Jan.- Feb. 2009 - OUTDOORS

outdoorspp.homestead.com

Jan.- Feb. 2009 - OUTDOORS

January-February 2009 OUTDOORS

1

dedicated to outdoor recreation in Colorado

OUTDOORS

Take a Break from the Slopes:

Try Alternative Snow Activities

PLUS:

Winter Mountain Biking at

Lake Pueblo State Park

Winter Trails Day 2009

Heli Skiing

... AND MORE!

Your Adventure Begins Here

january-february 2009

free!


2

OUTDOORS January-February 2009

TRY iT!

Special Delivery to the Slopes of Your Dreams: Heli Skiing

By Deb Acord

Call it the evolution of your skiing

transportation. You began on a

Poma lift, eventually mastering the

way you held on as the cable pulled you

up the hill. You graduated to a chairlift,

not an easy skill to master but still an

effective way to get up the mountain.

You hopped onto a gondola whenever

one was available, and occasionally,

you hitched a ride on a snowcat that

transported you to magical stretches of

untouched powder.

But then, you tried something that

made all other forms of ski transportation

seem positively pedestrian. You

splurged on a ride on a helicopter.

“Splurge” is the best way to describe

helicopter skiing (commonly called heli

skiing). It’s pricey, but those who have

experienced the luxury of a chartered

flight to some of the country’s highest,

most pristine terrain say it’s worth the

expense, even if you only go once in

your lifetime.

Helicopter skiing operations can be

found throughout North and South

America, but there’s only one company

in Colorado. Telluride Helitrax has been

transporting skiers to remote locations

in the San Juan Mountains since 1982.

Skiers and snowboarders who are Helitrax

customers have

250 square miles of

Where to catch a ride on a helicopter:

Telluride Helitrax in Telluride, Colorado; www.helitrax.net

Diamond Peaks Heli Ski Adventures in Utah’s Wasatch Mountains; www.diamondpeaks.com

Sun Valley Heli Ski Guides in Sun Valley, Idaho; www.sunvalleyheliski.com

High Mountain Heli Skiing in the Tetons in Wyoming; www.heliskijackson.com

Wasatch Powderbird Guides in Utah; www.powderbird.com

North Cascade Heli Skiing in northeastern Washington; www.heli-ski.com

Heli Skiing FAQs

mountain terrain for their playground,

with each run dropping 1,000 to 2,500

feet. a

1. What is heli skiing? Helicopter-assisted skiing and snowboarding.

2. What are typical costs and what do they cover? Costs vary according

to the package. One-day trips start around $750 at some operations; Helitrax’s

one-day cost is $1,350 and includes a guide, lunch and snacks, drinks,

sunscreen, use of an avalanche beacon, powder skis and ski poles, or snowboard.

Custom packages can run up to $6,000 for a privately chartered trip.

3. What is a typical day? Six runs are typical at Helitrax, with each run

dropping 1,000 to 2,500 feet. Helitrax skiing is all above 10,000 feet, so skiers

and boarders should be reasonably fit and able to function at that altitude. Adventurous

intermediates, advanced and experts can ski the San Juan terrain.

Other operations in the West don’t have the altitude offered by the San Juans,

and some are open to less-experienced skiers and boarders.

4. Do you need to jump out of the helicopter? Only if you’re being

filmed by Warren Miller’s crew. Heli ski companies land their helicopters so

skiers and boarders can get off safely.

5. What areas of the world are best known for heli skiing? Heli skiing

is offered throughout the world, even in the Himalayas (www.himachal.com).

In the Lower 48, heli-ski operations are found in Wyoming, Idaho, Utah, Colorado,

California, Washington, Montana, and Nevada.

6. What about avalanches? All skiers and snowboarders should be aware

of avalanche danger. Guides are trained in avalanche safety. At Helitrax, each

person is given an avalanche beacon.

7. Is it safe? Yes, if you follow the directions given by the helicopter pilot

and your guide on the mountain. Terrain is chosen daily by the helicopter pilot

and guides based on the weather and snow conditions.

8. Do you need insurance? It’s not mandatory, but some people purchase

travel insurance in the event of a trip cancellation.

9. Can you use your own skis or snowboard? Yes, if they are powder-specific.

Many heli-ski operations (including Helitrax) include rentals in

the total cost.

10. Can skiers and snowboarders be in the same group? Yes.

Sources: Telluride Helitrax, Diamond Peaks Heli Ski Adventures, and North

Cascade Heli Skiing.


January-February 2009 OUTDOORS

3

FEATURES

Publishers & editors:

Julie Raber • John Vasilakis

Copy editor:

Helen Macdonald

Graphic Designer:

K. Ramey Newell - KeenGraphics.net

TABLE of cOnTEnTS

WInTer sPOrTs

Embrace the Colorado Winter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

mOunTaIn bIkInG

Winter Mountain Biking at Lake Pueblo State Park ...................8

DiSTRiBUTiOn LOcATiOnS

OUTDOORS, based in Colorado Springs, is the largest outdoor recreation

publication in Colorado, distributed to 540 locations in the following cities:

Alamosa

Breckenridge

Buena Vista

Burlington

Cañon City

Colorado Springs

Cortez

Cripple Creek

Dinosaur

Divide

Durango

Estes Park

Falcon

Fountain

Fruita

Ft. Collins

Glenwood Springs

Gunnison/Crested Butte

Julesburg

La Junta

Lake George

Lamar

Leadville

Manitou Springs

Monarch

Montrose

Monument

OUTDOORS staff

Contributing Writers:

Deb Acord • Theresa Ludwick

ad Designers:

Carol Bradford • Patrick Contreras

Stephen Minor

Copyright 2006-2009 by Outdoors LLC. All rights reserved. No portion of Outdoors,

including advertising, editorial features, artwork, articles, columns or photography,

may be reproduced in whole or in part without written permission of the publisher.

OUTDOORS LLc

2 N. Cascade Avenue, Suite 1100

Colorado Springs, CO 80903

(719) 590-4104 Fax: (719) 325-7008

E-mail: office@OutdoorsLLC.com

www.OutdoorsLLC.com

Peyton

Pueblo

Pueblo West

Red Rocks

Salida

Telluride

Trinidad

Westcliffe

Woodland Park

To get more information regarding specific distribution locations, please visit our

website at: www.OutdoorsLLC.com and click on "Distribution."

cOLUmnS

Try IT!

Heli Skiing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

OuTDOOr famIly fun

Ice-Skating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

frIenDs Of The OuTDOOrs

El Paso County Parks’ Naturalist Docent Organization ................9

be safe OuT There!

Protect Yourself from Snowboarding Injuries ........................10

CalenDar Of evenTs ...........................................12

ThInk Green

Rethinking Bottled Water ...........................................14

gO THERE! Colorado Destinations

estes Park .........................................................6

salida .............................................................7

leadville ..........................................................10

Telluride & Durango . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

Gunnison-Crested butte ..........................................15


4

By Deb Acord

According to the Merriam-Webster

dictionary, “alternative” means

“different from the usual or

conventional.” Apply that definition to a

snowy day in Colorado, and “alternative”

can mean activities that take you away

from the lifts and trails of your favorite

ski resort for the day.

One of the best things about Colorado’s

winter is the number of ways you can

embrace the cold:

• clutching the sides of a sled or toboggan

as you rocket down a steep hill;



clipped into a pair of long, skinny cross-

country skis or a pair of snowshoes,

exploring a trail deep in the woods;

settled behind a team of dogs or snuggled

in a horse-drawn sleigh;

• laced into a pair of ice skates, gliding

across a glassy pond;

• tethered to a kite, your skis or snowboard

lifting off the ground at the whim

of the wind.

To experience all that winter in Colorado

has to offer, check out these activities:

breckenridge/keystone/frisco/Dillon

Catch a ride on a sleigh with Two Below

Zero. This company offers a memorable

sleigh ride culminating in an old-fashioned

dinner experience or a hot cocoa treat in

addition to family-oriented entertainment.

Trips depart from the Frisco Nordic Center.

Cost for dinner sleigh rides: $84 for adults,

$55 for children, free for children 3 and under.

Cost for hot cocoa sleigh rides: $55 for

OUTDOORS January-February 2009

Embrace the Colorado Winter… In OH So Many Ways!

adults, $45 for children, free for children 3

and under. For more information, go to

www.dinnersleighrides.com or call (800)

571-6853 or (970) 453-1520.

Try your skills at cross-country skiing

and snowshoeing on the trails at the Breckenridge

and Frisco Nordic centers. Both centers

have rental gear and feature groomed

and ungroomed trails. For more information,

go to www.breckenridgenordic.com

or call (970) 453-6855. The Gold Run Nordic

Center also has lessons, clinics, and rentals.

Go to www.townofbreckenridge.com (click

on Recreation, then Nordic Skiing) or call

(970) 547-7889. At Keystone, check out the

Keystone Nordic Center in the White River

National Forest; http://keystone.snow.com/

info/winter.nordic.asp, (970) 496-4275.

Tour on a snowmobile or dog sled.

Explore the backcountry on a machine or

behind a team of sled dogs. Good Times

Adventures offer several snowmobile

options (with no cost for children 5 and

under and discounted rates for passengers):

a short trip, $75 (children 6–8, $20);

a classic trip to the Continental Divide on

the Georgia Pass, $100 (children 6–8, $20),

and a three-hour extended trip, $150 (children

6–8, $30). Want dog power instead

of horsepower? Choose a six-mile relay

tour through the Middle Fork of the Swan

River. $70 for adults, $35 for children 8 and

under (not recommended for children 3

and younger). For more information, go

to www.snowmobilecolorado.com or call

(970) 453-7604.

Fly a kite, on your skis or snowboard.

Harness the wind and you might never

go back to traditional skiing or boarding.

You can learn to snow kite on Lake

Dillon with the pros from Colorado Kite

Force. $249 for a four-hour lesson; private

lessons are $75 per hour or $40 for

a half-hour. Demos, rentals, and gear

available at the company’s headquarters,

located at 12 Fawn Court, Silverthorne.

www.coloradokiteforce.com, (970) 485-3300.

Go sledding at Carter Park (south end of

High Street, next to Breckenridge Elementary

School). Free.

Spin on ice skates at Stephen C. West

Ice Arena, 0189 Boreas Pass Road. $6 for

adults, $5 for ages 17 and under and 60

and older. www.townofbreckenridge.com

(click on Recreation), (970) 547-9974.

monarch/salida

Try a snowmobile tour in and around

the historic areas of Garfield and the

Monarch Ski Area. Rent a snowmobile

from Monarch Tours and explore on your

own, or take a guided tour. Rentals: $75

for one hour, $105 for two hours, $130

for three hours, and $180 for six hours.

Guided tours: $55 single rider, $80 double

(scenic tour); $85 for experienced riders

(high adventure tour); $120 for halfday

tour; or $175 for all day with lunch.

www.snowmobilemonarch.com, (719)

539-2572.

Explore Old Monarch Pass or other trails

in the San Isabel National Forest on snowshoes

or cross-country skis. Explore parts

continued on next page u


January-February 2009 OUTDOORS

5

embraCe The COlOraDO WInTer

t continued from previous page

of the Colorado Trail that passes through

this area (go to www.coloradotrail.org for

information).

Soak in a hot springs. The Salida Hot

Springs features Colorado’s largest indoor

hot-springs pool and an additional

lane pool. $11 for adults, $5 for children

6–17, and $3 for children five and under.

www.salidarec.com, (719) 539-6738.

Crested butte/Gunnison

See Crested Butte’s historic highlights

from a horse-drawn limousine pulled by

Dan, a Percheron draft horse from Fantasy

Ranch Outfitters. $15 for adults, $10 for

children 12 and under. Want to rough it?

The ranch also offers winter trail rides—

$50 per person, $60 with ground transportation.

www.fantasyranchoutfitters.com,

(970) 349-5425.

Explore the area on cross-country skis

or snowshoes. The Crested Butte Nordic

Center features 50K of groomed trails, as

well as guided backcountry tours. Rentals

and instruction are also available. 620

2nd St., Crested Butte; www.cbnordic.org,

(970) 349-1707.

Slide, glide, and sled. The Crested Butte

Nordic Center rents saucers and sleds for $5 a

day and also features an outdoor ice-skating

rink (rentals available at $9 for adults and $7

for children or seniors). You can also skate at

the Big Mine Ice Rink in Crested Butte.

Call out the dogs. Lucky Cat Dog Farm

in Gunnison offers sled dog tours. $180 for

adults, $165 for children under 12. www.

OUTDOOR FAmiLY FUn

Ice-Skating:

Hot Chocolate Dreams and Ice Capades Wishes

By Theresa Ludwick

Winter is the time for hot chocolate

and homemade versions of

Currier & Ives paintings: bundled

up ice-skaters with colorful scarves flying

in the breeze, children skating dizzying

circles around their parents, family pets flitting

around the frozen scene; laughter, pink

cheeks, and the sheer joy of frivolity.

No community is a true “community”

without a place to lace up (or Velcro if you

must) a pair of skates and join with others

in a winter pastime that has endured for

centuries. Though outdoor ice-skating on

a real pond is the only way to go for some,

others prefer indoor skating. Whatever

your partiality, there are plenty of places

to skate here in Colorado and plenty of

reasons to try it if you never have. No

need to be a Christopher Bowman or a

Michelle Kwan, although Ice Capades

wishes are certainly welcome.

Ice-skating has been around for a long

time and its earliest mention was by English

monk William FitzStephen in the Middle

Ages, when the moors in Finsbury and

Moorfield froze over: “Some of the children

have attached bones to their

ankles… They fly across the

ice like birds, or well-fired

arrows.” While bones have

been replaced by stainless

steel, ice-skating is

still a sport not only children,

but the whole family, can

learn and enjoy together.

If you’ve got time

and a working sense of

balance, you’re well on

your way.

Of course, first you’ll

need ice skates. In

most cases, skates can

be rented at public rinks fairly inexpensively,

but don’t rule out buying them if you plan

to skate often. Either way, you’ll want durable

yet flexible skates that are going to be

kind to your feet. When fitting your skates,

be sure to wear comfortable socks and lace

the skates firmly but not overly tight. Once

they’re on, stand up and check the position

of your toes, which should not be touching

Indoor and Outdoor Ice-Skating Venues

Indoor Rinks

Mark Sertich Ice Center, Colorado Springs, 719-385-5983

Colorado Springs World Arena and Ice Hall, Colorado Springs, 719-477-2150

Honnen Ice Arena, Colorado Springs, 719-389-6157

Colorado Sports Center, Monument, 719-487-8572

Pueblo Plaza Ice Arena, Pueblo, 719-553-2732

Stephen C. West Ice Arena, Breckenridge, 970-547-9974

Outdoor Rinks

Crested Butte Nordic Center, Crested Butte, 719-349-0974

Maggie Pond Ice Rink, Breckenridge, 970-547-5726

West Lake at Copper Mountain, 866-841-2481

Keystone Resort, Keystone, 800-354-4386

Gazebo Lake, Green Mountain Falls (no number available)

luckycatdogfarm.com, (970) 641-1636.

Hut it. The Adaptive Sports Center

sponsors ski and snowshoe trips to a

backcountry hut. $200 a day/night for

each of a minimum of two participants,

including a 24-hour guide, food, fuel, and

lodging (total cost depends on length of trip).

www.adaptivesports.org, (866) 349-2296.

ski Cooper/leadville

Throw in a line. Twin Lakes and

Turquoise Lake are known for their icefishing

opportunities. Turquoise holds

rainbow, brown, cutthroat, and lake trout;

Twin Lakes are noted for large lake trout and

also have rainbow, brown, and cutthroat.

Turquoise is four miles west of Leadville;

Twin Lakes are 17 miles north of Buena

Vista, then six miles west on Colorado

Highway 82. For more information, check

the end of the skate boot. Your heels should

have some horizontal moving room, while

vertical looseness indicates a bad fit.

Before skating, dress in warm, loose

layers of clothing, preferably of material

that will wick off dampness and perspiration

(your children will thank you). Even

if you plan to skate indoors, ice is ice, and

the temperature will be on the cool side.

Dress accordingly in gloves or mittens and

a hat. Helmets are recommended too, especially

for small children and beginners.

A bicycle helmet will suffice. In addition,

wrist guards and knee pads are helpful for

those inevitable beginner falls. Speaking

of small children, taking into account the

child’s physical stamina, coordination, and

attention span, three years of age is not

too young to begin, accompanied by supervision,

of course. Learn-to-skate classes

abound at public skating rinks. Depending

on the number of classes (usually about 6),

the duration of classes (generally 30 minutes),

and skate rentals, lessons can cost

between $50 and $65.

Once you’re all buttoned and laced up,

you’re ready to look for the perfect ice-

with the Colorado Division of Wildlife,

http://wildlife.state.co.us.

Explore the Mineral Belt Trail, an

11.6-mile paved trail that winds through

the historic Leadville Mining District

on the outskirts of Leadville. A favorite

of cyclists in the summer, this trail is

perfect for cross-country skiing and

snowshoeing in the winter. For a map,

go to www.mineralbelttrail.com.

Cross-country ski, fine-dining style.

Head to the Tennessee Pass Nordic Center

(at the base of Ski Cooper) and ski or snowshoe

a one-mile trail to the Tennessee Pass

Cookhouse, a yurt high atop Tennessee

Pass, where you’ll be served a gourmet

meal (reservations required—$75

per person). www.tennesseepass.com,

(719) 486-8114. a

There are plenty of places to skate

here in Colorado and plenty of

reasons to try it if you never have.

skating venue. Outdoor skating makes for a

classic and nostalgic experience and some

prefer it for its natural qualities as well. On

a brisk, sunny day, there is little to compare

with the feeling of a lazy, unhurried skim

across a pond’s frozen expanse and perhaps

a bonfire on the shore with marshmallowroasting

friends. In places like Holland and

Sweden, lake and canal skating are big with

the winter populace.

Indoor skating, on the other hand, has

its advantages. A consistent temperature

means consistent ice conditions; no “thin

ice” warnings or concerns, and rink size

is often more accommodating to larger

numbers of skaters. Depending on the facility,

indoor-skating programs may include

practice areas, family-skating sessions, iceskating

parties, or refreshment bars on

the sidelines.

I’ll bet it wasn’t long before Brother

FitzStephen—after witnessing those adolescents

on bones—snuck away from

his monastery and flew “like a well-fired

arrow” across the ancient moors himself

(though perhaps with a pillow bound to

his posterior). a


6

WINTER TRAILS DAY 2009

Winter Trails is an event where

children and adults can try

snowshoeing and/or crosscountry

skiing FREE at more than one

hundred locations in the U.S. and Canada.

Winter Trails, now in its fourteenth

year, offers entire families or groups of

friends—regardless of age—an opportunity

to get outside in the winter and

enjoy a day on the snow. Both snowshoeing

and cross-country skiing provide

an excellent form of exercise and a

chance to enjoy nature with a minimal

This quaint mountain village is

home to a community who enjoy

the great outdoors; no matter the season.

Folks who have hiked the numerous trails

(355 miles) in Rocky Mountain National

Park during the height of the season, pack

away their summer gear and bring out

the snowshoes since wintertime offers its

own natural beauty.

The people who live here enjoy sharing

their favorite remote spots with visitors.

There are numerous outfitter stores offering

equipment sales, rentals, and guided

backcountry snowshoe treks; whether it is

for a few hours, all day, or overnight.

During the summer hundreds of people

can be seen on the trails in the park—and

oftentimes one has to hike for hours to

find themselves alone among the tall

pines and shimmering glacier lakes. But

as the snow begins to pile up, wintertime

solitude is found within the first hour of

a snowshoe trek. Imagine standing alone

or with a small group of friends in the

middle of a snow-covered glacier lake

surrounded by glistening forests and

majestic rugged mountain peaks. The

quiet serenity boggles the mind.

to modest learning curve.

The size and scope of Winter Trails

events vary from location to location.

All provide the necessary equipment

and assistance and many include short

nature hikes and other activities.

Go to www.wintertrails.org for more

information on Winter Trails Day 2009.

Provided is a list of Winter Trails event

sites in Colorado. All of these events will

take place on Saturday, January 10 with

the exception of Estes Park, which will be

on Saturday, February 14. a

Estes Park

One memorable snowshoe trek is from

the Glacier Gorge Trailhead—an easy 10mile

drive from Estes Park. The moderate

2.4 -mile trail to Mills Lake is well traveled;

passes the frozen cascades of Alberta Falls,

with spectacular views of Longs Peak, and

the Keyboard of the Winds—jagged rock

spiral formations carved over thousands of

years. Mills Lake is considered by many to

be one of the prettiest lakes in the park and

is dotted with sun-drenched rock grottos

to enjoy a picnic lunch. The trail continues

another two miles into the backcountry,

becomes less traveled, and more scenic

as it winds around rock formations, and

traverses a snow-covered meadow that

opens to dramatic views of the rock cliffs

that surround Black Lake.

For more information about snowshoeing

in the Estes Park area, call 800-44-ESTES (800-

443-7837) or visit EstesParkCVB.com. a

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OUTDOORS January-February 2009

Durango

The Perfect Winter Escape…

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1900 Fall River Road, Estes Park, CO 80517 - 970.586.0910 - 800.238.0910 - www.boulderbrook.com

Durango

bear Creek nature Center,

Colorado springs

January 10, 10 a.m.–1 p.m.

245 Bear Creek Road, Colorado

Springs

719-520-6388

paulamegorden@elpasoco.com

www.elpasocountyparks.com

Glacier basin, rocky mtn. nat'l

Park, estes Park

February 14, 10 a.m.–3 p.m.

970-586-4431

staff@estesparkresort.com

www.estesparkresort.com

high Trail sports, frisco

January 10, 8 a.m.–7 p.m.

1121 Dillon Dam Road, Frisco

970-668-3748

beth@highroadcorp.com

www.hightrailsports.com

gO THERE!

Crested Butte

Gunnison

Crested Butte

Gunnison

Buena Vista

Buena Vista

Estes Park

Estes Park

keystone nordic Center,

keystone

January 10, 1 p.m.–4 p.m.

Elk Run Street, Keystone

970-496-4275

jhlavaty@vailresorts.com

www.keystoneresort.com

reI, echo lake

January 10, 10 a.m.–3 p.m.

303-756-3100

denverreservations@rei.com

www.rei.com/stores

steamboat ski Touring Center,

steamboat springs

January 10, 1 p.m.–5 p.m.

970-879-8180

xcski@nordicski.net

www.nordicski.net

Woodland Park

Manitou Springs

Old Colorado City

Woodland Park

Manitou Springs

Old Colorado City

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January-February 2009 OUTDOORSWoodland

Park

7

Salida

Chaffee County

Chaffee County is located in central

Colorado, the heart of the Colorado

Rockies. As “Colorado’s Headwaters

of Adventure”—it stars the small

towns of Buena Vista, Salida, Poncha

Springs, as well as the Monarch Ski &

Snowboard Area.

Folks drawn here enjoy the welcome

contrasts OTDYmh_8thAd.pdf to the state's more 10/20/08 glamorous 14:50:10

destination resorts. You don't need the

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gO THERE!

Crested Butte

Gunnison

Buena Vista

trendiest clothes or newest equipment to

fit in with the locals. However, if you do

have a thirst for adventure there are more

than one hundred miles of Arkansas River

and its tributaries to raft, fish, float, or

Durango

kayak in. Fifteen of the states fifty-three

14,000 foot peaks touch the sky here in

the Sawatch Range.

In spring, summer, fall, and winter,

Chaffee County is a mecca for the out-

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C

Manitou Springs

Old Colorado City

door enthusiast. Visitors can choose

from recreational activities such as hiking,

biking, ATVing, kayaking, whitewater

rafting, fly-fishing, camping, horseback

riding, swimming, tennis and

golfing. Winter-sports fans can enjoy

skiing and snowboarding at Monarch

Mountain, snowmobiling, cross-country

skiing, snowshoeing, and ice fishing.

Year-round visitors in the “banana belt”

OTDHldyXprss_8thAd.pdf 10/20/08 14:53:34

7400 US HWY 50W Salida, Colorado 81201

can enjoy distinctive restaurants, unique

shops, incredible art galleries and a large

selection of antique shops in the historic

towns of Salida and Buena Vista. Lodging

options range from motels to rustic

inns, bed-and-breakfasts, hostels, beautiful

campsites to guest ranches.

For more information and a complimentary

brochure, visit

www.ColoradoHeadwaters.com. a

La Junta

Guest Amenities Include:

� complimentary hot breakfast bar

� free high speed wireless internet

� discounted lift tickets for our guests

� indoor pool & hot tub

719-539-8500

toll free 866-823-8753


8

By Theresa Ludwick

During the winter months in some

parts of the United States, donning

your thermals and hopping on a

mountain bike is out of the question unless

you want to be found in the spring

thaw—with your hands frozen to the bars

and a delirious smile frozen to your face.

In Colorado’s higher elevations that can

happen too, although the smile may go

deeper than the dimples on your cheeks.

While some higher-elevation resorts and

parks accommodate mountain bikers in

wintertime, as snow on snow piles up, trail

after trail closes down.

Nevertheless, as most Colorado mountain

bikers know, the arrival of Old Man

Winter is no reason to put away your bike

here, with recent winters being warmer

than in the past. In fact, the "Old Man" is

probably out on his Trek right now, zipping

down a chute or scaling a ladder

somewhere in the white wilderness. And

why not, when Colorado has some of the

best and prettiest topography around for

mountain bike enthusiasts?

While trails at higher elevations become

increasingly inaccessible as snow

OUTDOORS January-February 2009

Winter Mountain Biking is a Scream at Lake Pueblo State Park

�������

������������

falls and frosty winds make moan, Lake

Pueblo State Park boasts a system of trails

that are user-friendly even in the deep of

winter. The area’s lower elevation (4,690

feet) and winter temperatures that range

between 30 and 60 degrees Fahrenheit

leaves many trail options available whether

you are just starting out or you've been

pedaling for many years.

Lake Pueblo State Park was established

in 1975 and is located west of Pueblo off

Highway 96. It is comprised of 13,691 acres

and there are four recreation/campground

areas that surround the man-made Pueblo

Reservoir. About a million and a half visitors

a year (mostly in summer) make use

of the park’s numerous amenities, which

include boating, camping, hiking, fishing,

and horseback riding. In winter, the park’s

18 miles of dirt, shale, and paved trails entice

mountain bikers itching for dips and

climbs or just a long, spread-out ride amid

beautiful scenery and views of the Green

and Wet mountain ranges to the east and

Pikes Peak to the north. Most of these trails

can be accessed at the Arkansas Point

Campground near the reservoir’s south

shore and offer varying degrees of technical

difficulty.

Novices might try the smoother trails

with names like The Duke and Voodoo,

while seasoned riders may prefer the more

challenging terrain of Rock Canyon, Key

Hole, or Dead Dog, where you’ll find lots of

drop-offs and “rock gardens.” For veteran

mountain biker 48-year-old Paul Mead of

Colorado Springs the park’s Lower Dog is

a favorite. “It starts off with a ladder and

drops into some challenging rock slabs,”

he says, and is “a kick-butt fun ride!”

Mead has been riding his whole life,

though he started seriously about ten

years ago. While lacking in much vertical

terrain, the trails at Lake Pueblo State Park,

he says, still provide thrills. “There are no

long, grueling challenges, but there are

lots of fun drops, ramps, ladders, rocky

chutes, and tricky sections that will keep

you entertained.” Distance-wise, trails at

the park range from the small but stimulating

Quick Draw (hence the name) to

the Voodoo Loop, at 9.7 miles. The trails

are maintained by volunteers: bikers who

know what makes for a good traverse, and

more are always in development.

It doesn’t take much to winterize your

bike if it’s too painful to park it in the basement

for months or see it hanging in the

garage like the carcass of a dead moose.

A little loving care will ensure that your

velocipede is well protected from the elements

and kept in good running order.

continued on next page u


January-February 2009 OUTDOORS

9

WInTer mOunTaIn bIkInG

t continued from previous page

The best thing you can do is lubricate all

components with synthetic chain oil and

wipe your bike down after trips to protect

it from water, road salt, and debris.

For snow riding, you will want to underinflate

skinny tires for better traction,

though you’re better off investing in

fat ones, especially if the snow is more

than about a half an inch deep. The

FRiEnDS OF THE OUTDOORS

El Paso County Parks’ Naturalist Docent Organization

We will connect people to their

natural and cultural resources

and inspire them to become

stewards for our parks and the environment!

This vision took shape in 1977

with the establishment of the El Paso

County Parks’ Naturalist Docent Organization

(NDO). This vision continues

to be the focus of the NDO’s 31-year

partnership with El Paso County at Bear

Creek and Fountain Creek nature centers.

A “docent” is someone that shares

their personal knowledge and experience

as a visiting teacher. The naturalist

docents, after extensive training by

nature center staff, volunteer at both

nature centers and help visitors connect

with the outdoors.

more Than a field Trip

Ask your neighbor about the nature

centers and their likely response is, “I

remember going there on a field trip…”

Providing this opportunity to thousands

of school children each year has been a

major role the docents have engaged

in at Bear Creek and Fountain Creek nature

centers. The educational programs

provided to schools incorporate the

Colorado State Standards and include

science, math, language arts, history,

and physical education. A field trip to

the nature center is often a child’s first

introduction to the outdoors and can

really committed winter rider—read

“hardcore”—would probably purchase

something like the wide-tired Pugsley

(made by Surly), specially made for

winter conditions as well as sand, mud,

rocks, and roots. In addition, you might

think about getting fenders to avoid the

Pepé le Pew look. With the decreased

visibility of winter riding, it might be

wise to light your bike as well.

Waterproof yourself, too, by wearing

breathable layers that will wick off

shape their perceptions for a lifetime. A

child’s uncertainty of the outdoors is a

learned behavior. Many of the children

on the field trips have spent little time

outside their neighborhood or school

yard. We provide a positive outdoor experience

that can start a child’s lifetime

of enjoyment in the outdoors.

affordable local Tourism

More families are staying closer

to home during vacations. Although

the nature centers have thousands of

visitors from across the country every

year, both centers provide an affordable

and nearby place for local citizens

to visit. Bear Creek Nature Center

is just minutes from downtown

Colorado Springs, while Fountain

Creek Nature Center is a short drive

from Fountain and Colorado Springs.

The nature centers provide a window

into the local environment. Hands-on

displays, including an observation

beehive, microscopes, binoculars to

view the wildlife, and many other interactive

exhibits, await every visitor.

Several miles of scenic hiking trails

wind along creeks and around ponds

offering outdoor experiences around

each bend.

Programs for everyone

The El Paso County nature centers

offer programs open to individuals,

moisture and can be added or removed

depending on the temperature (avoid

cotton, which traps moisture rather than

dispersing it). Good riding pants and fullfinger

biking gloves are essential—“with a

tighter fit than ski gloves, for working levers,”

says Mead. And though bikers without

brains often forego head protection,

the ones with brains keep them intact with

sturdy helmets.

As with any other Colorado state park, a

park pass must be purchased before using

families, and groups. Check out the website,

www.elpasocountyparks.com, to

explore the variety of program choices.

Each program is designed to connect the

visitor to the outdoors. The professional

nature center staff offers educational and

recreational programs including a children’s

series for three- to six-year-olds

and their parents. Special events include

a kite festival at Fountain Creek Nature

Center and Big Bear Day at Bear Creek

Nature Center. Local artists of all levels

participate in annual art shows. The centers

also host a variety of guest speakers

the trails. You can choose between a daily

pass or an annual pass. Visit www.parks.

state.co.us for more information.

Snow is no reason in Colorado to stable

your two-wheeled steed. Not when Lake

Pueblo State Park’s 18 miles of trails are

open and waiting for someone just like you

to lay down tracks and maybe make a few

unintentional snow angels in the process.

For more information on Lake Pueblo

State Park, go to:

http://parks.state.co.us/parks/lakepueblo. a

that may bring live snakes to teach about

the rattlesnakes or share the best places

to go fly-fishing in the Pikes Peak region.

join us and make a Difference

The Naturalist Docent Organization

is seeking new volunteers to help with

programs, provide information at the

reception desk, and assist with special

projects. For more information, call

Bear Creek Nature Center at 520-6387

or Fountain Creek Nature Center at 520-

6745. To discover the programs and

find one that interests you, visit us at

www.elpasocountyparks.com. a

Use your hiking pole and the new QUICKROPE YellowJacket to

instantly hang bear bags. Never tie a knot again! Use Promo code

CODB during January and February to receive 20% off!

w w w . Q U I C K R O P E . c o m


10

BE SAFE OUT THERE!

Protect Yourself from Snowboarding Injuries

Snowboarding is a high-speed mountain

sport that exposes the rider to

various levels of danger, from innocent

little slips to high-impact crashes. Beginning

snowboarders are the ones who normally

get injured even though they attempt less

dangerous maneuvers than advanced snowboarders.

In fact, 25 percent of injuries occur

during a snowboarder’s first experience and

almost 50 percent occur during the first season

of snowboarding.

Considering the fact that both your feet

are fixed in non-release snowboard bindings,

it is logical that “falling” is the leading cause of

injury in snowboarding. Falls are followed by

collisions with stationary objects and other

snowboarders or skiers.

Compared to skiing, wrist injuries are by

far the most common of all snowboarding

injuries, followed by ankle and knee injuries.

So needless to say, once you have your

board all ready for the thrills and excitement

of riding the slopes make sure that

YOU are protected from head to toe.

WrIsT InjurIes

Wrist injuries are the number one

snowboarding injury. This is because

when snowboarders lose their balance,

they can’t “step out” in order to recover, as

both feet are firmly attached to the board.

The instinctive reaction when falling on

your snowboard is to outstretch a hand to

break your landing, thus placing the upper

limbs at risk of injury. To prevent this from

happening, try not to catch your fall with

your hands but instead teach yourself to

fall on your elbows. Your elbows are able

to absorb a much greater impact than

your wrists. Better yet, try to keep your

arms safely tucked in. It is better to roll out

of a fall, therefore distributing impact over

a greater portion of your body.

Leadville gO THERE!

OUTDOORS January-February 2009

To help prevent wrist injuries consider

purchasing either wrist guards (to wear

under your gloves) or some glove manufacturers

make gloves with integrated

wrist protection built into the glove.

ankle InjurIes

The sport of snowboarding places a

Durango

Crested Butte

Gunnison

Leadville

Buena Vista

lot of pressure on your ankles and calves.

Ankle injuries usually occur from hard

sideways impacts (such as crashes) and are

particularly common after jumping. These

situations may lead to an ankle sprain or

Estes Park

Woodland Park

Manitou Springs

Old Colorado City

SAFETY

FiRST!

continued on next page u

La Junta


January-February 2009 OUTDOORS

11

be safe OuT There!

avoiding snowboarding injuries

t continued from previous page

to a more serious condition called “snowboarder’s

ankle.” Expert riders tend to have

more ankle injuries, although the risk is decreasing

as better ankle support is added

to snowboarding boots. Hard-shell boots

tend to be worn by more experienced

boarders and definitely protect the ankle

more. Soft boots are favored by beginners

or those less experienced because they

allow for some ankle movement which

makes it easier for the rider to maneuver

their board. However, this softer boot also

leads to more ankle injuries.

knee InjurIes

The knees are the natural springs that

absorb most of the shocks during snowboarding.

However, compared to skiing,

knee injuries are less common and not as

severe—the main reason being that the

snowboard has only two edges that can

“catch” unexpectedly on snow as compared

to the four edges on skis. Another

factor is that snowboards tend to be shorter

than skis and therefore the “lever arm” of

force produced by any twist is reduced.

Most knee injuries in snowboarding

are caused by extremely hard collisions

(such as when you hit a tree) or impacts

from unexpected angles or turning motions.

To avoid such injuries, make sure

that you know your limitations. Keep in

mind that the firmer your boots and the

tighter the binding settings, the greater

your risk of injuring a knee. In addition,

make sure that you keep your knees bent

at all times, especially when performing

jumps or tricks.

heaD InjurIes

Crashes with natural objects, such as

hard snow surfaces, ice, rocks, trees, or

unnatural objects such as rails and boxes

in snow parks, can cause serious head injuries.

This is why helmets are an essential

component of any snowboarder’s protective

gear. No matter what your abilities are,

it is essential that you wear a snowboard

helmet at all times.

When buying a helmet, choose a helmet

made specifically for snowboarding.

They are stronger at the sides of the helmet

where snowboarding impacts are

most likely to occur.

Telluride & Durango

ImPaCT InjurIes

Many injuries are caused by snowboard-

ers crashing into obstacles including hard

apparatus in snow parks or when attempting

to land a jump.

gO THERE!

Another source of impact injuries Gunnison comes

from colliding with other skiers and snowboarders,

especially on busy slopes. To avoid

these types of injuries always keep your

Durango

Telluride

Estes Park

speed in check in order to maintain control.

Many snowboarders Woodland opt Park to minimize

their chances of impact-related injuries

Crested Butte

Manitou Springs

Buena Vista

Old Colorado City

by protecting their back, hips, shoulders,

and torso by using upper body armor and

shells. In addition, knee pads, elbow guards,

or padded shorts/pants to protect your tailbone

can help to soften the impact that

comes from these types of crashes. a

35,000

of OUTDOORS readers

ski

or

snowboard


12

jAnUARY

asTrOnOmy

mysteries of the sky

Bear Creek Nature Center, Colo. Springs

Friday, January 30, 7:00–8:30 p.m.

Cost: $4 per person

Find answers to your questions about the mysteries

and motions of the stars, constellations, moon

phases, and seasons. Reservations required.

(719) 520-6387

bIrDInG

fountain Creek Winter bird Count

Fountain Creek Nature Center, Fountain

Saturday, January 10, 8:30–11:30 a.m.

Observe and record the number of bird species

and populations in the park. Reservations

required.

(719) 520-6745

basic raptor ID

Cheyenne Mtn. SP, Colo. Springs

Sunday, January 11, 1:00 p.m.

Reservations required.

(719) 576-2016

searching for eagles

Fountain Creek Nature Center, Fountain

Saturday, January 24, 10 a.m.–noon

Learn about eagles and search for wintering bald

eagles in the park. Reservations required.

(719) 520-6745

ChIlDren

nature adventures

Fountain Creek Nature Center, Fountain

Thursdays, 10:00–11:30 a.m. & 1:30–3:00 p.m.

Cost: $4 per person

Children ages 3–6. Reservations required.

(719) 520-6745

Twos and Threes Outdoors

Fountain Creek Nature Center, Fountain

Fridays, 10:00–11:15 a.m.

Cost: $3 per person

Children ages 2 or 3. Reservations required.

(719) 520-6745

little Wonders: animals under Cover

Bear Creek Nature Center, Colo. Springs

Wednesday, January 7, 10–11 a.m.

Cost: $3 per person

For ages 2–3, with an adult. Reservations required.

(719) 520-6387

nature for Toddlers (and their folks)

Mountain Park Environmental Center, Beulah

Friday, January 16, 10 a.m.

Cost: $5 per family (members); $8 per family (nonmembers)

Call to register (719) 485-4444

nature explorers: Wacky Weasels

Bear Creek Nature Center, Colo. Springs

Thursday, January 29, 10:00–11:15 a.m. and

1:00–2:15 p.m.

Cost: $4 per person

For ages 4–5, with an adult. Reservations required.

(719) 520-6387

Groundhog Oops! Prairie Dog Day

Fountain Creek Nature Center, Fountain

Saturday, January 31, 10 a.m.–noon

Cost: $5 per person

View a slide show, make a craft, then drive to a

nearby dog town to find a shadow. Reservations

required.

(719) 520-6745

fesTIvals

Winter Trails Day Celebration

Bear Creek Nature Center, Colo. Springs

Saturday, January 10, 10 a.m.–1 p.m.

Opportunity to learn more about snowshoeing

and cross-country skiing. Reservations required.

(719) 520-6745

Winter Trails Day

Frisco Nordic Center

Saturday, January 10

(970) 453-6855; www.breckenridgenordic.com

Winter Trails Day

Breckenridge Nordic Center

Saturday, January 17

(970) 453-6855; www.breckenridgenordic.com

fIshInG

Grand slam Ice fishing Tournament

Eleven Mile SP

Saturday, January 10, 5 a.m.

One hundred and fifty teams of two people

compete.

(719) 748-0317

hIkInG

Cookie burner hikes

Cheyenne Mtn. SP, Colo. Springs

Saturdays, January 3,10,17,24,31, 9 a.m.

hound hike

Castlewood Canyon SP, Franktown

Sunday, January 4, 10:00–11:30 a.m.

Fun event with your dog and a 2-mile hike. Call to

reserve spot.

(303) 688-5242; www.parks.state.co.us

Waterfalls, Pools, and Grottos: Part 2

Castlewood Canyon SP, Franktown

Saturday, January 10, 1–3 p.m.

See what the new year in the park has to offer. Call

to reserve spot.

(303) 688-5242; www.parks.state.co.us

OUTDOORS January-February 2009

cALEnDAR OF EvEnTS

first hike of 2009

Mountain Park Environmental Center, Beulah

Saturday, January 10, 1 p.m.

Free for MPEC members, $5 non-members.

Call to register; (719) 485-4444

family “mystery” hikes

Cheyenne Mtn. SP, Colo. Springs

Sunday, January 11 & 25, 1 p.m.

Families will be given a riddle to solve using clues

found along the trail.

hike for hope buttermilk uphill

Buttermilk Mountain, Aspen

Sunday, January 11, 7:30 a.m.

2-mile hike, 1,800 vertical feet. Raise awareness

and funds for the #1 genetic killer of children

in the U.S.

(970) 925-6137; www.hikeforhopemd.com

Plains to Canyon I

Castlewood Canyon SP, Franktown

Saturday, January 17, 10 a.m. –3 p.m.

Learn about how Castlewood Canyon was formed.

Call to reserve spot.

(303) 688-5242; www.parks.state.co.us

east Canyon Trail hike: a journey of Observation

Castlewood Canyon SP, Franktown

Sunday, January 18, 12:30–4:00 p.m.

Hone your observation skills on this interesting

hike. Call to reserve spot.

(303) 688-5242; www.parks.state.co.us

snowshoe hike

Poncha Springs Visitor Center Parking Lot

Saturday, January 31, 10 a.m.–2 p.m.

Fun and free snowshoe hike. Moderate 2-hour

hike; snacks provided.

(719) 207-4130; www.quietuse.org

kayakInG

Cheyenne mountain high school, Colo. springs

Sundays, January 18 & 25, 5–7 p.m.

Cost: free for members; $10 non-members

Pikes Peak Whitewater Club’s pool sessions

(learn to roll).

(719) 481-4452; www.pikespeakwhitewaterclub.com

mIsCellaneOus

Great fruitcake Toss

Memorial Park, Manitou Springs

Saturday, January 3, 9:30 a.m.–2:00 p.m.

(719) 685-5089; www.manitousprings.org

International snow sculpture Championships

Blue River Plaza, Breckenridge

Tuesday, January 20–Sunday, January 25

Teams from around the globe descend on Breckenridge

to hand carve 20-ton blocks of snow into

beautiful works of art.

(970) 547-3100; www.townofbreckenridge.com

mulTI-sPOrTs

Chilly Cheeks Duathlon

Cherry Creek SP, Denver

Saturday, January 17, 10 a.m.

1.5-mile run, single lap around 3.6-mile paved loop

on bike, 2.5-mile run, further two laps of bike loop,

and then run 50m to finish line.

(303) 642-7917;

www.racingunderground.com/chillycheeks/

Winter Triathlon

Tennessee Pass Nordic Center at Ski Cooper

Saturday, January 21, 10 a.m.

5K snowshoe, 10K snow bike, 8K skate ski.

(970) 845-0931; www.pedalpowerbike.com

naTure

lIve: reptiles!

Bear Creek Nature Center, Colo. Springs

Saturday, January 3, 10:00–11:30 a.m.

Cost: $5 (members), $8 (nonmembers)

Touch and hold live snakes, lizards, and tortoises.

Reservations required.

(719) 520-6387

runnInG

rescue run

Palmer Park, Colorado Springs

Thursday, January 1, 9:30 a.m.

5K/10K/Kids Run.

(719) 473-7848; www.racingunderground.com

Winter series I (5k & 10k)

Fox Run Regional Park, Colo. Springs

Saturday, January 10, 10 a.m.

(719) 598-2953; www.pprrun.org

full moon run

Ball field @ Beckers & El Paso (Manitou Springs)

Sunday, January 11, 7 p.m.

Groups will be formed to run various distances; a

tailgate gathering after the run.

(719) 495-5891; www.pprrun.org

Winter series II (5k & 10k)

El Pomar Youth Sports Park, Colo. Springs

Saturday, January 24, 10 a.m.

(719) 598-2953; www.pprrun.org

frost Giant 5k and 10k Winter races

Estes Park Town Hall

Sunday, January 25, 11 a.m. and noon

(970) 586-8191; www.estesparkcvb.com

skIInG (CrOss-COunTry)

Citizens’ race

Crested Butte Nordic Center

Saturday, January 10

20K classic race.

(970) 349-1707; www.cbnordic.org


January-February 2009 OUTDOORS

13

jAnUARY

continued

moonlight Tour

Crested Butte Nordic Center

Saturday, January 10, 7 p.m.

Cost: $25 adults, $20 kids

Ski or snowshoe under the full moon. Guided tour

includes hot drinks and snacks.

www.cbnordic.org

Citizens’ race

Crested Butte Nordic Center

Saturday, January 17

20K skate race and awards party.

(970) 349-1707; www.cbnordic.org

alley loop nordic marathon

Crested Butte Nordic Center

Saturday, January 31

Unique course that winds its way through the

streets and alleys of downtown Crested Butte.

(970) 349-1707; www.cbnordic.org

skIInG/snOWbOarDInG

j4 super G

Peak 10, Breckenridge

Friday, January 23–Sunday, January 25

11- and 12-year-olds compete on the impressive

Super G course on Cimarron.

www.quantumsportsclub.org

snOWshOeInG

Turquoise lake 20-mile snowshoe run

Leadville

Saturday, January 3

(719) 539-4112; chaffeerunners@yahoo.com

moonlight Tour

Crested Butte Nordic Center

Saturday, January 10, 7 p.m.

Cost: $25 adults, $20 kids

Ski or snowshoe under the full moon. Guided tour

includes hot drinks and snacks.

www.cbnordic.org

The swift skedaddle snowshoe adventure

The Raven Golf Club, Silverthorne

Sunday, January 11, 9 a.m.

3K (great for kids and families) and 10K (90 percent

of course on single track).

(970) 845-0931; www.pedalpowerbike.com

beaver Creek snowshoe series #1

Creekside Park, Beaver Creek

Sunday, January 11, 11 a.m.

5K and 10K.

(970) 476-6797; www.bcsnowshoe.com

Owl Creek Chase – 21k

Snowmass Village & Aspen

Saturday, January 17, 8:30 a.m.

(970) 429-2093; www.owlcreekchase.com

cALEnDAR OF EvEnTS

Pazzo’s Colorado state Championships

Tennessee Pass Nordic Center at Ski Cooper

Saturday, January 17, 10 a.m.

5K and 10K.

(970) 845-0931; www.pedalpowerbike.com

beginner’s snowshoe Tour

Wilderness Expeditions, Salida

Sunday, January 25, 8:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

Cost of $30 pp includes snowshoes, poles, gaiters,

and lunch. Ages 8 and up.

(719) 539-5703; www.salidarec.com

FEBRUARY

asTrOnOmy

Winter stargazing for beginners

Fountain Creek Nature Center, Fountain

Friday, February 20, 7:00–8:30 p.m.

Cost: $5 per person

Make a star chart and learn the patterns and

locations of stars and other night objects.

Reservations required.

(719) 520-6745

bIkInG

1st annual "Peak region Cyclist" bicycle 2009 -

bike show/expo

Norris-Penrose Event Center, Colo. Springs

1045 W. Rio Grande St.

Saturday, February 21, 9:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m.

Cost: $3 admission, portion of the proceeds to

benefit Medicine Wheel Trail Advocates.

www.peakregioncyclist.com

bIrDInG

lIve: falcons!

Bear Creek Nature Center, Colo. Springs

Saturday, February 7, 10–11 a.m.

Cost: $5 (members), $8 (nonmembers)

Demonstrations with the fastest birds of prey.

Reservations required.

(719) 520-6387

ChIlDren

nature adventures

Fountain Creek Nature Center, Fountain

Thursdays, 10:00–11:30 a.m. & 1:30–3:00 p.m.

Cost: $4 per person

Children ages 3–6. Reservations required.

(719) 520-6745

Twos and Threes Outdoors

Fountain Creek Nature Center, Fountain

Fridays, 10:00–11:15 a.m.

Cost: $3 per person

Children ages 2 or 3. Reservations required.

(719) 520-6745

nature explorers: super sleepers

Bear Creek Nature Center, Colo. Springs

Thursday, February 12, 10:00–11:15 a.m. and

1:00–2:15 p.m.

Cost: $4 per person

For ages 4–5, with an adult. Reservations required.

(719) 520-6387

little Wonders: frolicking foxes

Bear Creek Nature Center, Colo. Springs

Wednesday, February 25, 10–11 a.m.

Cost: $3 per person

For ages 2–3, with an adult. Reservations required.

(719) 520-6387

DOGsleDDInG

rocky mountain high sled Dog sprints

Cedaredge

Saturday, February 14–Sunday, February 15

www.rmsdc.com

Grand County sled Dog Classic

Cedaredge

Saturday, February 21–Sunday, February 22

www.rmsdc.com

fesTIvals

eagle Day

Lake Pueblo SP

Saturday, February 1, 9 a.m.

Fun day filled with activities and opportunities to

view eagles.

www.eagleday.org

Cripple Creek Ice festival

200 block of Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek

Friday, February 6–Sunday, February 8

Friday, February 13–Monday, February 16

Ice carving, beer garden, and live entertainment.

www.cripple-creek.co.us

Winter Trails Day

Glacier Basin area of Rocky Mountain NP, Estes Park

Saturday, February 14, 10 a.m.–3 p.m.

Snowshoeing and cross-country ski demos, trials,

kids’ scavenger hunt, etc.

(970) 586-4431; www.estesparkcvb.com

bighorn sheep Day

Garden of the Gods Visitors Center, Colo. Springs

Saturday, February 14, 10 a.m.–3 p.m.

A free festival focusing on Colorado’s magnificent

state mammal – the bighorn sheep.

(719) 219-0108

Tenth mountain Division Day

Friday, February 20

A celebration with the men of the Tenth Mountain

Division of World War II. Activities and skiing will

be held all day.

(719) 486-2277; www.skicooper.com

high Plains snow Goose and birding festival

Lamar

Friday, February 20–Sunday, February 22

www.highplainssnowgoose.com

fIshInG

south Park Ice masters Traveling Trophy fishing

Tournament

Eleven Mile SP

Saturday, February 7, 5 a.m.

One hundred and fifty teams of two people

compete.

(719) 748-0317

hIkInG

hound hike

Castlewood Canyon SP, Franktown

Sunday, February 1, 10:00–11:30 a.m.

Fun event with your dog and a 2-mile hike. Call to

reserve spot.

(303) 688-5242; www.parks.state.co.us

What’s in a name?

Fountain Creek Nature Center, Fountain

Saturday, February 7, 10:00– 11:30 a.m.

Cost: $5 per person

Slide show and hike to discover that names

have power to reveal interesting facts.

Reservations required.

(719) 520-6745

Waterfalls, Pools, and Grottos: Part 3

Castlewood Canyon SP, Franktown

Saturday, February 7, 1–3 p.m.

Come see what the winter is changing. Call to

reserve spot.

(303) 688-5242; www.parks.state.co.us

lower Canyon Ice hike

Castlewood Canyon SP, Franktown

Sunday, February 8, 1:00–3:30 p.m.

Hear about ice and visit some winter wonderland.

Call to reserve spot.

(303) 688-5242; www.parks.state.co.us

(just Past) valentine’s Day hike

Mountain Park Environmental Center, Beulah

Sunday, February 15, 1:00 p.m.

Cost: MPEC members free; $5 non-members

Call to register (719) 485-4444

Plains to Canyon I

Castlewood Canyon SP, Franktown

Tuesday, February 17, 10 a.m. –3 p.m.

Learn about how Castlewood Canyon was formed.

Call to reserve spot.

(303) 688-5242; www.parks.state.co.us

Tracks, scats, Dens, and nests

Fountain Creek Nature Center, Fountain

Saturday, February 28, 10:00 a.m.–noon

Cost: $5 per person

Interactive slide show; search for wildlife and the


14

FEBRUARY

continued

signs they left behind on a hike.

Reservations required.

(719) 520-6745

kayakInG

Cheyenne mountain high school, Colo. springs

Sundays, February 8, 15 & 22, 5–7 p.m.

Cost: free for members; $10 non-members

Pikes Peak Whitewater Club’s pool sessions

(learn to roll).

(719) 481-4452;

www.pikespeakwhitewaterclub.com

mIsCellaneOus

beacon bowl and avalanche awareness Day

Arapahoe Basin Ski Area

Saturday, February 7, 8 a.m.

Entrants compete in timed trials to find a buried

beacon the fastest.

(970) 513-5721; www.arapahoebasin.com

mulTI-sPOrTs

Chilly Cheeks Duathlon

Cherry Creek SP, Denver

Saturday, February 28, 10 a.m.

10-mile nondrafting paved bike ride and 4 miles of

running on road and dirt trails.

(303) 642-7917;

www.racingunderground.com/chillycheeks/

OrIenTeerInG

Introduction to Winter Orienteering

Mountain Park Environmental Center, Beulah

Saturday, February 7, 10:00 a.m.–2:30 p.m.

Cost: $20 MPEC members, $25 non-members

Maps, compasses and snowshoes provided.

Call to register (719) 485-4444

THink gREEn!

OUTDOORS January-February 2009

cALEnDAR OF EvEnTS

runnInG

landsharks race for a Cause (Deployed u.s.

armed forces)

Focus on the Family Ball Fields, Colo. Springs

Saturday, February 7, 9:30 a.m.

0.23 miles/ 0.5 miles/ 1 mile.

(719) 591-4787; www.pprrun.org

full moon run

Ball field @ Beckers & El Paso (Manitou Springs)

Monday, February 9, 7 p.m.

Groups will be formed to run various distances; a

tailgate gathering after the run.

(719) 495-5891; www.pprrun.org

valentines Twosome relay

City Park, Pueblo

Saturday, February 14, 9 a.m.

1.6-miles per participant.

(719) 947-3682; www.socorunners.org

Winter series III (5 mile & 10 mile)

Santa Fe Trail @ Baptist Rd., Colo. Springs

Saturday, February 14, 10 a.m.

(719) 598-2953; www.pprrun.org

run the republic!

Republic Plaza, Downtown Denver

Sunday, February 22, 8 a.m.

Climb to the 53rd floor, and then take the elevator

down for food, interactive booths, and fun. Supports

American Lung Association.

(303) 388-4327; www.lungcolorado.org

spring runoff Tune-up – 10k

City Park, Pueblo

Sunday, February 22, 9 a.m.

(719) 564-0847; www.socorunners.org

Winter series Iv (10k & 20k)

Wolford Elementary School, Black Forest

Saturday, February 28, 10 a.m.

(719) 598-2953; www.pprrun.org

Rethinking Bottled Water

skIInG (CrOss-COunTry)

frisco Gold rush

Frisco Nordic Center

Sunday, February 1

5K/10K classic, and 5K/10K skate.

(303) 635-2815; www.emgcolorado.com

moonlight Tour

Crested Butte Nordic Center

Monday, February 9, 7 p.m.

Cost: $25 adults, $20 kids

Ski or snowshoe under the full moon. Guided tour

includes hot drinks and snacks. www.cbnordic.org

50k Classic

Crested Butte Nordic Center

Saturday, February 14

Loosely run classic race that involves skiing the

Crested Butte Nordic complete trail system.

(970) 349-1707; www.cbnordic.org

skIInG

ski Cooper Telefest

Ski Cooper “Black Powder” Race Area

Saturday, February 21

Telemark race clinic, an uphill/downhill/uphill race,

and a giant slalom race.

(719) 486-3531; www.skicooper.com

snOWshOeInG

The screamin’ snowman snowshoe race

Nordic Center at the Eldora Ski Area

Sunday, February 1, 9:45 a.m.

(303) 440-8700, then push “#267”;

Nordic@eldora.com (e-mail)

frisco Gold rush – 7k

Frisco Nordic Center

Sunday, February 1

7K TUBBS Snowshoe at 11:30 a.m.

(303) 635-2815; www.emgcolorado.com

There is no need to pay $10 per gallon for

bottled water when you can fill up at the tap

for pennies. Tap water is safe in most areas.

The Natural Resources Defense Council carried

out a four-year review of the bottled water industry

and concluded “there is no assurance that

just because water comes out of a bottle, it is any

cleaner or safer than water from the tap.” Check

the status of your water by going to the Environmental

Protection Agency’s website: www.epa.

gov/safewater. However, if you still feel uncertain,

try a filter (such as a Brita) or a Watergeeks sports

bottle, which has a filter built right into the bottle.

In addition, most water dispensers that are built

into refrigerators have filters; just remember to

change the filters periodically (see your manufacturer’s

guidelines).

beaver Creek snowshoe series #2

Creekside Park, Beaver Creek

Sunday, February 8, 11 a.m.

5K and 10K.

(970) 476-6797; www.bcsnowshoe.com

moonlight Tour

Crested Butte Nordic Center

Monday, February 9, 7 p.m.

Cost: $25 adults, $20 kids

Ski or snowshoe under the full moon. Guided tour

includes hot drinks and snacks.

www.cbnordic.org

Intermediate snowshoe Tour

Wilderness Expeditions, Salida

Monday, February 16, 8:30 a.m.–1:00 p.m.

Cost of $40 pp includes snowshoes, poles, gaiters,

and lunch. Ages 8 and up.

(719) 539-5703; www.salidarec.com

Off-Track Off-beat 10k snowshoe race

Leadville

Saturday, February 21

(719) 486-7484

vail mountain Winter uphill – 2 miles

Vail Mountain

Saturday, February 21

(970) 477-3220; www.vailmountainlodge.com

billy’s Island Grill vail mtn. night – 5 miles

Lionshead Gondola, Vail

Saturday, February 28, 7 p.m.

(970) 845-0931; www.pedalpowerbike.com

This event information is subject to change;

please check the information sources to

verify event details.

If you would like your outdoor-recreational

events listed in our next issue please call us

at (719) 590-4104

or e-mail julie@OUTDOORSLLC.com

According to the Container Recycling Institute,

sales of plastic water bottles 1 liter or less increased

more than 115 percent from 13 billion in 2002 to

27.9 billion in 2005 and about 86 percent of plastic

water bottles in the U.S. become garbage or litter.

These bottles can take between 400 and 1,000 years

to degrade. The EPI (Environmental Performance Index)

indicates that about 2.7 million tons of plastic are

used worldwide to bottle water each year. While recycling

your plastic water bottles is good, using a reusable

water bottle is much better for the environment.

Carry your tap water in a reusable Bisphenol-A-free

bottle such as a Sigg (www.Sigg.com).

Rethink bottled water and use tap water and

reusable water bottles as a smart and simple way

to reduce unnecessary waste and to take better

care of our planet. a


January-February 2009 OUTDOORS

15

Gunnison-Crested Butte

Colorado, Pure & simple

Some of the most beautiful places on

earth are lesser known and undisturbed.

There’s a special sense of wonder

that goes along with discovering a place

like this. You take that place with you, even

when you leave. Gunnison-Crested Butte

is a breathtakingly beautiful place that has

remained very much the same since these

two towns were settled in the 1880s.

A first-class and ever evolving ski resort,

Crested Butte Mountain Resort shows you

that the longest lines you’ll see are behind

your skis! This true destination resort attracts

visitors who like to come for a longer visit

and get to know the place. Winter also brings

snowshoeing, dog sledding, ice-skating, ice

fishing, snowmobiling and Nordic skiing.

The Gunnison Valley boasts over 75 km of

groomed tracks and Gunnison recently

opened a new indoor ice facility.

Colorado residents are one of the largest

groups of visitors in winter. From the north

and central Front Range it’s only about a

4-hour drive and not in stop-and-go traffic!

From Colorado Springs it’s just an easy 3-

hour drive. Take a look at some upcoming

winter events. More events can be found

on GunnisonCrestedButte.com. a

gO THERE!

Crested Butte

Gunnison

Buena Vista

What's Happening in Gunnison-Crested Butte

january 2009

1 Learn to Skate Ski for Free, Crested Butte Nordic Center Durango

10 Citizens Nordic Ski Race, 20K Classic, Crested Butte Nordic Center

10 Full Moon “Dessert at the Yurt” Nordic Ski & Snowshoe Tours, Crested Butte Nordic Center

10 Moonlight Snowshoe Tours, Crested Butte Mountain Resort

17 Citizens Nordic Ski Race, 20K Skate, Crested Butte Nordic Center

31 23rd Annual Alley Loop Nordic Marathon (1.5 K, 3K, 5K, 10K, 21K, 42K), CB Nordic Center

31 & feb. 1 K2’s Ultimate Groove with Heather Paul (Telemark Skiing Clinic),

Crested Butte Mountain Resort

february 2009

5 Learn to Skate Ski for Free, Crested Butte Nordic Center

7 Cosmic Colorado Ski Mountaineering Cup (Randonnee Rally), Crested Butte Mountain Resort

9 Full Moon “Dessert at the Yurt” Nordic Ski & Snowshoe Tours, Crested Butte Nordic Center

9 Moonlight Snowshoe Tours, Crested Butte Mountain Resort

14–15 Alison Gannett’s HEAD/Keen Rippin Chix Steep Camp, Crested Butte Mountain Resort

17–21 18th Annual U.S. Extreme Freeskiing Championships, Crested Butte Mountain Resort

19–22 USSA Race – Dan Prater Memorial Cup, Crested Butte Mountain Resort

21–22 Rocky Mountain Youth Hockey League Midget Playoffs,

Jorgensen Event Center Indoor Ice Rink

24 Mardi Gras Parade & Concert, Presented by Crested Butte Mountain Theatre, Crested Butte

Woodland Park

Manitou Springs

Old Colorado City

La Junta


16

OUTDOORS January-February 2009

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