Dazzle | Issue 3

Ideaworks2

We sincerely hope you enjoy reading Dazzle, as we have worked hard to feature topics that we believe you will find interesting, informative and leave you walking away with new-found marketing inspiration. Some articles which might be of particular interest include:

• “Gen Z: The Generation You Need to Pay Attention to” (pg. 5)
• “Social Good: A Long-standing Commitment at Ideaworks (pg. 6)
• “Mixing it Up, Marketing Style” (pg. 10)
• A friendly peek into what’s happening at our agency with “Life @ 197” (pg. 17)
• And much more!

Please don’t hesitate to reach out to us with feedback, questions or if there is a topic you’d like covered in a future issue.

Issue 3

DECKED

OUT IN

SILVER

& GOLD

ADDYRECAP

p.18

SOCIAL

GOOD p.6

A LONGSTANDING

COMMITMENT

AT IDEAWORKS

MEET

GEN

Zp. 5

THE GENERATION

that is changing

THE FACE OF

MARKETING!

FIND THE RIGHT

MARKETING MIX

P. 10


contents

4 5 6

EDITOR’S LETTER

from Chelsey Tupper, director of

marketing communications

GEN Z

Taking a closer look at the

generation that is changing

the face of marketing

SOCIAL GOOD

A longstanding

commitment at Ideaworks

8 10 14

SUPPORTING A

LOCAL CHARITY

makes good business sense

MARKETING MIX

In order to make an impact,

you have to mix the right

tools together

17 18

LIFE @ 197

A behind-the-scenes

look at our team

THE REAL WORLD

Future marketing professionals

visit Ideaworks

19

DECKED OUT

STORYTELLING

IN SILVER & GOLD

A letter from our owner

We won three awards in 2016;

and CCO, Peter Steve

two were for this publication!


EDITORIAL

Editor-in-Chief Chelsey Tupper

Contributing Editor Alyssa Zekoski

Art Director Allison Simenkiewicz

Contributing Art Director Rachael Baratta

CONTACT US

Call Us: 570-609-5650

Email Us: info@ideaworks.marketing

Visit Our Website: ideaworks.marketing

FOLLOW US

@IdeaworksAgency

facebook.com/IdeaworksMarketing

@ideaworksmarketing

Ideaworks Marketing

COVER CREDITS

Featured Chelsey Tupper

Location Donna Hansbury’s Kitchen

Photographer Allison Simenkiewicz

DAZZLE: ISSUE THREE 3


FROM THE EDITOR

CHELSEY TUPPER, DIRECTOR OF MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS

A MILLENNIAL’S

PERSPECTIVE ON

GEN Z

EARLIER THIS YEAR,

I was fortunate to have the

opportunity to travel alongside

my boss, Donna Hansbury,

president and CEO of Ideaworks,

to Pensacola, FL, for a client

meeting. Donna and I were

asked by the client to put

together a presentation on how

to communicate with Gen Z –

the generation born between

1995/1996 and the early 2000s –

for the meeting’s attendees, since

this client’s target audience is

members of this generation. Not

only did this require me to do

my first client presentation ever,

and my first presentation since

graduating college nine years

ago, but it also required extensive

research. Donna and I needed

to get into the mindset of this

dynamic, intriguing generation

so we could fulfill the client’s

request. Throughout the research

process, I obviously learned a lot

about Gen Z, but I also realized

that I am extremely proud to be

a part of a generation that does

remember some of the “good old

days.”

The most mind-blowing fact

about Gen Z that stood out to

me is that Millennials, which

is my generation, those born

between 1982 and 1996, are

the last generation that will

remember life before the prolific

growth of technology. Gen Z’ers

are commonly referred to as

“tech-savvy,” but are you actually

“savvy” when the thing you are

savvy in is all you know? Therefore,

Gen Z’ers should actually be called

“tech dependent.” In the case

of Gen Z, they do not know life

without cell phones, the internet

(and the internet without dial-up),

iPods, laptops, etc. They do not

“Gen Z’ers should actually be

called ‘tech-dependent.’”

know a life that doesn’t include

immediate access to whatever

they want. When I pondered

this, it blew me away because

I remember my mother telling

me when I was in third grade

that this thing called the internet

would let me talk to people all

over the world. I remember when

my father brought home our

first computer, a Gateway 2000

desktop, and I thought it was the

coolest piece of technology we

had in the house. I also remember

writing reports in middle school

and needing to actually go to the

library to research.

It’s examples like these that make

me feel lucky to be a part of a

generation that didn’t always

rely on technology. This tidbit of

research made me realize just

how unique the Gen Z generation

is from all the others. It’s for

this reason that Gen Z’ers are

entirely different than anything

marketers have ever seen. As

a result, it’s imperative we, as

marketers, get into the minds of

this generation if we want to be

able to remain competitive in the

marketplace. However, no matter

if you’re trying to communicate

with Gen Z, Millennials, Gen Y or

Baby Boomers, it’s important to

fully understand what resonates

most so your message isn’t lost

4 DAZZLE: ISSUE THREE

* To help communicate with Gen Z, we’ve provided our top 10 insightful pieces of Gen Z research on the next page. Hopefully, this

information will get the ball rolling on ideas for how your organization can better relate and market to this generation, since

it will become 40% of the population in the next three years! Also, if you would like a copy of our Gen Z Insights brochure,

please email chelseyt@ideaworks.marketing.


ZThe Generation

You Need to Pay

Attention To

COVER FEATURE

By: Chelsey Tupper

Donna Hansbury,

president of Ideaworks,

and Chelsey Tupper,

director of marketing

communications, recently

traveled to Pensacola, FL,

to attend a client’s yearly

marketing meeting.

The client asked Donna and Chelsey

to do a presentation on how to

best communicate with Gen Z (the

generation after Millennials – born

between 1995/1996 and the early

2000s), since this group is the client’s

target audience. The presentation

went very well, and the attendees

walked away with valuable insight

on how to better interact with this

dynamic generation.

Since the presentation, Donna,

Chelsey, and the rest of the Ideaworks

team have worked with this client to

make its promotions, designs, and

activities more “Gen Z friendly,” and so

far, it has all been well-received.

Here are the

10 FACTS WE

FOUND MOST

INTERESTING

ABOUT GEN Z:

Gen Z’ers are extremely

good at multitasking,

as they are accustomed

to going between five

screens (desktop, laptop,

smartphone, tablet/handheld

gaming device and TV).

2

Seventy-one percent

of Gen Z’ers use more

than one social network

and are most active on

Snapchat and Instagram.

Most refer to Gen Z as

tech-savvy, but it is actually

more accurate to call them

tech-dependent since this

generation does not know

life without technology.

4

When you factor in the

purchasing influence

Gen Z has on its parents,

this generation has

about $44 billion in

buying power.

6

When advertising or

marketing to Gen Z, these

individuals respond best

to authenticity and

influencers – not celebrities.

Gen Z’ers are socially aware

and care deeply about

social good. This generation

enjoys volunteering and likes

to see brands actively involved

with 8social issues and activism.

Gen Z’ers are comfortable

and conversant with a range

of different cultures, races and

ethnicities.

When it comes to food,

30% of Gen Z’ers claimed

to be more willing to pay

for healthy and premium

food products.

In

10

terms of eating habits, Gen Z’ers

prefer organic/natural foods, breakfast

foods like eggs and proteins that

require more cooking time than cold

cereal, robust salad bars, fresh-cut

veggies and made-to-order options.

This generation also enjoys food as an

experience, and as such, ethnic spices/

sauces and unique foods are appealing.

Gen Z’ers do not want their avenues of communication to be flooded with

lots of text. Instead, this generation is made up of highly visual consumers

that crave eye-catching content. This is because Gen Z’ers are so well-versed in

communicating with symbols and emoji.


SOCIAL

A LONGSTANDING COMMITMENT AT IDEAWORKS

GOOD

By: Alyssa Zekoski

& Chelsey Tupper

EARLIER THIS MONTH, OUR DIRECTOR OF MARKETING

COMMUNICATIONS, CHELSEY TUPPER, ATTENDED THE

2017 MCON CONFERENCE,

HELD AT THE NEWSEUM IN WASHINGTON, D.C.

THIS ANNUAL CONFERENCE sparked her interest, as it

is designed for individuals who are dedicated to social good

and societal change, and who want to hear from some of the

most notable thought leaders on cause-related marketing and

activists who feel passionately about their work. Much of what

was discussed included ways to attract more Millennials to

show support and interest in a particular cause by using creative

branding strategies and other well-thought-out marketing

tactics that resonate well with this generation.

During the conference, Chelsey heard from a number of

accomplished speakers who drove home a vital point:

Through its work, a business must personify its very

roots and reasons for doing – put plainly, each day,

employees should reflect their company’s core beliefs.

In addition to the #GivingTuesday Townhall, during which she

learned about assimilating charitable efforts in your business

practices annually, this central message from MCON resonated

for Chelsey, who would return home to continue breathing life

into Ideaworks’ own philanthropic initiatives with the entire team

– a practice that Ideaworks has been committed to for over 20

years, as one of our foundational values is service to others.

This dedication is shown

by our unwavering

commitment to local

organizations like Blue

Chip Farms Animal

Refuge. Blue Chip Farms,

located in Dallas, PA, is a

non-profit, no-kill animal

shelter that provides

care, comfort and a

loving home to every

animal that is brought to

its safe haven, regardless

of health impairments

or age. Being animal

lovers, Ideaworks’ owners

Peter and Judy Steve elected Blue Chip as our charity of choice

in 2015. Since then, we have gone on to provide a wide range

of marketing support to Blue Chip at no cost, helping its team

spearhead some of its most valuable initiatives like Adopt-A-

Kennel, Legacy of Love and the newest sponsorship program,

Kitty Condos. Working with Blue Chip continues to be one of

our company highlights, but this has not been a solitary effort.

We continue to reflect upon our core beliefs and participate in

various cause-related initiatives.


COVER FEATURE

In March and April of this year, our team participated in

the Back Mountain Chamber’s Spring Food Drive, donating

non-perishable items to the Back Mountain Food Bank. Giving

back to the community and providing healthy, nutrient-rich

meals to families is an effort we are committed to in our work,

as some of our largest clients are proponents of healthy living,

clean environments and optimal quality of life.

In June, Ideaworks was fully committed to raising awareness

for various causes and helping individuals in the process. We

“went purple” for Alzheimer’s and other dementias, being that

June is National Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month. Our

team enthusiastically involved themselves in this project by

changing our email signatures from black to purple text, the

recognized color of the Alzheimer’s Association, and including

a call to action to “#ENDALZ” in the sign off. We also scheduled

a day to wear purple and heightened awareness for this

worthy cause on social media.

Also in June, we had the opportunity to team up with the

Greater Wilkes-Barre Association for the Blind. We hosted a

high school student in the Association’s Transition Assistance

Program, who expressed an interest in becoming a graphic

designer and photographer in the future. She learned a lot

while job shadowing our creative designers and also enjoyed

lunch with our team where she was able to hear more about

what differentiates us as an agency. We are proud of this

young girl and know she will continue to grow in her craft in

the years to come.

At Ideaworks, we firmly believe that, day in and day out, you

should be communicating what your business is truly about,

and acting as a spokesperson for those values that your

company holds dear. While raising awareness during National

Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month, choosing Blue Chip

Farms as our “charity of choice” and partaking in other local

initiatives have been excellent opportunities for us to get

involved, they will certainly not be the last. As put by Christina

Tosi (award-winning owner of Milk Bar Bakery with locations

in New York, Washington, D.C., Las Vegas and Toronto), who

offered insights to her MCON audience, “It’s easy to support

things when you believe in them.”

DAZZLE: ISSUE THREE 7


Supporting

a Local

Charity

Makes

Good

Business

SENSE

IT’S NOT UNUSUAL for a business to support the

community in which it’s located, and where its employees

and associates live and work. As such, most companies

will make a donation to a local charity, support a

community organization during the holidays or hold an

office fundraiser in support of a deserving cause. All these

activities are very admirable indeed. However, what if a

business decided to support a local charity by doing more

than these efforts? By taking their commitment to their

community one step further and offering their professional

services to a local charity at no cost? This is exactly what our

team decided to do in support of Blue Chip Farm Animal

Refuge – a no-kill animal shelter located in Dallas, PA.

The Ideaworks and Blue Chip partnership kicked off in

November 2015 when Ideaworks relocated to its new

office in Wyoming from Plymouth, PA. At the open house,

Ideaworks’ owners Peter and Judy Steve decided to make

a $500 donation to Blue Chip in honor of Ideaworks’ grand

opening and in recognition of the great work Blue Chip

does in the area. During the event, Judy learned more

about the organization’s need for marketing support from

Cordie Braun, Blue Chip’s fundraising director. After that, as

they say, the rest is history.

By: Chelsey Tupper

8 DAZZLE: ISSUE THREE


The entire Ideaworks team got on board to support Blue Chip

and the much-needed work the organization does to provide

care, comfort and safety to all animals, including finding

many of them forever homes. Since the relationship started,

Ideaworks has provided Blue Chip with full marketing support,

including the development and implementation of a new

brand identity, an updated website with new content, a full

program of e-mail and media marketing outreach, as well as

the creation of ancillary collateral and signage to support the

organization’s fundraising efforts. Ideaworks also provides

social media support through artwork creation and campaign

management, including the launch of Blue Chip’s three primary

campaigns: Adopt-a-Kennel, Legacy of Love and Kitty Condos.

According to Judy Steve, Ideaworks’ owner, “The relationship

with Blue Chip has been fantastic. Not only are they

appreciative of the support we

provide, but they go out of their

way to promote our agency and

the great work we do. On top of

that, our entire team is thrilled

to be supporting

such a deserving

organization like

Blue Chip.”

Steve went on to add that the relationship with Blue Chip

not only benefits the charity but has also resulted in many

benefits for Ideaworks, as well.

THESE BENEFITS INCLUDE:

• Ideaworks’ recognition within the community for supporting

such a deserving organization, something that is of

particular importance to today’s younger generations

• Increased employee morale within the agency for being a

part of a company that cares

• Team building within Ideaworks, bringing everyone together

to work on initiatives that make the community better

• Connecting Ideaworks with other community businesses

and leaders (many who might, in turn, do business with

the agency)

• Gaining exposure for Ideaworks to generate new

business leads

While local charities are always appreciative of any help and

assistance a business offers, perhaps now is the right time

to rethink your social responsibility approach and search for

new opportunities that will not only positively impact your

community but your business and employees, as well.

TIPS ON SELECTING

AND WORKING WITH

A LOCAL CHARITY

Photo by KAE Imagery

SELECT A CHARITY:

• Deserving of your support – an organization that will value

your assistance beyond adding to their fundraising efforts.

• Your entire organization can get behind – involve your

employees right from the start.

• That will promote your business, too – explain that this is

a partnership for mutual success.

• Important to your community – most legitimate charities

are deserving, but those closer to home generate more

community interest and involvement.

• You can support 100% as promised – live up to your

promise and be prepared to treat the charity like you would

any other business client.

DAZZLE: ISSUE THREE 9


COVER FEATURE

Mixing

it UP,

Marketing

Style

10 DAZZLE: ISSUE THREE


Newspapers, radio, television, billboards, websites,

email, direct mail, the internet, Facebook, Twitter…

So many channels, so little time! And you can only stretch your budget so far.

Here are four steps you can take to create a recipe for success every time.


Establish

A Budget

74%

of internet users

perform local

searches and of

this percentage,

82%

of local searchers

follow-up offline via

an in-store visit.

Incorporating a budget doesn’t

mean stressing about limitations;

rather, it’s about exploring

possibilities. Working within

financial boundaries challenges

you to be more thoughtful

about how you’re spending your

marketing dollars. By employing

a more streamlined, targeted

approach, you can reach prospects

that are already considering the

service or product you provide,

but haven’t decided just where

to get it from yet. This is where

search engine marketing (SEM)

could come into play. Searching

on websites like Google and Bing

is the most popular medium for

locating information. In fact, 74%

of internet users perform local

searches and of this percentage,

82% of local searchers follow-up

offline via an in-store visit, phone

call or purchase. SEM is also very

cost-effective compared to other

marketing mediums, so it’s worth

considering on a smaller budget.

What are your goals?

Who is your audience?

how can you reach them?

Sources

1 (TMP / comScore)

2 (https://nuancedmedia.com/3-benefits-of-search-engine-marketing-for-business/)

3 (Source:Emarketer 2012)


Know

Your Target

It all boils down to knowing

your customer. Warm up to your

target market’s demographics,

psychographics and lifestyle.

Geography, income, ethnicity,

gender, and age are key factors that

impact buying decisions and habits.

It’s especially helpful with digital

marketing, where being in the right

place at the right time has become

less about serendipity and more

about strategy. Take Facebook, for

example, where 29.7% of users are

age 25 to 34. This is the prime target

demographic for many businesses’

marketing efforts. If it’s part of

yours, then Facebook is where

you need to be.

Choosing the

right Social media

platform For

your business

Be

Consistent

The key ingredient in your marketing

mix is to create brand recognition,

and that involves creating compelling

content. While it’s nice to add some

spice to your messaging, you want

to make sure that everything blends

together well, and that one piece

doesn’t overpower another. That

means using the same themes and

messaging across all platforms in

your marketing mix, as implementing

multiple tactics keeps you top-ofmind.

Prospects viewing an ad,

web page, direct mail piece, or

even a video from a well-integrated

campaign should receive a consistent

flavor from your messaging, with each

element of the mix complementing

and reinforcing the others.

Measure

Your Success

What are you hoping to

accomplish? Measure your marketing

efforts against your business goal.

If it’s brand awareness, track your

social media posts. If it’s attracting

more visitors to your website, try

using Google Analytics. If it’s sales,

take a look at how many leads were

generated during your direct mail

or e-blast campaign. Useful tools

like Constant Contact, Hubspot and

Marketo make it easy to follow each

customer’s journey, starting with the

first visit to your website. Take the time

to monitor your progress so you’ll be

able to amplify what’s working and

adjust what’s not.

Still not sure

how to

mix it up?

We can add the secret sauce

to your marketing plan.

Contact us at 570.609.5650

or email at

info@ideaworks.marketing.com

Demographic

1.3+ Billion Users

Ages 25-54

60% Female

1.3+ Billion Users

Ages 18-29

200 Million Users

Ages 18-29

1 Billion Users

All Ages

70 Million Users

Ages 18-35

80% Female

600 Million Users

Ages 30-49

Purpose

Building

Relationships

News & Articles;

Conversation

Building Relationships;

Conversation

“How To...” Videos;

Stream Music Videos

Scrapbooking;

Life Planning

News & Articles;

Conversation

Best For

Building

Brand Loyalty

Public Relations

Lead Generation;

Retail, Art, Food,

Entertainment &

Beauty Businesses

Brand Awareness;

Service Industry

Lead Generation;

Clothing,

Art & Food Business

Business

Development;

B2B Businesses

Downside

Limited Reach

140 Characters

Or Less

Images Only

Resource Intensive

Images Only;

Very Specific

Demographic

Limited

Interactions


Checking out

at ideaworks

By guest writer: Rachel Urbanowicz

14 DAZZLE: ISSUE THREE


I TAUGHT a senior communications “special topics” course at

Misericordia last fall: Powerful, Persuasive Marketing Design.

In this class, we tackled the task of transforming a client need,

such as, “we’d like a new logo and website,” into a reality that doesn’t

just “get it done,” but instead, goes above and beyond in terms of

expressing that client’s personality and unique offering

for their market.

Having experienced this exact kind of work firsthand during my

time at Ideaworks, I knew it was an ideal place for these students

to visit and learn more about. While I was employed by Ideaworks, I

worked with clients as they told me their ideas, and they would send

me documents and information to help populate the marketing

pieces the Ideaworks team would create. Sometimes, there was so

much information that it was difficult to choose the most important

content to focus on; other times, more material was needed,

requiring additional, persistent and tactful client communication to

get to the key message — the “big idea” of the piece.

Officially, my job was to handle these tasks on my own, but just

as often, I had help from others on the Ideaworks team who had

more, and different kinds of experience with the client base: Peter

Steve, Donna Hansbury, Carrie Gregory, Kelly Alansky, Patty Pugh

and Sue Cunningham. Each one of these individuals, at one time or

another, made the difference between having to pester the client

with additional questions, or worse, making a mistake — and getting

it right the first time. In other words, they saved me. And more

importantly, we gave the client the most bang for their buck by

collaborating and bringing forth our best work.

“I never would

have guessed that

a small agency

in Wyoming,

Pennsylvania,

would have

national clients,”

mused Matt

Scanlon, a student

at Misericordia

University, after his

visit to Ideaworks

Marketing.

Which brings me to the importance of a good team. I was extremely

fortunate that my marketing design class was composed of a small,

powerhouse group of individuals with strong experience and

complimentary talents.

SOUND A LITTLE LIKE

IDEAWORKS?

The parallels are interesting: we had our writer, our videographer,

our designers and our web expert. Sometimes more than one

description could apply to the given person.

Acting as a small marketing firm, our class took on a service learning

client at the beginning of the semester (Reaching Beyond Limits in

Kingston, Pennsylvania). Our challenge, which we met, was to create

their new logo, website, video and printed marketing collateral — all

in 15 weeks.

As I write, I recall that 15 weeks isn’t an unusual turnaround

expectation for a hefty client project; some might even say it’s

generous. Deadlines can be aggressive, and in the Department

of Mass Communications and Design at Misericordia, we are

committed to giving the students an experience as close to the “real

world” as possible. In addition to classwork and internships, this

includes industry site visits whenever feasible. Ideaworks presented

a perfect place to visit for our class. Fortunately for us, when I made

the request, they generously agreed.

Rachel Urbanowicz, M.A., is in her second

year as an assistant professor in the Department of

Mass Communications and Design at Misericordia

University, teaching courses in graphic design,

website design and public relations. She also

advises the student club, Service by Design,

which provides graphics and PR services to nonprofits

in Luzerne County. Prior to Misericordia,

Rachel worked as communications director at

Ideaworks; previously, she has done marketing

communications design work for clients in Silicon

Valley, Chicago, Minneapolis and New York.


“Getting to sit down and experience, one-to-one, all the

work they do from their own perspective was a great

opportunity,” said Melanie Quintanilla, one of the student

visitors. She added, “I like their open floor plan; it reminds

me of the Mac Lab at school, where we can just turn to

someone and ask them a question.”

“Or give them a task to do,” joked Matt Scanlon, noting

Quintanilla’s ability to manage projects. She is the web

editor-in-chief of the Misericordia student newspaper,

The Highlander.

Matt Gromala, the journalist of the group, stated,

“Ideaworks was really interesting, and an awesome place

to see. I was especially interested in their work with the

Hollywood Bowl, since I write a lot about music.”

Everyone in the group enjoyed the aesthetic of the big,

vintage, refurbished home as an office space. “It was

definitely unexpected,” said Quintanilla, “and really cute.

It’s like their home.”

In a coincidence that drove home the overlapping of

academic and professional worlds, students Christa Porasky

and Erin Dougherty ended up joining members of the

Ideaworks team at the American Advertising Federation

of Northeast Pennsylvania event, “Cropped,” later that

same evening! They had a great time collaborating on yet

another successful, fast-tracked project, a perfect way to

end the day for these student and professional marketing

design superstars.

Getting

to sit

down and

experience,

one-to-one,

all the work

they do from

their own

perspective

was a great

opportunity.

16 DAZZLE: ISSUE THREE


Kelly Alansky, one of our

graphic designers, celebrated

a graduation this year! Her son

Porter graduated pre-school.

Patty Pugh, a 20+ year veteran of Ideaworks Marketing, was

recently promoted to vice president of creative & operations

according to an announcement by Donna Hansbury, president

& CEO. In her new role, Pugh will be responsible for all aspects

of Ideaworks’ creative initiatives and design execution, as

well as the overall operational workflow of the agency. In

commenting on the appointment, Peter Steve, owner &

CCO stated, “There is no better person than Patty for this

very important role within our agency. She understands our

business, our commitment to our clients and is a tremendous

graphic designer in her own right. I’m proud to have Patty on

our team.” Pugh resides in Plains, PA, with her husband Eddie

and their three children, Madison, Jordan and Cooper.

Sue Cunningham,

our administrative

assistant, and her

children, Mikey

and Miley, went

strawberry picking

on a nice weekend

in June. Sue made

a great strawberry

jam and brought it

into the office

to share!

Alyssa Zekoski is new to our team,

joining Ideaworks in April as our marketing

communications manager. She graduated

summa cum laude from Misericordia University

in 2015 where she received the Misericordia

Excellence in English and Excellence in

Secondary Education awards, respectively.

Alyssa has past work experience as a web

content editor and long-term substitute English

teacher. She is getting married next summer,

and recently got her engagement photos taken

at Island Beach State Park in New Jersey.

In May, after a long six months

on the campaign trail, Chelsey

Tupper’s husband Brian won

the primary election to be

the next Magisterial District

Judge of the Back Mountain,

the community in which

they reside. Brian is poised to

succeed his father, who has

held the position for the past

24 years. Chelsey was Brian’s

campaign marketing chair and

his biggest supporter.

Allison Simenkiewicz,

one of our graphic

designers, took her

sister, Alanah, to the

Harpursville Zoo for her

15 th birthday. Alanah was

able to feed April the

giraffe and see her baby.

Originally from the U.K,

Abigail Ludden, our

newest graphic designer,

has come to call NEPA her

home with her husband

and cat. She loves

typography and creating

new brand identities. Abby

is excited for her new role at

our company and is looking

forward to the many

amazing projects ahead!

Patty Pugh, our VP of creative

and operations, and her family

celebrated two big milestones

in June! Her daughter, Madison,

who was born the year

Ideaworks was established,

graduated with honors from

James M. Coughlin High School.

Her son, Cooper, graduated

from Pre-K and is super excited

to start kindergarten in the fall!

The Ideaworks team recently

loaded up our donations for

the Back Mountain Chamber’s

Annual Food Drive, which

benefitted the Back Mountain

Food Pantry. Our team loves

to help the community in

any way we can!

Philip Barket joined our team

as art director this July. Hailing

from Pottsville, PA, he has been

working in NEPA as a graphic

designer and art director for over

16 years. In his spare time, Philip

enjoys collecting toys and action

figures, sipping whiskey and

smoking fine cigars.

Bob Lynn is our friendly 197 neighbor

who is always willing to lend a helping

hand to the Ideaworks team! We appreciate

all that he does for us, and we sincerely

thank him for his kindness and generosity.

DAZZLE: DAZZLE ISSUE FALL THREE 2016 179


COVER FEATURE

DECKED OUT IN

SILVER

& GOLD

18 DAZZLE: ISSUE THREE

AS THE OLD ADAGE GOES, HARD WORK PAYS OFF!

We were enthralled to find that we had won a

gold award at the AAF Northeastern Pennsylvania’s

ADDY Awards, held in Scranton earlier this year.

Which publication of ours landed us the honor? You

might’ve guessed it – this one! Our last issue of Dazzle

was chosen for the gold in the Advertising Industry

Self-Promotion Online/Interactive category. The

winning publication included a number of Ideaworkscreated

infographics, a quiz and our feature story,

“Challenging Goliath: How small brands can challenge

industry giants.” Dazzle is a true group effort, with

every member of the Ideaworks team contributing to

its success. We were delighted to accept this ADDY

Award during a lively night filled with networking,

camaraderie and of course, creative celebration!

OUR TALENTED TEAM also took home a silver award

at the ADDY Awards in the Digital Publication category.

We received the honor for our design of Pulse, VIVE

Health & Fitness’ monthly magazine. VIVE, one of our

local clients from Kingston, PA, is a premier fitness

club in northeastern Pennsylvania. Pulse features

monthly highlights, exclusive interviews with trainers,

management, staff and members, recipes, health and

wellness tips and the like – all carefully crafted and

artfully designed to form a clean, visually-appealing

piece for VIVE members to enjoy each month. It’s

always a pleasure to collaborate with our local clients

on a regular basis, and it’s even better when our

collaboration fuels award-winning publications!

DAZZLE

ALSO WON

JUDGE’S CHOICE!


STORYTELLING

PETER STEVE, OWNER & CCO

STORYTELLING:

MAKING AN EMOTIONAL CONNECTION

WITH YOUR AUDIENCE

STORYTELLING HAS BEEN

around forever, with the earliest

example being a series of cave

paintings depicting a variety

of animals and one image of a

human being dated to 15,000 to

13,000 B.C.

From these humble beginnings,

storytelling has progressed from

the likes of Aesop’s fables to

Shakespeare’s plays to those of

the late Steve Jobs, who was

most recently known as the

world’s best storyteller.

Storytelling is uniquely woven

into the fabric of our lives. It

helps us assimilate and process

information, pass on our history

from generation to generation

and provide a framework for

how we experience the world.

Without storytelling, there would

be no movies, no television and

no literature.

In business, storytelling has

experienced a rebirth of sorts,

playing a crucial role in how brands

and organizations communicate

with their target audiences.

When done correctly, storytelling

enables a brand or organization

to engage its audience and

influence them to take the

desired action.

Think about some of today’s

biggest and most successful

brands — they all tell amazing

stories. For example, Apple tells

stories of people challenging the

norms, Nike tells stories of people

doing the impossible and GE tells

stories of technology improving

daily life.

While there is far more that

goes into effective business

storytelling than simply spinning

a good yarn, all good business

storytellers share a number of

qualities they make their stories

engaging and memorable.

As marketing Guru Seth Godin

stated, “Marketing is the art of

telling a story that resonates

with your audience and then

spreads.” I hope this article serves

as your prompt to create a brand

or organizational story that

moves your audience to action

and ultimately leads to success.

Following are a few of those

qualities that you can use in

creating your own brand or

organization’s story:

1. Give your stories a human face; work to make it personal

for your audience.

2. Create your story as if you are a color commentator, not

a play-by-play announcer.

3. Engage your audience with meaningful examples and characters.

4. Craft your story building upon one of the five timeless story

themes (Hero’s Quest, Creation Stories, Stories of Transformation,

Fall & Redemption and Myth of the Crossroads).

5. Entertain your audience and let your story reveal something

about themselves.

6. Keep your message simple. Complexity is your enemy.

7. Understand your audience’s “aspired self,” the way they see

themselves rather than how they actually are.

If you would like to learn more about storytelling in business, contact

us for a copy of our presentation titled “Storytelling: Making an

Emotional Connection with Your Audience.”

DAZZLE: ISSUE THREE 19


Brand ID (Brand Intelligent Design) is easy-to-use software that

allows you to customize marketing materials and resources without

compromising your company’s identity. Colors, logos and fonts remain

consistent, keeping your brand standards in check across your entire

organization. This “one-stop shop” houses an online library of templatebased

marketing support materials. From brochures, sell sheets, and

menus, to postcards, letters and emails, Brand ID can help your company

cut costs, save time and maximize results!

Call Ideaworks Marketing today for a FREE demonstration,

570-609-5650 or email info@ideaworks.marketing.

CUSTOMIZE

MATERIALS

SAVE TIME

AND MONEY

PROTECT

YOUR BRAND

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