10-30-1940 - Village of Pinckney

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10-30-1940 - Village of Pinckney

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KWTTO Iti "AI* m«

NIWI THAT'S m Tw PKINT Btitrtutt)

Vol 57

General Election iPinckney High School

Is Tuesday. Nov.o, Loses To Lindei:

Queerest Campaign in History Will

Draw to * Clot* With »4flx Side*

rUi, " i l

RalliM Held in This County

This Year.

er held in the history of the state

and county. The campaign has been

confined mostly to radio talks, usually

delivered from Detroit or points

in other states. Wendell WilUrie

toured the state stopping only at big

industrial centers.The Gallup poll fol

lowing his visit showed Michigan in

the Democrat column^ Henry Wallace,

Democrat candidate for vice

president also made a tour here last

Thursday but does not seem to have

gotten any huge overflow crowds.

The people have been demanding

thai President Roosevelt visit Michigan

but so far have been unable to

get him to do so. He is undoubtedly

the only person who could get a record

crowd.

In the meantime a number of lesser

lights have appeared at various

places in the state without wowing

anyone to any great extent. Gen.

Hugh "Ironpants" Johnson appeared

on the lecture course of Michigan

State College at East Lansing last

Wednesday. He had been booked

some time ago, and the students paid

for tickets to hear him. Instead of

delivering an ordinary lecture he

apologised for omiting this and delivered

a bitter Anti-Roosevelt political

harangue which was broadcast

by the Republican state committee,

Henry Wallace was scheduled to appear

there the next day. Richard

Groening, student council president

requested President Shaw of the

college to dismiss the college in order

to give the students a chance to

hear Wallace. This he asked in the

name of fair play as the students

had been obliged to pay the previous

day to hear Gen. Johnson deliver a

partisan lector*. President Shaw ag-

-ffeed and recessed the enilage from

1:50 to 8:00 p. ra. so the rtttdefttj

could Hear Wallace.

OatcUs*M Pinckney Throagaoat {the

Contest aad Takes Easy Vic-

Left uu

Schedule.

Pinckney took the field with a

This is the hist week of one of I shattered lineup last Friday and the

the queerest political campaigns ev-1 Linden team had little trouble in de-

' feating them 35 to 0. An upheavel

took place which resulted in the relegation

of Darrow, freshman hackfield

man, the teams most cons'stent

ground gainer and Joe Lavey,

serior end to the sidelines. Consequently

Pinckney had no oftcn>e

ur-d failed to make a single fir it

down the first half. The Pinckney

line failed to hold and the passes

they tried were intercepted. In the

second half they completed a number

of short passes caught by Widmayer

and Amburgey but failed to

get any nearer to the goal line than

the thirty yard line.

The Linden team, about the same

weight as Pinckney, had a well balanced

offense and scored early in

the game, they intercepted a number

of Pinckney passes and completed

a number of their own. Behind

a good solid wail of interference

they showed a good running game.

Theii bast performance was by Adams,

their speedy quarter back. He

picked up a Pinckney punt in the

second half and ran it back some

70 yards for a touchdown. Previously

he had made a 50 yard run for a

touchdown.

u-**

The PuH'noy team has been a j

pusale this year. At times they lookel

good, especially in the second

Hartland game, the only contest they

won this year. To the man on the

side lines their principal fault is a

lack of agressivenees and cooperativeneas.

Friday they meet New Hudson

here. This team is having a big

season and recently beat Brighton

29 to 7 and also South Lyon. Pinckney's

last contest is with Stockbridge

the following week.

Pinckoey, Livingaton County, Michif*a Wednesday, Oct. 30. 194Q

"Nk^

SSTAftUSH BASIC US.IDEA,

OPPORTUNITY POM ALL , 3C0AN£D

PESSIMISTS AND QOITTgftS.

UKg THOSE WHO APTE* HIM BUILT

THE COUNT**\ Hit HAO VISION.

IIS BELIEF - NO LiMIT TO

P*00*£33t HAS BEEN TRUE

AND STILL IS TRUE fO*

AMERICANS TODAY —

BECAUSE THEY W04KAN0

SACRIFICE FOR. SECURITY

AND SUCCESS.

AMERICA STILL HAS FOR ITS SONS

AND DAUGHTERS £VEA N£WF*0NTt£RS

Catholic Church

Rev. Francis Murphy

Baptist Church

Local Young People

Are To Wed

)

Ichii

^•K 4 v^M

ran riMt

Mirror i Q M

State News |V * * *

lr .Which ftha Whys and Wherefore*

'.

Ihe controversies involve two

referendums, State Proposal No. 3,

the 1939 bus bill, and State Proposal

No. 4, the dentists' anti-competiti jn

bill. The state legislature, alon* with

other measures, passed both acts on

ly to have special groups cir»•a'i-'.e

petitions for J n.'i'.enchini of l^.e

j -^torle.

And so, when you go to the polls

next Tuesday, you will be confronted

with huge special ballots of bed-

*.heet proportions. The headings will

mean little, if anything.

But Competition

The bus act feud involves two

tranj-portation concerns, the Department

of Street Railways in Detroit

a municipal utility, and the EaBtern

Michigan Motor Bus Company,

private utility.

In 1939 the legislature enacted an

amendment to the Motor Carrier

Act. This charge said that when Detroit

seeks to operate its buses beyond

a two-mile limit from the city's

borders, and on state highways, it

must come under the same regulations

and pay the same taxes as do

I>i ivate transportation buses.

The Michigan Motor Bus Association,

which y.eeks> a "Yes" vote on

the No. 3 proposal, wants competition

to be put on the same basis for

ali.

The DSK of Detroit, which

municipal utility urges a "no"

ia ses the cry of "monopoly

"proffts".

Who is concerned about all

as a

vote,

' and

this?

i

It was just

distinguished

R E Ni*T

MEN I

50 years ago that »

citizen of Livingston

, R iWinani nf Hiiu

buig township was etoctad governor

of Michigan in 1890. The Democrat

.ticket was elected by a landslide,

T H'ron Stout wae elected to coagraat

in that ticket and they also was every

county office. The Democrats

elected were Sheriff, John McCabe;

Prosecutor, Dennis Shields; Clerk,

Gene Sfcowe; Register, Alonzo Fr^sbfe;

Treasurer, George ColerviA;

C ; Tcuit Court Com., Judd Yettand

one" John Comiskey; Representative,

Wm Harper. Edwin B. Winans bad

been in politics most of his life timet

liavir^ been supervisor and cong.'OS'tman.

His opponent on the Republican

ticket, John Turner was a successful

business man. Some of hie

business enterprises were unsaveTy

and when the campaign spotlight

wa? turned on them it resulted*" in

his defeat. The Winans Lake country

club is now located 00 the Gov.

Winans homestead in Hamburg township.

V.

Wendell Willkie still continues to

be the target for eggs and tha tin

of the throwers Is improving. The

a j pics: who play up each of these i$~

I -tone's for all they are worth are,

mnhably as much too blame as any

'nf the continuance of these incid-

1 ntiv The first throwing which took

[lace in Pontiac was the act of

tnoughtk'.ss school boys but aoOft of

those which followed were planned

ind premediated by irresponsibly

pen-ons who craved publicity %pd

limelight the press gives such incid-

m

take place at the Congregational

Swarthout R. G. Dooley

ery part of the state. Tha same is

chuich this evening at 6:00 p. m.

Ludtke

R. T. Felch

true of matt of tha Republican can­

Coil gregational Church A supper will be served by the

Young

R, E. Coon

didates except Gov. Dickinson who

Ladies Aid for the invited guests.

Amburgey Q. B. Adams

has done little campaigning and thai Palmer

The marriage of Robert Read, son

L. H. Bowles

mostly from Methodist church pul­

Rev. J. M. MCLUCM, Minister of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Read to Miss

t Aschenbrenner R. H. L. Kelly

pits. He was scheduled to tour the

Mi-. Herman Vedder, S. 5. Supt Genevieve Bullis, daughter of Mr.

Kuhn

K. B O'Dell

upper peninsula with other Repub­

Mri. Florence Baugha, Orfeniit and and Mrs. Arthur Bullis who live

Substitutions : Pinckney, Hamparlican

state candidates but did not

Choir Director

west of town will take place on

ian, Vedder, D. Widmayer, Cass.

go claiming that he had to be pre­

Morning worship and sermon Thursday night at 8:00 p. m. at the

Linden: Evans, Lobb, Ryan, Warsent

at a big labor conference in

10:30 a. m. j home of the bride. Rev. J. M. Mcner.

Touchdowns: Steele 2, Adams

Lansing this week and settle a dis-

Sunday School . 11:80 a. m. I ucas will officiate.

2, L. Kelly. Extra points Bowles, O'put.

Labor leaders claimed no such

Young People's Meeting .. 7:00 p. m.

Dell, Steele z.

— o —

labor crisis existed and although he

Choir Rehearsal, Wednesday

Referee: Riordan.

CELEBRATE OOTH

did call a labor meeting most of the

Evening 7:30 p. m. ANNIVERSARY

principal labor leaders failed to at­

A hearty welcome is extended to

CIRCUIT COURT NEWS

tend. The Detroit Free Press in its

all who worship with us. "Come with Monday's Ann Arbor News carried

issue of October 19 gives another

ui and we will do thee good." I a picture of Mr. and Mrs. A. N.

Judge Collins opened the adjourn-!

reason for the governor's failure to

j Hodgeman of Dexter who celebrated

ed term of the circuit court at How­

tour the upper peninsula. It states

MRS. CYNTHIA WELLMAN their 60th wedding anniversary. He

ell last week. The case of Harold

that the governor is eager to de­

i« 87 and his wife 77. Mr. Hodge­

Austin of Indiana versus the receivclare

for "Emergency Prohibition'*

Mrs. Cynthia Wellman, 77, died man lived in Pinckney years ago,

er of the Ann Arbor railroad was

during the time of war preparedness

at her home in Marion township on being a son of the late Joe Hodge-

started before a jury of 4 women

and on account of tha unpopularity

Thursday after a long illness. She n.an.

end 8 men. Harold Austin, 13, was

of such a program in the upper pen­

followed the nursing profession and

injured when the truck in which he

insula, tha state committee discour­

wa* well known all over the coun­

NOTICE

was riding, with Chester Parks, Jas.

aged his trip there.

ty. Her husband, Edwin Wellman, The meeting to establish a soil

Parks and Glen Parks was struck by

died a number of years ago.. Surviv­ conservation for Hamburg, Genoa

In the ceemjs/ tfce campaign has a train near Chflson in July 1939.

ing are nine children, Sfias, George, and Green Oak townships will be

been tha deeatees hi history. The only James Parks was killed. Austin

Mrs. Alvah Rider and Mrs. Charles held at the Odd Fellow Hall, Ham­

candidates oft tha eaunty Republican •reeks damages for injuries,

Hanson of Howell, Byron of Pon- burg on the evening of November

ticket offered atfleouj opposition are A sanity hearing was held in the!

TSL."!^ " """ !L"1i«M. Mrs. Gi«e Fewrton of Ln- 8th at 7 K)0 p. m.

those for shaftffr esti representative * • ' . • ^ *"»•?••••*?* fuin*, Lloyd of N«w Jer«y, Nfa,.

Mane of the other candidates have indacency and he will be

of Detroit and Gerald at home.

MARRIAGE LICENSES

bothered to have cards or potters brought before a sanity commission

The funeral was held from the

prfciad and have done no campaign­ for committal to an Institution.

West Marion church Saturday af­ The following marriage licenses

ing ttVayeak of. The hottest race if Richard and Ivan Bussard, arrestternoon,

Rev. Swadling officiating. were issued at the county clerk's

betwoeft tha two candidates for shered numerous times for drunkenness

Burial was in the Green Cemetery. office last week: George William

iff, hrTto Kennedy, present holder and who have served terms in Liv-

Meyer, 21, Pinckney, Mary Jane

of ttetftOaf and William C. Miller, ingatoa, Geneeee and Oakland eoun- GEORGE (L. OEV1NE Otwell, 19, Pinckney; Robert Arnold

both rfciain ratidents. Kennedy toi' ty J** ware each given 9 months to

20, Howell, Margaret McDaniels, 18,

held tha office two terms and Miller three years in Jackson by Judge Col­

George Devine, 77, died at St Howell; Horace Hanson, 27, Howserved

two terms back in the w*rW, lins. ««^- • jowpv8 Mercy Hospital, Ann Arbor j pll Mary Ke«fe, 24, Howell; Burton

war days. The «»£*«"> has bean » ^ « ~ | ^ grant** » ^ to Frances | M_,_ .^., . ,„,„ nw,aaB[Ho ««*«t; McGarryi 20, Penton, Helen VantHAtttivmostly

personal MTMM1&1 solicitation RAlteftmitan as naith- nahh Henna* rotx 0100 staymona row . „. , , «*.»,_*-_ ^-—-v:--Bi»:—,

Winkle,

.. , formerly Florence M an*j.Pbck j ^ . R ^ * E ^ ciark, 20, Hart analysis of the two competing claim*

ney, 4 sons, Claude, Leo, Louis and| )and| Vetta Jane Crawford, 19, 0* "The dentists who secured the pas­

Harold, and a daughter, Mrs. Har- jrartland.

sage of this art claim that poor den­

vey Blanchard. The funeral was held

ial work Is confined largely to the

from St Joseph's church, Dexter, FIRST GAME OF BIG

"advertising" dentist and by deprrvtoday.

Burial was In St Joseph's j EUCHRE TOURNAMENT

(Caettiaaod ©• Last Pago)

cemetery.

Livingston Lodge lost tha first "Leaves of Lethargy", the true

NOTICE

contest of the euchre tournament story of a clever criminal who combined

science with "witchcra^" in

The Ladies Aid Society of the> ^ T^***"."

. 1 ter on Wednesday night. 12 the search for an elixir af eternal

Congregational Church will were in play. On Wednesday ni^M,* ^

dinner in the church Parlors on

>

Tuesday, November Mh, from 1140

family of Detroit wan Sunday cal-) Dr. and Mrs. Hollis Sigler of How­ s m. until all are itffid. Tickets

lers at tha home of Mr. and Mrs. •'• wen Sunday callers at tha home are 85c. School children 15c.

Michaai Lavey. of Mrs. Hattie Deck**.

Mrs. W. R. Solar, Sac.

Th During the 8 year term of

Farley as Democrat national djair*

man he was forced to stand e> eaa>

stant stream of abiee from list

press as a cheap Tammany poUtki*,

a ward heeler, etc Now the* e» it

nut of the picture all ia chassfjjew-*

he has praise coming bis weerftpAt

directions from the fenae

press His succesaor Kerwerg

now the target for the feme

of abuse directed at him. Fhrtaj. aa

a private dtixen Is evtdifjaty a* ee>

tirery differesrt parson than

the national

« *"W article In a*new> series

October 6, Livingston Lodge) wfll |» *f Master Detectrva H. Aabioa-

as? fiaw^n at

to Dexter to play the second *•> Wolfe, ia The American Weekly, tha Hitter, Jrn — -

test there. All who have no way te|ssslt»t»e distributed wth next 8ango

please phone secretary. ^¾ CWeafo Herald-American.

m * ~ + *

fhewe all

* * •

Pord Motor Co ptaat at

y

.1.'


p*A

The Piockney Dispatch Wednesday, Oct 30. 1940

! *^ ' J 1-^J i m+'&'J- ^ ,- • W Ml a J ag

The Emergency Demands We Vote

Democratic

Fast Experience

Our l'n; ; i".:l udmir.,. ir.i'.,mi and it. able leadership have success­

fully carried thi- nji'io!; \\u uni^huui one- of stormiest periods in his­

tory, Dark days la_ ah( ad in d wf should by all means entrust the

se who have shown by their

;utiun. iliat iht'v aiv apaMr of meeting emergencies.

?m

•••At>

*M

y>->:

MURRAY D, VAN WAGONER

PWHK8

FRANK MURPHYr

Lieutenant Governor^

B%

••a?


><

TBEODORE t "PHIL* Iff i

T **« State Treasurer ~^

^OR COUNTY CLERK

THOMAS J. FINLAN

n

*: •"tf" '**««»? .ifrK-,* JH»|fj|.IUimpil II 1 • I Hj,l

S: if:

/ LEO V.

Secretary CARD

of State

JAMES D.

A«4jtsr

*<

'•V,''


J&S&K : -f

E^T"

JOHN LEIGHTON

FOR STATE SENATOR

FOR REGISTER OF DEEDS

JAY BARBER

FOR PRESIDENT

FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT

HENRY A. WALLACE

FOR VICE PRESIDENT ,

That Third Term

Bugaboo

What the Founding Fathers Thought

AT THE CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION, which in 1787

drew up our Federal Constitution, the very cornerstone of our Republic

- the third term question was debated thoroughly over a period

of weeks. Proposals to write in any prohibition against a third

term were overwhelmingly defeased.

Some third Term pro ponets among the Founding Fathers

AMONG THE THIRD TERM PROPONENTS WERE:- Governor

Morris, Alexander Hamilton, George Washington. Their reason: Because

at some time of national emergency, a third term limitation

would be highly detrimental to the nation's welfare.

Whai Congress has Thought

TiML AND AGAIN, bills have been introduced in both Houses

oi v.ongress proposing to limit the term of the Presidential office,

in ail our national existence, no sucn bill has ever been passed.

WM. HOWARD TAE'l said: "It wouiu Le very satisfactory if

Coolidge were to run for a Third Term."

Some Republican statements about a Third Term

WILLIAM E. BORAli said: "The people who could be trusted to

determine whether or not they desire a President for Second Term

nay also be trusted to determine whether or not they desire a.

.'resident lor a Third Term. I think they can be trusted to settle

both questions in a way to best conserve the inutc.-i ( . i,n

and the Republic." •

HERBERT HOOVER said: "I still believe that President Coolidge

should be nominated and re-elected" (when Calvin Coolidge

was being urged to run for a Third Term).

What About dictatorship,

THE DANGER TO DEMOCRACY comes not from an experienced

statesman who has handled the gravest domestic emergencies, but

from an inexperienced leadership which may become panic stricken

in time of crisis.

THERE CAN BE NO DICTATORSHIP where wc have a free

press, free speech, and free elections. No one need fear a Third

Term unless he fears the people.

Is this the time to bring national defense to a standstill

WITH THE WORLD CRISIS GROWING more acute daily, nothing

would please Hitler more, or do more to stymie our national

defense program, than a change in the Presidency at a time when

the United States needs continuity of national leadership.

GEORGE WASHINGTON said: "I can see no propriety in precluding

ourselves from the services of any man who in some emcrgencv

shall be deemed universally most capable of serving the

public."

That the emergency today is great is evident from the apm'-vi

tion of millions of dollars for armament and the drafting of vr-

That the President is deemed universally most capable of serving

the people is evident from every poll.

FRANKLIN ROOSEVELT said: "Today, all private plans, nil

private lives have been repealed by an overriding public danger -

my conscience will not let me turn my back upon a call to service.

The right to make that call rests with the people through the American

method of a free election."

When all that America ha? stood for n'rrc the time of Washington

is at stake —

vSS N ? •}

v»^ *$•*,

^ •"j 1 '

**,

FOR REPRESENTATIVE

GUY HOSLEY

*«*1

FOR DRAIN COMMISSIONER

WILLIAM DILLOWAY

**$? ^\*-

^\\

&fi

**

; : *$ : -*< ^

#>

b\ -. > *V

%s$

FOR PROSECUTOR

FRANCIS E, BARRON

Vote Democratic

-"J

For the Future

_!^^^ZZIZ^^Z«

The future ns wen as the present has been uppermost in the

minds of the administration. As today's emergencies demanded ac-

tion.tomorrow needs have been considered. Events of past will ef­

fect events of tomorrow. The Democratic party has carried out a

constructive program in the best interests of the nation. These men

are prepared to meet emergencies with action based on experience.

v-Vniud St&e afeatoT

*v*

GHARLEF ADAIR

FOR CONGRESSMAN

.*

"S3

FOR SURVEYOR

FORD R. HUBBEL

FOR SHERIFF i

1RVIN J. KENNEDY

JUDGE PHILIP ELLIOTT ,. g

»-•*> State Supreme Court J£JI

RAYMOND W. STARR

FOR ATTORNEY GENERAL

^^•^•s^s

^T;

FOR COUNTY TREASURER

MRS. ELEANOR LEDWIDGE

FOR CORONERS

WILBUR JOHNSON

RUSSELL WOODRUFF


HHIHItlllllitlllHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUItlllllllttllHIIIIIHIIIIimillllllllllllllllllllllllllUlllllUl THE COUNTY'S SHARE OF COST

Re-Elect

John A.

Hagman

County j

Clerk

REPUBLICAN TICKET

HiiHiiiMiiiiiii miuiiiiiiiiiiiii liiuiiiiiiii iimmiimmimfmtiitttttfttHiiHtttiiHiHir

I

Elect

William Dilloway

Drain Commissioner

DEMOCRAT TICKET

HONEST QUALIFIED AND WORTHY

FORMER PINCKNEY RESIDENT

KEEP

WILLIAM W.BLACKNE*

IN CONGRESS

GOOD LIGHTING

for your home is as easy as

ywr Detroit Edison Offk*

tor OM of evr Horn* lighting

m

IJ«MwHh

MM Ufftt M«tor, and t*» you how

f» g*t geotf llffcting •eenoMkally-

jf.v:

m

/

He Represents You

'THE AMERICAN WAY"

'Vote Republican

THwi SIE tto dWwwn

til your roowi.

•A§ ee» of T*e Detrok Auvuoct* I

yamt lighting

and answei

Mr. urf Vn.

L. C Gerfaam

GnttCfa*.

One. Campbell and

war* t& Detroit

foeeta of Mr. **• Unit

tan Ptvm Hollow

Tht Qty of Detroit hm

long enjoyed certain

fits ond prtftlofoi, N

they ON trying to further

encroach upon oot-etoto

territory—they wont %o

run Detroit Street Railway

buses beyond the etty

limit* without poyinf

nighwoy

You eon ttep thai unsafe?

practice by voting '*TEeV*

on Propoool Number 3.

PROTECT YOUR

HIGHWAY MOOTS

MAKE DETROIT

PAY ITS SHARE

.VOTE *NOt •

State BalfoV^ci. 4 ..

Anti-Contpetitloft Act

"Ridiculously low" will be Livingston

County's share of the cost of

of this long- range program

of park and parkway development

which will be launched whe nthe voters

of the five counties centering

around Detroit approve the Parkway-PlaygTound

Proposal, State Proposal

Number 5, in the election next

Tuesday.

This is the opinion of R. Bruce

McPherson of Howell, who is a member

of the general committee of the

Detroit-Huron-Clinton Park and

Parkway Association, the civic organization

which is furthering the

piopeial

Upon the passage of the proposal,

McPherson erplained, a Metropolitan

Authority, or Commission, will be

established for the counties of Livingston,

Wayne, Washtenaw, Oak-

•lanr and Macomb. This authority

will be empowered to plan, develop

and maintain adequate public parklands,

playgrounds, bathing beaches

and other recreational facilities, and

also parkways, or limited access

highways, serving all paita of the

five-county area.

"Wayne County, having the greatest

population and the most wealth

of any county in the area, will pay

the major part of the expense necessary

to maintain th Authority,"

McPherson explained. "Edward H.

Williams of the Wayne County

Board of Auditors has announced

that Livingston's share will be only

seven-tenths of one-percent of the

total cost. Livingston's share of the

cost, under the law, cannot exceed

a maximum of $6,128 a year. It is

likely that for several years to come

Livingston's share will be only abcut

one-fifth of this amount, or

kss than $1,500 a year, because

early planning does not cost much

money.

"The new Authority, working in

close harmony with the federal, state

county and other agencies which will

actually finance and build the parks,

parkways, express highways and the

J bathing beaches that are so badly

needed in this area, will be in a

position to see to it that many

this small amount will be spent in

this county. We of this county

stand to be big gainers if we say

"Yes" to the Parkway-Playground

Proposal."

Actually, many advantages, material,

and social, will accrue to the

people of the county he said.

'Passage of the Parkway-Playp.vound

Proposal means safe, fast,

convenient express highways, capfbU

of taking the county's residents

to and from the heart of Detroit in

two thirds their present driving time,

with no traffic lights, intersections

or congestion to cause delay," he

pointed out. "The plan also means

a development of the county's natrew

residents here. A similar plan

ural resources that bring desirable

in Greater New York City accomplished

just this for outlying counties.

The plan will bring hundreds

o' thousands of new tourist' dollars

here each year, for parklands and

playlands attract profitable tourist

trade. And the plan will create a

great deal of additional employment

for our citizens.

"All these things spell greater

prosperity, better health and increas"

sed happiness for every man, woman

and child in the county, at a

low annual per person cost that is

less than that of a package of cigarettes

or an ice cream soda".

PHILATHEA NOTES

Our Notes didn't have "their hat

en" last week, but they were in the

paper neverthlesse.

Rev. McLucas, the teacher of the

Paraca Class kindly welcomed the

Fhilathea into his class for the

Sunday discussion period. This was

a very important lesson, the topic

being, "Christian Motives for Abstinence.

"Abstinence" goes further

than the generally accepted meaning

given to "Temperance". A

prominent lesson example was John

(the Baptist of whom it was said,

"For he shell be great in the sight

of the Lord, and shall drink neither

wine nor strong drink, and he shall

be filled with the Holy Ghost even

from his mothers womb". Luke 1:15.

It would be hard to find an exemple

where one is filled with the Holy

Ghost and with strong drink at the

same time. They never harmonise,

and the person who thinks they do,

has little influence on the side of

real righteousness.

The Philatheas were chosen for

table committee for the Monday

evening, October 28th family night

Next Sunday it Missionary Day

v our Sunday School. We hope for

a good attendance in all classes.,

Study Lake 4:16-30 for next Sunday's

lesson, "Jesus Declares His

Minion." Golden Text, "For the

Son of Men Is come to speak and

tc save feet whkh was loot" Lake

19:11

Mia, Cbusie Reason and daagnter.

Leeta, attended the wedding of

Marjorie Kaaun and Kenneth Carpenter

at Methodist Episcopal church

at Oxford Saturday.

To Re-elect

Truly o Pi/Wit Servmit


Michigan is Safe With Him

*

Keep Him in Lansing to

Safeguard Michigan

*0ft

REPUBLICAN

GOVERNOR DICKINSON

Look at the Governor's Record of Kept Promises:

l Labor Peace and Progress

2. Balanced Budget

3. Ho Mew Taxes

4. No Special Sessions

5. Costs Cut in Republican-Controlled Department*

6. Medical and Hospital Costs Now Within the Reach of All

7. Politics How Out of Relief

8. Hew Deal Deficit Reduced By $1,250,000.00

9. Michigan How Lives Within Its Income

10. Administrative Costs Cut and Many Others

CONSUMERS

PROTECT YOUR POCKETBOOKS

VOTE "NO" on No. 4

STATE DENTAL BILL

This is an important message to you, Mr and Mrs. Consumer,

Michigan has a model statute governing the use of advertising.

It fully protets the consumer against misuse of advertising by fait*

Or misleading statements of any kind.

Newspapers am ready at all times to keep their advertising columns

cleon from such abuse Merchants likewise do not wish to misleod the

consumer with inaccurate statements which result only in ill will ond loss

•f patronage.

The economic freedom of the corrsumer depends largely on hfs or her

ability to get truthful information. Is there ony justification for a scheme to

rob you of this right, to prohibit telling the truth?

State Propcsn! No 4, the Dental Bill, would deny the consumer this

important privilege. It would prohibit the telling of prices. It would encourage

other grrv r * tc work for special legislation to restrict competition.

It would evade the Americor system of justice by court and Jury. It

would deny to both consumer and business man the freedom of truthful

advertising.

Consumers, Guard yrur rights!

Defend the righJ to tell the truth, as fudged by court and jury, and OS

safeguc drd agomst abuse by the Michigan false advertising law ,

This is the American way!

V01E"NO"ON STATE PROPOSAL NO. 4.

MICHIGAN PRESS ASSOCIATION

(A, StatevntH Qrinhizalion of IT Daily awl Ul Weekly S*w*i>*f#r*)

J*

i


"I^^T r "-

A*AM

YOUNG AMERICANS

Vr.u fire, interested in your Jobs.

If you haven't one»you want one.

The righc to work is one of vour choicest possessions.

Yon can't work if old people keep the jobs available

Retire the Aged

Give Them Security and You the Jobs

A VOTE FOR ME IS A

VOTE FOR A JOB

(Your Sixth District Representative Voted "No")

The D*ily Papers Report that «,t Least One Foreign Country Is Gett

ing Out of the'Depression by This , Means.

CHARLES R.ADAIR

Democratic Candidate for Congressman.

Sixth Congressional District

SUNDAY

Hunting

In Livingston County

Violators Will Be Prosecuted

Vote Nov.

The Pinckney Dispatch Wednesdayt Oct. 30. 1940

NEIGHBORING NOTES

Pan Reason, former editor of the ,

Rockbridge Brief Sun, and recent- j

ly advertising manager for the Ing- ,

for the Vickerstaff Advertising Co.

ham County News, is now working

handeling advertising in motorbusses

Married October 19 at the home

of the brides parents, Mr. and Mrs.

J. R Buckley, their daughter, Shirley,

to Otto Gingerrich of Lansing^

A shower was given one day last

week by Mrs. Dan Howlett of Gregory'

for her sister, Miss Genevieve

DuUij wliu will bu a biidc un Oct

ober 31. J

Mrs. A. Riley Crittenden of How-)

ell left last week for the Methodist)

Ola People's Home in Chelsea where

she will make her home. She ij the

widow of A. Riley Crittenden, for-j

mer editor, coroner and circuit court,

commissioner. I

John Scully, son of Thomas Scul-J

ly of Howell has enlisted in the state

police and is stationed at Manisti-.

que, Michigan. I

The total number of draft regis-/

trees in Livingston county was 2,360 i

Dog Warden Floyd English has|

collected a total of $1028 ia dog I

.taxes this year making the total col-j

lections for the year $4212. ,

Mrs. Ira C. Ott, wife of Ira Ott,

Dexter Michigan, Central agent died/

at ber home Thursday morning after

a long Tuness. Surviving are her husband

and a daughter, Marilyn.

Henry M^ Dean, 80, living on a

farm in Sharon township near Chel-

. sea was found dead Thursday. Coroner

Ganzhorn pronounced it a case

of suicide.

E J. Van Riper, living on the

Lindley farm near North Lake had

to have his left hand amputated

when it was caught and lacerated in

a corn shredder last week.

Frank Hagman, brother of County J

Clerk Hagman was struck by an 1

auto there last week Monday and

had his knee badly crushed.

The Brighton Masonic Lodge will

hold a Life "Membership nighft on J

Thursday, October 31. Grand Mas-j

ter Charles Sherman will deliver an

address.

Mrs. Elizabeth Burden Stoddarl,!

died at LaFeria, Texas, Thursday

The Stoddard family formerly liv-J

cd in Marion and her husband, Wm.|

Stoddard is a former sheriff of Livingston

county. He survives with a

son, John, and two grandsons. The

funeral and burial were held in

Howell Sunday.

USE THE

for good lightinginyourhome

Our Home Lighting Advisor will

measure your lighting with a

Light Meter — a "Magic Eye"

that tells you if you have the

ri^ht light for safe seeing. Phone

your Detroit Edison office.

NOW MORE THAN EVER

we need these proven public servants

Mfth •''!

m -r

t* y

*

r^ng

. ij

'.'"••1

~M

.:•

DR. EUGENE C. KBYBS HARRY F. KELLY

Lieutenant Govern*? Secretary of State

THE MANDATB OF 1938—Two years

ago the people of Michigan registered a protest

at the ballot box. It was a protest against

wasteful spending, mounting deficits, and a

betrayal of honest laboring men.

You gave the Republican party in Michigan

a mandate to do • job.

This party has kept the faith/

NO NEW TAXES—Needs of public service

have been met on a "pay-as-you-go" basit

without recourse to new taxes.

i

VERNON J. BROWN

Auditor General

Business has been encouraged to GO

AHEAD—hire more men, increase payrolls.

Industrial peace has replaced industrial

turmoil.

The party has kept the faith!

VOTE NOV. 5

HERBERT RUSHTON

Attorney General

i

i

RE-ELECT

Charles P.

Adams

STATE

REPRESENTATIVE


Republican Ticket

EXPERIENCED AND EFFICIENT

; '-""T

Standard Station

RED CROWN GASOLINE

For Quicker Starting

Chanpe Now to Summer Oils and Greases

Ur Greasra? Car Washing

Nat. Door Check & Mfig.Co.

FORD LAMB, Mgr.

Attention Farmers!

Free Service for Your Dead or Disabled

Horses - Cows - Sheep - Calves and Hogs

REMOVED AT ONCE

Phone Collect Day or Night - Nearest Station

Howell 360 Aim Arbor 5538

Oscar Myers Rendering Works l

NOTES of 25 YEARS AGO

— o —

Dispatch of October 3, 1915

Henry Dudley Grieve, 77, died at

h,s home here on October 30. He

hys been a resident of Putnam and

L nadilla since he was four years

old. He leaves his wife and two

daughters, Mrs. Grace Croofot, and

Mr*. Katherine Placeway.

Mrs. M. J. Reason gave a shower

at her home on the night of October

28 in honor of Miss Florence

Reason, a coming bride. A luncheon

wi;. served and the guest of honor

received many beautiful gifts.

The recent Holstein cattle sale at

FELIX H. H. FLYNN

State Treasurer

MORE WORK TO BE DONE—In two

years* time the record of accomplishment

has been notable.

Workers have enjoyed more stabilized

employment The labor mediation board is

respected by all. Farmers enjoy better marketing

methods.

Let's carry on goo


Re-Elect

Joe Gates

Prosecuting Attorney

Republican Ticket

Republican

Rally and Dance

_ .«• _.»«K u/*flnea a large oven and cost-;

ETIQUETTE

v•< m

vou. This week we will

Mr. Header's impression.

co-iru an hour.

Kiectricity save- us a lot M' work

tha: 1 (>n I'nday of the Teacher's In-

Hiu.Me Mr. Header attended u math­

wc wo Hd do it tin- old mc-thematics

meeting. There, John Chesth;in

wt would do it tlv old nu'th-

I'-.an, l'riniipal of the High School

I od. Radios givo us VITV much new.-,

at V undercook l^ke; and Jasper

aiuuscinent, and tell.- us the thiri(i>

Hieftje, of Jackson Hi#h School

that are going on in the world. It

ji'.avi .speeches on "Teaching Arith-

telU about the wars in the old world

i n pt'u in the High School". The idea

It tells us about the ball game*, and

I broujjn out was that the pupils in

many other kinds of sports. It tells 1

v\i cbool must be taught arith­

us af exciting adventures of wellmetic

in oi'inatics for many years and

ti 'city has many advantages for tin

''.aught that in some schools arith­

wold.

Jeffrey , Jerry Ledwid' metic was not being stressed enough.

A vood knowledge of arithmetic is a

\or\ valuabl • as sot to a person af-

1

••:• he 'jet- through school.

This

quette

week we are starting an eticolumn

and we hope it will

beneficial to each reader.

NOTF.S OF THE GAME

Sat. Nov. X

nrovr

You can find a lot of definitionfor

the word "" to that ques-

ned his money. He used a box car hut if we were to -ay "Can

t i O I ! .

for his laboratory until he tipped

ly"" the correct

you dance prop(

ever a bottle of phosphorous which

vou would he

;'.n-\ua- for most »f

caught fire to the box car. His ap­

10

pliances were improved each year.

Number 1

HecUicity 1.- a ^-rea- help to man­

Sh? is a senior 5 feet four and

kind. It gives us light and heat and

1 cne-half inches tall, weighs about

man> other useful things. It is

' 138 pounds, has light brown hair

made .from falling water. When the

I and bluish grey eyes.

water falls off from a hign cliff »t

She was born October 11, 1^22 fall- into cups which turn around a

on a farm southeast of Pinckney. lar?e wheel. The turning of this

She lived there for two years and, large w„«. — — - wh„,

then moved to Pinckney for a year, largr ^ \ ^ \ * ^ M t v

fed attendance for the month of After a year she moved to Lansing and f>\\ht0}lKh thp air

SPECIAL NOTICE , October: Rene Haines, William Clark where she lived for a year and then J generated. It .* sent ^ou*

' , K A+VI Dorothy Lavey, Eugene Esch, I.or- moved back to a farm west of, to houses ^ ^ / , ^ poal or

1

Starting Monday, November-4th ^na

Shirley, ¾ ^ Willip Phillip M Murphy, Jack Pinckney and she has lived there Electnerty ^ « i ? ^ ^ jr

the Pinckney

stores will close at

Jeffreys, Dean Schmid, Joyce Clark, , ?

X r chief interests are playing m a n y ' b o m e s ^ ^ ^ ^ Z

6:00 p. m.

Mary Margaret Clark, Shirley Wegener,

Jo Ann Griffiths, George

, Softball basketball, going to movies | .nt. ^

STATE OF MICHIGAN

Clark, Jackie Craft.

As a reward for perfect attend- ,

The Probate Court for \\hm County unce they are excused after the af- |

of Livingiton

ternoon recess.

At a session of said Court, held Mary Jean Kirschke visited her

* the Probate Office in the _City of grandmother in Detroit.

Howell, in said County, on the 29th Juanita Truhn visited her aunt in

day of October, A. D. 1940.

Howell.

Present: Hon. Willis L. Lyons, Jack Jeffreys was in Jackson on

Saturday.

Judge of Probate.

The perfect spellers in the second

In tb. Matter of the £»Ute of

grade spelling review were: Mary

ChToline Sales, deceased.

C 1 eden 'wiwpd one of the best

l>'e.h ,-i'hiKil team,- we have ^eeu this

' ear. The hoy- were well schooled in

tie fundamental^ of the game and

their back field was exceptionally

1a>t and shifty.

The 1'MH'kney hoy- experienced a

h t of difficulty in trying to figure

oat tfe Linden attack because the

cii;ii"c>h;ick called no signals. The

h:u! w.i- -napped a» soon as the cent<

r aw that the hacks were in posi-

' •( n.

citie of the bright spots of the

1

from the Pinckney standpoint

,l

' exceptionally fine kicking of

K\ eiyhody -hon H\ K nnw nn\v ! > ' 1, e. On one occasion one of his

1

(i:in '\eled c'ih yards and then rolv•niching

from the ruiiainc. In ord- ., a out of hounds, \\\> average for

i'! to master lythm, practice hy 'he tame wa • approximately 38

;. our.-elf. Turn on the radio or whi- van

1 • * a tune and Lap your feel untd the

\ KU ;e(d you can keep exact time to • 1 Y

'•.! c iiiu-ir; then -'.and up and dance ii-i we

aiouiid the loom 1H a -implr >ide-

If you don't know how to he-

' en

a>k .-omeone to nolp you. Kven

V would he y;l;ul to teach you

•lie k: ow> ahoiit dancing, hut

'1 a k \\w to teach you at a pubdance,

She wants to ,-pend her

• is- daneing, not teaching.

» *< "

,,,.< '(•[)< are forever changing,

' ^ u X Z is collecting pins of .,1 \ where their trucks ^ ^ dance etiquette remains about

.VI

s o f. She now has about 320 in her of w.res^d too, are^ ^ ^

•aine Here are some hints on,

in• 1 dance etiquette.

collection. • , . ,,_ .ew pole? which

Don't grab her so tightly thai

Hor .»««» I. to pl«. whom- y» ^ P» » , £ J d t h e v „ut i 1- to ga>p for breath. On the

ever she « wth. (^t ^ ^ f.^ „,.

hand, don't hold her so gin-

accidents. They hire many men to that she won't be able to fol-

Number 2

be ready to work day or night.They

She has hazel eyes and dark brown

have electric lights on corner- to

hair. She is five feet 3 inches tall,

prevent incidents.

would not prefer to give her weight.

Th*» Fdison Company installs met­

She was born in Gregory on the

ers whicr run automatically to keep

14th of March, 1923 and has live*

the number of hours we use electric­

Robert L. ..'. ; •»,«* »i„.una Mailene - 1.- there an etiquette question you

vauld hke answered. Drop your

que.-tion in the public letter box in

the session room. Your name does-

: 't have to be signed to it. We will

answer it in this column as soon as

possible.

Py: Thank you and Please.

Last Thursday morning the entire

''iion' -aw a motion picture, in the

; tiuitorium. The name of it was:

"Perk's Kad Boy in the Circus". The

shov had many laughs in it, and I'm party rnuo, ,,.„,....

qniti sure it was enjoyed by all. We j pood sized crowd there, plenty of

only wish we could turn in our 36 • c!fier and doughnuts and from ft*

mi'limeter machine for a 40 milli- ( poihr- there were a lot of flahaa

useful in hot weather. meter, and that we could use it more j caught from the fish pond. Pritat

He was born in Detroit, December! H will turn around very fast and (ften, not only for enjoyment, but j were given to those dressed In cot*

11, 1923. When he was six years, Vow cool air out. I' will cool you

-"»««/»«•• inn tomes. «


11, 1923. When he was six years , ° A f^ .g Tepy conveBient lt would be helpful m i Funniest dressed ^ • - " J * ^ *

old he moved to the farm where he , * - .n for sick ^^oP ^ ^ ^ It c03t6l rJc0. . ^ ^ dre„ed Rrty Don Gw««J

TEACH«'S -NST.TUTE ^JZ^JXZnS

1e m wnfflllir ' ^ co * 6

now lives. I 0028 feT;ts an honr. The sewing

His ambition 1« to be a mechanic • ,g yery ^ ^ %}M, Tt r 0^

His chief interests are football, | ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ — ^ ^ The ^ .

trie stove is v«J **M r'to'ns. to ns. All{ All Ir, the previous ^ ^ "'Ton"of rmm^t " d're^ed couple ...TrtW*

" d ^mming.

t Lloyd Nasht son of Mr. and Mrs. , baa «£*'^ n T O «l0GRAPHlE3

^ v T wi^i„th* Orville Nash baa gone to Santa | A N S W E R „ 1 U ^_ : 0 nn«

This week thoae who helped in the

"news" are Junior Petsch and Nor­

^ ^

ma Young.

The following p*>plt war* in pw-

, v^

latwaa.

Hamparian.


A

Community Hall Thar****

Plnckney Oct. ^«*

Your Show and Mine

CALDWELL*^

COMEDIANS

This Week's Flay

The m

A Rural Comedy Drama—A Good Story "Plenty

or Laughs Thrill* Galore

Ask vour i neadly Merchants tor

FREE COURTESY TICKET

D . lfu *? ^it ^. Children a Dime

?5T«T IOC Any Time

A Bank's Duly To It's

< Borrowers

As set forth in the Statement

of Principles of Commercial

Banking of the American

Bunkers Association.

"Within the boundaries .-ft

by his primary obligation to

depositors, the hanker >houM

seek to assist in making souno

credit standing and of good

loans to appi: ' nls of proixr

character."

"No loan should he grants

with a clear understanding

between the bank ami borrower

regarding the meal)-. the

method and the time of repayment.

This bank realizes that it is

rendering its best loan service

when its loan policy supoiuos

the sound need- of the in

dividual.- and businesses of this

community. It strives to give

adequate loan service to individual-

and busm-s enterprises

of suitable character.

AUTO LOANS

Finance your new cr late

model used car through thi?

bank.

First National Bank

.•v HOWEl i

Member Federal Deposit la

*uran-.* Corporation. A! 1 l)»*

ootit* Ii lured up to tS.OOo fai

etch Depositor.

Plainfield

Jack Smith held a Halloween party

at his home Thursday evening.

There were 20 in attendance. Games

were played, dancing was enjoyed.

A scavenger hunt was held at 10:30

Prizes were given and a lovely,

fhmty luncheon was served the host

to all present.

Rev. and Mrs. Swadling called

Ladior of the W. S. of the Church

Service attended a meting Tuesdav

night at South Lyon.

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Sweet attended

the Silver wedding anniversary

of Rev. and Mrs. Ray Barber

of Chelsea Sunday afternoon.

Rev. and Mrs. Swadling called

Wednesday on their brother, Mr.

Arthur Fullsom in Shephard Sanitarium,

Findlay, Ohio, Wednesday

and Mrs. Florence Button accompanied

them.

Rev. and Mrs. Ed Swadling mot-

< red to Adrian Friday after their

daughter, Miss Carrie Swadling and

girl friend from Corea who attends

college at Adrian.

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Bishop and

family of Lansing were Sunday

guests of Mr. and Mrs. Duane Jacobs.

Mrs. Ada Van Syckel was Sunday

dinner guest with Mrs. Florence Dutton.

The last galloping tea whan the

whole guild will meet with Mrs.

Nina Miller Thursday afternoon.

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Delmart, Betty

Ann and Mrs. Shost of Detroit were

Sunday guests at Mr. H. A. Wasron

and Arlo and called on Mrs.

Florence Dutton.

/Miss Fay Leach and friend, Misc

.Jenks of Lansing was week end [

guest of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Gladstone

Mr- and Mrs. A. J. Holmes and

Mrs. Marion Gladstone were guests

in Lansing Wednesday.

Mr. Dale Holmes of Lansing was

home Saturday afternoon.

Dr. Braley and Mr. Brown of

Highland Park were Wednesday

fruests at the Braley farm.

Mrs. Floicrce Dutton called Friday

afternoon on Mrs. Fred Rose.

AM State Highway Commiasrioner

for aev«n and *

hall yaara Murray D. Van

Wagons* hat proved, that

ha knows how to oat

things dona. Aa Govarno*

ha can ba countad on to

apply tha aaina vigorous

methoda and to gtoa Mich*

igan oapablt Uadarahip,

VOTE FOR HIM , „ /

WITH " "'*-**'

VAN WAGONE

GOVERNOR

- > ^

The Pinckncy Dispatch Wednesday, Oct 30. 1940

-—»f

ill

SYLVAN THEATRE

CHELSEA, MICH.

Michigan's Finest Small Town

Theatre

Aii Coudit'cned

Friday and Saturday, Nov. 1-2

THEY DRIVE BY NIGHT

A Melodrama -with GEORGE RAFT

ANN SHERIDAN, IDA LUPINO

;Jnd HUMPHREY BOGART.

Cartoon: "Sniffles Takes a Trip".

Sun., Mon„ Tues., Nov. 3-4-5

BOOM TOWN

A Melodrama with CLARK GAB­

LE, SPENCER TRACY, CLAUD-

ETTE COLBERT, HEDY LAMARR

and FRANK MORGAN.

The Year'* Greatest Entertainment

Treat with the Biggest Caet

ever assembled in One Picture.

Wed., Thur*., Nov

6-7

GIRL FROM AVENUE A

DOUBLE FEATURE

A Comedy with JANE WITHERS,

KENT TAYLOR, LAURA HOPE

CREWS and KATHARINE ALD-

RIDGE.

ALSO

MEXICAN SPITFIRE

A Lorn edy with LUPE VELEZ,

LEON ERROLL and DONALD

WOODS.

Coming Attraction: "Lucky Partner.";

"The Sea Hawk" "Scatterbrain".

""Mr, and~~Mrs. Gorman Kelly and

Miss Nellie Gardner were in Dexter

Tuesday.

The jury in the case of Harold

Austin vs the Ann Arbor railroad )

brought in a verdict, of no cause

ft.' action last Monday.

Mrs. Emma Carpenter is visiting

Mr.-. James Weber art; Dearborn.

Mr. and Mrs. E. Wray Hinckley

^'siled Mrs. Hinckley's sister, Mrs.

Florence Spoonser and family at

Chelsea.

Mrs. James DeWolf and grand-

(Inuchter, Joyce Ann DeWolf spent

Thursday with Mrs. DeWolf's mother,

Mrs. Fred Janke, sr., at .South

Lyon

s

Hamburg

The body of Mrs. Frank Burnett;

of Standish was brought to Hamtuij.

Monday where funeral services

were held at St. Stephen's Episcopal

church at one o'clock. Burial was in

1'aiJiburg cemetery.

Miss Cora Seeley was the daughter

of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Seeley

an-1 was born in Cayuga, county,

Ne\» York, September 15, 1864 comwher

a young girl; here she grew to

mg with her parents to Hamburg

womanhood. There she was united \

in marriage with Frank Burnett, also

of Hamburg, November 4, 1885,

moving to stanaiSTl. M1H 1H yilfvived

by the widower, two children,

Mrs. Ernest Piate of Flint and Erwiu

Burnett of Grand Rapids and

live grandchildren.

She died at the home of her

daughter, Mrs. Piate at Flint on

Friday, October 25th.

Mesdames May E. Stephanon,

Emily Kuchar, Lois Borton, Gladys

Lee, Minnie Buckaleu, Nellie J. Pear-

.-on. Emily E. Docking, Ida Knapp,

Jennie Shannon, Mary Moore, Nellie

E. Haight, Mildred Whitlock, Minnie

Cooper, Ella Featherly, Mary Dyer

, Lucile Tomlin, Majel Navarre, and

1 Mabel Rorabacher and Miss Jule A.

I Ball, members of Hamburg hive, No.

392, Lady Maccabees attended the

annual meeting of Livingston County

Maccabee association held in the

Lecion hall at Fowlerville Tuesday.

The meeting was in charge of Mrs.

Florence Fickett. of Howell, county

commander. Guests were: Mrs. Bertha

McCall of Detroit, member of

the eexcutive board of Michigan ;Mrs

Mildred E. Kline and Mrs. Esther

Hollister of Lansing, district manager

and assistant district manager,

Carl E. Weuthner of Manchester,

number of the executive committee

oT the Great Camp of Michigan and

Mrs. Weurthner and Mrs. Susie M.

Beai and Mrs. Ethel Ziegler of

Ypsihmti.

Official reports were given by

Mrs. .Annette Newman of Howell,

Sat.

Nov. 2

THESE SPE'Jl'ALS ARE FOR CASH ONLY"

Campbell's Soups';- Cans 25

Raro Blue Syrup jArgo Corn or Gloss

Stareb

M

Fels Naptha

Soap

jATBars

Clapps Baby Food Apple bailee

4m Cans m gr *» No*2

jFruit Cocktail

| Rich whip, Carolene

Armours

record-keeper and Miss Jule A. Ball

1 c{ Hamburg, finance-keeper. Mrs.

Nellie E. Haight pianist for 17 years

and Miss Ball, finance-keeper for 18

\ ear: were presented with corsages

in recognition of these services. Mrs.

Kiint made the presentations, to

which both responded briefly.

Election of officers resulted as

i..o'lows:

Mrs. Florence Fickett, commander,

Mrs. Ruby Soules, Fowlerville,

past commander; Mrs. May E.

F't-'phen, It. commander, Mrs. Mary

Moore, record-keeper and Miss Jule

A Ball, finance-keeppr, all of Hamv

e«;i member, a

Mrs. Fern Coffey, sergeant and Mrs M ,u members.

Mabel Kuttler, mistress at arms of It

i FowVrvillo, Mrs. Norine Stine and heic:

is cucumber harvesting time?

Clayton Carpenter has his

Mr.-. Anna Eilant, Howell, first and niiit acres harvested. Arthur Shehan

-"cnnd lady uf the guards, Mrs. Car- unci son, Roland Shehan who have

Ce Rorabacher, Oak Grove, sentinel •40 acres on the Arthur Shehan and

Mrs. Mildred Whitlock, Hamburg, Myron W. Hendrick farms are har­

picket, Mrs. Nellie E. Haight, Hamvesting theirs. They are raised for

burg, pianist.

seec 1 for the Isabelle Seed Co. at

Following the luncheon the meeting,

opened with the exemplifving of

Jackson.

4

.hr ope nine ceremony by Hamburg

Vvvr.

The newly-elected officers were

ir-talled by Mr-. Bertha McCall asi-tra

by Mrs. Maxine Berger of

1'owlerville "as great mistress at arms

Remarks were given by each of

ihe visitors Hamburg hive was winrrr

of both the honor and attendance

banners which were presented

u, IS 4

Woodhury s

Facial Soap

4*" *$'

Richtood

Sauer Kraut

Sweetkeart Soap

Lb.

Can

Quaker

10

Putted Wheat

fkgs I9' |

3

TIW.

Can

Butter LB.

Mother AnnCodflsie 28

c

c

Lard 2 LB

fiolonga Slicing ' B

Bacon Square* L *

Oleo " LB

15

154

10

1M Oranges.Jiiioy 2 DOZ.

St. Mary's Church

ton and other places.

REASON & SONS

Popper Squash $\N 101

Eatmrre Cranberries «* 18 C

Rsasa&aga 3 LB 10 c

[Texas S ecdless Grapefrnit Pink 4 for 19 C

Ba2.at.a5 ( R?P L E D 4 LB 25 c

Guy H Hosley

Candidate for

State

Representative

Thursday, October 31 is Vigil of

al

ni

to the commander, Mrs. May E., _, , _ , _

i .. , , „ .,,. ,, , -'Inursday 7 to 9

Stephanon by Mrs. Kline. Report of i . A , XT

u ^ .14 • ««» Saturday, Nov

the courtesy committee was given

by Mrs. Hattie Jubb of Howell.

It was voted to hold a public initiation

at a candle light service in

St. Joseph's hall at Howell, Tuesday.

November 12, at 8 p. m. with

the commanders, Mrs. Annette Newman

of Howell, Mrs. Carrie Grill of

Fowlerville and Mrs. May E. Stephanon,

of Hamburg as committee on

arrangements. The work to be put

ot by the Minnie L. Adams drill

team of Lansing. The May, 1941

meeting will be held in St. Joseph's

liail at Howell.

With Ellen Sabin of Fowlerftlle

7"'esiding the following program was

presented, opening with everyone

s.-tsing, "God Bless America". Reading-

were given by Miss Dorothy

Kv.Jor, Fowlerville, Mrs. Alice Schoenhal*.

Howell and Miss Ball. The

piece de luxe was a play, "Initiation

at Queen of Sheba Lodge, No

13" by Hamburg hive; personnel

was: Worshipful High Cockalorum,

Mrs. Minnie Buckaleu, Assistant

High Cockalorum, Mrs. Emily Kuchar;

Exacted Pitch Fork, Mrs. Lois

Borton, Magnificent Salted Peanut,

Mrsc. Mary Moore; pianist, Mrs.

Nellie E. Haight, initiates, Mrs. Ella

Featherly and Carl E. Weurthner.

Th* meeting closed with singing,

"Plest Be the Tie That Binds," Thus

the end of a perfect day.

Miss ETsie DeWolf of Hamburg

township has organized a 4-H clothing

club known as the "Merry Tailo'cttes".

Members are: Miss DeWolf

lender, Jean Sweitzer, president,

Joan Imus, vice-president, Mary

Strfindborg, secretary, Eleanor Bo-,

ja, treasurer, Miss DeWolf is a 4th!!"* ^"y**. Philadelphia, Bos-

1 saints, a fast and abstinence day.

Friday Nov. 1st, is the first Friday.

Friday is also the Feast of All

Souls, all are obliged to hear mass

the same as on Sunday. Mass riday

P. and 8 o'clock. Confessions on

p. m.

ember 2 is all souls

day. Masses Saturday fi, 8, 9 o'clock

All names, intentions handed in for

all souls day masses will be enrolled

in the Purgatorial society and again

remembered each Saturday throughout

the month of November. November

is devoted to the Holy souls.

Novena Devotions in Honor of

Lady of Sorrows every Friday at

7:30 p. m. Friday Novena books may

be obtained at the Rectory.

Sunday, November 3rd, Masses at

usua 1 Democrat Ticket

Yoir Vote Will Be Appreciated

*.%•

STATE OF MICHIGAN DRAFT DRAWINGS TUESDAY

1'he draft drawings were held at

The Probate Court for the County Washington, D. C. Tuesday. The

of Livingston.

i'irst number drawn was 158. Among

At a session of said Court, held chrvse having this numbir was Clar­

at the Probate Office in the City of ence Chapman of AnA Arbor, a

Howell in said County, on the 22d grandson of Mrs. Htry Pick of this

day of October A. D., 1040.

place. He is married.' and has four

hours of 8:30 and 10:45 a. m.

Present: Hon. Willis L. Lyons, children and is empl&yed by the De­

Children's catechism home Satur

Judge of Probate

troit Edison Company.

d< y following the 9 o'clock Mass.

In The Matter Of The Estate of The numbers wan not posted in

All mass intentions for November

William H. Peck, Deceased.

townships in thii county as there

will be published next week.

Warren Barton having filed in was not sufficient time. The numbers

We are most grateful to the dif­

said Court his final administration ar« posted at the draft headquarferent

committees who worked hard

account, and his petition praying ters at Howell. The numbers only

to keep the altar, and church served

for the allowance t' (reof and for run from 1 to 2360 in this county.

decently, devotedly during the mis-

a construction of the will of saia

s on, to the men and ladies who as­

deceased, assigning the residue o''

sisted in the dinner service to the

NOTICE

the estate to Edith Garloch 1 cc


••«•!• 1 ,

CASH SPECIALS!

FBI. SAT., Nov. i, Nov. %

Ivory Soap Bars. 15c

The Pinckney Dispatch Wednesday, Oct. 30. 1940

Ivory Flakes

21^

Dreft Lge. Pkg. 21C

P. & 6. White Naptha Soap 3 Bars 10c

Maxwell House Coffee Lb. 256

Kraft's Cheese Spread in slass jar 16c

SUGAR, lO Lbs. 47c

Spry "Triple"

Creamed 3 Lb. 47c

Lux Toilet

Soap 3 Cakes

Rinso „Top Speed"2 Lge. Pkgs.

SutvRay Soda Crackers 2 Lbs.

Kellogg's Corn Flakes 2 Lge. Pit??

17c

35o

17c

19c

"Table King" Salad Dressing Qt.21c

Tomato Juice 46 Oz* Can 15c

BANANAS

TOKAY GRAPES

SWEET POTATOES

CRANBERRIES

4 Lbs 25c JRANGES 2 Dozen 35c

2 Lbs. 19c ONIONS

10 Lb. Bae 17c

3 Lbs. 10c CARROTS 3 Bunches 10c

Lb 18c|PEPPER SQUASH 3 for 10c

Kennedy's Gen. Store

PHONE 23F3 WE DEL1VEP

•VMV#

t

I

i

The Pincknej Dispatch

Catered at tit* Paatoiflc*

at Pincknay, Mick, a*

second cla&> matter.

Subscription $1.26 a year

Paid in Advance.

PAUL W. CURLETT PUBLISHER

Misb Kamonda Ledwidge was in

Lairing Saiturday.

Miss Joyce Isham spent the week

er>d in St. Johns.

Winston Baughn is working in the

fcorer.aon factory in Dexter,

Mr. arid Mrs. W. H. Gardner were

in Howell Saturday on business.

Charles Clinton of Detroit visited

hs brother. Rov. here over Sunday.

Cyius AtLee and Howard Read

were home from Albion College the

week end.

Mrs. James Roche spent Saturday

afternoon with her son, George

near Dexter.

Dr. George Mann and mother of

Detroit were Sunday guests of Mrs.

N. O. Frye.

J. F. Hamel and wife of Detroit j

.vho own the Darwin farm spent the j

week end here. I

Adrian i avey i? spending several

vueks with Mr. and Mrs. Robert

Gradwell at Ch'cago.

Willard Chamberlain has succeeded

Jack Smith as the Ann Arbor

News agent here.

(Miss Janice Merrill of Lansing

^pent the week end with her grandmother,

Mrs. Nettie Vaughn.

Sheriff Kennedy and wife of

r'uwell caiV 1 on his mother, Mrs.

Pit.-y Kennedy Sunday afternoon. '

Mr. and Mrs. Will Mercer were

Sunday evening dinner guests of Dr. 1

and Mrs. A. J. McGregor at Brighton

Mr. and Mrs. Victor Whitten of

Romeo, were guests Sunday of Rev.

and Mrs. J. M. McLucas and family.

Mr. and Mrs. Lee Hoff and Mr.

and Mrs. George Foster of Flint

wore Sunday guests of the Hoff Sistors.

' ;

Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Arthur Haines

of Lansing were Sunday guests at

tlu home of Mr .and Mrs. Abel

I.: nes.

LiiDonis Spears and Aloysius

SiuckaLlc attended the Mich-Penn.

football game at Ann Arbor Saturday.

Mr.

•\r iiy

p.u ^ts of M

\II n jr.

Mrs. C. J

liie member

md Mi ••. Pearl Fish:r and

of i^rVield were Sunday

ind Mrs. (jeorge Mea-

Clinton was hostess to

of her Five Hundred

o'clock luncheon last

"Halloween ??

Novelties of All Kinds for the Occasion.

Masks, Lanterns. Games. Favors. Decorations

HALLOWEEN

WITHOUT

CANDY?

at Vrry I nw Pri/»a.

LARGE STOCK OF BOX

CANDIES ON HAND

Kennedy Drug Store

»


PROFESSIONAL CORNER

Tbe Pinckney Sanitarium

BAY M. DUFFY, M. D.

Pinckney, Michigan.

Office Horn*—

2 J00 to 440 P. M.

7:00 to 9;00 P. M.

DR. G R. McCLUSKEY

DENTIST

112¼ N. Michigan

Phones

Offlce; 220 Res. 123J

Evenings by appointment

HOWELL, MICHIGAN

CLAUDE SHELDON

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR

Phone 19F12 Pinclcn«y, Mack

PERCY ELLIS

AUCTIONEER

Farm Sales a Specialtj

Phons Pinckney 19-FM

LEE LAVEY

GENERAL INSURANCE

Phone S9-F3

Pinckney, Michigan

Ray H. Burrell Paul M. Burrell

A. J BURRELL & SONS

ARTISTIC MEMORIALS

R M. Oharlesworth, Mgr.

Phone 31 Brighton Mich

P. H. Swarthout & Son

FUNERAL HOME

Modern Tel. Amtalanec

Equipment 39 Service

Pinckney, Mich.

DON W. VANWINKLE

Attorney at Law

Office over

First Slate Savings Bank

HOWELL, MICHIGAN

Dr. Gerald W. McColIodi

Osteopath . Physician

and Surgeon

FIRST NATIONAL BANK BLDG.

Phone Howell 57. Howell, Michigan

Hour*s 9 to 12 - 1 to 5

Evenings by Appointment

In Pinckney Every Thursday

Afternoon at 120 Livingston

Phone 87

For Advance Appointment

Office Phone 6568

Residence Phone 22389

CHIROPRACTOR

DR. V. W. PETERSON

Ann Arbor, Michigan

502 First National Bank

Painleea Chiropractic Technic

C. M. GIBSON, D. C.

307½ S. MAIN ST.

ANN ARBOR, MICH.

DR MARY MINNISS

CHIROPODIST

All Foot Troubles Quickly Relieved

PHONE 22370

352 Main St Ann Arbor, Mich

n The Swis» Watchmaker"

H. RUST, JEWELER

Skilled Watch and Clock Repairing

Across from Allenel Hotel

107 S,Fourth Ave. Ann Arbor, Mich.

Cemetery Memorials

A R N E T S

#24 N. Main Ann Arbor Mich

Represented by

JOHN W. RANE

Whitmore Lake Phone 681

JAY P. SWEENEY

Attorney at Law

HOWELL, MICHIGAN

MARTIN J LAVAN

Attorney at Law

Phon » 13 Brighton Mieb.

Electrical Contracting

FIXTURES SUPPLIES

ELECTRICAL WIRING AND REPAIRING

REASONABLE PRICES

ESTIMATES CHEERFULLY GIVEN

* ALL WORK GUARANTEED

C Jack Sheldon

19F12 Electrical Contractor

P'nckney

STOCK POOD

CM*- Cloj lid (inori hii for Sale

Hauling Trucking

WFPi« v •».-

Produca of AM Kind*

LOHG DIS rANCF

W. H. MEYER

TU Plncho^y DjjRalch Wednesday, Oct, 30. 1940

NOTES of 50 YhARS

Dispatch of October 30, 1890

First snow of the season Tuesday

last.

The new voting booth have bees

made and placed in position.

Mrs. Wrn. Black attended the funeral

of her si&ter in Detroit last

week.

Michael Lavey has been appointed

administrator of the Sarah Malloy

estate.

Henry E. Harris left Monday for

New Mexico.

Lyle Younglove is attending school

in DeLiull.

Clyde Stocking, a former Pinckney

boy is candidate for coui*y

clerk in Ogemaw county.

John Maier has secured a position

as engineer in the electric light plant

at Owosso, owned by the Travis

Brothers, formerly of Pettysville.

Byron Stouit, candidate for congress

addressed a meeting at the

town hall Saturday.

We are much indebted to Henry

Kice for a bunch of fine celery he

grew himself.

Col. S. F. Norton editor of the

Chicago Sentinel will talk here tonight

in the interests of the industrial

party.

R. E. Finch is in Jfeckson attending

the funeral of his brother-in-law

B. H. Johnson.

The ladies o| the M. E. Church

will serve a ten cent dinner in the

basement of the town hall on election

day.

A large fine illustrated volume,

callel the Album of Livingston county

containing writeups of prominent

persons is being publishel by Chapman

Bros, of Chicago.

David Van Horn is attending a

school in An^f"Arbor.

Pepper and Rose are shipping ci- !

der from Pettysville. !

Messrs Pearson and Stowe of |

Howell spoke here last Tuesday and I

William Ball of Hamburg on Thurs- j

day night. |

John Billinsky who has been wor- |

king for Mark Allison this summer '

has gone west.

Mr. Glover will organize a singing

school at the Sprout school Friday

night.

A Democratic meeting will be

held at the Eamen school on Friday

night. W. P. Van Winkle and Judd

Yelland of Howell the the speakers

Miss Jennie White has a new Packard

organ purchased of Rush Lake

and is now taking lessons of Mis??

Amelia Clark.

The Sprout school is being remodeled,

a new floor, desks etc, being

put in. G. M. Sprout is teacher.

— 0 —

IMrs. Roy Merrill and daughter,

Mercedes visited Mrs. Nettie Vaughn

Sunday evening

" " ''* " 1.. i.. 1

Test your home

flighting with the

itiaaic &M

Use this new service without

charge . have your lighting

measured with the Light Meter.

This "Magic Eye" tells you exactly

how much light you have.

Phone your Dctr6it Edison office.

REPUBLICAN

The Next Few Hours May Decide

THE DESTINY

OF OUR COUNTRY

In a few hours you will be called upon

to decide whether a President of the

United States shall break one of our

most cherished and hallowed traditions.

There are — of course — other grave

issues. But none, however grave, is

likely to have such a far-reaching effect

on the future of our country. Shall we,

with open eyes, ¢0 down the road that

leads to Fascism, Nazism, Communism

or whatever you choose to call a type

of government which denies the dignity

of man and the rights of the individual?

Shall we, for the first time in our history,

accept the theory of the indispensable

man, as against the fact that no

man in all history lias ever been indispensable?

JVlake no mistake. Once we set foot on

the road to dictatorship there is no

turning back any more than the people

of (icnnany or Russia can now turn

back and choose other leaders . . . any

more than the people of (Germany can

now eiul the terrible war that their

present k.iders have led them into.

So when you enter the polling booth on

Tuesday and you are alone with your

conscience with the hallot spread out

before \u, it will he up to you to

choose whether we shall surely remain

free men and women working together

in a democracy, or whether we shall

put ourselves in peril of the Act of Coni...••*.

1 a ',he Emergency Farm

.*;••.;'a ' Ac; of ]',)'.'>'.], as amended j

* : '. S. C. Til in 1 J, Sections 1016-1

i Oil/), as mortgagee, filed for record I

in the office of :hc Register of Deeds'

of I,iving.-ton County, Michigan, on

the 12th day of October, 1034, re-

< eided in Liber 144 of Mortgages, on

page 7'i thereof, and which mortgage

ua-. thereafter and on the 13th day

of July, 1040, by an instrument in

v-. : ii:iei'Uftt, taxe.^, assessments and insurance

paid, shall at the option oj

mortgagee, become and be due and

\>.ryable forthwith, and default hav-

!• • been made in payment of the in-

'•:< t and taxes provided in said

n /:i;'a;

t'!i"-, duly assigned to the Federal

l-'-irm Mortgage Corporation, a corpoi

a: ion, of Washinton, D. C, and

r c, which default has coniii:*

(•• (i for more than thirty days, the

,-.iid mortgagee doih hereby e.vercue

it option to declare the principal

on of said mortgage and all arrearj-pe

of interest and taxes due and

pf yable.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN

Tbat said mortgage will be foreclosed,

pursuant to power of sale, and

the premises therein described as:

West Half of the Southeast

Quarter of Section Twenty-two,

Township Four North of Range

Three East:

ly.it: within said county and state Wil

bo sold at public auction to the higfcc



linillltlllUUIHtltllllllllllillllltHIIlllllllllllllllllltllllllllllllllllllltllllllllillllllMllllllllllllIilllllllM §

slllHIIHIIIIHIIIIIIIIIUIHII

SENATOR

VANDENBERG

When You Vote for Vandenberg

You Vote for Michigan

Senator Arthur H. Vandenberg is Michigan's

champion. In foreign relations, in

finance, in commerce, he is one of the few

successful, influential and important men

Michigan ever sent to Washington. BUT

he has never forgotten the people who sent

him there. For thirteen years he has fought

for Michigan's interests—from sugar beets

to automobiles, from furniture to fruit. He's

a staunch friend of farming, an aggressive

spokesman for organized labor . . . and an

implacable foe of extravagance.

Vandenberg is the man who sponsored

the famous ''munitions investigation" that

took big profits out of war.

He is the man who forced congressi\ val

reapportionment, gaining four seats for

Michigan in the House of Representatives,

and four votes in the Klectoral College.

He is the man who was chiefly responsible

for last January's bill which stopped

an increase of 50% in taxes on 40,000,000

workers.

He is called "the Father of Rank Deposit

Insurance."

The Pinckney Dispatch Wednesday, Oct 30. 1940

" fS >m ? mmmmmm ^ m T^^ m ~ m W mmummm * m ^ mmm ? mm ^^ ^^^^^^*^

He is the man who saved America $500,-

000,000 by defeating the shamefully wasteful

Passamaquoddy and Florida Ship Canal

and a number of other senseless projects.

He has done all these things for the nation,

but he has never been too busy to

"deliver the goods" for Michigan.

He saved the state's copper industry with

his tariff.

He sponsored Isle Royale's development

as Michigan's first National Park.

He has vigilantly guarded the state's vast

interests in Great Lakes commerce, and he

is working now for Michigan's share in

National Defense.

Thi, is the man who is a *reat leader of

the Senate minority party . . . the man whom

Life magazine picked among the "first ten"

Senators.

His re-election is Michigan's duty to 47

other states as well as to itself. His reelection

means that Michigan will continue

to be "tops" in the United States Senate!

I Re-elect MICHIGAN'S NATIONAL LEADER!

( ARTHUR H. VANDENBERG

iTnuiiiHtiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiuttiii inuiiiiiiiHiHiiiiiiiiiiniHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiuiiiiiiiLMiiirniiiiiiuiiiiuiniiiiiiiititiiiiii

FOR YOUR CHILDREN'S SAKE I

ii-

Vote

on

PARKWAY

PLAYGROUND

PROPOSAL

{STATEPROPOSAL NUMBERS)

What the Parkway-Playground Proposal Means to You!

Y OUR

"YES" VOTE means the setting

up of a joint Commission, or

Authority, for the Metropolitan Counties

of Wayne, Washtenaw, Oakland,

Livingston and Macomb ... representing

you in the planning, developing

and operating of adequate parks, playgrounds,

bathing beaches, and of safe,

fast, convenient express highways to

take you to your destination without

4#Jay or danger due to traffic jams!

AN ANNUAL COST of less than 15

k cents a person . . . the mere price

of a nut sundae! . . . will get this

vitally-needed program well under way

throughout the five-county area I

YOUR "YES" VOTE means children

of this crowded area will have an

abundance of $afe places to go and

play! Actually, your "Yes" can save

the lives of many children who otherwise

are destined to meet sudden

tragedy on our motor-jammed streets

and highways! (Seven years of parkway-playground

progress in Greater

New York has reduced traffic accidents

to children 42 per cent! And juvenile

delinquency 20 per cent!) Let's give our

own children a chance for happiness!

On Tuesday, let's all vote "Yes" on our

own Parkway-Playground Proposal!

YOUR "YES" VOTE means manifold

other benefits to be shared by every

one of the three million people living

in the five counties centering about

Detroit! "Yes" means greater em*

ploy men tt for it takes men to build

parkways, playgrounds, bathing

beaches! "Yes" means millions move

tourist dollars, because playlands at*

tract visitors* "Yes" means a mora

gracious home environment! "Yes"

means a healthier, happier, more pros*

CrouM people! For all our sakes • • •

;'• all be sure to vote "Yes!"

PARKSiARKVAYyllX PR E v W AKIDFNTS

UNIQUE FIGURE OF CAMPAIGN

t *

One of the unique figures of the

rresent campaign is that of the Dem-i

ocraitic Candidate for Congress from'

the Sixth District. Charles R. Adair

lia long been a figure in the public

and political life of Flint and

Genesee County. He has always been

a keen student of both our social

and economic problems. He is a recognized

authority on the entire

s] monetary system.

jE' From the beginning of the depres-

5, sion in 1929, Mr. Adair waa an ernest

seeker for a solution. When he

first read the Townsend Plan he

felt that it had the possibilities needed

by 4he country, if recovery is

ever to be achieved. Since then he

ha•> been a consistent advocate of

gj adequate provision to the old. This

S. seemed wise for several reasons.

First, it would remove fear and that

"pallid giant" is the cause "of most

panics. Then their removal from

the adtive search for jobs would

5j~rjrrean — that the young people"would

have their chance. If they faced a

EI world where constant concern for

the future was not necessary weight

to be carriedtfhey migt make a new

world instead of keeping the one

•Si they found.

j^j Mr. Adair wishes to go to Cons'

gress to do something to assist in)

Sj bringing about a better condition/

sjs-mong the people of, not only the

sixth Michigan District, but of the

entire country.

Personally, he would bring to the

5 J office not only the wisdom acquirg|

ed by experience and long study but

SI al.-o the viewpoint of one whose

SI heart has never grown old. A visit

S, with him will convince anyone that

5 the only mark the years have left

5 upon him is to be found in the greying

of his massive head of hair.

Even those who are opposed politically

admit that "Charlie" Adair is

honest and sincere. Certainly nothing

more valuable can be found !n a.

public servant than these two qual-J

ities.

When asked about his chances, (Mr.

Adair said with a twinkle in his eye

"Well anyway, they all know I'm

running. Yes, and it looks good. ,

GENERAL ELECTION

To the Qualified Electors: Notice

i* hereby „


V

o

u

A

We Wednesday, Oct 30. 1940

SAVE AMERICA

Join the Big Swing to

WILLKIE

Vote

KEEP AMERICA OUT OF WAR

Name of Offices

Voted for

PRESIDENTIAL

Electors of President fcmd

Vice-President of the U. S.

STATE

Governor

Lieutenant Governor

Secretary of State

Attorney General

State Treasurer

Auditor General

CONGRESSIONAL

United States Senator

Representative in

Congress 6th District

LEGISLATIVE

State Senator,

14th District

Representative in

State Legislature

COUNTY

Prosecuting Attorney

Sheriff

County Clerk

County Treasurer

Register of Deeds

Drain Commissioner

Coroner

Coroner

Ask Yourself this Question

• • • • # . /

**-*! J» J3* M

County Surveyor

l

bS^l,i£\^ :

• Governor

President of the United State*

Wendell L. Willkie

Vice-President of Ine United States

Charles L. McNary

nLuren D. Dickinson

Lieutenant Governor



• Auditor



• Prosecuting

Eugene C. Keyes

Secretary of State

Harry F. Kelly

Attorney General

Herbert J. Rush ton

Sta.te Treasurer

Felix H. H. Flynn

General

Vernon J. Brown.

United States Senator

Arthur H. Vandenburg

Representative in Congress, 6th Dis.

William W. Blacfeney

State Senator, 14th Dis.

Harry F. Hittle

Representative in Sfcate Legislature

Charles P. Adams

Attorney

Joe P. Gates i

Dw, Sheriff

Uiara C. Miller




• Coroner



County Clerk

John A. Hagman

County Treasurer

Jennie M. {Eastman

Register jof Deeds

Frank D Bush

Train ConvnUsioner

Floyd W. Munsell ,

Guy Grieve

Coroner

Henry H. Surveyor Wines

Clay W. Gordon

Lead

v

o

u

A

N


v.

&. 'UM

iiifmiMlliiii ' ^"'ifiirffT-

Classified f.

k Want Ads

FOF SALE_JShropsnlre Rams,

Yearlings and two year olds, at farmer's

price*. Also 50 young ewes

air.l 8 yearling steers.

Fred Leece, Whitmore Lake.

Lemen Road. Phone 371

FOR SALE: Large circulating coal

and wood burning stove. Very good

outfit inn apply at

Pinckney Tavern.

WILL PAY CASH for old glass,

china dishes , pictures, bells, furni-

tuie,

call.

dolls, hunt your attics and

Mrs, Branson, 306 Mill St.

Pinckney, Phone 68.

FOR SALE:- 19S6 Ford DeLuxe

Tudor, very clean. Radio and heater.

Owner must sell. Will sacrifice.

Inquire : Brighton Motor

Sales

FOR SALE: Size 20 Bomnd Oak

Heating Stove in go)od condition.

like new. A

C. M. Reade,

v

2426 Kensington,

Michigan.

Lansing,

FOR SALE: Blacktop Rami

J. L. Donotiue*. 1 1-2 Mi. N.

and 1 Mi. E. Gregory.

WANTED :Ewe Sheep. Good grazt-ns.

Horace A. Fick,

6660 Zeob Road, Dexter.

WANTED" Elderly widower or"?

bachelor to stay on farm. More for

home. Small wage.

•—Gvurw Runiybaw, Route" 1—

Pinckney

Foa SALE One cook stove, Very

good shape, used one year only.

Met Chalker

WE HAVE AG. E. 5 bulb table

model radio. Will sell or trade for

bred sowTnig 9xI2~wIth felt pad, an

electric clock; 2 burner electric stove

at 3025 Patterson Lake Road.

FOR SALE - Large Circulating ba&t

burner coal stove.

Charles Clark.

?OK SALE Team of horses, 6 and

FOR SALlT: 7 mixed milk cows; j 7 years old; wt. 3700.

150 lb. base. Best offer taken. Lee Lavey.

See Mr. Teodori, after 5 p. m. FOR SALE __24 Blacktop Belalne

Pestysville, Michigan. | buoks, yearlings.

SPECIAL NOTICE:- Will the per- Bert Reason, Pinckney.

.sons jwho borrowed the extension

ladder and house jacks from the

late Charles J. Teeple please return

them.

Mrs. Mary Teeple.

To the woman who wants

FOR SALE Sow and eleven pigs.

Inquire of: Carl Schmid, Pinckney

Hamburg and Williams St. Michigan

WANTED TO BUY: Old buttons,

Siasu, china dolls, furniture, anything

eld,

Mrs. Bronson,

306 Mill St.,

Pinckney, Michigan.

Telephone 63 *i

FOR~SALErOne Universal autotnatic

electric stove, 5 burners and oven

Good as new.

Lucius Doyle.

FOR SALE: McCormick Corn husker

and a stock of new Rosenthal

Steel 4-20, Steel 40 and Steel 30

corn hunkers.

F. A. RATHBUN,Fowlerville

Michigan. Rosenthal dealer.

Phone 90.

TO RENT— Reasonable. Well fur*

ni.shed sleeping room, grouad floor, 1

private entrance and bath.

Also meals served.

Mrs. Charles Chamberlain

fr'u

Nov. 1

IN Hilt HOMf

V iuvue you to use thii Detroit

XJ..U.I service: MEASURE your

Ijfht with a Light Meter. There

is no charge or obligation. Phone

your Detroit Edison office.

^••PP'WWIWIWJI^ " ! I" WPIW

Tfa Pinckney Ditpatch Wednesday, Oct

— • -»'

Mis, N. 0. Frye had gs Sunday

guests, Mrs. A. T. Mann and son,

George, Mr. and Mrs. Morcorn of

Detroit, Mr. and Mrs. Claude Daaforth

and daughter, Marjorie of

Flint, Fred Tetple and wife of

Howell.

SPECIALS

CASH SPECIALS

Soup Vegetable 22

Lb.

Bag

(Coatinaod from Flret Pag*)

MICHIGAN STATE MIRROR NEWS

ivg them of advertising, they would

lose their cliental, who would seek

more competent care.

"The 'advertising' dentists claim

they are able to attract persons who

otherwise would neglect their teeth,

tnat their work is as good as other

dentists, that advertising prices prevent

other dentists from 'gouging'

the public, and that advertising is as

rightfully applied to dentistry as to

the sales of any other service.

Do**n't Mako SOBM

Continuing trie Bttreatl's analysis

"The public at large is not particularly

concerned with a quarrel

within a dental profession. It is concerned

with the protection of public [

health. No doubt much of the material

of this act (P. A- 122) is in

the - interest of public hearth.

"As to the allegation that advertising

and the operation of more

than one office is prima facie evict:

nee of poor denial practices — to

the laymen THAT DOESN'T MAKE

SENSE, Possibly the answer is competent

state regulation of all dentuts

- advertisers and non-advertistrs

alike.

As both dental groups must have

professional training at a recognized

dental college and must be licensed

by the dentists' own state dental

board, the competitive motive behind

the bill is easy to see, as the

Detroit Bureau points out. From the

consumer's viewpoint, the anti-competition

restriction "desn't make

sense."

Shutting; put Competition

If the State Proposal No. 4 was

ti'e only anti-competition bill to confront

the consumer, perhaps there

would be less reason for concern.

But such is not the case.

Stuart Perry, editor of the Adj'an

Daily Telegram which has never

received a penny in dental advertising,

has called attention editorially

to the point that the dentists' act is

designed to stifle competition and

woujd establish a dangerous precedent

for the cpnsumer who always

pays

If it is wrong to advertise the

trvrfth about dental prices, then it is

wrong to tell the truth about other

prices. And where will it all end?

In 19-11 tbe "truth in advertising"

statute, making it illegal for anyone

to make an untruthful, deceptive or

misleading statement in any advertisement,

was introduced nationally.

(Michigan's statute is considered to

Sat.

Nov. 2

Pancake Flour

Coffee Symons

Beat

Karo S

Blue

Macaroni " Spaghetti

Oxydol Pkge,

Graham Flour 5

Tomatoes •and Paek«d

Salad Dressing

($ Clarks

ftAMtar

750"

or

Nuereit

Qt.

n

^DeHfer

st all Tin

30. 1940

v

:¾¾¾¾

•37,50:

This is only one of the many Duo-Therm ^

oil-burning circulating heaters now Avail*

able. Each model has all the grace and

appearance of a fine piece of furniture.

Three different finishes—harmonise with 0

any room, ^. I

*****-'

*•.* sv sS w s *•. J

_. DUOTHEItM

mar s^r. i Hvmm*m*Tmmunm~

ample as turning a dial I All

toe heat you want on cold

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