but it’s strong and its

not-overwhelming bitterness is tempered by the

frothy milk. I decide to buy a bag of their beans

– they’re stacked up on some shelves in nice

brown bags – to grind at home. Though when

I get back to the office I rave about the salad,

rather than the coffee: it was well worth waiting

15 minutes for.

Alex Leith

Photo by Alex Leith

75


76

Photo by Alex Leith


RECIPE

Green chutney

A versatile ‘flavour bomb’, from Chloe

at Seven Sisters’ Spices

Green chutneys are such a common feature

in a lot of cuisines. You could almost classify

pesto as a green chutney, with the traditional

basil, pine nut and parmesan. In India

they can be made with all sorts of different

ingredients, but my Indian-influenced one

is made using 100g coriander, 50g peanuts,

½tsp turmeric, 2tsp ground coriander seeds,

three cloves crushed garlic, one green chilli

and the juice and zest of one lime. Place all

of the ingredients into a small food processor

and blitz to a coarse paste. You can freeze it,

or you can keep it in your fridge for about a

week to ten days.

The thing I love about this is that you can use

it as a curry paste, you can use it as a marinade,

you can mix it with yoghurt to make

a dressing – there’s just a million different

things you can do with it. You can use it as a

chutney, just as it is. It’s really versatile. It’s

also nice as a vegetarian option if you crumble

some feta in with it, because the lovely zing of

the coriander and lime goes really nicely with

the feta cheese. Sometimes I put fresh mint

leaves in as well. It really is just one of those

recipes that you can sort of wing around,

depending on your flavour preferences.

I think there are some ingredients which

people think they’d only ever buy from a shop

and they’d only ever use in one way. If you

start to take ownership of things like this and

just use them how you want, you can break

that limitation of thinking that a chutney

is just a chutney, or a paste is just a paste.

They’re all amalgamations of flavours that

you can just sort of riff off. If you know you

like the basic flavour you can just start to play

around with it.

That sort of thinking is increasingly quite a

big component of the workshops that I teach.

Yes, you’ve made a mango chutney, but you

can do this, this and this with it. It can be

quite labour-intensive in the first instance,

but then once you have a stock of these lovely,

quite complex flavour bombs in your fridge,

you can stick them in all sorts of things.

I’m teaching three different workshops at

the moment on a rotation: ‘The Alchemy of

Spice’, which looks at working with spices

in all their different manifestations - curries,

dal, flatbreads, spiced rice, chutneys; ‘Spiced

Salads and Sugar-free Treats’, which is about

fresh, raw and ‘clean’ eating; and ‘Pickles

and Condiments’, which very much focuses

on what I’ve just been talking about with the

green chutney.

This month I’ll be doing a cookery demonstration

in Inglis Hall’s new test kitchen.

They’re really keen to have people coming in

and just using it, so I’m hoping to teach some

courses in there and maybe do some stuff for

Octoberfeast too!

Interview by Rebecca Cunningham

Upcoming workshops are on Sat 8th, Mon 17th

and Sat 29th July, 10.30am-2.30pm, £45 per

person. sevensistersspices.com

77


LEWES FRIDAY FOOD

MARKET 7 TH BIRTHDAY

Plus Hamper Raffle

buy local - eat seasonal - feel good

We are 11 years old this month!

46 High Street, Lewes. 01273 481048


FOOD

Big Daddy's

8-ounce burgers... at a price

Lewes hasn’t had a dedicated burger place open up since the

early eighties, when the Beefeater came on the scene. I guess

I didn’t know much about burgers in those days: there was a

Wimpy in Brighton, but they toasted their buns, which wasn’t

cool. I loved Beefeaters as a 16 year old; I often used to spend my lunch money there.

Nowadays it’s hard to find a food joint which doesn’t sell burgers. If you want a ‘world famous’ one with

garlic sauce, go to the Elly. If you want a cheap one, go to the Charky. If you want a gourmet-style one,

with hand-ground meat and house-made sauces, go to the Pelham Arms. If you want one served with

Stilton, go to the Dripping Pan.

It’s curious, then, that another dedicated burger store should open up now - and in the same building as

Beefeaters was, on Fisher Street. It takes me three visits to Big Daddy’s before I find it open (they decided

not to do lunchtimes in the week). Happy to be there, I choose a ‘New Yorker’ (‘8oz burger with cheese,

pickles, tomato, lettuce, traditional burger relish, mustard & onion rings)’ from 13 choices. I chat to the

owner during the ten or 15 minutes I wait; he’s the brother of the guy who runs the Spice Merchant.

And? It’s a pretty good burger, solid and tasty, juicy without being sloppy, and full of different textures,

from the softness of the brioche bun, through the chewiness of the meat, to the crunch of the onion ring.

Though at £9.50 (including 50p card charge) it’s probably beyond the pocket of most 16 year olds. AL

Photo by Alex Leith

79


HAVE YOU EVER HAD DINNER

AT HOME WITH ITALIANS?

Real homemade pasta with authentic Italian sauce,

the fresh smell of basil, the delicate taste of extra

virgin olive oil... I've brought here to Lewes the

flavors of my region, Liguria, and the pleasure to

eat in a family environment, a traditional Ligurian

style meal with ingredients straight from Italy.

The Pelham arms

HIGH ST.

LEWES

A Great British pub,

a warm welcome,

wonderful food & ambience

Book on my Facebook page, call 07979 095864

or email dining@articiocca.uk

See you soon, Ciao!

I

Lewes’s first

I

Smokehouse

I in a Pub!

Hand Crafted Food - Local Suppliers

Best Burgers for Miles

Award winning Sunday Roasts

Vegetarian, vegan & gluten free options

Abyss Brewing beers brewed on site

GREAT VENUE FOR CELEBRATIONS

children & dog friendly

I

OPENING TIMES

Monday

Bar 4pm to 11pm

Tuesday to Thursday

Bar 12 noon to 11pm

Food 12 noon to 2.30pm & 6 to 9.30pm

Friday & Saturday

Bar 12 noon to Midnight

Food 12 noon to 2.30pm & 6 to 9.30pm

Sunday

Bar 12 noon to 10.30pm

Food 12 noon to 8pm

T 01273 476149 E manager@thepelhamarms.co.uk

Book online @ www.thepelhamarms.co.uk

@PelhamArmsLewes pelhamarmslewes pelhamarmslewes


Illustration by Chloë King

FOOD

Edible updates

OctoberFeast has done much to bring 'pop-up suppers' to Lewes and it’s great to

see regulars offering events outside the festival. The ‘In Residence’ supper club on

South St is offering both grown-up events and children’s dining on the first Saturday

of the month all summer. [facebook.com/InResidenceSupperClub] Kabak are hosting a

special ‘Feast in the Forest’ on the 15th, promising more outstanding Middle Eastern food in

Laughton’s picturesque Lower Vert Wood, see tabl.com. Café du Jardin are enjoying their new wine cellar,

and will continue their ‘Regions of France’ series with a three-course menu on 22nd July. The Feature

Kitchen team up with Pestle & Mortar to offer tantalising Thai takeaway on 14th, 21st and 28th July.

Next up, birthdays. Birthday wishes to Cheese Please and also to the newly-named Lewes Friday Food

Market, turning seven this month with a special edition on the 28th. They’re bringing more new traders in

including, this month, The Sweetarian and Picnik Brighton, and will soon be the place to pick up your

favourite Tina’s Kitchen lunches. Tina is stopping her café trade this month to focus on workshops and

nutritional therapy come September.

In other news: Ouse Valley Foods are relocating to Barcombe and raw milk dairy Hook & Son have

launched a crowdfunding campaign to replace grazing land they are losing to development: gofundme.

com/grazing-land-for-our-cows. Street Food Rocks are looking after the grub at Ouse Day (Sun 9th);

The Snowdrop Inn welcome new head chef Charlie Jackson; The Giant’s Rest pub in Wilmington is

under new management and Guido Lounge is taking residence next door to Aqua, as part of the Loungers

chain. [thelounges.co.uk] Chloë King

Milton Street, East Sussex, BN26 5RL

01323 870840 • www.thesussexox.co.uk


THE WAY WE WORK

This month we asked ‘photographer, writer & illustrator, feminist,

permaculturist & post-colonialist, urban gardener’ Aiste Saulyte to

capture some of the Lewes area beekeepers at work. And she asked them:

have you got an unusual use for honey?

aistesaulyte.co.uk

Ian White

"It can be taken a spoonful at a time as just a tonic, to add some additional vitamins and minerals.

Or, some say, local honey can be taken to help alleviate the symptoms of hay fever."


THE WAY WE WORK

John Clayton

"Well, I suffer from hay fever, so I use it to help me with that!"


THE WAY WE WORK

Hilary Osman

"I used to work as a nurse. There was a time when we'd tried all we could to heal a patient's

wound, but nothing worked. I used honey on it and it's the only thing that worked!"


THE WAY WE WORK

Norman Dickinson

"We have a boxer dog called Zoot. He has Cushing's disease. I ran out of ham to wrap his pills

in and tried coating them in honey instead - it worked, he loved it!"


HEALTH

Health from the hive

Honey bee good…

Visit any artisan market and you’ll probably find a

stall selling honey and related products — but we

are far from the first to utilise the healing properties

of everything bee. In fact, apitherapy — to

use the proper term — was practised centuries

ago in ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome, while

honey was still being used to fight infection in the

early twentieth century.

As our ancestors knew, raw honey is anti-inflammatory,

anti-fungal and anti-bacterial. The key

word, though, is raw, as filtered or pasteurised

honeys do not offer the same benefits. Even raw

honeys vary in potency, with medically licensed

Manuka one of the best known.

As well as eradicating over 250 strains of bacteria,

raw honey has been found to heal wounds and

can be used on mild burns and sunburn. It’s a

natural cough syrup, and can also treat cold sores,

herpes and dandruff.

And it’s not the only bee product with healing

powers. Bee pollen, which bees make to feed their

young, has equally impressive credentials. With

a protein content of around 40 per cent, a single

teaspoon takes a bee a whole month to gather.

Containing nearly all the nutrients we require,

bee pollen has been used to speed recovery from

chronic illness, reduce cravings, stabilise weight,

improve digestion and fight infection. Most commonly,

though, it is an effective hayfever remedy

— although it must be made locally and taken for

at least six weeks before the season begins.

Propolis is a waxy resin manufactured by bees

from leaf buds and used to disinfect the hive,

repair cracks, and even to embalm intruders. It is

the most powerful natural antioxidant known, and

is also antimicrobial, analgesic, anaesthetic and

anti-inflammatory. Used for thousands of years, it

can help prevent dental plaque, heal tumours and

ulcers and soothe sore throats.

Royal Jelly is another well-known bee product.

All bee larvae are given some, but only one is fed

exclusively on it, becoming queen and going on

to live four times longer than the others, laying

up to a million eggs.

Containing a wealth of vitamins, minerals, amino

acids and enzymes, it has anti-bacterial and

anti-fungal properties, and, perhaps because of its

association with the queen bee, is often taken to

boost fertility. It is also the only food known to

contain 10-HDA, a fatty acid associated with enhanced

learning abilities and improved memory.

Finally, for those feeling brave, there is a sting in

our tale. As the name suggests, bee venom therapy

involves being repeatedly stung, and has been

used to treat MS, Lyme disease, and arthritis. The

venom entering the body increases red blood cell

levels, and delivers an anti-inflammatory, which

stimulates the immune system, relieving pain and

promoting healing.

Anita Hall

86


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Friendly cats and kittens

seek loving homes

Lewes, Seaford & District

Cats Protection

(BN6-10 & BN25-26)

Call 01273 515605

For neutering services for your own

For neutering services for your own

cat, call 01273 813111

LEWES MAIN

SURGERY

21 Cliffe High Street

01273 473232

Cliffe Vets - your local

Veterinary Practice since 1865

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SURGERY

01273 814590

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SURGERY

01273 302609

LAUGHTON

EQUINE CLINIC

01323 815210

Domestic Pet, Farm Animal and Equine Services

www.cliffevets.co.uk – www.cliffeequine.co.uk


WILDLIFE

Moth trapping

The light of my life

There comes a time in everyone’s life when they

tire of the fleeting distractions and amusements that

our modern society has to offer. That day came to

me at the age of five. So I became a naturalist and

discovered an alternative universe of endless fascination

and wonder. While my peers sat indoors with

their Action Men and Ataris I’d be found on some

desolate, windswept estuary scanning the mudflats

with my binoculars. But, brothers and sisters, I have

a confession: I fell into a life of sin. My humble local

ramblings turned into an obsession and soon I was

travelling all over Britain just to get my fix of rarer

and rarer species. But then… I saw the light.

My first encounter with a moth trap was a religious

revelation. I remember flicking the power switch

and standing bathed in that blinding mercury

vapour glow, baptised by the bulb, as moths swirled

like cherubs around me. Next morning I raced down

to the trap at 5am, as excited as a child on Christmas

Day, and opened my box of surprises. Pink

elephants, carpets, brocades, tigers and emeralds.

A fantastic wealth of wildlife. I was immediately

converted. A strange new world was revealed every

evening right there in my own back garden. It’s a

thrill which has never left me.

We all know that moths are attracted to light. We’ve

all seen them battering against the bedroom window

or flying laps around a lightbulb. Yet we don’t know

why they do this – there are many theories. It bugs

me but if the moths ever start talking it’s going to be

the first thing I ask them. This attraction can be exploited

by naturalists to allow them to study moths.

Moth traps have many designs (but they’re basically

a bulb, funnel and bucket) and are packed with egg

boxes offering a cosy one night’s accommodation

for the moths which can be identified, recorded and

released unharmed the following day.

For a whole year my neighbours assumed my

nocturnal light signals were attempting to call occupants

of interplanetary craft (and they seemed to

find the fact that I was trapping moths even more

eccentric). I’ve travelled with my trap all across Sussex

lighting up our remote coombes and woodlands

like Las Vegas (which sometimes also attracts passing

ravers in search of a wild night out).

I’m never happier than when I’m stood in front of

the lights, cables and buttons of my moth trap like

Tom Baker at the control panel of his Tardis. Every

night I’m transported to another time and place. So

if you want to see a middle-aged man get overexcited

I’ll be firing up my mercury bulb for a moth

trapping evening at St John sub Castro Churchyard

at 8.30pm on 14th July. Michael Blencowe, Sussex

Wildlife Trust, illustration by Mark Greco

89


吀 栀 攀 䄀 戀 攀 爀 最 愀 瘀 攀 渀 渀 礀 䄀 爀 洀 猀

吀 栀 攀 䄀 戀 攀 爀 最 愀 瘀 攀 渀 渀 礀 䄀 爀 洀 猀 Ⰰ 猀 攀 琀 椀 渀 琀 栀 攀 戀 攀 愀 甀 琀 椀 昀 甀 氀

瘀 椀 氀 氀 愀 最 攀 漀 昀 刀 漀 搀 洀 攀 氀 氀 Ⰰ 漀 û 攀 爀 猀 愀 琀 爀 愀 搀 椀 琀 椀 漀 渀 愀 氀 挀 漀 甀 渀 琀 爀 礀 瀀 甀 戀 Ⰰ

昀 愀 洀 椀 氀 礀 ☀ 搀 漀 最 ⴀ 昀 爀 椀 攀 渀 搀 氀 礀 愀 琀 洀 漀 猀 瀀 栀 攀 爀 攀

圀 攀 漀 û 攀 爀 昀 爀 攀 猀 栀 氀 礀 瀀 爀 攀 瀀 愀 爀 攀 搀 Ⰰ 栀 漀 洀 攀 洀 愀 搀 攀 昀 漀 漀 搀 愀 琀 最 爀 攀 愀 琀 瀀 爀 椀 挀 攀 猀 Ⰰ 瀀 甀 戀 挀 氀 愀 猀 猀 椀 挀 猀

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ꌀ㈀⸀ 㔀 匀 琀 攀 愀 欀 一 椀 最 栀 琀 攀 瘀 攀 爀 礀 吀 栀 甀 爀 猀 搀 愀 礀 椀 渀 挀 氀 甀 搀 椀 渀 最 愀 昀 爀 攀 攀 搀 爀 椀 渀 欀 Ⰰ 洀 甀 猀 椀 挀 愀 渀 搀 洀 漀 爀 攀 ℀

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吀 攀 氀 㨀 ⬀ 㐀 㐀 ⠀ ⤀ ㈀ 㜀 アパート 㐀 㜀 ㈀ 㐀 㘀 眀 㨀 眀 眀 眀 ⸀ 愀 戀 攀 爀 最 愀 瘀 攀 渀 渀 礀 愀 爀 洀 猀 ⸀ 挀 漀 洀


COLUMN

Walkies

#5 Rodmell & Breaky Bottom

It’s mid-June and the colour palette in the countryside

around Rodmell has been turned up to maximum

volume. There’s barely a cloud in an electric

blue sky, the trees and the grass have turned Robin

Hood green in their midsummer glory, and the

hedgerows are popping with elderflowers. When a

light breeze blows over the Downs, the wheat fields

look like rippling silk.

There’s also a hint of romance in the air. Todd, the

handsome Bordoodle belonging to friends, who my

wife, Sarah, and I often take for a walk, has been

joined by Daisy and Ruby, two high-energy spaniels

belonging to yet more dog-owning friends.

As we head off up the hill towards the Downs along

the small road opposite the Abergavenny pub, Cordelia,

Sarah’s niece, is in danger of having her arm

pulled out of its socket by two year-old Ruby, the

youngest of our canine escorts. Todd, meanwhile,

has decided to play the mature elder statesman.

When we reach the top and meet the South Downs

Way, we plunge into the brave new world that opens

up in front of us. We are soon snugly ensconced in

one of the many folds of the Downs which remain

largely deserted even in the height of summer. “Bottoms!?”

giggles Cordelia mischievously, when I tell

her the technical term for this hidden topography.

Our route takes us up onto Highdole Hill and back

down again along the edge of the six acres of vineyards

cultivated so successfully by Peter Hall since

1974. It was back then that he had his Eureka! moment

and realised how similar the soil and climate

here are to the Champagne and Loire valley regions

in France. After producing a series of elegant white

wines, he has now turned exclusively to méthode

champenoise, high quality sparkling bruts, which

have become the stuff of local legend.

By now we are making the final push up Mill Hill

from the south on the way back to Rodmell. To

listen to Cordelia, you would have thought it was

the North Face of the Eiger. But then, she is only six

and I’m not sure I’d made it out of the back garden

at that age.

“Do you know the name of the vineyard we’ve

just passed?” I say jauntily, trying to take her mind

off the pain. “It’s called Breaky Bottom.” Cordelia

puts her hands on her hips and looks at me sternly.

“More like Never-Ending Stinky Bottom,” she huffs

grumpily. “I suppose it could catch on,” I nod sagely.

Richard Madden

Map: OS Explorer: OL25. Distance: 3 miles. Terrain:

They call them Downs, but they’re mostly Ups.

Directions: Take the road opposite the pub to the

top of Mill Hill, down into the valley and up Highdole

Hill. Turn right where the next footpath meets

and then right again, down around Breaky Bottom

vineyard and back to the top of Mill Hill. Head back

down to the pub. Start/End/watering hole: Abergavenny

Arms.

91


TRADE SECRETS

Helen Marsh

Director, Middle Farm

Photo by Alex Leith

I’m from many generations of farmers, on both

sides of my family, but out of 18 cousins, I’m the

only one still left in the business. It’s hard to farm

in this country. That having been said, it is a privilege

to live and work here; look at all the space we

have around us!

My parents came here in 1960, as tenants of

Firle Estate. The land’s not great here because the

rainfall on the Downs seems to drain onto Middle

Farm! So my mother started a shop selling eggs

from the farm, as well as homemade jams, preserves,

cakes etc. Mum and Dad taught themselves

butchery from a Reader’s Digest ‘Cookery Year’.

We think it might have been the first farm shop in

the country.

We’ve never had large amounts of money for

development, so every change round here

has been incremental. The milking parlour, the

butcher’s shop, the tea room, the cider shop, the

open farm. Every bit depends on all the others,

like parts of a jigsaw. My passion is the plant sales

area. If I wasn’t a farmer and shopkeeper, I’d love

to run a nursery. Oh, and we’re just trialling our

new ice-cream bike: that’s very exciting.

My husband Rod and I wake up at about six

in the morning, not too early. We’ll sometimes

have a director’s meeting before we get up, deciding

on the day’s priorities. We have to hit the

ground running, there’s so much to achieve in the

day. We’ll be back in bed by 9pm, exhausted…

The earliest riser on the farm is William,

who milks our 110 Jersey cows. He gets up at

4.30am. Some of the milk goes into our delicious

ice-cream.

I wouldn’t do this if we weren’t a real farm.

The farm is 625 acres, and 620 of that is still a

working farm. But we only get about 10% of our

income from agriculture. The rest is from the

other enterprises. Mind you, we wouldn’t be able

to do what we’re doing if we weren’t next to a

main A27 road.

We champion locally produced food and drink,

and have endeavoured, over the decades, to build

good personal relationships with small producers.

The price we all pay to supermarkets for food

and drink does not reflect the true price, either

of production, or of the often disastrous environmental

consequences of intensive food production

to reduce price to the consumer. Someone, or

something, is always exploited…

It’s very rewarding when customers and visitors

praise what we do; it makes all the hard

work worthwhile.

Of the 55 people who work here 25 are fulltime

and nine live on the farm. It’s a real community

and it’s nice to know everyone’s near in case of

an emergency. The least hard-working member of

the team is Bob, our dog. He’s not a working dog:

he’s a family dog...

As told to Alex Leith

93


WE TRY...

Photos by Guy McQueen (left) and Alex Leith

Cricket Nets

The batsman’s Leith, the bowler’s BOLA

So I slope the ball in, at about 60mph, and it

bounces just outside off stump, and angles in. Imran

Khan, who’s thwacked everything else I’ve sent at

him straight past me, scoops at it rather, and hits it

in the air, straight to silly mid-off…

Unfortunately it isn’t THE Imran Khan, it’s his

compatriot namesake, who joined Lewes Priory CC

as overseas pro in 2008. We’re in the club’s brandnew

£30,000 nets at the Stanley Turner Ground, so

there is no fielder to make the catch. And, while it is

me who’s responsible for sending the ball down to

Priory’s opening bat, I’ve been given a good deal of

help by BOLA, the club’s new bowling machine.

And it’s a splendid machine, spaceship-shaped, and

perched so high on three spindly legs that you have

to climb up a little step ladder to operate it. Inside

its body, visible through the little hole you drop the

ball in, are two rubber wheels which can be adjusted

to change its direction and speed. It can’t spin the

ball, but it can swing it, and can hurl it down as fast

as 99mph. Pow!

On Thursdays (at 6pm) Priory are offering free

practice sessions for anyone who wants to turn up,

so as well as getting a go on BOLA, I’m here to get

some batting tips from Imran. I get padded up (for

the first time in about 25 years), slip on a box, don

a helmet, visor and all, pick up a bat and head down

to the wicket to face BOLA, operated by a fellow

called Harry.

The first ball whizzes past my flailing bat, and

Imran, looking rather worried, approaches me. I

never made the first team at school, I just made

the first team laugh. And batting was never my

strong point; I eventually became reserve wicket

keeper, and scorer, for the Seconds. He has a

whole list of instructions. “Loosen your batting

arm,” he says. “Your head is at the wrong angle.

Look straighter down your shoulder. Lift the bat

in the air before the ball comes to you. And don’t

follow through so much.”

After every two or three balls he gives me pretty

much the same information again, but it must be

sinking in, because soon I start connecting with

the ball, albeit usually off the edge of the bat. I ask

Harry how fast he’s set the machine, and am rather

upset to find that it’s down as low as 40mph, which

is about the speed Joe Root lobs down his spin for

England and Yorkshire.

No matter, Imran’s tips are starting to bear fruit.

On my penultimate ball, I watch it bounce, put

a straight bat down to it, connect with it right in

the meat, and send it straight down the pitch, past

BOLA and Harry. “I’ve got it now,” I think, and

then get straight bowled. Damn.

Alex Leith

Lewes Priory Cricket Club are grateful to sponsors

Veolia for helping to fund their new nets.

lewespriory.play-cricket.com

95


Sam Roberts

Lewes Skate Park

I moved to Lewes from

Brighton four years ago,

and as a skater I was horrified

to find the terrible

state the skate park on

Malling Rec was in. It was

dangerous, and outdated.

I decided to get in touch

with the local council to

see if something could be

done about it.

These things take time,

and I learnt a lot about

the planning process!

We needed to raise around

£200,000 and we did it

by getting funding from

the District Council, and

Veolia, and various other

building developers who

needed to invest money

in a community project

in order to get planning

permission - what’s

known as a Section 106.

Chris Bibb from the

LDC was enormously

helpful.

We put together a user

group of local skaters

who were interested in

having a say in the development.

We did a lot

of sketches of obstacles,

and put them out as part

of a tender brief. The

park companies came

back with three different

skate park designs,

which we put out to

96


MY SPACE

public consultation. The winning design

was from Wheelscape from Bristol. We

worked very hard with Wheelscape to

come up with something unique. The

results, I believe, are spectacular.

There are plenty of features, including

a volcano, a doorway and a DIY-esque

spine. There’s a back wall feature that was

inspired by a DIY skate park in Sweden.

There’s a Harvey’s beer barrel embedded

in one of the walls. There are other little

nods to Lewes town, too. There’s a wall

inspired by mathematical tiles; the tile

finishing and colours make it reminiscent

of Pells Pool; there’s an ammonite feature

like Brian the Snail.

I reckon it’s one of the best parks

for miles around. Most parks are very

forward-backward, so if you hit something

wrong, you have to start all over

again. Here if you hit something wrong,

you’ll end up hitting something else – it’s

extremely ‘flowy’.

A lot of old local skaters have come

out of the woodwork since it was

completed, reenergising the skate scene,

and we’ve had visitors from miles around.

There was a minibus full of guys from

Bournemouth the other day, and there’ll

be plenty more in the future. A new park

this original gets talked about all over the

country – and people will travel to use it.

We’re not finished yet - we’ve got

a wish list of extra features. Floodlights

would be a nice addition; a water

fountain would be good; I’d like to build

a barbecue in the shape of a quarter pipe

for summer evening feasts.

My day job is as a graphic designer; I

work for the Sussex Wildlife Trust. It’s

great to be able to come somewhere like

this for a skate after work. It’s been well

worth all the hassle - I’m stoked, to be

honest. As told to Alex Leith

Photos by Alex Leith

97


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We can also provide scarifiers to help keep your lawn

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Let us visit you and provide an estimate for your

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Call Dom on 07711092457 or Tim on 07429351302

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We collect and deliver all vehicles

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For a reliable efficient service call

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Engine management diagnostics


COLUMN

Lewes Out Loud

Plenty more Henty

Despite Henty’s hollyhocks heading heavenward to

achieve new heights this summer and my deadheading

activity causing a stir in Southover, it is true

to say that I am no latterday Monty Don.

I have been to the Chelsea Flower Show on two occasions.

Once as a quasi-representative of the Eden

Project in the early days of the Cornish attraction

and secondly, as a reporter for hospital radio.

In one remarkable day, I interviewed Sir Harry

Secombe, Cilla Black, Jimmy Greaves, Penelope

Keith and, bizarrely, weatherman Michael Fish.

Keen amateur gardeners all, and happy to share

their enthusiasm. Sir Harry joked about not having

green fingers, unlike his wife, Myra.

Of course, in Lewes we are blessed with some

delightful public and private gardens. On a journey

by rail into Brighton recently, I checked out

the stunning floral display along a good length of

Platform 3 opposite.

This has been created in the past four years by

a couple of determined women who live in the

town but do not have gardens of their own, Jane

and Mary (also see pg 11). Jane, who you can

see in my picture, told me that when Mary approached

the people in charge of the railway station

in June 2013, the area they have transformed

was over grown and in a very poor state.

Today, with contributions from small businesses

and local individuals offering seedlings and

cuttings, the herbaceous borders are a delight.

“Some people have even been known to miss

their train admiring the plants,” Jane told me.

I’m not surprised. They are a joy and certainly

the whole area around the station is beginning

to come alive – especially with the Depot cinema

having opened at the end of May.

Like so many people, I visited the new complex

on the opening weekend and had one of my brief

encounters with cheery bar manager, Nicola, who

told me she lives in Denton. She recommended

that I should watch the free film in the studio

telling the fascinating story of cinema in Lewes.

I did and how I wish I could have met usherette,

Queenie Page, who was known to regulars at the

De Luxe cinema on School Hill. According to

Ruth Thomson’s new book Screen Stories – Lewes

Goes to the Pictures (£8.99), Queenie was nicknamed

‘Flit-gun Lil’.

‘She wore a uniform and a pill box hat. Her left

leg was shorter than her right, so she had a four

inch elevated boot. She was very fast and nimble

nevertheless’. I like the sound of Queenie and she

probably needed to move fast in her battle with

marauding kids and those troublesome fleas.

Finally, on the theme of getting out and about.

An early warning to girlfriends and wives of

Seagull fans about to experience the ‘joy’ of

Premiership games away in Manchester, Liverpool

and South Norwood. Don’t expect much

tourist information on their return! “How was

Norwich?” the innocent question, last season.

“Decent pies but the referee was crap!” came the

answer. Hardly mind broadening.

John Henty

99


BUSINESS NEWS

It went up, then, before

you could say ‘oldest pub in

Lewes’ it went down again.

Did anyone else notice the

scaffolding on the Crown

Inn, by the War Memorial,

raised over a weekend in

May? Nothing seemed to

happen underneath it, but

it got everybody talking.

It’s only a rumour at the

moment but we’ve heard

the pub has gone for a good

price to a pubco, starting

with ‘W’.

Just down the road, Bon

Ami, a shop which always

proved difficult to pigeonhole,

has closed down but

is being replaced by Goods,

a homeware store. We called

round during their refurb, but

no-one was home, though there

were some rather nice ceramic

pots already on the shelf, and a

subtle street sign was protruding

from the wall.

For those who used to enjoy

sitting on the seats outside

Waterstones, sipping coffee,

never fear. The tables and chairs

might have gone, but they

shouldn’t be gone long: it’s a licensing issue, apparently,

which should be sorted soon.

Over the road we noticed a colourful space

upstairs in the Riverside, between TashTori

and the café, which is being offered as a for-hire

pop-up space. £15 for four hours, £25 for the

day, ring 01273 473577/470705.

And round next to the Library, some awning has

gone up with an architectural render of the new

development of 25 homes (in 15 houses) called

‘Styles Field’. Oakley are handling the sales.

Charity corner now, and we

bumped into Sarah Clowes,

as we were going to press,

who gave us a leaflet about

St Peter & St James’ latest

fundraising initiative… a

lottery! There’s a £2,000

prize up for grabs every

week, as well as a rollover

prize that can get as high

as £25,000. And all for £1

a week.

In this space last month we

suggested that Back Yard

Café were to open Lewes

first roastery. Two readers

have written in to point

out there have been at least

two before: Flint at the top

of St Nicholas Lane, and another

on School Hill, where Tizz’s

now trades.

Last but one, we’re proud to be

one of the judges of the fourth

edition of the Lewes District

Business Awards. Our category,

Culture, Leisure and Tourism,

received an unprecedented 11

entries, which, after much research,

discussion, and consultation

with other judges, we whittled

down to four finalists: (in

alphabetical order) Bluebell Railway, Ditchling

Museum, Newhaven Fort and Pells Pool. The

winner of this and the other 13 awards will be

announced at a grand black tie event in the Town

Hall on July 13th. For the full list of finalists see

lewesdistrictbusinessawards.co.uk.

And finally… Grace Gasson, who formerly

worked for Cooper & Son, by the War Memorial,

is setting up her own funeral director service,

simply named Grace. Got any business news?

Send it in to us at alex@vivamagazines.com

101


DIRECTORY

Please note that though we aim to only take advertising from reputable businesses, we cannot guarantee

the quality of any work undertaken, and accept no responsibility or liability for any issues arising.

To advertise in Viva Lewes please call 01273 434567 or email advertising@vivamagazines.com

a & s

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Directory Spotlight:

Colin Mitchell, Kubrick Construction

How come the name?

It was inspired by Stanley,

though I’m not a film

buff by any means.

How long have you

been going? I’ve been

in the building trade

since 1988, self employed

since 1996, and Kubrick

construction has been going since 2012.

What are you working on at the moment? A

roof conversion near the level crossing in Plumpton,

and an extension in Malling. Two or three

jobs is enough.

What other sort of stuff do you do? Residential

building work and outbuildings.

How many in the team? It can range from four

to twelve.

Is your work ever dangerous? No, it should

never be dangerous, safety must always come first.

Some readers won’t know

where Upper Stoneham

is… It’s just outside Lewes

on the Uckfield Rd, it’s a

great location and we’re

surrounded by craftsmen

with real skills.

We’ve heard about your

mod pods. Can you explain

what they are? Garden rooms of all shapes,

nothing original, we just jumped on the George

Clark bandwagon. It’s all been made possible

because of Jess at CNC Cutting Edge, who has the

brains to make anything with his CNC machine.

What tool would you take to your desert

island? An axe!

Give us a top tip… Pre-plan… this will save

you money. Also tell your neighbours what you’re

planning! AL

kubrickconstruction.co.uk

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HOME

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TELEPHONE: 01273 472 836

MOBILE: 07974 752 491

EMAIL: cdpoulter@btinternet.com


HOME

LTD

We are a building company specialising in residential

extensions, refurbishments, loft conversions

and conservation work on listed buildings.

We pride ourselves on paying attention to detail,

using bespoke materials and bringing projects

in on time and on budget.

Contact us for a free quote and please

visit the website for more info:

www.stjamesbuilding.co.uk

01273 499 641 / 07780 964 608


HOME

Curtains Roman Blinds Soft Furnishings

Now stockist of Ian Mankin fabrics -

100% Natural fibres, woven in Lancashire.

- Planning

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m. 07585 968725

w. www.kubrickconstruction.co.uk

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Also Professional Repairs and Alterations Service.

Tel: 01273 470817

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HOME

Chartered Building Surveyors

• Building Surveys • Defect Analysis

• Project Management • Dilapidaaons

• Historic Building Specialists • Party Wall

Contact us for friendly professional advice

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JLR ELECTRICS

and PPSTERING

Lewes-based female specialist

in plastering and electrics

Please call Jay on 07917 855538

Handyman Services for your House and Garden

Lewes based. Free quotes.

Honest, reliable, friendly service.

Reasonable rates

Tel: 07460 828240

Email: ahbservices@outlook.com

HB ad.indd 1 27/07/2015 17:46


HOME

Jack Plane Carpenter

Nice work, fair price,

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www.jackplanecarpentry.co.uk

01273 483339 / 07887 993396

We believe we can create any shape

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From a one off blitz to regular maintenance.

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brookhartservices@gmail.com

www.brook-hart.co.uk

GARDENS

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Mobile 07941 057337

Phone 01273 488261

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info@ globalgardens.co.uk

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Ruth Wharton Viva Advert 3.17 AW.qxp_6 12/05/2017 10

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HEALTH AND WELLBEING

Central Lewes-based practice

offering Psychotherapy,

Counselling, Psychology and

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We work with individuals, couples,

families, adolescents and children

Visit NHS Choices (Livewell) for a

wide range of resources including:

• How to get vitamin D from the sun

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• Gym Free workouts

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intake, coping with anxiety and/or

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Visit our Healthy Living Pharmacy Zone

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Sam Jahara, Transactional Analyst

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Mark Vahrmeyer, Integrative Psychotherapist

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Andrew Wells_Viva Lewes_AW.indd 1 25/06/2012 09:05

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I N C O R P O R A T I N G F L O T Y R E S


INSIDE LEFT

A BIGGER SPLASH

It’s summer 1932, and the Brighton Boys’ Brigade are enjoying a dip in Glynde Swimming Pool while on

their annual camping expedition in a field near the village. The week-long camp had become a regular

fixture in the BBB calendar, having been run since 1919. The Boys made quite a splash every year: the

villagers used to turn out to see them arrive en masse at the train station, and march, accompanied by

their band, to their camp field.

Perhaps one of the lads in the water is Ernest Albert Smith, member of the 26th Boys’ Brigade Brighton,

based in Queen’s Road Presbyterian Church. ‘We were a very poor family,’ he later wrote, of his visit to

Glynde that summer. ‘As my mother was unable to work and father suffered from an incurable disease,

finances were at rock bottom. Mr Charles Hitchings, who was my Company Officer, visited my mother

and agreed to pay for me to go to Glynde Camp for a week.’ ‘Chas’ Hitchings was a CO at the BBB for

many years; he is also on record as playing many times for the BBB Officers in their annual cricket match

against Glynde’s First XI.

We love the variety of swimming togs (some of them look woollen), the way some of the chaps are wearing

raincoats as bathing gowns, and the manner in which the leather ball appears to be stuck to the head

of the chap in the bottom left of the picture. The Brighton Boys’ Brigade still hold their annual camp in

Glynde, and still get access to the pool while they’re there.

The pool was built in 1902 on the orders of Thomas Seymour Brand, owner of Glynde Place. Originally

the water used was the cooling water from Glynde Dairy, en route to Glynde Reach. It has had its ups

and downs – a major fundraising drive in the 70s saved it from closure, and another refurbishment took

place in 2005. In 2011 the filter system was completely replaced. The pool is open to residents of Glynde,

Beddingham and Firle, and their guests, but there are a couple of opportunities to try it out this summer.

Love Supreme revellers can enjoy a ‘Secret Swim’ on July 2nd and 3rd; everyone else will have to wait

until the 5th of August, when the 149th edition of the Glynde & Beddingham Flower Show and Fete

takes place (12-5pm), and the pool is open to visitors for a 50p charge. AL

114


1 Malling Street, Lewes, BN7 2RA . 01273 471 269 . alistairflemingdesign.co.uk

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