Pottery In Australia Vol 36 No 2 Winter 1997

australianceramics

~ ... -

Volume 36 ~'t 2l,Wi~ 1997

Special

Glaze

Feature


,

I

Contents C',,' I. .' ' .... , S13rrp

Showcase


Survey of recent work

Crescendo

A tribute to Joan Campbell including

excerpts from the catalogue ediled by

Anne Grey and personal tributes by

Sandra Black and Greg Daly.

Special Focus: Graduate Students

II Pictorial survey

Graduate student ceramic work from

Colleges and Universities around

Australia

m So you want to be a Student

Karen Weiss discusses options for

tertiary students of ceramics in Colleges

and Universities.

am College and University course

information

Profiles

II Traineeship

Graduate experience by Juan De Castro

Mike Kusnik OAM

A prOfile of a special member of the

Australian ceramics community by Helen

Ross

Gordon McAuslan. 1913-1996

Ceramist, sculptor. painter and illustrator.

A tnbute by Stephen Skllitzi

Heat and Dust

Karen Goss visits remote Aboriginal

communities to share her passion for

pottery. Article by Katie Suthertand

Ceramic Sculpture

The work of Sandy Johnson, Review by

Kyu Hee Park

Em The Art of Glaze

New work by Rowley Drysdale. RSVlew

by Stephanie Outridge-Reld

Great Glazes

A new sectlC)!, presenting a range of

glazes for you to test and try, This issue

looks at traditional and special eHect

glazes from the stoneware range.

Opaque White Glaze

Chris Myers

Oil Spot Glaze

Mike Kusnik

AshlessAsh

Terry Kirk

Bronze Glazes

Joe Szirer

Colouring Translucent Bone China

Gabrielle Fleet

White Magnesia Matt Stoneware

JanineKing

Coming Events

II

PI

II

North Shore Crafts Group

The 40th Annual exhibition and sale

includes seven potters,

Claydown

An annual Summer School in northem

Tasmania

Down the River

'CIay & Cabemet 2' a popular event to

be held at Newcastle UniverSity.

September 1997

Signs

Jennifer Sexton reports on a special

project by Shan Hatwell and profoundly

deaf students

II

Australia Wide

News from our State representatives

Reviews

Niki Hepi

Recent work. Review by Joe Szirer

Ocean as Metaphor

Recent work by Bill Burton. Review by

Megan Kinninment

Book Reviews


Letters

News

ISSUE 36/2 WINTER 1995 + F'arTERY IN AuSTRAUA 1


issue opens with a tribute to

Joan Campbell, a poner who had

TIis

a special place in many hearts.

Her exhibition 'Crescendo', was a

firting finale to a very creative life.

The colour catalogue from the

exhibition , edited hy Anne Gray, is

beautifu lly pre ented both in the text

and the photographic material. I

would recommend it to everyone,

including schools and libraries. An

very small excerpt is included in this

issue. Copies could he purchased from Anne at

Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery, The Universiry of Western

Australia, Perth, phone: 09 380 3707, Fax 0') 380 1OI7.

The 'Graduate Student Issue ' has become an

important part of each year for us and for our readers.

This year we have revised the format and included the

course information from Colleges and Universities in a

chart in the B&W section. This will allow more

convenient comparison for those of you seeking a

course to suit your requiremenlS. I thank, most Sincerely,

Karen Weiss who compiled the information and devised

the questionaire that was sen I 10 Colleges and

Universities - an enormous job which she tackled

fearlessly and with her usual enthusiasm. A special

thanks also to all Ihe teachers and Head teachers who

took the time to provide the necessary infomalion. I

know papelwork can become all consuming.

The extra space that came from Ihis rearrangement

has been given over to a special seaion, 'Great Glazes'.

Here you will find a treasure trove of recipes and advice

that will have you experimenting in all kinds of new

directions.

Of course, we all know that glaze recipes are not the

answer, but like enthusiastic cooks and food recipes, we

love collecting them (particularly if they come with a

picture)! Used as a starting point for your own research

they may well take your work in a new direction or

solve a current problem.

Greg Daly calls glaze technology 'a journey' which is

much less intimidating! A great journey is one where you

enjoy the process of getting there, not

just the end point. A journey is best

enjoyed widl your eyes and mind wide

open, ready to take in anything that

comes your way - good or bad. Often

what is unexpected becomes the

highlight of the journey. And most

importantly, a journey, when raken with

the right atlitude, is fun - whatever

happens!

The other good news is that, thanks

to the generoSity of the teachers I asked

to contribute to this section, I have enough information

to carry this section into the next two issues. So this

issue we look at stoneware glazes, next issue mid fire

and earthenware is covered in the last issue for the year.

What a feast!

ext issue will be packed with helpful infomation on

making and marketing. We have profiles of makers who

have found solutions to the economics of being a

ceramist plus articles designed to help you by a range of

professionals including curators, gallery owners, arts

workers. Add to that reviews, technical information,

news and the usual special features and it is essential

reading.

Those who live in Sydney who haven't been to the

Pottcrs' Society of Australia'S exhibition 'In Context' at

Manly Art Gallery and Museum, should get their skates

on ;Ind go, it closes very soon. This is a unique

opportunity to see work by 12 of our prominent ceramic

artislS; both current 1V0rk and early works taken from

rhe Manly At Gallery and Museum Collection. There are

some eX1raordinary leaps of creative expression. A must

see exhibition! 00

2 POTIERY IN AUSTRALIA + ISSUE 36/2 WINTER 1997


Crescendo

Joan Campbell's

Recent Work

Joan Campbell's exhibition at Lawrence Wilson Art Gallery was an appropriate tribute to one of

Australia's foremost ceramic artists. Excerpts from the exhibition catalogue by gallery director and

catalogue editor ANNA GRAY and ceramist JOAN CAMPBELL.

6 POTIERY IN AusTRAlIA + ISSUE 3612 WINTER 1997


- -----~--------------------------------------------------------------------~

'This exhibition presents the last works of one of

Western Australia's foremost artists, Joan

Campbell, and pays tribute to her. These quiet,

elegant, near ahstract forms arc the culm ination of a

lifetime working with clay - as well as the product of

considerable human experience.

These works are about continuity. Their very making

was also an expres ion of the vital energy of the creative

force, the sustaining power of the will to create. The

forms were made in 1996 before Joan became ill.

However, some of the works were completed under

Joan 's supervision during her final days, demonstrating

her remarkable uedic-dtion to her work and the love and

admiration of colleagues who 'lssisted her. At first Joan

went to the workshop and worked with them there.

When she was confined to bed, she supervised the work

from home, maintaining the same rigorous standards and

seeking the same sense of rightness as she would have

done if working in the ·tudio herself. If a piece was not

as she wanted it, back it went for re-glazing and refiring

... Her mind and her spirit were absolutely widl her

work, right until the end.

Joan Campbell's ceramic sculptures were journeys of

discovery for the artist, and remain so for the viewer. She

constantly steered away from the well-worn path and

forged her own. In these works, as always, she dared to

do what she had not done before.

Joan Campbell was a suberb ceramic artist, with a great

sympathy for nature. But these qualities alone did not

create the magic of these works. This came from her own

character. The poSitive, wise, gentle and generous person

- the great liver of life - is embedded in all that she made.

Her spirit informs her fonTIS.' Anna Gray.

'I enjoy working in an exploratory way. I never quite

know what I am doing. Some of the works in this

exhibition are essentialy about the recycling of energy,

how we expend our energy and if we expend it, how ir

renews itself. 1 see this in the ocean all the time, where

the waves roll in expending their energy and then recycle

back, returning to the ocean. The tides come and go. The

sense of embracement in some of these works is not

about protection, but about there being no beginning and

no end - simply life in its fullness. I think the edge of the

sea is one of the greatest sources of energy on the earth~

A stroll along rhe edge of the sea can be a time of

nourishment of the spirit.

These works are also about life and its continuity, how

life continues. Our span of life force is limited, but our

contribution is important, it is essential to life's continuity.

Whilst we may depart life, life continues.

I have slways lived within rhe sight and sound of the

sea, and for most of my life it has played an important

part. The sounds of the sea have nurtured me almost

more than the sighr of the sea. There is a wonderful

rhythm on the beach, there is a freshness. My studio on

Bathers Beach looks onto the sea and I can hear the

moods of the sea. I hear different ene rgies being played. I

know that when 1 am gone the sea will still be there, in

continual motion. The sea humbles me constantly ...

The work in this exhibition is some of the most difficult

technically and mosr spiritually pleasing that I have done,

in that the expressions came without me actually pushing

them. That is possibly just a result of years of working in

the unknown. The clay performed well and I was quite

relaxed about what I was doing. Although these forms arc

abstract, there is a sort of happiness about them which I

enjoyed while making them.

The forms are abstracted to fulfil the sculptural needs

of three dimensional expression: halancing the curves,

overcomi ng the difficulties of working in the round so

that harnlony and contradiction were all faced. For me,

the co nsideration of line, balance, dynamic tension,

texture, are all part of the making process. Scale was to a

large extent governed by the size of, and type of, kiln I

used. I had never done my expressive work in an electric

kiln before and to overcome my fear of being slick and in

total control I deliberately chose to develop - with the

ceramicist, Greg Daly's help - several glazes that were so

sensitive they did not allow complete control, and

continued to give me surprises ...

I see myself as a maker. Other people can decide

whether what I make is art or not...

I love clay because it is an honest material, it is totally

honest in its response to the human fingers. I believe that

human hands are the most brilliant tools ever devised by

anybody, and that they are hetter than any machine.

Many years ago I chose to work in a way which led me

to use my hands every day of my life. I do not push clay,

I build. For forty years I have coiled tons and tons of clay,

and my main tool is my thumb. I honestly believe we do

not realL.e the wonder of having hands. I like the fact that

we can connea wirh the spirit, with the intellect through

our hands.

I work with fire· that is an important element in my

work. I think every poner is mystified or has an aura of

mystery about what is going to be in the kiln, no matter

how many years they have been firing. No two days, no

two firings are ever the same. 1 never make two pieces

quite the same. [ never tried to make them different, but

if I tried to make them the same I could nor...

I doubt I will ever tire of what [ do - clay still has

fascinating and elusive qualities for me, it is the most

responsive material that we can use and one of the most

unexplored media in the world. 1 love what 1 do, but 1 do

not place any expectations on it. I live in the moment of

the day and [ have been placed in life to live'. Joan

Campbell.

3612 WINTER 1997 + POTIERY IN AUSTlW.1A 7


Bird form 11.1996· 1997. Earthenware. h85 x w55cm.

I don't ask of my own work that it be liked or disliked or anything else. I just ask

that it communicates a touch of life.

TRIBUTES

Distinguished West Austr'dlian potter, Joan Campbell

died peacefully at her home in South Fremantle on

Wednesday 5th March 1997. She was 71 ye-drs old.

At the time Joan bec


Above: Joan Campbell assembling her ·Sunflowers'.

Claysculpt Gulgong. 1995

Right: Joan Campbell installing mural. h7m.

on many high profile committees for local universities and

arts bodies. She was a distinguished speaker, as many of

you remember from conferences, and was in much

demand on the national speaking circuit.

Joan was involved in the setting up of the Crafts

Council of Australia and was the first representative for

WA, along with Eric Carr. She was on the Boards of the

Australia Council and Community Arts. For her service to

the arts she received the MBE in 1978 and the Roz Bower

Memorial Award for Services to Community Arts in 1986.

Joan was also elected [0 the International Academy of

Ceramics in 1973, made a life member of the Crafts

Council of WA in 1984 and elected Foundation Fellow of

Curtin University, WA, in 1987.

Joan made an enOnnous contribution [0 the arts locally,

nationally and internationally. She will be greatly missed

here in W A but she has left much behind in her work and

in the way she touched our lives. 00

Sandra Black

This world doesn't see the like of people like Joan

Campbell often enough. Her ability to give, create,

communicate and care ahout the essence of living

was very special.

Joan gave to people from all walks of life· poners,

students, community artists, those involved in arts

administration, health care and local government.

Through her creativity and atritude to life Joan touched

people who would have never come into contact with the

arts and opened their eyes and hearts.

We have lost a special person, one 1 came to call friend

over the last 20 years. Over Christmas 1 worked with Joan

developing with her a series of glazes for her exhibition

'Crescendo' which opened in April this year. Glaze tests

were sent every few days express post as Joan directed

the colour and surface finish of her work. All this despite

her deteriorating health. In the last weeks she worked

intensively with Stewart Scrambler, Ian Dowling and

Warwick Parmateer on the glazing and firing of works.

There was always joy there in creating and resolving the

pieces, a joy that is conveyed to others who view the

finished exhibition. Joan's passion for her work was a

strong force until the very end of her life.

We all have our own memories to keep and treasure

having met or known a very special person. At peace

with life, Joan helped and touched so many people from

many walks of life with her enthusiasm and love. 00

Greg Daty

36/2 WiNTER 1997 + POTTERY IN AUSTRAlJA 9


Overlapping sea form IV. 1996. Earthenware h73 x w70cm.

Ideas flow continuously. each work precipitates

possibilities for another.

Ovoid II. 1996. Earthenware. h73 x w57cm.

You live with a feeling that you will make one truly splendid

thing and this inspires your making.

1 0 POTIERY IN A USTlWJA + ISSUE 36fl WINTER 1997


Top Left: Annette Clark.

'Who Needs A Paddle?'.

Bottom Left: Catherine Sloane.

'Water form 1'. h40cm x w22cm.

Bottom Right: B. Manning.

'Balance of Power'.

Paperclay, black fired copper

glazes. 306 x 50 x 20cms.

36f2 WlNTtR 1997 + POTTERY IN AUSTAAUA 11


Top Left: Casey TAFE.

Linda Barnard.

Celedon Teasel.

Middle Left: Box Hill TAFE.

Michelle Cathie.

'Wood Fired Forms'. h1 00-160cm.

BaHam Left: Casey TAFE.

Cindy Mikiecuik.

Wood fried tableware.

BoHom Right: Box Hill TAFE.

Jane Reilly.

'Thrown & Asembled Forms'.

Salt Fired. h35cm.

12 POmRY IN AUSTRAUA + ISSUE 36/2 WJNTER 1997


Top Left: Barrier Reef TAFE.

Ray Caine. 'Tropical Fish'.

Wheelthrown, slab additions.

22cm.

Middle Left: Box Hill TAFE.

Sherrie Campbell. Carved bowl.

Celedon glaze. Reduction fired.

d42cm.

Bottom Left: Barrier Reef TAFE.

Caroline Starkey. Bowl 10cm.

Plate 30cm.

Cone 9 Crystaline Glaze.

Bottom Right: Casey TAFE.

Laurel Billington.

'Gothik Clocke'.

3612 WlNTER 1997 + POnERY IN AUSTRALIA 13


Top Left: Curtin University.

Rebecca Berry. 'Ocean Views'.

Paperclay and underglazes.

Middle Left: Eastern T AFE.

Norma Pugh. Neriage stoneware

jewellery boxes. h6cm.

Bottom Left: Cooma TAFE.

Sue Millner. Casserole, stoneware,

shellac resist decoration, celadon

type glaze. 12cm x 22cm.

Upper Right: Curtin University.

Fleur Schell. Low fired raku vessel.

Thrown and assembled. h42cm.

Opposite Page.

Upper Left: Eastern TAFE.

Maria Coyle. 'Daydreaming'.

Stoneware red raku. 1996. h96cm.

Middle Right: Eastern TAFE.

Jenny John. Carved bowl with blue

glaze (oxidised). d25cm.

Bottom Right: Cooma TAFE.

Heather van der Plaat. Boat form and

waves. Paper clay, barium glaze.

14 POTIERY IN AUST1W.1A + ISSUE )6/2 WINTER 1997


36/1 WINTER 1997 + POTIERY IN AUSTRAlIA 15


Top Left: Goulburn TAFE.

Irene Heckenburg. 'Bountiful'.

Slips, glaze on terra cotta with copper.

61 x 40 x 15 em.

Top Right: Goulburn TAFE.

Lesley Burrows.

Jar. Majolica. 32 x 15 x 6 em .

Bottom Right: Holmesglen TAFE.

Daniel Berry. 'Samurai Armour'.

Handbuilt raku piece, copper matt glaze.

h70cm x w45em.

Opposite Page.

Top Left: Gateway TAFE.

Kathryn Rashbrook. 'Chrysalis'.

Colombino.120cm.

Bottom Left: Holmesglen TAFE.

Raymond Laurens. 'Bubble Boy'.

Handbuilt raku piece High alkaline copper glazes.

h44cm, base 12cm.

Top Right: Gateway TAFE.

Gayl Redfern.

'Abode'. 1996. h75cm.

16 POTIERY IN AUSTRALIA + ISSUE 36/2 WlNTER 1997


3612 WlNTER 1997 + POTIERY IN AUSTRAUA 17


Above: Hunter Institute ot Technology.

Olwyn Thickbroom. S/w macrocrystalline glaze. h30cm

Below: Hunter Institute of Technology.

Melynda Newton. Press moulded e/w. w40cm.

Above: Hunter Institute of Technology.

Nora Moelle. Shino glaze. h50cm.

Below: La Trobe University. Andrew Allen.

'Ovoid Forms'. Pit fired. h22cm.

18 POTTERY IN AUSTRAUA + ISSUE 36/2 WINTER 1997


Top Left: Kempsey TAFE.

Kirsten Harveit.

Mixed media metal/clay. Raku. 30cm x 40cm.

Bottom Left: Kempsey TAFE.

David Jacobs.

Plate - 'Isnik', earthenware. 30cm.

Bottom Right: La Trobe University.

Bridget Robertson.

'I seed it, but I don't believe it.' Blackfired. 52cm.

36/2 WINTER J 997 + POmRY IN AUSTRAlJA 19


Top Left: Liverpool TAFE. Svetislavka Vukelic. Raku figures.

Top Right: Monash University. Diane Waters. 'Over and Over'. Earthenware and metal. h48cm.

Below: Lismore TAFE. Janet Marchal. 'Bridge'. Wood fired porcelain. Inlay. w100 x h63 x d40

20 POTIERY IN AusT!wJA + ISSUE 36/2 WINTER 1997


LISMORE CAMPUS

NORTH COAST

INSTITUTE OF TAFE

LIVERPOOL COLLEGE

SOUTH WESTERN

SYDNEY INSTITUTE

OF TAFE

MONASH UNIVERSITY

CAUFIELD

Top: Lismore TAFE. Ruth Sutter. 'Transformation'. Stoneware and porcelain. wOO x h50 x d15

Above Left: Monash University. Caulfield. Diane Waters. 'Constant Stone'.

Detail. Winner of the 20th Annual Walker Award, 1996.

Above Right: Liverpool TAFE. Ji Sun lee. Reduced lustreware.

Below: Liverpool TAFE. Wisam Adas. Floor Tiles.

3612 WINTER 1997 + POTIERY IN AUSTRAUA 21


Moss Vale, TAFE. Amanda Durney.

Thrown Bowl. White earthenware, underglaze colours

brushed on a clear glaze, fired to l l00"C. d36cm.

Monash University, Gippsland.

Catherine Lane. 'Bleeding Heart'. Graduate Diploma.

Monash University, Peninsula.

Ben Parkinson. Anagama Woodfired Blossom Jar.

42cm x 28cm.

Monash University, Gippsland. Untitled.

Graduate Diploma.

22 POnERY IN AUSTRALIA + ISSUE 36/2 'MNTER 1997


MONASH UNIVERSITY

GIPPSLAND SCHOOL

OF ART

MONASH UNIVERSITY

PENINSULA SCHOOL

OF ART

MOSS VALE COLLEGE

OF TAFE

Top Left: Monash University, Peninsula.

Frances Lockett. Three salt-glazed stone

jars. 15cm x Hem, Large 18cm x 20cm.

Middle Left. Monash University, Gippsland.

Caroline Sonneman. B of Visual Arts.

'Earthworks firepits'.

Bottom Left: Moss Vale, TAFE.

Sherida Avnell. Thrown porcelain box.

Brushed underglaze decoration under

clear glaze. 25cm x 1Scm.

Above: Monash University, Peninsula.

Philippa Smith. Carved celedon bottle.

31cm x 14cm.

36/2 WINTER 1997 + Pomoy IN AUSTRAUA 23


Top Left: North

Adelaide School of

Art. Ben Booth.

Plate and Napkin

Co. 1996.

Bottom Left:

National Art

School.

Tony Orford.

'Spiral Form'.

Porcelain and dry

glaze.

Bottom Right:

Nepean TAFE.

Donna Ross. Vase.

Hakeme slip, iron

brushwork.

Reduced 122O"C.

31 x 21 .Scm.

24 POrrERY IN AUSTRAUA + ISSUE 36/2 WINTER 1997


Top Left: National Art School, East Sydney.

Mark Booth. 'Head Study'. Clay, wire and nails.

Middle Left: Nepean TAFE.

Jirina Tota. Jewel Box. Carved Design, Green

Celadon Glaze. Reduced 1300". 19.5 x Bem.

Bottom Left: National Art School, East Sydney.

Katherine Wertheim. 'Bowl'.

Bottom Right: Nepean TAFE.

Christine Herbert. Cylinder vase. Slip.

Reduced 122O"C. 32.2 x 10.5 em.

31J2 WlNTER 1997 + POTTERY IN AUSTRAUA 25


Above: Northern Beaches TAFE.

Robin Lanchester. 1996.

Above: North Metropolitan TAFE, WA. Ann Storey.

'Wind sculpt' Saltglazed, white stoneware clay with

oxide slips and sgraffito. h36cm.

Below: Northern Beaches. Hillary Jones. 1996.

26 POTIERY IN AUSTRAlJA + ISSUE 3612 WINTER 1997


NORTHERN BEACHES

TAFE

NORTHERN

MELBOURNE

INSTITUTE OF TAFE

NORTH

METROPOLITAN TAFE

WESTERN AUSTRALIA

Above: Northern Melbourne TAFE.

Jan Maxwell.

Teapot. 128O"C reduction, gold lustre. 10em x 12em.

Top Right: North Metropolitan TAFE, WA.

Sue Warrington.

Platter, s/w. 4gem.

Below: Northern Beaches TAFE.

Margaret Armstrong. 1996

Right: Northern Beaches TAFE.

Kathy Windel. 1996

Bottom Right: Northern Beaches TAFE.

Karen Jennings. 1996

36/2 WlNTER 1997 + POTIERY IN AUSTRAUA 27


Above: Queensland College of Arts.

Darren Jones. Honours. 'Rocket'.

Slip cast vessels, raku glazes 1000"C fired, Packet of

'Rocket Stamps' dated 1918 from Bosnia­

Hercegovina. 1996. 30 x 40 x 20cm.

Above: Nowra TAFE.

Jillian Bain. Teapot, thrown and altered glaze on

glaze, stoneware reduction. h35cm.

Below: Queensland College of Arts.

Karen Laird. Detail, installation, 'Objects for the Interior'. Fired clay and red acrylic paint. 1.2m x 1.2m.

28 POTIERY IN AUSTRAUA + ISSUE 36/2 WINTER 1997


Above: Nowra TAFE.

Glenda Borchard. Slab Built earthenware vase

decorated with slips and underglaze. thin clear glaze

sprayed over the piece. h45cm.

Right: Nowra TAFE.

Leonie Barraclut!. Earthenware platter decorated

with underglaze. d3Ocm.

Below: NT University.

Deidre Edward. Escarpement forms. Terracotta clay.

pit fired. w50cm.

36fl \NINTER 1997 + POTIERY IN AUSTRAUA 29


Top Left: Southbank TAFE.

Lisa Roxborough.

Slip cast, teapot with underglazes, sfw. 33 x 24cm.

Top Right: Southbank TAFE.

Martina Tomanec.

Blue and white candleholder. h40cm.

Bottom Left: Southbank TAFE.

Minh Le. Woven pots.

Stoneware and oxides. h14. 18 and 25cm.

30 POTTERY IN AUSTRAUA + ISSUE 36/2 WINTER 1997


Left: Southbank TAFE.

Kerry Cook. 'Adam & Eve'. Terracotta. 30 x 22cm.

Below Right: RMIT University.

Souriana Boukhalife. 'Untitled'. Porcelain. h18cm, w14cm.

Bottom: RMIT University.

Steven Goldate. 'Three Vessels'. Porcelain, decorated

using Cobalt Sulphate and Uranyl Nitrate. h12-15cms.

36/2 WlNTER 1997 + POTIERY IN AUSTRAIJA 31


St. George TAFE. Karen Weiss.

'Intercept'. Earthenware.

St. George TAFE. Vicky Macris.

'The Brassy Tart Award'. Earthenware.

Southern Cross University. Steve Davies.

M.A. Student. 'Mill'. 1996.

Sutherland TAFE, Gymea. Tanya Miller.

Bowls. Earthenware with underglazes. Approx. 22cm.

32 POITERY IN AuSTRAUA + ISSUE 3612 WINTER 1997


Above: Sutherland TAFE, Gymea.

Catherine Saint-Guillaume.

'Low Profile-Bowl'. Earthenware with clear

earthenware glaze. 26cm wide.

Right: Southern Cross University.

Yvonne Mace. Honours Student.

'Pace Maker'.

Below: Sutherland TAFE, Gymea.

Mindy Maggio. Bowl with handles.

Stoneware with satin glaze.

h1 0cm x w25cm.

3612 WINTER 1997 + POnERY IN AUSTRAlIA 33


Above: Sydney College of the Arts.

J. Spedding.

'Tender Cruelties'.

Ceramic, copper pipe, soap.

150mm x 60mm.

Top Left: University of Ballarat.

Baiba Lowther.

Earthenware, dry glaze and engobes. h27cm.

Middle Left: School of Mines & Industry.

Annelies Egan.

Drape moulded dish. Stoneware 13OO"C.

d30cm.

Bottom Left: University of Ballarat.

Adrian Mould.

Anagama fired bowl, shino type glaze. d20cm.

34 POTIERY IN AUSTRAUA + ISSUE l6l? WINTER 1997


Top Left: University of Ballarat. Nat Karacsay.

Porcelain, copper red mirror black glazes, cone 10.

Above: School of Mines & Industry. Dean Millsom.

Teapots and cups. Earthenware 1140".

h2Dcm & h7cm.

Middle Right: Sydney College of the Arts.

Sara Zitner. 'Metaphysical'. 1 DDcm x 4Dcm.

Bottom Right: Sydney College of the Arts.

Tamara Vukovljak. 'Wind of the soul'. 2.4m x 4.2m.

36/2 WlNTER 1997 + POITERY IN AUSTAAUA 35


36 POTTERY IN A USl1W.lA + ISSUE 36n WINTER 1997


Top Left: USQ.

Larissa Holt.

'Untitled'.

White stoneware.

Bottom Left: University of SA.

Ira ina Michielson.

Cast cement with oxides.

65 x 65 x 17em.

Opposite Page.

Top Left: University of Newcastle. Keny Lavell.

Top Right: University of SA. Leith Semmens.

Ceramic with oxides and gold 1060"C. hl.Bm.

Bottom Left: USQ. Wendy Schoenfisch-Young. 'Raised Vessel'. 1996. Raku fired. h15cm.

Bottom Right: University of Newcastle. Installation. Leisel Mcllrick.

36/2 WINTER 19'}7 + POTIERY IN AUSTRAlIA 37


Above: UWS, Macarthur. Vicki Xiros 'Marked by difference'. BO-90cm.

Below: University of Tasmania, Launceston. Ward Hodgman. Slip caste stoneware.

38 POTIERY IN AUSTRAUA + ISSUE 3612 WINTER 1997


UNIVERSITY OF

TASMANIA

TASMANIAN SCHOOL

OF ART LAUNCESTON

UNIVERSITY OF

WESTERN SYDNEY

WESTERN AUSTRALIA

ACADEMY OF

PERFORMING ARTS

EDITH COWAN

Upper Left: University of Tasmania, Launceston.

Len Maynard. Stoneware.

Middle Left: Edith Cowan.

Elaine Steele. 'Spirit Free'. 40 x 15cm.

Bottom Left: Edith Cowan.

Anne Clifton. 'Conversations'. Clay and parchment. 6 x 3.5cm.

Bottom Right: UWS, Macarthur.

Mustapha Shearzad. 'Waiting in Pain'. 45cm.

36/2 WINTER 1997 + POTTERY IN AUSTRAUA 39


Mei Ling Ng.

'Harapan Di Penjara'.

Raku fired. 40 x 28cm.

Donna Funnel.

'Emerald Jetsom Pitcher'.

Stoneware. h52cm.

Stephen Bertonein. Teapots, cups & saucers. Salt fired.

40 POTIERY IN AUSTRAlJA + ISSUE 36/2 WlNTER 1997


Traineeship

Graduate experience by JUAN DE CASTRO

Opera queens as 'Carmen, Papa gena, Madama Butterfly'. Earthenware underglaze, glaze and gold.

Having graduated from Melbourne University with a

Bachelor of Education (V isual Arts) majoring in

Cemmics/Sculprure in 1995, I asked myself ·where

to next?' An education qualification meant that I cou ld

teach visual arts at high school level , which meant

rigorous applications to countless Secondary Colleges and

waiting to see if they would even grant an interview to a

graduate. The other option was to establish my own

studio space but of course this required a regular income,

not jusr dedication.

The summer that followed proved to be most

rewarding. I saw an advertisement for traineeships at the

Meat Market Craft Centre in early December and decided

to send my application. I was one of ten applicants who

were successful. The senior management led by Deborah

Klein, General Manager, offered me a traineeship in Ans

Administration which commenced February 1996 and

lasted for a yea r.

The Arts/Crafts Administration Traineeship Program is

federally funded by the Department of Education,

Employment, Training and Youth Affairs (DEETYA). The

purpose was to provide experience in the ans/crafts

indusrry for young people with ans backgrounds. DUring

my traineeship, I got to work in the retail and

administrdtive areas of the Craft Centre as well as being in

the Ceramic Workshop, the area where the majority of my

rraineeship took place.

Victor Greenaway co-ordinares rhe Ceramics Access

Workshop at rhe Centre. l! was under his supervision thai I

undertook most of my competencies for the Certificate.

These competencies aimed to broaden my experience

within the industry and they induded such things as dealing

with the geneml public's inquiries, safety procedures within

the working environment, assisting visiting artists and the

ability to develop my own work independently.

The laller was one of the great opportunities that came

out of the program. I had the chance to improve my ski lls

in sculpting and to learn the finer points of throwing on

the wheel with Vic's rutelage. There were many highlights

throughout the year. One of them came when Gillian Still,

a prominent porcelain artist from Britain gave a master

class in the ceramics workshop and I assisted her.

My time in the Craft Centre as a trainee has been most

regarding. It helped me establish a beginning in my

professional career as a ceram ic artist. I have formed

professional and personal associations with people in the

crafts community and gained experience through a wide

range of tasks and active interactions with fellow

craftspeople. G\.9

The Meat Markel Craft Centre. 42 Courtney St, Nth Melbourne, .3051.

Optn Tuesday to Sunday, lOam · Spm, dosed public holidays.

Juan de C1Slro, 3 Cook Ave, Kealba 3021.

36/2 WlNTER 1997 + POnERY IN AusTRAlIA 41


PROFILE

Mike Kusnik OAM

His expertise in clay, glaze and kiln technology has played an important part in the success of so

many Western Australian cerarnists'. Article by HELEN ROSS.

lcre have been two Western Australian's from

within the world of ceramics who have been

T;

honoured with recognition in the Australia Day

Awards. Joan Campbell was the first, and now Mike

Kusnik has been officially recognised for the great

benefits that he has brought to potters and others in the

ceramic industry here in the West. Mike's story is also a

tribute to the great changes in Australia's cultural life

which were made possible through the talent and

expenise which came into this country with post WW2

European immigration.

Born in Czechoslovakia in 1927, Mike graduated as a

ceramic chemist in 1947, just in time 10 undertake the

massive re-building of his country's ceramic industry

which had been devastated by the War. Pre-war

Czechoslovakia had been responsible for producing 2oo",

of the world's pottery, but in 1947 Mike was thrown in at

the deep enelto an industry in which Ihe personnel, raw

materials, and factories had either been destroyed or

wilhdrawn. Having to work harder and longer hours with

little expert guidance gave him the edge and hence the

satisfaction of achieving success through his own effons.

In 1950 Mike came to Australia and like so many 'new

Australians' spent his first few weeks at the Bonegillo

camp in Melbourne. The antagonism towards immigrants

was often very bad and quite a surprise to someone who

42 POTIERY IN Au5nw.JA + ISSUE 36/2 WINTER 1997


'thought we were wanted'. J!owever, ill feeling was often

associated with those groups who thought their jobs wcre

threatened and there were plenty of instances where

genuine warmth was shown to Mike and his compatriOts.

His first work in AUMralia was to help build a new brick

factory in Canberra - a far cry from ceramic chemistry but

welcome all the same. After this he found work in

Sydney with the ceramic production company, Fowler

Ltd. Unable to explain his qualifications he was given the

dirtiest work in the place and after 6 weeks left to do a

range of jobs - cook, milk bottler, tree cutter, radio

technician - each a steady improvement upon the other.

Around 1953 he was approached by two Czechs, one

an artist, the other an investor, to join them in establishing

a ceramic studio. It began as 'Kerra' and then changed to

'Co ronet' and together they produced around fifty

different domestic items, slip cast and underglaze

decorated. On a recent visit to Sydney. Mike was amused

to see these items now in antique shops. This was quite

a successful venture hut as the only single man in the

partnership, his hours were unfairly long and in 1959 he

moved to Melbourne to work at the Sylha Ceramic Studio.

This was a successful giftware pottery run by Sylvia

Halpern and her husband but Mike's advanced casting

techniques meant thal soon he was prodUCing more than

the rest of the production team could proces., and so he

began to look for more challenging work.

This came in the form of an advcrtisement for a

ceramic chemist at the I3risiYdne and Wunderlich factOlY

in Perth. He won the job and came to Western Au trJlia

in 1959 as a research and development chemist with lhe

firm which at the time boasted an amazingly diverse

production range - hotel ware, Wemhley Ware, sanitary

ware, bone china, electrical porcelain, bricks, tiles pipes,

crucibles for the mining indu try - once again he was

learning lhrough the challenge of dealing with the whole

spectrum of ceramic processes. This was even more the

case than in Czechoslovakia because, while European

industry had moved to buying in many of their processed

raw ingredients, in 1959 Brisbane and Wunderlich were

making all their own frits, glazes, stains and clay bodies.

During his first year al I3rislrJne and Wunderlich, Mike

noticed that outsiders, amateur poners, would often come

to ask for help. The other chemists would ~ay 'Mike,

quick hide' and they would all get under the table, But

Mike fcll sorry for these people and decided to help. The

first person he remembers was Eileen Keys , a 'very

persevering and authoritative person' he recalls. Mike was

able lO help out with such things as scavenging kiln

helves from the factory tip and recutting them, as well as

with glazc problems such as peeling, crazing, shivering

and non vitrification. [n those early years it was always

ladies who came to ask for help, it was not until the late

60s that men began to join the ranks of pottery

enthusiasts.

In 1969 Mike met Ray Samson , Head of the Art

Department at Perth Tech and it was Hay who started

like on his teaching career, Slalting with 4 hours a week

of ccramic technology. The classes were from 6-lOpm

but the student> were so keen that the cleaners would be

pushing them to leave at II pm. Their enthusiasm made

tcaching a real pleasure for Mike, he recalls that in the

second year of the course 50 people enrolled in the first

year program. In 1974 Mike !eft I3ristile (as Brisbane &

Wunderlich was by then known), and took up full time

teaching at the Western Australian Institute of

Technology, now Cunin University.

Throughout this whole period, Mike's expertise was

freely given to anyone who called upon him for help. He

te ted many hundreds of clay samples from all over the

stale sent lO him by amateur pOllcrs . It was the

appreciation and achievements of these grass rOOlS

pouers that gave Mike so much pleasure over the years.

The highlighls of his life. he says. have been the

achievements of other people in rheir struggles to

overcome problems and achieve results often of an

international standard, as in the case of the work of

Pippin Drysdale and Sandra Black.

He recalls one incident in 1970 when he drove with his

family clown to Albany lO conduct a workshop. On lhe

long ancl wet night drive his car was forced off the road

by a truck and slid over the muddy soft shoulder off the

road. He was helpless to stop the car careering towards a

rree when suddenly it stopped itself, bogged in sofl clay.

After being pulled out by a nearby farmer Mike continued

his journey, but wondering why on eanh he was doing

this. On arrival at their motel in Albany a huge bunch of

Ilowers greeted them and the neXl day 60 people were

there lO listen to his every word of advice and instruction.

He soon forgot rhe bad experience. Many of those same

people are still potting today and lhere are always places

lO stay with potting friends all over the countryside.

Some years ago I undertook research imo the histolY of

ceramics in Western Australia and I often compare

examples of work made in the Francis Kotai classes from

the lale 50s, with work from the 1980 Festival of Perth

Exhibition at the Fremantle Arts Centre. It is hard to

believe the incredible leap in skill and profes 'ionalism that

occurred in just a twenty year period. Much of this was

due to the unique resource which WA poners had in Mike

Kusnik - there are a thousand stories of glazing problems

solved, new bodies developed, kiln constructions

reworked. His conlribution lO the development of

ceramics in this State can never be overstated and all who

have benefited from his generosity know that his Order of

Australia is deserved a thousand rimes over. 00

Helen Ross, rreelance writer

3612 WlNTER 1997 + POTIERY tN AUST1WJA 43


REVIEW

Niky Hepi

New Work at Dairing Gallery. Review by JOE SZIRER

N

iky Hepi graduated with a Bachelor's degree in

Ceramic Design from Monash University in 1990.

The strength and characteristic style of her work is

still evident in th L~ recent exhibition. There have been

noticeable developments in scale, refinement of forms

and finishes.

Her greatest 'trengths are found in her forms and

surface treatments. The viewer can 't help but be

impressed oy the texture and colours and the timeless

qualities rhey evoke.

Slabs prepared from a coarse, dark clay body are

liberally coated with white slip, simple squiggly patterns

are then trailed onto the surface - using two or three well

chosen colours.

After the surface has firmed up the slabs are rolled

again. As a result the white slip stretches and crdcks,

revealing some of the dark clay beneath. The coloured

slip trailing in tum is pressed imo the surface, becoming a

slightly irregular, cracked, coloured inlay.

The slabs are fashioned into a variety of forms, with

th e aid of press moulds and other handbuilding

tech niques. Natu rall y, great care is taken to balance

pattern ed and plain slabs, to create an interesti ng

fragmented surface.

After bisque firing, the pieces are covered with a bluegreen

matt glaze, which is wiped from the decorated pans

and allowed to enhance the colour of the undecorated

clay and the many cracks that result from rolling and

Large bowl. 50 x 20cm.

pre S moulding ule slabs. The overall effect is intrigUing

and looks neither ancient nor contemporary, more a

mixture of both, adding mystery to the pieces.

Upon entering the Gallery, one is instantly attracted to

a large cauldron shaped bowl, with a small base and

generous ex t.ruded handles. A strong yet graceful form

seemingly defying graVity as it appears to hover above

the displa y stand.

The bottle and pitcher forms have rail slender necks

with stra nge appendages resembling the top of eastern

chu rches. They look as if they have been found on some

remote Mecliterannean excavation sight. Her lamp stands

tower like slender totemic sculptures, while the mirror

frames remind me of architectu ral remnants.The large

open platter forms are a little pale and insignificant in

comparison to the rest of the pieces.

Dairing Gallery professes to cater for recent graduates

and young artists, yet to gain recognition. An admirable

but difficu lt task, when considering the fact that they

haven't as yet had any of their exhibitions reviewed by

any of the mainstream critics. Like the young artists they

represent, they must wait patiently for such recognition.

But in the meantime rhey must be acknowledged for the

fine service they are providing for the ans and the high

quality of their exhibitors. 00

Joe Slifer is Senior Lecturer, Department of Ceramic Design, Monash

University. Caufield

44 POTTERY IN AusTIWJA + ISSUE 36/2 WINTER 1997


REVIEW

Ocean as Metaphor and Inspiration

Recent work by Bill Burton at the Ceramic Art Gallery. Review by MEGAN KINNINMENT

This exhibition embodies the anisl's philosophy on

aesthetics as a vehicle to relay spiritual experience.

Having travelled extensively in Asia, and being an

avid seaside fossicker, Bunon has successfully expressed

the changea ble moods of an oceanscape by drawing on

the traditions of the classical Sung Dynasty, most notable

for it's tranquility and deeply impregnated Zen

philosophy. These bowls, planers and masks display

spi ritual sensibilities that transcend th e physical;

simplicity, serenity, calmness and timelessness; imbueing

th e ex hibition with a fe eling of quiet , understated

elegance.

Bunon uses a highly developed repotoire of glazes

from classical Chinese traditions. The restrained,

monochrome effects of tenmoku, celadon and talc,

w mbinetl with the depth of overlayed chuns, titanium

and copper reds, are used to imitate or harmonise with

the eVaneSGlnt shades of nature; sky, ocean, cliff and

shore. The sheer beauty of the surfaces combine with the

purity of form and line to inspire contemplation. TIlere is

a stillness in this work, as if, in a contemplative moment

the ocean depths speak of the life Within, the inrangible

something behind outwa rd appea rances. In Zen terms,

the work points to the Unconscious behind all conscious

activity.

In order to transmute the richness of the ocean depths,

3612 WINTER r997 + POTIERY IN AUSTRAUA 45


he ha s employed the technique of glaze on glaze

application. On a bisqued stoneware body he layers

chuns, copper reds or titanium glazes over a ri ch

background of mirror black Tenmoku. The overglaze is

not applied with

controlled brush strokes,

rather th e essenti al

nature of the glazes

themselves appear in the

melting and cooling. A

natural fluidity is

accentuated, a softness

of movement reflecting

the motion of the sea .

The chun over tenmoku

brilliantly captures the

movement of spraying

waves, wh ile directing

of fine white rims. These are delightful examples of

celadons, pale green mirrors reflecting images of quiet

estuaries and gentle, dappled light. They are pieces to

hold and drift into.

Where the planers

and bowls have been

treated with the talc

glaze the effect is as

serene. Far from the

coolness of quiet pools,

these taIc pieces bring

us to the searing heat of

the high water mark on

th e ocean shore. The

subtle use of crazing in

this smooth wh ite surface

gives the appearance of

sun bleached shell,

the viewer's eye down Stoneware bowl. Talc glaze. w60cm washed up and left to

towards the near-black

crack. Dry and brittle as

depth of underlying currents. The th ey appear, the re is an

glaze appears almost curdled,

underlying element of stre ngth.

opaque yet translucent, in varying

l1lese glazes work well on simple

tones of whi te, green and pale

forms, where even the slightest

lavender to clear blue.

nuance in a rim , or the gentle

Where the tenmoku buhbles

spiral of throwi ng mark on a

and melts it's way up through dle

platter becomes a fea ture that

cracks, it is as if the blackness is

would be lost under a husier

reaching out to touch. The effect glaze. estled unobtrusively

is dramatic, particularly on the

amongst the smaller bowls are

bowls where the narrow base

three masks, each resembling a

invites the viewer further into the

wise Asian fa ce. With watchful

depths, invoking the sensation of

eyes and peaceful contentment,

entering the darkest fathoms of

they appear as ancient sages of

the ocean, or perhaps the deepest

Zen buddhism. They provide an

realms of the unknown, the dark

element of ritualism associated

pool of the unconscious. Chuang- Stoneware Platter, Titanium with with spiritual practice and are a

Tzu (369-283 Be), a Taoist sage, Tenmoku matt. d75cm. direct link into Burton's travels in

saw nature as a never ending transformation of Asia. Glazed in celadon that breaks to reveal a clay body

appearances. With the ocean as metaphor and inspiration, resembling soft gold, they have a sense of antiqUity that

the colour, texture, shape and movement of copper reds harks to the origins of the glazes and forms that were the

ancl crusry titanium glazes fuse into rockshelves, cliff-faces initial inspiration for this current body of work.

and shipwrecks of rusted iron. . This is an exhibition of sophisticated ceramic an, where

Bunon's approach to glaze is that there is no such ease and repose have resulted from the studied discipline

thing as a bad glaze, it's what you do with it. Impurities in of good craftmanship. These are works that are felt rather

the glazes don't faze him, in fact it is in this purposeful than thought.

letting go of control that the natural character of beaury is There is a Zen saying that a journey of a thousand

achieved, allowing the full force of nature to miles starts with the first step, and for Bill Bunon this is

predominate. The forms are tight and smooth, there is a "... a journey of ongoing discovery. It is by doing tlle work

wok-like curve inside and with the sprung tension of an that the direction comes, unfolding it's own meaning and

arched fencing sword, the curve seems to sweep into inventing me at the same time". 00

space while the narrow bases lift them as il· floating. This

sense of lightness is contin ued with celadons and Megan Kinninmcnt.

fishscale glazes that delicately recede to reveal the outline Megan is visual anisl living in onhem NSW.

46 POTTERY IN AUSTRALIA + ISSUE 36/2 WINTER 1997


Mask and Platter. Kuan Glaze. h16cm.

Stoneware bowl. Tenmoku & Chun glazes. w30cm x d28cm.

36/2 WINTER 1997 + POTTERY IN AUSTRAUA 47


48 POTIERY IN AUSTRAUA + ISSUE 36/2 WINTER 1997

REVIEW


'Feed me'. Raku fired. h34cm x w17cm.

'Tree as Decoration' (Garden Folly Series).

Ceramic and Bronze.

Sandy Johnson recently

exhibited her ceramic

sculptures at the Contemporary

Art & Design Gallery, Queensland.

Th e show seemed to whispe r

clearly about her love of nature.

The ex hibition included both

free standing and wall mounted

ceramic forms, mostly raku fired .

She used slips, underglazes, glazes

and occassionall y gold leaf [Q

decorate the surfac es. The green

and earthy colours were calm and

subtle. The surface textures were

built up with layers of slip, carved

and worked intricately. The scale

of the work varied from 15cm [Q

50cm.

The tree or bra nches of trees

were used with human imagery to

suggest the unbreakable

connection between humankind

'Unclean Forest'. Clay & Wood - Raku

fired. 60 x 25cm.

and nature. 'Feed Me' was a tree

whic h was feeding a ba by its

essence with breast shaped fruit;

'Tree of Knowledge' sprang from

pink and ora nge flames.

The piece 'Man as Animal, Man

is Animal' suggested the ways of

survival in nature. 'Tree as

Decoration', 'Token Tree' and

'Becoming Gold' were imitation

nature, nature for man's profit.

The artist realised there was no

going back. The work 'Knowing'

showed a cave which contained

paradise, but a piece of wire mesh

and two swords were ohstructing

the way. The only solution was to

find a new way.

This exhibition confirmed the

potency of natu re, not only for

th e cerami c artist bu t for the

viewers of the works. Q!)

3617. WlNTER 1997 + POTTERY IN AUSTRALIA 49


The Art of Glaze

New work by ROWLEY DRYSDALE, exhibited at Fusions Gallery, Queensland.

Review by STEPHANIE OUTRIDGE FIELD.

Rowley Drysdale is a

consummate 'glaze man' as

well as manipulator of clay,

su rface and image and the work

included in this solo show covers

many aspects of the material.

There are metallic shimmering

skinned forms that are precise,

cleanly cut slabs and precisely

thrown works. Some are bronze

with shiny crystals breaking

across the surface. Some are

lusciously combined with other

glazes on the interior of forms.

The Fishscale crackle series has

an icy mint green celadon

crackling in ordered fish scale

layers on the interior su rface of

small bowls. There is also a 'Red

Centre' bowl series that contains

a deep blood maroon glaze that

you can almost fall into it is so

deep and rich.

The monumental 'Earthsafe

Tabernacle' series are impressive

and worthy of quiet reflection.

They remind me of Marea

Gazzard's large forms - dley have

an uncluttered simplici ty and

'Earthsafe Tabernacle'. Multiple fired.

69cm x61cm.

'Departure'. Glaze pane. 36cm x 27cm.

unfussed surface that is stony and

seemingly everlasting. Very much

testament pieces.

'Escarpment Man' and 'Emergent'

are both wall panels combining

glazed ceramic tiles and timber.

This series is a quilt of textures as

image with colour and shape in a

narrow surface relief that give the

feeling of viewing ancient marks of

man. The perspex encourages an

atitude of intrusion and voyeurism

as well as allowing a modicum of

protection of the collages.

The 'Glaze Panes' are crystalline

like frozen tablets of glacial ice.

Quite magical.

Colour is just part of Drysdale's

artistic palette. He uses a variety of

forms, textures, scale and light to

produce visually appealing work.

These fulfill many roles; some are

storytellers, some expressions of

technique and form , some

challenge our concepts of the use

of 'ceramic' in an unexpected way.

This exhibition showcased the

myriad of possibilities for a creative

visual practitioner. 00

50 POnERY IN AUSTRAUA + ISSUE 36/2 WlNTER 1997


GREAT

GLAZES

Opaque White Glaze

CHRIS MYERS, Senior Lecturer, Peninsula School of Art, Monash University.

is an oxidised high fIre

alumina than the soda felspar.

glaze thar I have found to be

It will also take colourants

-n'is

very reliable and one that I

quite readily and is worth

have used CO!1SIal1t1y for over twenty

experimenting with to obtain

year.;. I think thar it was fir.;( shared

good quality coloured glazes.

by Mitsuo Shoji when he anived in

The glaze is unsuitable for

Australia from Japan in 1973. As a

underglaze or engobe decoration

result I call it Mitsuo's Whire.

as it's opacity will cover any

This glaze is a very smooth,

colour, but it will accomodare

opaque satin white and is 'Shallow Dish'. Multiple sandblastings. sprayed colour blushes and brush

suitable for domestic wares as w60cms. strokes with a good hard edge

well as for sculptural pieces. I use it on large sculptures can be obtained on this surface.

where I lVant to emphasise shadow and negative space, I find that this is an excellent glaze for post firing

but it is equally effctive on functional work as it doesn't decoration. It sandblasts be-dutifully and higlliights lustres

mark and is easily cleaned. extremely weU. Mother of Pearl lustre gives this glaze a

beautiful opalescent quality. TIle even whiteness of this

RECIPE

1l1e lUlity

glaze also provides an excellent canvas for decorating with

Soda Feldspar 55.7 molecular

on·gIaze enamels.

Kaolin 83 fonnula is

To gain the purest white, a white porcelaineous clay is

Whiting 13.3 K20 0.082 really required. I use Clayworks TMK which under

Talc 12.7 Al203 0.396 oxidation provides this. Iron bearing clays are also

Tin Oxide 10.0 Si02 2.311 attractive under dlis glaze. Edges anJ textures will break to

a20 0.179 a light rusty hue, particularly if the glaze is thinly applied.

Sn02 0.191 I spray the glaze fairly thickly so that the sandblasting will

eaO 0.476 produce texture, but even then I still find the glaze flow to

Fire to cone 10. MgO 0.263 be very stable. Rarely does it run and 1 always flatten Cone

10 completely. Naturally if it is not tired to a full cone 10

Some interesting combinations are:

the glaze surface will become increasingly matt and when

0.25 cobalt carbonate - a gende pale blue

reduuion fIred it loses its whiteness and becomes clear.

0.5 cobalt carbonate plus 1.0 nickel - a blue/white Mitsuo's white has been used by students of Monash

1.0 nickel plus 3 copper oxide - a golden brown University since the days of the Caufield Institute. It is a

good sta ndard all purpose glaze and one of my

favourites. Thank you Mitsuo. 00

I have found that if a direct exchange is made with

potash felspar instead of soda, that the glaze will fire

slightly glOSSier and dle white intensifies. This is because

the potash felspar contains slightly more silica and less

Chris Myers, POller/ Academic

Senior Lecturer, Peninsula School of An, Monash University.

52 POTIERY IN AUSTRAUA + ISSUE 31/2 WlNTER 1997


Glaze on white clay.

'Chevron Bowl'. Sandblasted with layered lustre. w38cm.

Use of colour and brush work on glaze.

3612 WlNTER 1997 + POTIERY IN AUSTRAlJA 53


GREAT

GLAZES

Anybody can make an Oil Spot

Glaze

Mike Kusnik OAM, Western Australia

Many Chinese and Japanese glazes

In each case there was a clear

are ea il y reproduced under

indication of eutectic combination

almost any condition. For

taking place on the line blend with

exa mple, the well known Tenmoku ,

Toma to Red and Celadon glazes.

However a number of glazes, mainly the

Oil Spot, Tea Dust and Hare's Fur are

very difficult to consistently reproduce. In

these glazes a separa tion of phases of

different iron oxide concentration takes

place during the firing. The separa tion of the

iron oxide in the molten glaze usually occurs

at the lOp temperatiurc and it is due 10

consolidation of blisters caused by gases (ie

trapped air) between glaze panicles and also

by oxygen released by the decomposing iron

Test pot

strong blister formation. All mixtures

were black, even the ones with only

2% add itions of iron ox ide. It was

decided 10 selec t one of each most

promising mixtures showing the Oil Spot

for funher evalua tion.

Both of these mixtures we weighed up

in larger quantities and applied to

porcelain as well as stoneware samples in

different thicknesses. In each case good

Oil Spot developed; the size of the spots

were directly proponional to the thickness

of the applied glaze. Difficulties were

oxide. On subsequent cooling of the glaze crystallisation

takes place defining the separation of iron bearing crystals

in chaf'Jctcristic round 'oil spots'.

encountered with keeping glaze materials in suspension

and it was decided to add to each mix 5% of bentonite to

improve the suspension and also provdc adherence.

In some glazes the iron separation can appear as TC'J

Dust and on venical surfaces will produce lines of Hare's

Fur. All of these phenomena are dependent on a number

of factors - glaze composition which produces high

RECIPES

GlazeNo1

Soda Feldsapr 100

Glaze No 2

Nepheline Syenite 100

viscosity melt at the top temperature, application and

firing schedule.

The first objective of this work was to concentrate on

Red Iron Oxide

Bentonite

5

5

Red I ron Oxide

Bentonite

5

5

highly viscous simple glazes fired to 13OO"C and produced

by one or two components.

The minerals - Soda Feldspar potash feldspar,

nepheline syenite, spodumene, petalite, granite and

cornish stone - were blended individually with red iron

oxide on the line blend principle and fired side by side

under oxidising atmosphere to Seger Cone 10. Two of the

Fire both recipes to Cone 10 in oxidation

Note: Glaze 2 has the slight edge over 1; but both

gh zes proved successful on many different stoneware

bodies. including porcelain. Successfu l results were

obtained in both gas and electric kilns.

Well known ceramic anist, Flela Kotai used these glazes

on pots upto 1m tall. 00

minerals, soda feldspar and nepheline syenite showed

outstanding promise.

Acknowledgement to Bill Nicholl for help wilh pholOgraphs.

54 POTTIRY IN A USTRAlIA + ISSUE 3612 WINTER 1997


Ashless 'Ash' Glazes

By TERRY KIRK, Teacher of Ceramics, Northem Beaches College of T AFE

My first encounter with

this rype of glaze was

in th e technical

information for potters in the

back of Herbert Sanders'

wonderful 'The World of

Japanese Ceramics'l

Photographs there show

blue, green and orange

examples of glaze called

'Jokon', that most of us

would describe infonnaliy as a 'runny ash-like glaze'.

The recipe contains 45% barium carbonate and the rest

ash. I have always liked the way some glazes form

little rivulets within the surface of the glaze, without the

glaze itself running, but I have nevn been a fan of

wood ash as a glaze material due to its variable

composition and co nfounded in convenience. The

technical section of Sanders' book laid out the

challenge of substituting materials other than ashes for

the ash in the Jokon re cipes. The other obvious

substitution was friendly whiting for the more vexatious

barium carbonate.

Some years later Ian Currie published his excellent

book, 'S toneware Glazes'2, and chapters 8 and 11

dealing with calcium and barium rich volumetric

blending put a new spin on the whole exercise. Glaze

tests laid out according to their molecular equivalents

show a wonderful eutectic valley deepening from a high

'in the south-west' ( the flux matts, low in alumina and

silica), to a runny low with rivulets (higher alumina and

silica) following the line of the L8 alumina: silica ratio 'to

the nonh-east'. Oh joy, no absolute need for wood ash.

In retrospect, this is a postmodemist tale of technology

inverting the natural order to reveal the bleed in' obvious!

Some of the earliest and most basic stoneware glnes are

of this rype and the Cao - AI203 - Si02 eutectic is one of

the best known and most studied.

Good results can be achieved in both oxidation and

reduction using seemingly any of the oxide additions for

colour in amounts suggested in the books. TIle character

of the glaze changes

markedly over sl ips giving

salt-glaze-like effects on

porcelaineous slips and

bodies fired horizontally,

through to threatening runs

on vertical surfaces. To

protect kiln shelves from

runs and provide a warm

contrast, the bOllom third

or so is best left unglazed

or, in reduction thinly airbrushed Shino is both effective

and prudent. In oxidation this area ca n be given a

variation of Oribe.

RECIPE

Glaze Biaxial Biaxial Biaxial Biaxial

1 1 4 12 16

WHITI NG 43.48 3561 18.07 100.00 26.90

KAOLIN 30.80 6438 32.87 00.00 0.00

QUARTZ 25.72 00.00 49.06 0000 73.09

Glaze 1 is a starting glaze for substitution experiments 3 .

Biaxial 1,4,12, and 16 are comer glazes of a simple 4x4

biaxial volumetric blend that shows the eutectic trough

and has only whiting in the bottom left corner (Biaxial 12)

from which the 1:8 AI203 I Si02 line radiates; or more

simply line blend berween 12 and 4.

NB. Don't forget the addition of oxides for colour.

These glazes are drab without colour. Start with the

addition to the base recipe of 5% red iron oxide for brown

and orange, and 1% cobalt carbonate for blue. 00

References: 1 Sanders, Herben 'The World of Japanese Ceramics',

Kodansha, Tokyo,I9(i7.

2 Curri e, Ian 'Stoneware Glazes' , BOOlSlrap Press, Maryvalc,

2nd Ed., t 9~5 .

3 Rye, Owen 'Substitution: A New Method of Glaze Experiments',

Pottery in AUSlrdlia, Vol. 21 , No. 3.

36/2 WINTER 1997 .. POTTERY IN A USTRAlIA 55


GREAT

GLAZES

Bronze Glazes

JOE SZIRER, Ceramics Teacher, Monash University, Caufield.


,-

A t Monash we aim to produce self sufficient, independent

f"'+f:udents. Glaze development is of major importance in

this procedure. Undergraduates learn this process,

through a number of exercises, induding systematic blending

techniques. By the time they undertake post graduate srudies,

they are capable of producing original fmishes for their work.

Both these glazes will run so necessary precautions should

MAGNIFICENT

BRONZE

Kaolin

Manganese Dioxide

Copper Oxide

Neph Syenite

Ferro Frit 4110

Pearl Ash

IS

80

15

25

7.5

36

Silica 25

Nickel Oxide 2.5

Black Iron Oxide 5

A bright bronze at 124QOC-12000c

in oxidation or light reduction

CRINKLEY LEATHER

Kaolin 30

Manganese Dioxide 80

Copper Oxide 30

Neph Syenite 25

Ferro Frit4110 15

At 1220"C this glaze is a smooth

matt rust with crinkles

At 124O"C it becomes a smooth

mall rust with some bronze

developing in some areas -

crinkles develop into man 3D

At 1260·C this glaze is a satin

bronze glaze with some black and

gold crystals. Fire in oxidation or

reduction. A beautiful glaze.

be taken. I nre tllem on fire bricks and leave 'Iegs' on pieces

unglazed - colour them witll black undergla7~ instead.

Both glazes respond well if the body is washed with

ropper, dark underglaze rolours or slips. TIle rolour bemmes

a brighter gold over these underglaze applications. 00

56 POTTffiY IN AUSTRAUA + ISSUE 3612 WINTER 199 7


GREAT

GLAZES

Colouring Translucent Bone China

GABRIELLE FLEET, currently studying for a Masters at Monash University, Caufield.

I

devised a means of colouring a highly translucent hone

china, without noticeably affecting the translucency.

This was achieved using water soluble metal salts.

Conventional methods of colouring ceramics render it

opaque which is inappropriate for my work. For my

application the colouranlS are used for the transmittance of

light. This reveals beautiful and almost Auoresent colours

when placed before a halogen lamp. The sole use of

nitrates instead of sulphates and chlorides is intentiona l.

Nitrates are the most soluble of the metal salts and are

ge nerally the most stable and least volati le during

decomposition to the oxide. during the firing priocess. The

gases evolved during the decomposition of the nitrates are

the least toxic and corrosive of the soluble metal sailS.

These tests were executed without unnecessary use of

protective masks and fume hoods but with only latex

gloves to protect my skin from absorbing the water

soluble compounds. There are no fumes asociated with

these water sol uble compounds, and the only vapour

evaporating from the metal salt solution is wate r. The

only possible risk is through ingestion or absorbtion of a

considerable quantity through the skin.

Water soluble coloura nlS - painted onto bisqued test tiles.

The natu ral bone ash content is suplemented with

Fe (N03)3 Very translucent, golden brown, yellow

Co(N03)2 Translucent purple

Cu( 03)2 Very translucent turquoise

cre 03)3 Translucent, grass green

TRANSLUCENT

BONE ASH BODY

Ingredient %

atural bone ash ?' - )

Synthetic hone as 25

Nepheline syen ire 27

Ecka lite I 30

Macaloid 25

Fire to 126O"C

symhetic bone ;Ish because of the impractical and time

consuming grinding and sieving of the natural bone ash.

This formulation is seived 5 times to remove any lumps

and th en ball mill ed for 8-10 hours. The hydrated

macaloid is added after th e ball milling to avoid

destroying the plastic qualities of the macaloid. This was

the most practical of the recipes I tested as it maintained

high translucency and retained effective plasticity. 00

36/2 WINTER 1997 + POTTERY IN AUSTRAUA 57


GREAT

GLAZES

White Magnesia Matt Stoneware

Janine King, Part-time teacher of ceramics Moss ValeTAFE

Detail student work, white magnesia trailed over tenmoku glaze.

Detail student work, white magnesia

trailed over glaze blue spangle.

Some years ago I organised a weekend workshop

with my friend and colleague Suzie Startin at Moss

Vale Tafe (Ulawarra Institute of Technology). The focus

was on decorating with stoneware glazes using double

dipping, traili ng and brushing (glaze over glaze)

techniques. One of the white glazes she was working

with at the time became one of my favourites and has

been used extensively by the students since then.

The glazes fire to 1300°C (reduction beginning at

lOOO"C and finishing at 1250"C).

The glaze is a semi-matt wh ite and has a smooth

sa tin y su rface wh ich responds nicely to colour

decoration. It should be applied quite thickly (like you

would a celadon) to retain a nice buttery fin ish. It can

be trailed over darker glazes and can work very nicely

applied over a standard temnoku after wax resist. If it

is thinl y applied or fired very hot, used on a porcelain

body it tends to a more glassy transparent finish.

IL has also been a great base for colour additions in our

glaze technology class using all the standard oxides.

In my own wolkshop I have made it with many vdIiations -

eg: Try using Soda feldspar inste'Jd of POIaSh and any number

of different ball clays including day Cemm, and the old Cresta

BB. At College we use Ball Clay FX. 00

RECIPE

Potash feldspar 35

Silica 25

Ball Clay 15

Whiting 10

Talc 10

Fire to 1300'C reduction.

58 POTIERY IN A USTRALIA + ISSUE 36/2 WINTER 1997


TRIBUTE

Gordon McAuslan

1913-1996

Ceramicist and sculpture, painter, illustrator. A tribute by STEPHEN SKlLU1ZI

Quiet achievers like

his anistic career with

Gordon McAuslan

instruction from the Harry

by definition 'just

J Weston Postal School of

get on with the jon' Drawing which he

without feeling compelled

claimed gave him 'a

to trumpel their message.

thorough grounding in the

Such deliberate and keen

conventional techniques'.

focus on the work at hand 'Female Figures'. 1985. h50cm. During the Depression

(to the exclusion of the media circus that often envelopes Gordon canvassed door 10 door for black and white

market-driven an practice) is a sign of both self· drawings of homes. He taught himself showcard writing

sufficiency and high artistic integrity. But it does result in and prouuced his own magazine 'Cartoonist' which he

general surprise amongst the cognoscenri, when final illustrated and printed using linocuts. Appalled by the

appraisal is undertaken, that such an artistic force could terrible conditions of this time he len! his services to left

for so long - over 50 years of art prdctice in this case - wing causes and illustrated cartoons for the Communist

have been largely ignored ny art or craft chroniclers. Party's Workers Weekly.

evertheless works of Gordon are held in several public In Wellington Gordon found part-time work as a junior

collections in Australia and New Zealand in addition to commercial artist and exhibited water colours with the

numerous privale collections.

New Zealand Academy of Fine ArtS. His influences at this

Attitudes 10 life and an most often quoted by Gordon time included Maori artefacts, Balinese wood carving, the

were Shelley's 'The soul's delight is in the doing' and cartoons of David Low and caricatures by George Finey.

Braque's 'you cannot be any better in your art than you By 1936 he had moved to Sydney where he freelanced as

are in yourself'. The latter part of his long career was an ilIustralor producing work for 'Radio World' and 'Man'

dominateu by his ceramic wo rks which from the start magazine. He also produced the first six covers for 'Man

were mature statements being hased on a wide artistic Junior' and was its Art Director.

foundation since the 1930's.

Always an adventurer and environmenta list Gordon

Born in 1913 at Riverton New Zealand, Gordon began made a canoe and took a solo trip down the

3612 WlNTER 1997 + PorrERY IN A USTRAUA 59


Murrumbidgee River. Images from this time show his ana lysis and generally tolerant art societies, MCAusian's

experimentation with pointillist techniques. He spent time oeuvre at that time presented the 'culting edge' of

studying the artefacts of 'primitive' cultu res in the Modernist art to a largely disdainful, smugly-provincial, art

museums of Sydney, Dunedin and Wellington and copied hierarchy.

two p'.lintings from reproductions of Malevich the Kussian Even in the sixties McAuslan felt obliged to deliver a

Suprematist. These experimentations and adaptations of well-aimed, armour-piercing 'Broadside - As the most

modernist influences were to become seminal aspects of all rejected member of the contemporary Art Society of

of Gordon's later works, partkularly the head forms in clay. .S.W. I hereby reject the rejectors (and resign) on the

Gordon'S war service took him to New Guinea where following grounds: .. .'

he made 'countless' sketches as Corporal-draugh15man in Since those formative, post-war years the wholesale

Battalion Intelligence Section. He also produced a large importation of the divers aesthetics of the European

number of water ----_ Modernist school,

colours and a few exemplified by

mall carvings. Picasso, Brancusi, Arp,

Attracted to the breVity

Miro, Kke, Modigliani,

and vitality of Oriental

has ameliorated that

call igraphy Gordon

smug bias to the point

began 10 eliminate where MCAuslan's

detail from his work. prolific output is

After the war judged 'whimsical and

Gordon returned to charming'. Whilst

ew Zealand where

being of no threat to

he held eleven solo

the current status quo,

shows. Works were

his seamless design

purchased by the sense across the

Auckland Art Gallery

media of clay, wood,

and the Invercargill

stone and creened or

City Collection. By

painted 2D works , is

1947 Gordon was back not lightweight but

in Sydney. He married

rather is a mature

Leslie Frith with whom statement of the

he later had two 'Modernist' vision of

children , Dain and

our world. MCAuslan

Janet. Leslie and was an artist who

Gordon sailed 10 clearly understood his

England where he

long-term professional

worked with Edward

concerns and gently

Wadsworth AKA . He 'Wine Server', High fired earthenware, matt white glaze. 45cm. enticed his admirers

formed a close

relationship with the artist from whom he also learnt

tempera painting. He was invigorated by this 2 years of

travelling in the U.K., Italy and France where they had a

memorable meeting with the sculptor Brancusi and were

given a private viewing of Picasso's latest work - 'the

paint hardly dry on the canvasses'.

In 1949 Gordon had another nine solo shows in New

Zealand and participated in a show of ew Zealand art

which lOured to London. At that time, 1950, Gordon

lamented the dearth of enlightened critics in his

homeland ew Zealand in a sati ri cal egg tempera

painting 'My picture looking at the critics'. Visually, it

evoked the controlled spontaneity explored by Miro with

its crisp, reductive face images and zany linear motifs. [n

contrast to today's wealth of informed art and artists'

into 'seeing things his

way'. Almost all of his figurative ceramics have their

stylistic roots in Brancusi and Arp and the European

Modernist School in gener.ll.

A large part of his post fifties activity was glazed

e-.lnhCf1IV'dte coiled ponery, often decorative wine servers.

These pseudo-functional vessels are explorations of the

human image which was always central to his aesthetic.

On a technical level Gordon used the coil-built method

almost exclUSively with commercial high fired e-.lrthenware

1100-1200"C glazes (mostly man white). His preference for

clay was clay dug out from under his home at

Normanhurst during room extensions, which was wedged

with coffee grounds for a speckled glaze effeLl. He said of

his work 'It is all design and the solving of little problems

relevant to the particular activity'.

60 POTIERY IN AUSTRALIA + Issue 36/2 WINTER 1997


Typically Gordon's idiosyncratic wine servers are

delineated by a vertical axis visually segmented into

various anthropomorphic primary forms. One such 3&ms

high server is di tinguished by its curious trumpet-like

extension (used to pour in the wine) sprouting

asymmetrically from its spherica l elemental head. A

studded chocker accentuates the elongated neck; the

female chest is an ovoid cylinder with a small smooth

pouring spout and opposing

handle as the two arms. The

conical wa ist with bands of

impressed geometrics and

squarish flanged hips are

supported by fou r homlike legs.

The commercial malt white glaze

is relieved by subtle pilling from

the imbedded coffee grounds

and by salmon pink highlights

on the decorative edges from tile

glaze breaking over the ironbearing

clay. Dinner guests thus

served would have both the eye

and the palate pleasantly

refreshed by the experience.

In 1951 Gordon and Leslie

settled in Sydney. He worked as

a picture framer and joined the

Contemporary Art ociety. He

held a joint exhibition at the

Bissietta Gallery and taught pantime

at the East Sydney

Technical College.

Gordon was offered a position

teaching at Sydney Gramm ar

School where he became

Anmaster from 1957 to 1976. He

started his ceramic work at that

time using the pottery kiln at the

school. This writer was a

primary and high school pupil of

his from 1957 till 1964. I cherish

many memories of those

adolescent ycars where the

reality of an artist 's struggle was

osmotically transferred from

school master to eager student. Th at is, the diverse

nexuses of art/design, content/context, technique/ skill,

innovation/ tradition were first encountered at McAuslan's

hand through his after-school-hours 'practical' example.

The 'theory' of what I observed came latter at university

level. His chool class room cou pled as his aftcr-hou rs

personal studiO, storeroom, even a cramped ga llery

competing for space with his pupils' naive attempts, often

derivative of the resident Master. Ironically, the 'best' art

teachers - that mantle sits comfortably on McAuslan's

shoulders - are firstly practicing artists, and secondly

teachers and thirdly disciplinarians, although a balance of

all three is de irable of course. MCAuslan performed that

balancing aa well.

With a heavy load of teaching, it was a constant struggle to

keep his own output as an artiS! fresh and original. He was

clrdwn more and more to express his ideas ~lI'Ough economy

and purity of line. In 1960

Gordon joined the

Sculptor's Society and was

secretary for five years,

which was the beginning

of a long and happy

'Wine Server'. h38cm.

fri endship with May

Barrie.

A March/ Apri l 1997

Retrospective of his

work- I3 paintings, 8

screenprints, 8 sculptures

and many ceramic

objects - was held at the

beautiful rural artis ts '

colo ny setting near

Albion Park, N.S. W. at

the studios of May

Barrie, Tori de Mestre,

and Grahame Kime.

Having retired to

imbin .S.W. he simply

enjoyed whatever he

was working on. His

ceramics output in

imbin was prolific and

sophisticated encompassing

bottles, wine servers,

scu lptures and beaded

necklace;. Whilst. dlOO5ing

to avoid the ceramic

world's centre stage,

Gordon's legacy should

not be underrated

because of his rcticence

for self promotion.

There are many

hundreds of ceramic objects currently gr'dcing the homes

of Australians that attest to his design sensitivity and long

term cornmiunent that ran deeper than concurrent transient

fashions. Gorcbn McAuslan was busy and contented until the

last hour of his 83 years. 00

S.ephen Skilli.zi (M.F.A.) Founda.ion Coordin",or of Ceramics Degrc'e

Course, t979, •• Sou.h Aus.r.liian College of Advanced P.duc:uion.

Note: ExcerplS from the Rerrospedivc Exhibilion brochure induded.

36/2 WINTER .997 + POnERY tN AUS1RAlJA 61


North Shore Craft Group Inc.

The 40th Annual Exhibition and Sale, July 23-27 1997, includes the work of seven Sydney potters,

In July, 1997, one of Sydney's premier

crafts associations, the North Shore

Craft Group Inc. will celebrate its

40th Annual Exhibition. TIle Group was

formed in 1957 at a privately held

'keeping in touch' lunch for the

teachers and students of a suburban

evening college pottery course. A

former teacher, the late Phyllis

Molesworth, convinced the eleven

others present to hold an exhibition of

their best work. Crafts people working

in other media were invited to give

variety and the exhibition was duly

held in an upstairs room at the local

School of Arts - nothing was for sale.

Helen Parker (an enameller), one of

the original 12 members and at over 90, still an active

exhibitor, remembers it this way ... "The work produced

was meant to be fine work of merit and to be seen by as

many people as possible, Selling was not important at the

time, our expenses were minimal", For the first dozen

exhibitions, some at the local Town Hall and later at a

Department Store ga llery, no hiring fee was charged.

There were minimal props and the members gathered to

handmake the invitations and catalogues.

The evolution of the Group from amateur beginnings

reflects the changing attirude to crafts in Australia over the

last 40 years. Today, there are 44 exhibiting Members and

almost all the pieces presented for display are for sale. By

retaining a selective approach to membership, the Group

is able to present a diverse range of crafts at a very high

level of quality. Many members are well-known

professionals in their field , busy wi th a variety of

exhibition and teaching commitments. The presentation of

work is of the highest standard, reflecting the

professionalism of the members.

Seven Potters will be exhibiting this year as part of the group.

Jan Buttenshaw is currendy President of the Group. She

produces a full range of domestic ware

using glaze on glaze techniques, She

also produces one-off figurative

sculpture pieces in porcelain finLshed

in a celadon glaze. TIlese humourous

fat ladies and gents in all walks of life

are full of character. Large platters are

also a feature. These are made from

paper clay, woodfired with salt and

seaweed to create surface designs.

Nicky Coady's stoneware includes

an ovoid 'Spiral' teapot developed

using stretched and textured slabs. The

spiral - a well used motif through the

ages - depictS movement, evolution.

Odler teapots and platters use soft slab

techniques with thrown additions and are

fmished in caleum mat! glazes containing yellow ochre and

cobalt carbonate.

Thelma Delaney produces beautiful functional

stoneware pots using glaze on glaze to give richness to

the surfaces. Gillian Dodds also concentrates on thrown

functional ware and captures Australian colours and bush

scenes with her glazes.

Ebba Hansen works in earthenware and enjoys making

both functional and sculprural forms, Her work includes

delicate impressed motifs, fish and bird designs, and makes

use of coloured clay, colouring oxides and body stains,

Fran Swinden's works include both handbuilding and

thrown processes. Her domestic ware and slab teapots are

pre-decorated with printed trailed slip and coloured clay

inlay. They reflect her interest in working with fabric as

well as clay.

The functional "Wattle" vase forms are coil built and

dle decoration, based on a free interpretation of winterflowering

wattle, is carried out with brushed slips beneath

linear detail and textured areas in ceramic crayon.

Barbara Webster specialises in wood fired porcelain

and stoneware, making mainly functional ware with some

62 POTru


OppOSite page: Jan Buttenshaw "Luscious Loins"

celadon glaze, white stoneware, reduction gas fired

13OO"C. h22cm

Top left: Gillian Dodds 'Platter' fired in a natural gas

kiln to stoneware. Clay from Gulgong.

Top right: Nicky Coady. 'Spiral' ovoid teapot. Highly

textured - stretched slab technique.

Left: Fran Swinden. 'Wattle' vase form, coiled.

Brushed slips, linear details and textured areas in

ceramic crayon.

Above: Barbara Webster. 'Sugar and Jug' thrown

and woodfired with slip trailed motif - shino glaze.

decorative pieces. She takes full advantage of the exposed

clay body to pick up the subtle hues and ash deposits

that are synonymous with wood firing. The firing alone

takes 27 hours. Inspiration for decoration is Australian

native flora and the rugged Australian landscape with irs

infinite colours and textures applied by pouring slips,

glazes and oxides onto the pors.

With the variety of potters exhibiting, combined with

glass artists, wood turners, weavers, leather workers,

enamellers and more, this 40th Exhibition will be an

inspiring event. 00

The Nonh Shore Crah Group's 40th Exhibition will be held at the

KU-ring-gai Town Hall, 1186 Pacific Highway Pymble.

CommenCing Wednesday 23rd July to Sunday 27th inclusive.

For further details phone Jan Buttenshaw Tel 02 9938 1595

3612 WINTER J 997 + POTIERY IN AUSTRAlIA 63


Colourful dresses and challer contrast a backdrop of

dry shrubbery and salt-fia~s. An aboriginal woman

cocks her head, clasps her hands and smiles at her

just-completed creation - a curvaceous ceramic sculpture.

The serring is Burketown in the Gulf of Carpenleria and

anist Karen Gross is teaching a group of aboriginal

women how to rum a block of clay into a work of an.

She wipes the sweat from her forehead and suggesls that

the class try out the new kiln.

Originally from Sydney, Karen, 27, has made a career

out of a popular Australian dream - the proverbial

wo rking holiday. She visits remote aboriginal

com munities to share her passion for pottery, and

occasionally stops in at Momo, Queensland to lend a

hand on her panner's basil faml.

Equipped with a bag of old clothes, a ponable kiln and

a sense of adventure, Karen recently embarked on a nine-

week tour of the Gulf of Carpenteria, visiting such

communities as Burketown, Mornington Island and

Doomadgee. On this solo-tour, Karen will meet a

fascinating cast of children and adults and see some

diverse landscape.

"I love getting to know the people - I love the

relationships [ develop with my wonderful, enthusiastic

students,' she says.

Karen has probably seen more of Australia than many

of us will see in our entire lives. Over the past five years,

her nomadic habits have taken her to some of the most

isolated communities in the country - places with names

like Boggabilla, La~amanu , Goodooga, Kowanyama and

the Tanami Desen.

A self-confessed "bushy', Karen is not adverse to

sleeping in a swag, Sitting down to a meal of widgedee

grubs or taking a romp through the desert. She says

64 POTIERY IN AuSTRAUA + ISSUE 3612 WINTER 1997


lexibility is the key, with

wooden sculpture of a dead

ell-laid plans sometimes

kangaroo is the centre-piece

"Dming unstuck hya sudden

of the Yoram Gross Film

uneral, a ceremony or a

Studios foyer and walls are

OPical down-pour.

adorned with Karen's pencil

"Anything and everything

sketches and paintings.

hat can happen does "She is a very good artist.

appen ," she says.

One of my favourite pit'Ces is a

"I have to be flexible with sculpture Karen made with

fmy teaching too. Some painted bones - a clever idea

fhi ldren simply don 't have

and very effective; Yoram says.

anywhere safe to store ceramic

Yoram is a Polish immigrant,

bowls or mugs Or functional

and his wife andra - Karen's

pOlS. So sometimes we end

mother - is from Israel , so

up adorning the schools in

Karen 'S choice to discover

wall-mosaics or tiled pathways."

Australia before trekking

Karen is always welcomed to

overseas is not a maller of

he communities with open anns

'finding her roots'.

nd says she never has anything

The idea to discover outback

but a positive, wann reception.

Australia emerged 10 years ago

But her classes are sometimes

when Karen was studying

treated with a Iinle trepidation. Boggabilla, New South Wales. pottery and heard about the

"Pottery is something tOlally Teenage Roadshow, an

foreign, totally new to some of

independent arts project. In

hese people," she says.

1992 she was offered a place in

"I met a fantastic woman in dle program and soon became

roydon who had been

one of the youngest tour

igging wells for the Water

leaders and the first woman to

Board all her life. She looked

drive the roadshow's ex-army

at my clay and said 'I can't

tnlck to four Slates. These days

touch that - it reminds me too

Karen embarks on her missions

much of cow shit'. But she did

alone, but still embraces the

touch it and ended up chance to teach in schools,

producing some really prisons, women's cemres,

beautiful pots.' Croydon, Queensland. "anywhere that will have me".

What Karen puts imo her classes, she definitely gets "It is the most incredible experience - jU5t phenomenal:

back in personal satisfaction, having seen some awesome Karen enthuses.

Australian landscape and made some invaluable "It is like being invited to share a completely different

friendships.

culture. It makes me realise that cities like Sydney are so

' I can't tell you how exhi larating my work is. I'm devoid of any influence from the culture of indigenous

constantly meeting new and amazing people. I've met people."

some incredible aboriginal women who tell me about When asked about future journeys, she smiles and

their remarkable lives, like their first contact with white shnlgs her shoulders.

people. It's just a famastic opportunity for someone from "Aims and aspirations' is not my best subject. I have so

the city like me.

many ideas, I don't know if I can fit them into onc

'The second time I went to Goodooga, I had a whole lifetime."

lrail of children running behind my truck say ing 'the Her plans for the fonhcoming year include a trip to

pottery's here, the pottery's here'. I felt like a bit of Poland and Europe with her father. Then she may settle

sideshow coming back to town - but it was fantastic.' down and create altWork to the aroma of basil, from her

[f you want to catch a glimpse of Karen's art-work, just Manto studio.

visit Yoram Gross Film Studios in Sydney's Camperdown. "But above all, I want to ensure that arts programs like

Yoram Gross is Karen 's proud father and director- these continue to service remote communities." G\!)

producer of some of Australia 'S best known children 's

films (Bl inky Bill; Dot & th e Kangaroo). A striking 1(a,;eSu,hcrland, Tel""les PUbl;c;


Signs

Shan Hatwell and a group of profoundly deaf students produce their own powerful artworks with clay.

JENNIFER SEXTON reports.

Even to my untrained eyes, it was clear right from the

start, this is a special project.

I found a group of eight men and women happily

working away. On the table, creations, free standing

ceramic hands in 'sign' the language of people who are

deaf, plus a number of planers with imprints of hands

again in 'sign'.

This class has been set up exclusively for students who

are deaf. Here, under the close eye of Shan Harwell, and

the assistance of interpreter Lee Maddison, the students

are learning basic clay and firing skills - the results to be

presented to the public in an exhibition.

What 's different about this though , is tha t these

students are communicating their culture, their issues, and

their language to the world through their work.

Karen Rhodes was born profoundly deaf. Through the

inrerpreter, she tells me she's done pmtery hefore, but

nothing as empowering or eXCiting as this 'it makes me

feel quite proud depicting our language in clay, showing

people some of our signs'.

The 'hand' to hearing people is in most cases taken for

gra nted, it's just another useful appendage. But to these

students who are deaf, the hand is 'everything', without it

communication is near impossible and that message is

clear when you see their work - some of the hands are

missing parts of fingers and that too is highly symbolic.

Lee Maddison says, 'six years ago, people who were deaf

were to mainstream society 'deaf and dumb' - valueless.

They could only get jobs in factories and injuries to hands

from using dangerous machinery was commonplace.

'L'

'----=_--' i

Thank heavens things have changed. But it makes the

hands even more meaningful, as a symbol ofl

discrimination in years gone by.

Here the students make plaster moulds from thei r own

hands, the moulds are then used to make clay

impressions from terracotta and white earthenware clay,

fingers are carefully moved into position form ing the

appropriate sign. 1hen the hands are fired in a sawdust I

kiln for three days.

Plancrs are also made from terracotta clay, ash glazed I

and then fired in a gas kiln. The results are quite

fascinating,

Pam Taber, another student who is deaf, believes there

is still a need for community education about people who

are deaf. 'It's ou r language, it shows people how we

communicate, there's a sign saying culture and another

saying language, and that's what we're about - we have

our own culture and our own sign language, We're proud

to be deaf and its great to show people Our language for

the first time, creatively'.

Shan Harwell, who pioneered this project at Wagga

TAPE, together with Lee Maddison, nurtured the student's

work and is excited at how it is evolving. She believes it's

the stan of something important for the students. I agree,

the finished 'hands', the images they form , are highly

evocative; they're mysteriOUS, sensitive, vulnerable, and

yet strong like the people they represent. G!O

Jennifer Sexton

Producer/Presenler, 'Art Warp', ABC Radio Ri"erina

66 POTIERY IN AUSTRAlIA + ISSUE l6f1. WlNTER 1997


So You Want to be a Student

A comparative look at the Ceramic Course options available in Australia,

Article and research by KAREN WEISS,

You're thinking of doing a course. To make it easier

for you to find the course that meets your needs,

we have surveyed Ceramics courses throughout

Australia. You've seen the pictures, now browse through

our table, listed by State,

THE INSTITUTES I:lasically, you are looking at two

systems: TAfE and Universities, TAfE Colleges run

courses with a strong emphasis on the practical and

technical training needed by a pOller. Having said that,

th ere is considerable va riation in focus within the

curriculum, from College to College, T AFE colleges have a

good deal of autonomy and have often taken advantage

of this to tailor courses for local conditions and demands,

TAFE colleges run courses varying from teaching basic

skills to Advanced Diplomas which integrate An Hi tory

and conceptual development with small business and

advanced technical skills, TAFE courses arc relatively

inexpensive and are otien offered both as pan-time and

full-time, Chidcare may be ava ilable to students,

Universities usually offer cer'dmics as pan of a Bachelor

of VisuaVFinel Applied Arts degree, The student is offered

a choice of electives in the first year and then can choose

to go on to major in ceramics, Masters Degrees can be

done by cou rsework or research, depending on the

University, and some also offer Ph,D,s,

Degree cou rses are pan-time or full -time or may be

done as external post-graduate studies,

The University course gives the student the possibility

of exploring diverse media with an emphasis on Arts

training followed by speCialisation,

Many TAFE Colleges and Universities also offer single

subject studies, These are usually studies with practical

applications, such as mouldmaking or glaze theory, They

are shon courses, usually one night a week for a tenn, sLx

months or a yea r.These cou rses mayor may not be

accredited, Generally TAfE offers accredited courses,

Universities offer non-accredited courses. There arc

exceptions, Accreditation or otherwise will only be of

concem to you if you are thinking of going on to do a

more substantial course and can use the piece of paper.

The Ieaming is just as valuable,

PRIMARY ORIENTATION The orientation of

courses varies enormously, Some have a strong bi as

towards produ ction and tec hnical skills, producing

trad itional fun ctional ware or utilising industri al

techniqu es, Others lean equally strongly towards the

conceptual and scu lptural, making individual art

statem ent s, Still others try and achi eve a balance

somewhere in the middle,

ARTIST·IN -RESIDENCE PROGRAM Smdents

benefit from this program, panicularly if the institute takes

full advantage of the anist's presence by integrating them

into the curriculum via workshops, lectures etc. Having a

successful professional around from outside the system,

can give a salutary perspective and hel p the smdent beller

define the al ternatives that exist once the course is

finish ed, This is equally true of guest lecturers, The

majority of institutes have visits from guest lecturers,

TEACHING STAFF Teachers are the backbone of

the depanment. Having several pan-time teachers is an

advantage, Often they will have been brought in because

of a particular area of expenise, or extensive experience,

This widens the pool of knowledge,

KILNS The number and type of kilns in an institute

can tell you a great deal about the priority and types of

firings done there, Ii also tells you of the options available

to the smdent, If the course you favour has '& others' in

the kiln column, in many cases this indicates kilns such as

raku, blackfire, pi!' (E is electric and \VI IF is wood fired in

the table following),

SPECIAL FEATURES Educational Institutes are

being enco uraged more and more to compete for

smdents, Institutes are offering more flexible courses, This

means part-time courses are more co mmon, modular

courses are being introduced and interdisciplinary and

inte rca mpu s stud y options are becoming the rule,

InterdiSCiplinary studies means that depanments can share

sta ff and facilities, creating more options for students in

either elective subjects or lectures in specia lised areas,

Intercampus studies make these possibilities available

between campuses within courses,

IT'S A BUYER'S MARKET I-lave a good look at what it

is you are buying, Ask to be shown around the

depanment, the staff will be happy to show it off. Work

out what your needs are, Do you need childcare' Do you

have to fit the course in around a job' Do you have a

disabi lit y' Do you have special interests' HAPPY

LEARNING' oo

ll1anks 10 all the institutiOns for the information [hey supplied and

also to TAFE and the Universities Admission Boards in various SHHCS.

C K.Weiss t997

36/2 WINTER 19'17 + PonERY IN AUSTRALIA 67


'LIll ... "l ln"Uut"UL (,>tIT'-l I r 1'1 \,j ,'llbl' "I1I1gk,

~

Nerem TAPE, Penrim Ceramics Cen fT '! Tech prr 1 nighl x 2yrs

University of Western Sydney, Macuthur B.A. (Vis. AIts) fT 4day, x 3yrs Yes. A

National An School, East Sydney Adv Dip Arts (Cer,mics) Fr r 5 dayn 3yrs Yes,

Cen in Ceramks prr 7hpw x 3yr.; non Ace

Sydney C


E-5,Gas j,

W/ F2

Concenlrales solely on pursuit of beauty in the making ri sound

functional polS. Inlerdiscipl, intercampus studit';'; ;1\;:111.

Yes

No

2 frr, IOprr

5 Frr, 5prr

2Frr,2prr

f 6, Gas 3

E 13 Gas 9

W/F 1&001""

El2Gas5

ochers ""'"

f7Gas3

& others

E5Gas4

W/F l

Access 10 exctUenfindusui.a1 equip'L cad-am programs,

Cenue for Ceramic ReseaM, Design & Prod'n. Inlcrd


Univ""iry of Balla"lt B V~ Ans (C=mks) PfT 4 pfT

M.A. FfT & PfT I)"s FfT 4yrs PfT

Ph.D FfT & Pfl' 3-5)"s rfT 9yrs max PfT

Monash University Grad Dip F..xlemal prr 2yrs

Gippsland Campus M.A. (V~ Ans) rfT &Ex1PfT 2yrs rfT; 4yrs Ext pfT

' No

PhD FfT 3rrs

Monash University B.A. Ceramic Design FfT & pfT 3y" PT 6)"PT Yes

Peninsula School of An B.A.Hoos (Cr,fts) FfT 4yrs

Gr.ld Dip (Cer,mic Design) FfT & PfT I)"PT ly"PT

M.A. rfT & PfT Varies NonAq

SOl1l}l AUSJBAIJA

Notth Adelaide School of An Adv Dip Aru (Applied & Visual) rfT & PfT 4 (Cer:lmics) FfT& PfTxl 2rrs rfT No

2days x 4yrs

Timl's avail.

Ceramic mooulcs rfl' Jday/ 2nL'i x 2yrs

Queensl3nd College 01 Fine An BVIS. Arts Fine An rfT Sdays x 3yrs No

WESfERN Al ISTRAiiA

WA School 01 An & Design Dip Art & Design (Studio Cer-.tln) FfT 4days x 3yrs No

conc


'

ctical .cd1n 1 base '0 explore '0 IFrr & 3P/f E2Gas6 ~ worJang r. ship with olher an ptacuces_ lnlercunpus studies ;'lVaii.

1\l'Uai CI'l'2[[viry

W /F 2& others Emphlsis on lechnology/di\'ersilY of ceranucs. _

-

few; on crt:alivc functional work ~ Yes IFff & 3PfT E2 Excellenl facilities, skilled Slaff. Special emphasis woodfire

developing Sludlo ponel'l) Gas 5 & using local raw malcnals. Functional ponery

W/F 2

mal is dl!l.lIcnglOg & disciplined,

& aher

rve10ping technical conceprual skills. Yos SFff & 4PfT E17Gas5 StudentS cfk."OUraged to work in variety of media

W/F & others inc! concrett! & glass.Students clX)OS(" & develop own field .

~ sltills (or architectural applic'n

llliercampus w/fire.

tv profe.~ion.al C3p3cilM:s, concepts No IFfT, 1-2prr E5 Imerdisciphruuy & imerC3mpus slUdies avail. Exttmal po5t

M 'I im·estigalion GlS 5 graduate from Sludem's own sllIdio.

W/F4

Ncmiorking Wlthuv ouLSidc AuS{

Variety of spccialisations. B.A. Hons plannc:d.

cimical,procfn concqxuaJ &

S'time 2FfT E4 Specialist firing techniques. Emphasis craftsmanship.

;earch skills Gas 4 W/F 3 .echnology, design,

& ()(hers & re.~rch . Imerdiscip. & inlcrcampus stUdies avail.

'\'eloplOg production conceplUal skilb BIlle!< 2FfT. P 'f E8Gas6 flexible interdisciplinary snill)' ""thm program Balance of .!okills

vanes & o


'Claydown' Tasmania

An annual Summer School with clay and fire.

RcedY Marsh Pottery in

northern Tasmania has

hosted two 'Claydowns' and

is planning a third for 1998. These

residential summer schools are led

by guest tutors - Malin a

and Dennis Monks in

1996, Sandy Lockwood in

1997.

Each school provides a

busy program lasting six

days. Activity revolves

around loads of soft day

and two longthroated

woodfired kilns. The

poltery is surrounded by

forest rich in wildlife,

while nearby, unique bush

camping fac ilities for

panicipanrs make outdoor

living easy.

What happens at Claydown is quite different from

what c1ayworkers experience in their own workplaces,

and different too, from what sltldenrs get from protracted

cerami cs cours es in conventional institutions. At

'Claydown ' there are no production quotas. Nor arc

there ex hi bi ti on or assessment deadlines. A rich

Claydown '97 participants made work

for two long throated wood kilns, one

was salted.

A lighter moment at Claydown '97 - blue-tongued

wildlife is confused for clay.

excha nge develops between

participants as they make, slip,

glaze, fire and take on the various

challenges presented. A tight time

schedule encourages risk taking -

new discoveries are made

and fresh understandings

develop. While techniques

and recipes are freely

shared, their imp0rlance

is secondary. 'Claydown's'

principle strength is in

giving individuals the

chance to compare the

starti ng point for their

own arts practice with

that of other c1ayworkers -

ii 's an opportunity to

understand what is

essential to each other'S

work, to find the essence,

the 'whys' of what we do with clay as well as the 'bows'. 00

For Dellliis of eLA YDOWN TASMANIA '98, COnl'C!: Neil HolTmann

4;0 Larcombes Rd, Reedy Marsh, Tasmania. 7.104

Phone/Fax 03 63622646

72 POmRY IN AUSTRAUA + ISSUE 3612 WlNTER 1997


Down the River

'Clay and Cabernet 2' is to be held at Newcastle University, Septernber 13 & 14, 1997.

It is two hun dred yea rs since

a functional teapot and discuss

Newcastle was established at the

pigments, decoration and glazes.

mouth of the Hun ter River and

His domestic ware is richly

twenty eight years si nce the

decorated and colourful.

beginnings of Newcastl e Studio

Kevin Flanagan's work is 'a

Potters Inc anel the subsequent

journey through a maze of

deve lopment of Back to Back

imagery'. He will develop three

Galleries and srudio in Back's old

different sculptural fonns over the

butcher shop in Cooks Hill.

weekend incorporating twigs,

Following requests from those

canvas, steel, wood, biruman, paint,

attending 'Clay and Cabernet' in the

clay and slips.

vineyards in 1995, Newcastle Srudio

Miltiades Kyriakides' amalgamation

Potters has decided to repeat this of handbui lt and slipcast

highly succesful workshop weekend.

components with neon lights in

This yea r they are going to follow Kevin Flanagan, outside Bushland Studio. sculptural assemblages will more

lhe success with 'Down the River', to

than stimulate your imagination. He

be held on tile weekend of the 13-14lh

will discuss lhe making and use of

September in the Ceramic StudioS

neon light, and his experiences at

of the niversity of Newcastle's Faenza Concorso 1995 and Fletcher

beautiful bushland Callaghan Challenge 1997.

campus.

The wonderful faci lities of the

The official opening by Pottery in

University of Newcastle will allow

Australia's editor, Sue Buckle will be

active pa l1icipation in a range of

followed by twO days of processes, including throwing,

demonstra ti ons, sl id es and talks

decora ting, handbuilding large

featuring the diverse talents of Janet Mary-Lou Hogarth. sculptures widl cast components and

de Boos, Kevin Flanagan, Mary-LOU Hogarth, Miltiades glazing and firing for boi.h ra],:u and overnight firings.

Kyriakides, jeff Mincham and Andrew Parker.

Each ceramist will demonstrate over the two days.

Subtle, beautiful forms which make reference to the We are starting the weekend wilh an exhibition opening

vessel showcase jeff Mincham's interest in the history of of the visiting artiSts' works fo llowed by a barbeque and

raku firing. His innovative raku firing techniques will be celebra tion. The fun continues on Saturday night with

shared and demonstrated.

dinner and an auction of ceramics work.

janet DeBoos' expeltise in glaze technology is well known So come to Newcastle in the Spring, enjoy mingl ing

and she will share the secrets of dry glaze fonnulation and with kindred spirits and be extended. inspired and

application. janet will demonstrate her produllion techniques provoked. Exhibitions will be held at Back to Back

and explore aspects of innovative production.

Galleries and the Newc-Jstle Region Gallery (the Newcastle

Mary-Iou Hoga rth will make several pieces Bicentenary Acquisitive Exhibition).

demonstrating a range of techniques and tlnishes. Her slab Book ea rly and dont miss out! G\9

fonns tell stories of everyday life with a touch of humour.

The process of throwing large poLS in sections will be

tackled by Andrew Parker who will also show lhe design of

See the enclosed brochure for more details or Phone Jan Pryor

043 S88 022 or Margot Morgan 049 488 997.

16f2 WINTER 1997 + POnERY IN AUSTRALiA 73


Wide

A ROUNDUP OF LOCAL NEWS AND EVENTS FROM OUR STATE REPRESENTATIVES

NORTH QUEENSlAND

This year is the 10th anniversary of the Mackay Ans

Festival. Two pottery related visual arts evenl, on

during this period are an exhibition of work by

Byron Bay potter Mary Lou Hogarth titled "Listening at

Doors", at Earth Sea Pottery & Gallery, Slade Pt. Tel 551024.

This exhibition opens on Sunday 13th July with music

supplied by students of Mackay Conservatorium of Music

and afternoon teas provided by a local school. The

exhibition closes on Sunday 20th July. Pioneer Poners are

also taking the opportunity of showing their entire

collection of ceramiCS, acqUired over a period of 18 years at

the Mackay Ciry Library. The Mackay Ans Feslival runs from

the Il1h - 20th July.

The North Queensland Potters Association in Townsville

is holding a competition with a difference. This year the

club is recognising ils 251h anniversa ry by inviting all

previous major award winners and past judges to send

work for purchase. The judge is Gwyn Hanssen Pigott and

a total of 56000 has been donated. The purchased works

will become part of the Perc Tucker Regional Gallery's

permanent collection. These awards open on Friday 8th

August and close on Sunday 17th August. Pioneer Potters

are also holding their annual competition - opening on

Friday 12th September atlhe Mackay Entertainment Centre.

Total prize monies on offer are $3,600 and the judge this

year is Rowley Drysdale. For entry forms write to Pioneer

Poners, Mackay PO Box 3114, Nth Mackay, Qld 4741.

Nob Creek Pottery owner, Steve Bishopric, well known

for the myriad of colours he achieves from his anagama

kiln, is developing some new and exciting work for an

exhibition at Rockhampton Art Ga llery opening on 26th

September. This exhibition celebrates 20 Ye'Jrs of working

on the Capricorn Coast and is his first solo exhibition. lbe

show is to be partly retrospective and also shOWing some

new anagama fired work based on female forms and what

he describes as "primitive men issues" - sOllnd interesting.

NOrtil Queensland Potters should also remember that Ihe

Queensland Potters Association are holding their state

conference in Cairns Ihis year, the dates are 10, II , 12

October 1997. TI,e venue is FNQ Institule of TAPE, Cairns

College. More details When tlley become available.

. R/CKWc=

TASMANIA

time of writing, the Southern Poners will have

enjoyed a workshop with Andrew Cope. He also ran an

A:the

. teresting and informative workshop for the Ceramic

Pursuits Group at ti,e Universiry of Launceston. An exhibition of

Andrew's pots is being held at the Handmark gallery.

The Sou th ern POllers are anticipating their Annual

Exhibition at the Schoolhouse Gallery, Rosny , on

September 23rd until October 11th. After the exhibition, the

Group will run a workshop in October wilh New Zealand

poner, Brian Gartside. Interested persons who would like

to attend can phone Christine Crisp on 03-6223 1580.

The University of Tasmania at Launceston are looking

forward to the residency of Pippin Drysdale to the ceramic

studio. Pippin who visited the state a couple of Ye'Jrs ago, is

well remembered by the Tasmanian poners for her excellent

work and friendly personaliry. We look forward to her stay!

Yours in the mud,

• l..E!wNE V I\NC€RSLINK MIll ElERNADi'JE AUNO

QUEENSlAND

Busy times are in evidence. There seems 10 be a lot of

activity in many varied quaners at the moment.

The Churchie Exhibition of Emerging Art 1997 held in

Brishane was judged by Jeff Shaw, Director of the Open

College of Ihe Arts with Ihe Qld Arts Council and Tim

Morrell who is currently CuralOr of Contemporary Art al the

Qld Art Gallery. This year a $1000 prize was awarded in

ceramics with Michael Ciavarelli winning with a wood fired

stoneware work entitled "Stacks l ' which was nearly a

metre high and stood up to a 26 hour firing.

David Bange had his Masters exhibilion, "The Decorated

Lion : Challenging the Belief in Fun(1ion" at Doggen Street

Studio, which continued his work with architectonic totems

as a narrative of his experience.

Rowley Orysdale, who will be conducting a workshop in

Townsville, had a piece from his recent show at Fusions

purchased for the University of Southern Queensland collection.

Barry Tate is opening his own gallery at oosaville in

June called (of course) The Tate Gallery which will fe-Jture

contemporary art with the first show fealuring cerJmic wall

paintings and sculpture by himself and Michael Ciavarelli.

Lynne Griffilhs, another Sunshine Coasl artist will be

featured with mixed media work in the following exhibition.

Les Blakeborough has been shOWing with Savode who

74 POTTERY IN AUSTRALIA + ISSUE 36/2 WINTER 1997


Wide

A ROUNDUP OF LOCAL NEWS AND EVENTS FROM OU R STATE REPRESE NTATIVES

have once again committed to a large show featuring

contemporary clay curated by Jess Gibson.

Sandy Johnson has recently completed a cerami


BOOK REVIEW

The Best of Pottery

Selected by Jonathon Fairbanks

and Angela Fina

Rockport Publishers, Massachusetts

If you wam a pictorial feast then this is for you. In 139

full colour pages with three large pictures per page

there is something for every taste and technique.

Professor of Art, Salve Regina University, Newport, Rhode

Island, Jay Lacouture, states in the introduction 'It is a

snapshot of the state of pottety, taken in 1996 .. .1 believe

it is the first volume in the country to take such a

popularist approach to soliCiting and featuring such an

extensive, diverse collecion. This snapshot will serve as a

useful educational tool for students, teachers, collectors,

novices and professionals.'

The layout is simple. The divisions are Earthenware,

Porcelain and White Ware and Stoneware (and yes, some

Australian artists are included.)

This book wi ll certainly send you back into the studio

full of ideas. 00

Kiln Building by Ian

Gregory

Ceramics Handbook Series

Craftsman House, Sydney

KILN

BUILDING

IAN G REGORY

is a very practical handbook (as are the others

in this series including 'Soda Firing', 'Ceramics and

1:'i5

Print' and more).

The chapters cover 'Kiln planning', 'Choice of fuels',

'Kiln types and design considerations ', 'Materials,

'Construction methods and equipment', Xiln plans' and

'Experimental kilns'.

There arc many clear diagrams and drawing as well as

pictures of kilns being constructed and fired. This book

wa s not produced in Australia but the prin ciples

described are universal and so will help everyone

interested in kiln building.

Very much a practical guide, as the author says in the

Preface 'Porrery and kiln building go hand in hand and,

contrary to popular belief, it is not jllst a case of piling

bricks together, putting in a few pots, and hey presto!

Producing anything with one's hands needs thought,

care an applicarion. A feeling for standards and tradition

is essential and without it there is no point in continuing

the art of craft pottery or building of pottery kilns.

I am a working potter and have written about aspects

of kilns and firing learned from my own

experience ... after reading this book YOll will at least be

able 10 make a start.'

There are kilns for gas, for wood, for salt, for oil. Kilns

of brick and kilns of fib re. Once fire kiln and mu lti

chambered kilns. Even a very spectacular 'fire tree'! 00

BOlh available from McGiIIs Technical Bookstores, Brisbane and

Melbourne.

76 POTfERY tN AusTRALIA + ISSUE 3612 WINTER 1996


etters

'An Expert Touch'.

Derwent Valley Gazette Wed Oct 30 1974

I have just come across this old newspaper featuring Joan

Campbell and thought you might like it for your archives.

This workshop was held in my garden and was very

well attended by members of the Tasmanian Potters

Society and a group of about six prisoners from my oid

pottery class at the Hayes Prison Farm, complete with a

warder (he was the odd man out). We all had a splendid

time. I still have that pot and another Joan gave me.

She will be missed greatly not only for her skills bu t

also for her wannth and generosity.

Regards,

Lilia Weatherly,

Austins Ferry, Tasmania

GLAZEQUERY

I would like you to ple-dsc publish the following in the

next edition.

I would also like to take this opportunity to

congrawlate you and your staff on the quality of your

publication . I teach ceramics at a large Sydney High

School and we use your magazine extensively to provide

inspiration for ou r students and provide stimulus and

ideas needed to construct innovative programs.

Question: I use low firing earthenware clays and would

like to fmd a good, safe, dry glaze to usc on sculptural

pieces. Any suggestions'

Wendy Mortimer

36 Mepunga Street

Concord West 2138

ERRATUM

During 1994 and 1995 I was a ceramics student at Monash

UniverSity Frankston and was fortunate to have Chris

Myers and Paul Davis as teachers. Chris and Paul have

accumulated an amazing knowledge of ceramic glazes

and decorative techniques during their ceramic careers.

This knowledge was always generously passed onto us

as students.

In the article I wrote about sandblasting (Vol 35/4) I

carelessly omitted to mention that much of the

information was originally researched by Chris Myers at

Monash and generously passed onto students to try in

their studio work. Chris's enthUSiasm and expertise in

sandblasting was the initial inspiration for my attempts at

sandblasting and building sandblasting equipment.

Yours faithfully

Walter Mitchell

77 POTIERY IN AUSTRAUA + ISSUE 3514 SUMMER 1996

ISSUE 35n WINTER 1996 + f'onERy N AusTPAuA 77


e W S for Winter 1997

POTFEST Penrith '97

8th, 9th & 10th August

Over 200 Potters

From Great Britain, Belgium, Holland, France and

Germany wi ll be selling at the biggest potters market

ever held in the UK on Friday 8th, Saturday 9th and

Sunday 10th August at Skirsgill Mart, Penrith,

Cumbria Junction 40, M6 - Bar & Restaurant available.

OPENING TIMES: Friday lOam - 5pm, Saturday 12

noon - 5pm, Sunday lOam - 5pm

ADMISSION: adu lts $2.00, Senior Citizen s $1.50

Chi Idren free

For further information telephone Geoff Cox: 017684

83820

•••••••••••••••••••••••••

EXPRESSIONS OF INTEREST

Darebin Arts and Entertainment Centre Exhibition

Space is CUITeI1tIy seeking expressions of interest

from craftspeople wistWIg to exhibit in the Cenlre's

exhibition space in 1997. Presently there are a

...mer 01 places available. Contact Jane Guy: Tet

(03)94168933

Old Trea5UIY Building Tel1'~OIlIl y ExhiIition Space.

Two exhibition spaces are temporarily available.

SlDtiissiDlIS and enqufts to Janet Shelley Tet (03)

96512233

•••••••••••••••••••••••••

The Arts In Action Expo

THIS EXPO which attr acts thousands of

artists, students, art enthusiasts a nd

collectors every year - will be held at the

Royal Hall of Industries Sydney Showground,

Paddington on Saturday July 26 and Sunday

July 2710.00am - 5.00pm both days.

The expo w ill include hands-on

demonstrations i n painting w ith water

colours, oils, pastels and gouache, as well as

fold art, decoupage, ceramics, glass art, air

brushing pottery, jewellery- making and

sculpture conducted by professional artists.

Art and craft products w ill also be on sale at

special prices during the exhibition.

KEY COMPETENCIES

& ARTS EDUCATION

The National Affiliation of Arts Educators, together

with the Australian Council for Educational Research

has just completed a national report called "The

Mayer Key Competencies and Arts Education." The

report uses the voices of arts teachers and arts

industry to show how the key competencies can link

the world of school an d the world of work, and

shows how the key competencies may have a

generic function across the five arts areas of dance,

drama, music, media and visual arts. The report

also provides important insights into what meaning

the key competencies have in the arts field.

Th e report makes a significant contribution to

expanding our understanding of the role of the key

competencies in arts education and the ways in

which the arts contribute to the general education

of students and their preparation for employment.

Copies of the report are available from Pam

Richmond at the national Affiliation of Arts Educators

(06) 201 2248

• ••••••••••••••••••••••••

Experimental Firing Day with Steve Harrison -

Sunday July 20th g.30am-5pm

Join the Potters' Society of Australia at this unique

opportunity to experience a multitude of firing

techniques in the one day.

There will be fast wood firing, wood fired raku, pit

firing, woodblock kilns, paper clay kilns, sawdust.

gas rapid fire and more. Bling lOaf your pots along

(more depending on size) and enjoy the excitement

of flame, smoke, raku glazes and fuming with other

pyromaniacs.

The day will be held at the country studio of Steve

Harrison and Janine King in Balmoral Village just

outside Mittagong. This is a 'handS on' day for both

beginners and the more experienced. Numbers are

limited so everyone can enjoy the day. Bookings are

essential - call Sue or Christina on 02 9901 3353 for

bookings and more information.

78 POTIERY IN AUSTRALIA + ISSUE 36/2 WINTER 1997


PETER RUSHFORTH

Celebrating 50 years as a potter

A srall cfuplay oE 18 oE Mer lW1fort:h's p::ts will l:e

en display in t:re !tw=rluJse t1Jse.m Eran Ppril 21

mtil .:hly-luJ.,lst 19'J7 .

19'J7 rrarks Feter's 50th 're3r as a p:Jt:ter. If start:al.

his training at the Royal Mell:xJume Institute of

Technology in 1947-1948, then heade:i t:re ceramic

dpJ.rtnaJt at t:re NiticraJ. Arts S:h:ol at East 8;


New S for Winlel' 1997 · continued

ASIALINK VISUAL ARTS/CRAFTS RESIDENCIES

Asialink's Visual Arts/Crafts Residencies began in 1991 and to date have placed 33 people in eight countries for periods

of up to four months officially although many people have stayed longer.

The aim of this program is to enlarge the experience available to Australian artists in our own region, to enable a longer

tern involvement with the host country, and to encourage ongoing contacts between Australian and Asian artists.

The Residency Program is funded by the Ausrralian Council, the Australia-Korea Foundation, the Australia-India

Council, the Australia-Indonesia Institute and the NSW Ministry for the Arts.

Asialink works closely with the Australian Embassies and High Commissions in the region to organise the residencies.

TIley are a reference point as the artist is at the institute as an individual, with no 'official' Status as such, although the

local people in each country will often see the artist in that light.

Each residency offers as specific amount of funding and initial contacts in each place. It is then up to the individual to

make as much of the experience as possible. The interest of the artist in the host country and their adaptability is very

important. The arti t is expected to do their own work, and to partake in workshops and seminars, though not to teach

foonally. An exhibition is not essential, but is regarded as a good way to 'present' the artist to the local community. It

could be held early in the residency, including work brought from Australia, or at the end showing work made during

the reSidency. 111is could depend of course on the type of work made by the artist.

The residencies are open to all artists/craftspeople who would be eligible under normal Australian Council criteria:

baSically applicants must be Australian citizens or have permanent resident status in Australia; demonstrate a proven

record of profeSSional activity over at least three years; and not be students. The residencies are genera lly for four

months, with funding of $10-12,000 which goes towards return airfare, living expenses and an exhibition during the

period.

Applications close Friday 20th October 1997 for residencies in 1998-99. The applications will be considered and

shortlisted in November by the Asialink Visual Arts AdviSOry Committee, which includes representatives of the Visual

arts/Craft Fund, the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Asialink, curators, art schools and artists. Three people's

applicatiOns, slides and Cvs will be sent to each venue, which will make the fmal decision.

lnfomJation for applicants will be available at Asialink from July. Please contact: Visual Ans/Craft Residency Program

Asialink 107 Barry St Carlton Vic 3053 Tel: 03 - 9349 2010/ 1899

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

6th INTERNATIONAL POTTERS FESTIVAL

4,5,6 July Abel)'stwyth

Pottel)': A Spedator Sport?

Clay sculptures several meters tall, fired in.situ, large.scale pit firings, larger than life human

figures, a field of ceramic creatures: these are some of the impressive sights which can be

expected at this year's Intemational Potters Festival in Aberystwyth West Wales. Spectating

aside, festival goers will be encouraged to get their hands dirty as well!

Hundreds of people from all over the world will be coming to the Arts Centre in the sea·side

town of Aberystwyth to attend what has become one of the largest festivals of its kind in

Europe. Internationally renowned ceramic artists and potters have been invited to

demonstrate and talk about their work. The organisers, North and South Wales Potters

Associations and Aberystwyth Arts Centre, have worked hard to make this festival the most

spectacular and exciting yet.

Anyone wishing to attend the festival should contact Aberystwyth Arts Centre for a booking

form as soon as possible as places are limited: telephone 01970622882. Fax: 01970 622883

Further information on the festival, plus updates can be found on

www.ftech.net/-carrog/lpc.htm

80 POTTERY IN A USTRAlIA + ISSUE 3612 WINTER 1997


News Im-Wink "

997 · ,"n'",.W

NEW RIGHTS FOR AUSTRALIAN CREATORS

The Federal Government is about to introduce important new rights for artists, playwrights,

composers, choreographers and other creators.

On March 4 1997 the Minister for Communications and the Arts and the Attorney General announced

a Cabinet decision that Australia will meet its international obligations by introducing moral rights

for creators through an amendment to the Copyright Act 1968.

These rights will give creators a legal right to be identified as the author of their works and to

object to the derogatory treatment of their work which is prejudicial to their reputation.

Australian Copyright Council Legal Officer Virginia Morrision, said today that moral rights are very

important particularly now that digital technology has made it so easy to manipulate works. "The

introduction of moral rights for Australians is long overdue. Creators in many other countries have

had these rights for a long time." Ms Morrison said.

The Australian Copyright Council is conducting a series of national workshops to inform artists,

playwrights, choreographers and composers of their current rights and how to deal with them as

well as explaining the Government's proposed reforms. The Council is also holding workshops for

lawyers, teachers and librarians. Workshops will be held in Melbourne from Monday 19 May to

Friday 23 May.

For further information please contact Virginia Morrison or Jennifer Bell at the Australian Copyright

Council on (02)93181788 or fax (02)9698 3536

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

INTERNATIONAL WORKS ON PAPER FAIR

Thursday 17 to Sunday 20 July 1997

The Galleries, State Library of New South Wales, Macquarie Street, Sydney

Intemational and local galleries. fine art publishers and specialists in the quality works on paper will be exhibiting at the

intemational Works on Paper Fair at the State Library of NSW from 17 to 20 July. The Intemational Works on Paper Fair is

the only art fair held in Australia devoted to showcasing works of art on paper.

A visual feast is in store· with works ranging from contemporary and vintage photographs, lithographs, linocuts,

etchings, drawings, computer generated images, watercolours and original vintage posters . by leading Australian

and international artists.

Works on paper are an important part of an artists' oeuvre and the art of drawing brings one closest to the creative

spirit of the artist. Prints and drawings are works of art in their won right· not just adjuncts to painting. Ever since the

Renaissance artists have produced prints and drawings as autonomous works of art. The late 19th Century saw major

developments in printmaking technologies and techniques, while the late 20th Century has produced some of the

greatest works on paper by such artists as Picasso and Matisse. In the 1960's and 1070's artists like Andy Warhol

were making prints that had to be considered on an equal footing with paintings as major works of art.

The International Works on paper Fair offers the opportunity for the public and students to view some of the worlds

best examples of works on paper, under the one roof.

Visitors to the Fair will be able to view works on paper by renowned international artists including Picasso, Chagall,

Pissaro, Miro, Degas and Toulous Lautrec. Original posters by some of the world's masters in this field are coming

from the United States of America. Australian artists will be featured with works on paper by leading contemporary

and traditional artists.

A program of lectures and continuous demonstrations of printmaking techniques will run throughout the four days of

the fair.

ISSUE 36/2 WINTER 1997 + PoTTERY '" AusTlW..lo\ 81


CERAMICS

AND PRINT

GLAZES

---.. ,- --

GlAIIU 1!(ijIlQIES

I. The Au.str.Ilian rouer>' DirectO


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ISSUE 3611 AUTUMN 19'17 + Ponmv N AusrnAuA 83


36/2 booklets/back issues order form

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84 POTIERY IN A USTRALIA + ISSUE 36/1 AUTUMN 1997


STOCKISTS

. NSW Newcastle Potter Su~'lies Red Hill South 'ewsagency • WESTERN AUSTRALIA

Aldersons Arts & Cr.fIs 3 Arnolds La, WARA Ali Shoreham Rd, RED HILL Angus & Robertson Bookworld

64-68 Violet St, REVESBY SW Pottery Supplies Roundhouse Gallery 240 York St, ALBAJ\'Y

Art Gallery of NSW 90 Viaoria Rd, PARRAMATIA 112 Queens Pde, TRARALGON Art Ga llery of WA

Domain Rd, SYDNEY

Bookshop, PERTH

POllers' Needs

TI,e Arts Book Shop

Atun Art 67 Boyd St KELSO 1067 High St, ARMIDALE Cmfts Council of W A

36 Railway Pde

Penh City Railway Station,

Raglan Gallery

TIle'dtre An

BURWooD

PERTH

5-7 Raglan St, MANLY 20 julia St, PORTLAND

Back to Back Galleries

HewitL' An Bookshop

Southern Cross Pottery The Valley Gallery

57 Bull St, COOKS HILL

7 Mouat St, FREMANrLE

14 Caba CIs, BOAMBEE Cm Steels Creek & Valley Rds,

Bathurst Regional An Gallel)' YARRA GI.EN Fremantle Arts Centre Bookshop

BATHURST Stun Craft Centre 1 Finneny Sr, FREMANTLE

MITIAGONG

Vidorian Ceramics Group

Bellingen Newsagency

7 Blackwood St, Guildford Village POllers

83 Hyde St, BELLI 'GEN Syretts Newsagency

NORTH MELBOURNE 22 Meadow St, GUILDFORD

30-32 Otho St, INVERELL

Brookvale Hobby Ceramic Studio

Walker Cemmies

jacksons Cemmics

II/Powells Rd, BRooKVALE Old Bakery Gallery 55 Lusher Rd, CHOYDO 94 jersey St, jOLlMOI\'T

22 Rosenthal Ave, LANE COVE

Carpenters Newsagency

Warrnambool Potters Wheel Margaret River POItery

25 Wiloughby Rd, CROWS NEST

Tallaga nda POllery 74 Liebig St, WARRNAMBooL 91 Bu sell Hwy,

116 Wallace Sr, BRAJDWooD MARGARET RIVER

Cemmic 'rudy Group

The Art Shed Gallc>f)'

• QUEENSLAND

POIters Market

The Clay and Cmfr Gallery

TI,e Artery

7 'aas Rd, THARWA

18 Stockdale Rd, O'CON OR

217 1-73 Burelli St,

P.O. Box 343 WARWICK

WOLLONGONG

The POIrery Place

Australian Cmfrworks

Whitermn Park Pouery

104 Keir" St, WOLLONGO 'G

Clay TIlings Porters Gallery

Shop 20, Village Ln, CAIRNS Whiteman Park, Lord St,

Walker Cem mics

WHITEMAN

21 Oaks Ave, DEEWHY

98 Starkey St,

Claycmft SUflplies

• NORTHERN TERRITORY

Coachouse Gallery KILLARNEY HEIGHTS 29 O'Conne I Terrace,

Aussie POlZ

Shop 7, Cnr. Manning St &

BOWEN HILLS

2 Saunders St jI Gill

Seconu Ave, KINGSWOOn • ACT Claymates

• TASMANIA

Coolangana Cmft Centre Gallery

Canberra Potters Society 120 Parker St, MAROOCHYDORE

Crafts Council ACr

Ceramic 'i Studio

1180 Bolong Rd, via BERRY

1 Aspinal Sr, WATSON

Hidden Talem Srudio-Gallcry 13 Russell St, INVERMA Y

Design Plus Gallery

Shop 6, 141 Ingham Rd,

Garema Place Pouers

WEST END, TOWNSVILLE

Emrcpo! Art ProdudS

P.O. Box 657 QUEEN BEY AN

18 Garema PI, CAN BERRA CITY Centre for the Arts

~1cCabes

Designed and Made

Newsagency lIunter St, HOBART

National Art Gallery of Aus!. 7 Eight Ave, HOME HILL

88 Geor~ St,

Handmark Gallery

The Roc , SYDNEY

Bookshop. CANBERRA

Mamnoa Ponery Supplies 77 Salamanca PI,

The Fabled Bookshops

TI,e Art Shed 143 James St, TooWooMBA BATIERY POINT

54 T erania St, NORTH IJSMORE

7 aas Rd, TIIARWA

onh Queensland Porters

• U.S.A.

Gleebooks

Walker Cemmies Association, TOWNSVILLE Seattle POllery S'd,plies

131 Glebe Point Rd, GLEBE

289 Canbem Ave, FYSH\X~ CK

Pouery Supplies

35 South Stanfor , SEA mE

• VICTORIA

Gunned"h Bookshop

51 Casdemaine St, MI LTON • CANADA

Shop 1, Civic Mall,

Artisan Craft Books

Meat Market Craft Centre The POIt::,))' Place Scona POllery Supply & Clay

Conadilly St, GUNNE DAH

42 Courtney St, 171 Newel St, CAIRNS AIl Studio

8105-104 St, Edmonton,

Hilldav Industries NORTH MELBOURNE The Clay Shed ALBERTA

lOB Oakes Rd,

Bendigo Pottery Services 2/24 Hi-tech Drive

OLD TOO GABBlE

Midland Hwy, EPSOM

KUNDA PARK • NEW ZEALAND

Coastal Cemmies

~)hrieS ewsagency Clayworks Poner Supplies Queensland AIl Gallery 124 Rimu Rd,

11,e Corso, MANLY

6 johnson Cn, DANDENO G SOUTH BRISBANE PARAPARAUMU

Inner Ci~ Clayworkers

Dairing Gallery Queensland POllers Assoc, Cobdaft Supplies

Cnr St )o lns Rd & Darghan St,

321 Lennox 5t, RICHMOND 82 Brunswick St, 24 Essex St, CHRISTCH URCH

GLEBE

FORTIllJDE VALLEY

Distelfink Gallery

Sou th Street Gallery

janets An SuppliesP/L

1005 High St, ARMADALE • SOUTH AUSTRALIA 10 Nile St, NELSO

143 Victoria Ave,

Bamfurlong Fine Crafts

CHAl 'WooD Narional Gallery of Victoria 34 Main St, HAHNDORF • SINGAPORE

Bookshop, MELBOURNE

Southern Li~ht Trading

Keane Cer,unics

jam Faaory Craft & Design

3971 Debenham Rd, Northcote Pottery Services

71 Seng Po Rd,


Ad.'anc,ed Diploma, Diploma & Certificate Courses

Part Time Options , '1 ;t :0

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"

I

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Full and Part TIme Options

at your local TAFE College or Phone 02 9217 4299 Enquire at your localTAFE College or Phone 0292174299

Craftsite Australia

www.craftaus.com.au

Information and images of contemporary

Australian craft on Craft Australia's web site.


HIGH CLASS FACILITIES

Holmesglen Institute of TAFE's Ceramic Department

boasts excellent facilities, aiding students 10 develop their

skills. The Department houses its own ceramics testing

laboratory, student kilns and wheels.

Students are

supplied with all materials and firings at no extra

charge and are guaranteed a wheel for each dass.

The Institute ensures high quality education in ceramics

with students Iaught by Industry professionals.

Holmesglen is the only TAFE in VICtoria to olfer a

Certificate level four in Industrial Ceramics. The

InstiMe's PottOl)' Skills and Sales course is also unique

to Holmesglen.

HOLMESGLEN CERAMIC COURSES

• Basic Course in Ceramic Technclogy & Training Skills

• Ceramic Mouldmaking

• Certificate II in Clay & Ceramic Operations

• Certificate IV in Clay & Ceramics (Industrial Ceramics)

• Diploma of Arts (Ceramics)

Pottery Skills & Sales

For further infonnation call 9564 1579

Holmesglen Institute of TAFE, Batesford Road, Chadstone

Visit our web site: www.holmesglen.vlc.edu.au

Holmesglen helps its students strive for success.

Several of the Ceramtc courses allow students to

progress Into higher degree courses at

University. All graduates in 1996 who applied lor

entry into a university course were accepted. A

number of graduates have also successfully set up

their own ceramic businesses.

The InstHute also helps students gain exposure of

their worie, holding a yearty ceramic exhibition and

Chrislmas pottery sale.

Students are also given the opportunity to be Iaught

by world renowned potters. Artists such as Greg

Daly and Jeff Mincham have shared their

knowledge and experience with students in

workshops held at the Institute. To further their

knowledge students are also taken on Induslty and

artist visits where they have the opporiunity to view

potters in their own studiolwork environment. In the

past, students have visited the studios of well known

artiSts Barty Hayes and Ted Secombe.

Ceramic

Study

Group

Inc.

lor eve'Yone inlerested in pOllelY

Melll.bers enjoy monthly meetings . monthl y

newsletters · weckf'nd workshops . residential

pIing School . amlllal Poners Fair . en ellsivc

library of books, vi deos aJld slides

'I,Oj·till.!!... lIl' ht·111 flU IIII' rUllI"tli I. ill.t~ (lj

,',wI! nWlllh (1''\('('PI J)1·C · I·IIIIU'r - II·III·II.II·~

jrwlu ... h,·) ill Ih., \la .. un " Iw.lln', nllilcfiJl~

1.7U. \1.u'III..,ri.· l lIi\(·,· .. il~

esc Inc. PO Bo.\ 1528, MaC


The Ceramics Department has a long history

of training and educating many of Australia's

leading ceramic artists and educators.

Whilst the course recognises the

importance of tradition, its teaching

emphasis is innovative, and offers studio

based practice under the guidance and

tuition of recognised practicing artists,

augmented and supported by the study of

visual art theory, drawing and professional

practice.

The department offers excellent established

facilities and a range of part time and full

time courses.

Ceramic Courses

1998 - Full time and part time courses

available.

1997 - Mid year intake into all part time

courses.

Studio access and tuition for:

• Wheel and handbuilding

• Glaze research

• Mouldmaking and slipcasting

• Kiln firing.

FURTHER ENQUIRIES

PLEASE CONTACT

The National Art School

Ceramics Department

Bill Samuels & Merran Esson

Phone (02) 93398630

or (02) 93398631

Fax (02) 93398683.

89


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• Two \'ertical lower jigger &

jolley machines, with moulds

for large bread crock.

• Five Vento potters wheels.

• Four Stainless Steel extruders.

• Two trolley jacks.

• Auto spraying machine with 3

heads.

• Printing machine with screens

suitable for pon jugs.

• Pebbles for ball mill.

• Ware trolleys.

• Ceramic tile lined small

blunger.

• Large cast iron table and head

for jigger & jolley machine.

• Small Tetlow spray booth.

• Large quantity used kiln

shelves - various Si7,cS, '/4""

thick.

• Two large Johnson tile presses

suitable for garden edging tiles.

• Surplus corks and boxes

• Display units.

• Three industrial YBCUUm

cleaners - Nillisk & Karaehe.

• Drawing board.

• Two strapping machines.

• Drying cupboards.

• Sponging machine.

• : Large blow heater.

• Bag "ennicufilc.

• Sundry items.

90


Only the BEST

Electric top loaders

Ask about the new range

of electronjc Cress kjlns.

VENCO

PRODUCTS

Potters Wheels

Want a cone 10 ki ln but

only have single phase?

\\'e have the solution!

We also stock Pacifica

Potters Wheels, with the

famous magic pedal !

Call for details and price

information.

Ceramic raft

33 Denninup Way, Malaga WA 6062

Ph: 08 9249 9266 Fx: 0892499690

TWO DAY CERAMIC WORKSHOPS

TilE ART OF SURFACE DECOHATION

Roberta Mears will run a series of workshops covc.-illg design techniques from the 15th century

through to contemporary ecrulnic an,

WORKSHOPS WILL H THHOUCH MAY TO SEIYfEMBER F.VEHY

T UES DA Y/ WEDNESDAY-residential and non residem i,,1 ava il able.

Develop [md illl prove yom' sense of COJOlU' alld desigll • cOll fi dclI l'C in pai llriug an d drawing skills

• unj)lock your crf'at"ivity and develop your own stylr • create a ht'Hlitiflll alld original ceramic art work

• Oxides, undcrglazc, pencil, resists. glazes wi ll be explored 011 hand t h rowTI qualiry earthenware

m.d stoneware pieces that have bee II produced bv studio poll ers.

WORKSHOPS AHE DESIGNED TO GATER FOR Ar,L LEVELS OF SKfl L

NO EXPER1ENCE IS fECESSAHY AS T HE EMP HAS IS IS ON TilE ENJOYMENT OF THE

CHEATIVE PR OCESS.

Workshops wi ll {'over hanrlpressecl hali


HOT & STICKY [l~

Steve Harrison - KILN & CLAY TECHNOLOGY

C STOM DESIGNED AND BUILT:

KILNs • RI brick or fibre

B URNERS • LPG or natural gas

H OODS • custom built stainless steel

STAINLESS STEEL VL E SYSTEMS

KrLNS AVAILABLE IN KIT FORM

KIL S DESIGNED, PLANS DRAWN

V ENCO POTTERS WHEELS

'0 SPECIFICATIONS

V ENCO VACUUM PUG MILLS

KILN SHELVES • sillimanite or silicon carbide

DIGITAL PYROMETERS AN D THERMOCOUPLES

CREATIVE SOLUTIONS TO TECHNICAL PROBLEMS

Old School Balm.oral Village via Picton 2571

Telephone or facsimile • 043 393 479

NEVI RHEAI! NEW RHEAIE NEW RElEAIE NEW RHEAIE

G.A.N. TRADING Monulociu,elS 01

EX - CEL KILNS

THE GAS KILN SINCE 1979

8cr TO JOcr QR MADE 10 SUIT YOUR NEEDS.

AlL KILN BUILDING MATERIALS (BRICKS. FIBRE.

MORTAR. ANCHORS & BURNERS MADE TO ORDER)

THE AUSTRALIAN POTTERS' DIRECTORY

A fUll (OIOUR GUIDI TO (ONIIMPORUY (IRAMIC PRACTICE IN AUITRAIIA

FerJllling !he won 01

MORE THAN 130 AUSTRAUAH aRAMJm, om so GAIIlRl£S, SUPPIIRS

AND POTlIRS' GIlOUPS

The "",lid ,ria ... for

MAKERS AND IUYERS, (OUIOORS, CURATORS, GAWRIES, INTlRfOR

DESIGNERS. TOURISTS, TEACHERS AND STUDfHTS

RRP AUDS26.00 PLUS POSTAGE

&SO. WE SUPPLY CANE HANDLES ( FROM

S 2.90 RETAIL). POHERY TOOLS. KEG TAPS m.

SAVE ON BULK! CLUB ORDERS

MAIL ORDER SERVICE FOR WHOLESALE

AND RETAIL.

PHONE FOR FREE PRICE LIST

404 NASH RD Mis rl77. GYMP IE 4570

PH 07 5482 7283 FAX 07 5482 8302

ACN 010378757

for mort: infonnation and orders fax or mail

rilE I'OTJTRS' '>{lClFrY O J AU'rRALL\

PO Box 937 Crows Nest NSW 2065 Austr.dia

TELEPHONE +61 (0)2 990 J 3353 FAC-SIMJl£ +61 (0)29436 I68J

EMAIL potinaus@ozcmaiJ.com..au

92

NEW RHEAIE NEW RHEAIE /JEW RHEAIE flEVi RIlIAI!


CLAYWORKS

FINE QUAUTY FlLTERPRESSED CLAY BODIES

NEW PRODUCT

HIGH VOLUME LOW PRESSURE (HVLP)

SPRAY SYSTEMS

REDUCES OVERSPRA Y BY 80%

REDUCES GLAZE WASTAGE BY UP TO 65%

MAKING YOUR STUDIO A SAFER WORK ENVIRONMENT

RlNGFORFREEBROCHURE

HIGH TEMPERATURE GLAZE STAINS

1300c - BLOOD RED

1300c - TOMATO RED

PLASTER TURNING LATHE.

A recent addition to our range of aids for

mould and die making .Variable speed

control and tool rest. Also available are

various spindles and cups of different sizes

CLAYWORKS AUSTRALIA PTY LTD

6 JOHNSTON COURT DANDENONG 3175

PHONE (03) 9791 6749 FAX (03) 9792 4476

A.C.N. OO7005923

93


KEROSENE LAMP POTTERS SETS

WITH Ql!ALlTY

CZECH CHIMNEYS

SPECIALISTS IN

0 1 L LAMP BURN ERS

WICKS, CH IMNEYS

dllJ aLI " ther oil Lamp ,jupp/it"

STOC KI ST S OF

VGt\T CO~

! \

102 CRIMP

55.00 EA

103 VIENNA

$4.00 EA

105 VIENNA

54 .60 [A

303 PIX I

52.40 [ A

LAM P OIL

Trade t!1Il/llirieJ We/COUll

449 Elizabeth Street, Melbourne Victoria 3000, Australia

Telephone (03) 9329 7804

Facsim ile (03) 93294720

94


• Manufacturers and agents for the Northcot.e and

Bendigo Pottery clays and slips

• Stockists of the best range of Clayworks, Keanes, and

Feeneys clays

• Manufacturers of the Northcote Pottery range of

powdered and brush-on glazes for Raku, Earthenware,

Midfire and Stoneware temperatures

• Manufacturers of 30 bright, intermixable liquid

underglazes in 20ml to 5 litre sizes, earthenware and

stoneware underglaze crayons, underglaze stamping ink

for use with rubber stamps, and the new liquid

underglaze Scribbler Pens

• Stockists of a wide range of pottery equipment from

Cowley, Venco, Tetlow, Woodrow Industries, Talisman,

Giffin, Peco, Armstrong, Port-O-Kiln, and Seven Skills

• Offering the widest range of powdered colourants

(stains, underglazes and onglazes) from Cookson

Matthey, Feno Corp a nd Cerdec

• Dealing in all areas of pottery materials and equipment

supply

• Repairs and rental of electric wheels and slab rollers

• Utilise our firing facilities for large or small works

• Come browse through the Potter's Gallery ever changing

range of work by Victorian potters

• Tour our 100 year old factory manufacturing terracotta

gardenware

• Technical advice and consultants available

NORTH COTE POTTERY

85a Clyde Street, Thornbury, Victoria 3071

Phone: (03) 9484 4580 Fax: (03) 9480 3075

95


Claycraft

for

Materials and equipment for

craft potters, schools and potteri es

Stockists of

CESCO underg lazes and glazes

FERRO colours WARD kilns

VENCO Wheels and Pug Mills

Queensland agent for TALISMAN products

ClAYS

Feeneys, Bennetts, Clayworks, Cesco,

Keanes, Northcote, Walkers

Raw Materials, Oxides, Stains,

Corks, Clockmovements, Tools, Equipment,

Books and magazines, Lotion pumps,

Kero lamps, Oil burners

PLEASE REPEAT

MATERIAL FOR

" AUSTRALIAN

COMBUSTION SERVICES"

ISSUE 35/4 • PAGE 92

(See photocopy reference enclosed)

Claycraft Supplies Pty Ltd

29 O'Connell Tee, Bowen Hills, Brisbane

PO Box 1278, Fortitude Valley, QLO 4006

Telephone: (07) 3854 1515 Fax: (07) 3252 1941

[P®W[3~W

AL INSTITUTE OF TAFE

e:s. ()ipl,~ma of Arts (Ceramics) program

Pottery in 1998.

This innovative and exciting development

brings together education. training and industry.

96


ARTISAN CRAFT BOOKS

M eat Marke t Cra ft Centre- C nr Cou rtne y &:: B l a c kwoo d S tree t s , N o rth Melbourne.

Ph: (03) 9 3 2 9 6042 Fax : (03) 9 3 26 1054

T h e most

o f b ooks

Australia

~xten8Jve

on

range

Cralt. in

Exhibition

post c ards

catalogues

Ring f o r

I I. to

specific eu b Ject

Mail order ser vice -

Postal rates $6 . 50 for the

first book and S2 . 00 per

b o ok thereafter

All major cre d it carda

Opening hours lOam ·

Tue s day to Sunday ~

Publ i c Holidays

5pm

97


Clean Eflicield Gas Kilns

and FwILZLL£

+ Environmentally friendly.

+ Low density hot face insulating

brick. (Fibre Free)

+ Economical to operate.

+ Made in Australia.

+ One of Australias most

experienced kiln and furnace

manufacturers.

+ Australias largest range - 32

standard sizes - custom sizes on

request.

+ Over 30 years experience -

Established 1963.

+ Over 15.000 kilns and furnaces

now in use.

98


Hydraulic PII}IY.o::l,~A'!~nd

for Semi or Full

Lathes

tic Production

Banchi Apribili CT 75

Press far making window boxes, large

platters and d' hes, bowls. flat ware, etc.

Tomia Maxi 2002

Lathe for making large pots, vases of

unusual shape and more.

f associated equipment and engineering service for small

o want to upgrade their plant from manual to semi or

Iy automatic production .

• A full range of clays suitable for presses and

to correct hardness . • Clays for pug and casting available i!ltlter!'aj:6fta, s'lonp,>J;rArp,

and porcelain coloured to your specifications . • 3 2 rliftFp",ht valrreties

earthenware, stoneware, bone ch ina, vitreous china "nt1ot,nr,cpl",rNl,on

• All clays suitable for making your own slip (

Technical data, catalogues and price lists

3v.IIII-"'-••

Geddes Street, Mulgrave, Victoria

~~~~03 9561 9034, Mob: 0412

100


The Western Australian

School of Visual Arts'

ceramics department is

unique in that it offers

students a number of

pathways in the attainment

of a Visual Arts Degree.

Linked to course won< in

tracHtional studio ceramics

are opportunities to cross

fertilise and/ or combine

with sculpture. installation,

performance, music, and

time based art practices.

Students are encouraged to investigate traditional

and/ or non traditional foons of expression and are exposed

to a vast array of ideologies, technologies and processes.

For further details contact

Dr Paul Counsel

WA School of Visual Arts

2 Bradford Street MT LAWLEY 6050

Tel (OS) 9370 6586 Fax (OS) 93706147

Email p.counsel @cowan.edu.au

~PAPER

SOUTH WESTERN SYDNEY INSTITUTE OF TAFE

LIVERPOOL I CAMPBELLTOWN

COLLEGE

ART GAlliRIES f ROM AROUND THE

WORlD OffE RING THE BEST IN

NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL

WORKS ON PAPER

AT THE SIXTH INTERNATIONAL

ART fAIR IN SYDNEY

16·20 JULY, 1997

STATE UBRARY Of NEW SOUTH WALES

MACQUARIE STREET SYDNEY 200l

Ceramics '1


.. ~# \\1 I \

• .. ... ' II "'I .1 \ I I

5-DAY INTENSIVE GLAZE SCHOOL

7-1 1 July 1997

The Ceramics Workshop of the canberra School of Art

offers a limited number of places in a residential 5-day

intensive glaze workshop run as an adjunct 10 the

GlazelClaylKiln distance education program.

For further details and enrolment forms contact

TONY FLYNN

C5A Ceramics Workshop - ANU

PO Box B04 Canberra ACT 2601

Fax (06) 249 5722

;. J. I' ~,' ~ ~ > T ' '0' " ~,

""'-':1 ),"",1.-


Coolangatta Craft Centre

GALLERY

I 180 SOLONG RD VIA BERRY NSW

o Exhibitions by well known

poners

o Workshops throughout

the year

o Accomodation in self

contained cottage

or bed and breakfast

o RailCar Cafe

For detoils or information ring 044 487205

FOR HANDBUILT AND FUNCTIONAL POTTERY

clay things

z

I

~

21 Oaks Ave, DEE WHY

Phone: (021 9981 1596

Open 6 days

a co-operotive gallery owned by 16 local potters

selling original Australian handicraft

(;oa,-·hollse

Galle.ey

0-

Exhibiting finely ccarted ceramics.

Pottery supplies available.

o R

N G

i

~

Open lltouday to Friday 9wu to Spm

Saturday 98J1I to 1.30I'IU

Shop 7 lllanuing SLrei!t KiufYJwood

Telellhone 047 365 866

July lSth-Augus16th

Room , & 2 Ceramtcs by

Glen England & Marg Hombuckle

Room 3 Paintings by Jacqul Porter

Augusl 12th-September Jrd

Room 1 Panti~ by Mandy Hopkins

Room 2 Glass by Patridl Wong

Room 3 PaIn~ by Hem M ihal~

September 9th-OciOOer 1st

Room 1 Ceramics by Joy Van Dei' Hayden

Room 2 Ceramics by Anne Reilly

Room 3 Paintings by Vince Bettingeri

321 Lennox Street Richmond, Victoria, Australia 3121

Tetephone (03) 9429 3296

104

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