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REAL LIFE: ‘Our

films are giving

hope to people

with dementia’

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with a twist…

YOURS.CO.UK

ISSUE 270

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stronger

bones

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9 PAGES OF

COOKERY

& CRAFT

✓ Seasonal Jersey

Royal recipes

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✓ Best buys

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NEW

Paul O’Grady:

‘I’ve been

such a fool…!’

APRIL 25-

MAY 8, 2017

£1.55

KEELEY HAWES:

The Durrells are back

and the animals are

the real stars

‘Get down Shep!’

55 years of

Blue Peter

pets

Figure-fixing

denim classics


Inside

COVER PIC:

Real life

9 Animal Magic

12 ‘Telling Seth’s story’

19 How to be a DJ

21 COVER Making a difference for

dementia sufferers

23 Talking Point: Trains

26 Bake Off’s Nancy Birtwhistle on

her high-tech challenge

Star chat

10 COVER Paul O’Grady

14 COVER Keeley Hawes

and The Durrells

16 COVER Blue Peter pets

24 Robson Green

146 Life lessons: Jane Asher

Your best life now!

29 Mole watch

30 COVER Wearing denim

34 Stronger hair plan

36 Spring health reboot

39 Diet recipe cards

42 COVER Build stronger bones

Good to know

61 Laughter is good

62 Trace your family tree

65 Your questions answered

67 Steam mops on test

69 Yours Retirement Services

71 Watching the pennies

72 Difficult conversations

Nostalgia

54 Blast from the past: aromas

57 Time of my life

Leisure time

89 COVER Cookery: Jersey Royals

91 COVER Spring salads

98 COVER Kitchen crafts

105 Garden tips

107 Secret Britain: Cambridge

108 Travel: Bangkok

111 The Suffolk Show

112 Yours Travel Club

Your favourites

47 Meeting Place

59 Roy Hudd

75 Friends of Yours

115 Free for every

reader: dahlia print

117 Carers in touch

125 Puzzles to test you

& prizes to win

137 Short story

145 Horoscopes

this fortnight...

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OF PRIZES

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34

Strengthen

your locks

89

Jersey Royals

Leap into

spring

Welcome…

I’m so looking forward to Paul O’Grady’s new show, For

the Love of Animals – India. Of all wild animals, I’ve

always had a particular affection for elephants – they

seem so intelligent and compassionate – and I can’t

wait to see what Paul makes of them when he meets

the gentle giants of India. Reading his interview (p10)

I think it’s going to be a real tearjerker!

Talking of animals; we also take a fond look back at

55 years of Blue Peter pets (p16) and The Durrells’ star

Keeley Hawes (p14) tells us why the new series is

so packed with all creatures great and small, she

and her human co-stars are outnumbered!

Look out, too, in this issue for our new-look

‘Inspiring you’ section (p89-101). With nine

pages of craft and cookery – it’s packed with

fresh salad recipes, the lowdown on

cooking oils, tips for Jersey Royals

and seven different projects to pep

up your kitchen – plenty to keep you

busy then!

See you

next issue,

Keep in touch...

We want to hear your news and views

Write to

Yours magazine,

Media House,

Peterborough Business Park,

Peterborough

PE2 6EA

Email

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Yoursmagazine

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Editor

108

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Five steps

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30


star chat

‘Jerome

would be

my perfect

partner in

crime!’

By Alison James

Robson Green is

momentarily

lost for words –

something that

doesn’t happen

very often, as the muchloved

actor and TV presenter

loves a chat. The reason for

this lull in the conversation

is because he’s mulling over

which actor he’d choose to

join him on the Granchester

set in a guest role.

“Mark Rylance, perhaps?”

he ponders. “He’s absolutely

brilliant. But hold on

a minute – what about

Jerome...? It’d be amazing

if he wanted to do it. We

haven’t worked together for

years. It’s a great idea.”

Indeed it is – but for series

four, perhaps. Series three

24

Robson as Geordie

and James Norton as

Sidney, Grantchester’s

YOURS n EVERY crime-fighting FORTNIGHT duo

Robson Green tells why

he’d love his former sidekick,

Jerome Flynn, to appear in ITV’s

period crime drama, Grantchester

of the ‘cop ‘n’ clergyman’

six-parter, co-starring James

Norton, is already going out

and is more popular than

ever. Is Robson surprised by

its success?

“Yes and no,” he replies.

“When we first started I

didn’t know whether it

would be popular – a period

drama featuring a detective

and a vicar who solve

crimes in this quaint English

village of Grantchester in

the Fifties... But the viewers

have really taken it to their

hearts and it’s going down

well in the US,

too. I think this

series is the

best yet. The

writing’s good,

the production

team is at

the top of its

game, the

characters are

engaging and likeable plus

there’s a real warmth and

charm to it. But there’s this

undercurrent of something

deeply uncomfortable, too.

Whether it be racism, bigotry

or whatever; the darkness

that existed and the denial

people lived in in the Fifties.

In this series, the stories are

grittier and more shocking

than ever before and both

my character, Geordie, and

Sidney, played by James,

are going through major

changes in their own lives.”

Such as?

“As far as Geordie is

concerned, it’s a case of

him putting everything

he holds dear at risk,”

Robson explains. “He’s

paralysed with the burden

of guilt and obligation

and has an overwhelming

sense of routine. He feels

his marriage is stale and

Robson has worked (and

sang!) with Jerome before

but would love him to join

the Grantchester cast

redundant. But he’s looking

at the wrong aspects of the

relationship and thinks the

grass is greener – which it

never is.”

Off screen, Robson (52)

has the reputation of being

the production’s ‘joker’.

Is this true?

“It is,” he admits. “When

we were filming series two,

I got a big telling off from the

producer because I threw

a bucket of cold water over

James while we filming

a swimming scene and

he went under, although

fortunately he was fine.

Then during the filming of

this series, I was ordered

off set for telling James old

Tommy Cooper jokes. One in

particular really got to him –

Tommy goes into a pet shop

and asks for a wasp.

‘We don’t have any,’ the

assistant replies. ‘Well there’s

one in the window,’ Tommy

protests. Classic!”

It’s the way you tell ‘em,

Robson!

n Grantchester is on Sunday

evenings on ITV.

PICS: REX/SHUTTERSTOCK


Your lifestyle has a huge impact on

how healthy your bones are, says

health writer Karen Evennett

Your bone health shouldn’t be taken

lightly. Without healthy bones to

support you, it isn’t possible to lead

an active life. While there are some

things which affect your risk of brittle

bones or osteoporosis that you can’t change,

such as your age, gender and genes, there are

some simple lifestyle tweaks that could help to

support your skeleton and reduce your risk of

falls and fractures.

Build

better

BONES

DOSE UP ON SUNSHINE

Your risk of osteoporosis is higher if you cover up all

summer, according to Sarah Leyland, Osteoporosis

Nurse Consultant at the National Osteoporosis

Society (www.nos.org.uk). “You need a healthy dose

of summer sun to make Vitamin D, which is vital for

bone health, among other things. But even if you bare

your arms and get outside most days, Public Health England

recommends that you top up with a daily 10mg (400iu)

Vitamin D supplement.”

Look for a supplement that contains Vitamin D3. Your

body absorbs this type most easily, because

it’s closest to the type it naturally

manufactures from sunlight. Fat

helps your body to make the best

use of Vitamin D, so an oil-based

supplement such as Fultium Daily

D3 (£3.99 for a month’s supply)

might be a good choice.

n Available from pharmacies.

DID YOU

KNOW?

Osteoporosis

usually has no

symptoms until a

fracture occurs

FOCUS ON CALCIUM

The mineral we all associate with

bone health is calcium. Dairy

is the most obvious source with

one 200ml glass of milk, plus a pot

of yogurt and a cheese omelette

adding up to the 700mg you

need every day.

“Be aware though,

that cheese is acidic

and eating it, along with

other animal proteins,

can rob you of more

calcium than it provides,

Do the calcium maths

One tin of

sardines

(200mg)

so try not to eat it every day,” says

nutritionist Marilyn Glenville

author of Osteoporosis – how

to prevent, treat and reverse

it (£10.99, Kyle Books, www.

marilynglenville.com). Instead,

choose organic live natural yogurt

which is alkaline and has the

advantage of being full of bacteria

that is beneficial to your body.

“Make your body more alkaline

and calcium-friendly by eating plenty

of fruit and vegetables,” says Marilyn.

stay strong

A portion of 10 almonds

Two dried A small tin of A portion

+ + + + + = 700mg

basmati rice

(50mg

figs (100mg) baked beans

of tofu

(50mg)

(100mg)

(200mg) of calcium

WATCH WHAT YOU

DRINK – AND WHEN

“Caffeine, alcohol and sugar

are all acidic and lead to

calcium being leached from

your bones,” says Marilyn.

“Phosphoric acid in fizzy

drinks also tells your body to

release calcium from bones.

“Tea is not as bad as coffee

bone-wise, but the tannin

binds to calcium and other

minerals in your digestive

tract, preventing you from

absorbing them.

“Wait at least an hour after

mealtimes before having

a cuppa.”

WALK THIS WAY

Walking counts as weight-bearing

exercise, making a demand on your

skeleton and also working against

gravity. “This helps to build bone

density,” says Marilyn. “If you want

to do something more vigorous, try

jogging, dancing, step-climbing or

cross-training.”

Swimming doesn’t have the same

bone-building effects as weightbearing

exercise because the water

is taking your weight for you, but it

can help to strengthen your back,

and that’s important to prevent rib

fractures. “Yoga and pilates are worth

trying because they keep you flexible

and strengthen the core muscles in

your abdomen, another way of keeping

your balance,” says Marilyn.

If you already have osteoporosis you

may be nervous about exercising in case

of a fracture. But it’s important for your

overall health and your bones to stay active.

700mg of calcium is the amount

you need in your diet every day

AVOID

SPINACH

AND

RHUBARB – BOTH

CONTAIN OXALIC

ACID WHICH

REACTS WITH

CALCIUM IN

THE DIGESTIVE

SYSTEM AND

STOPS IT

BEING

ABSORBED”

DID YOU

KNOW?

1 in 2 women

over 50 will break a

bone as a result of

osteoporosis

Walking and Tai Chi are ideal activities.

Avoid workouts that put stress on your

bones – these include high-impact activities

such as running or aerobics. Avoid jarring

or twisting your body, lots of bending and

abrupt or sudden movements.

YOURS n EVERY FORTNIGHT

43


{

♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

Inspiring

YOU

craft

PIMP UP

YOUR

POTS!

If terracotta

plant pots don’t

match the colour

scheme in your

kitchen, give

them a makeover

with decoupage.

Simply find some

pretty patterned

paper or tissue

paper of your

choice and cut

into squares,

about 4cm

(1½in)sq. Glue

the paper squares

onto your pot

using decoupage

glue. It doesn’t

have to be neat

but the squares

need to overlap.

Once you’ve

covered the

whole surface of

the pot, carefully

brush over

with a layer of

decoupage glue

and leave to dry.

Add a pretty

plant and place

on your kitchen

windowsill.

{

+ +

easy crafting tasty recipes genius ideas

Teapot herb planters

Give old ceramic teapots and jugs a

whole new lease of life!

Time: 10 mins Skill level: Beginner

MATERIALS

Old or unwanted jugs or teapots

Gravel or small stones

Compost

Herbs such as rosemary, thyme,

mint or basil

1 To begin, you need to make sufficient

drainage for the herbs so fill the base

of the teapots with a fairly thick layer of

stones or gravel.

2 Next add the compost then carefully

place the herbs inside the pot.

3 Pack your pot with soil. This can be

quite messy so use a paintbrush to

remove any excess from the pot. Water

regularly and remove any excess

water by carefully pouring it out from

the spout.

{

7 easy projects to

Spruce up

your kitchen

Vintage

chalkboard

Turn an old tray into a

practical noticeboard

Time: 30 mins (plus drying

time) Skill level: Beginner

MATERIALS

Coarse steel wool

Decorative old metal

serving tray

Latex primer

Latex chalkboard paint

1 Rub coarse steel wool over

the flat surface of the tray.

2 Prime the metal with a latex

primer made for galvanised

surfaces (ordinary primer will

just flake off).

3 After the primer dries, lightly

sand the surface.

4 Wipe off any dust and apply

a coat of the latex chalkboard

paint and allow to dry.

5 To mount, either hang one

of the handles onto a nail or

attach a picture hanger to the

back of the tray.

fun to make

♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

TRY USING OLD

TEACUPS OR

BOWLS FOR

PLANTING

SMALLER HERBS

OR SEEDLINGS

Pom-pom pot stand

Rest your hot pots and pans on this pretty

and protective mat

Time: 3-4 hours Skill level: Beginner

MATERIALS

An assortment of differently coloured wools

7cm (3in) pom-pom maker

A 26cm (10in) diameter circle of anti-slip

rug canvas

Darning needle

1 Make your first pom-pom by following the

instructions on the packet. Try to make them

as thick as possible, using as much wool

as you can.

2 Once you have tied your pom-pom in the

middle with a length of wool, leave the

ends long.

3 Continue to make enough pom-poms to

fill the rug canvas.

4 Once you think you have enough, it’s time

to attach them to the rug canvas. Take one

pom-pom and thread one of the lengths

of wool onto the darning needle. Pull this

through the rug canvas in the position you

want it to be. Then do the same with the

Tie-dye tea towel

Give your kitchen a cool coastal feel

with these bright blue tea towels

Time: 30 mins (plus drying time)

Skill level: Beginner

MATERIALS

Plain white cotton tea towels

Blue fabric dye

Plastic basin

Rubber bands

Rubber gloves

1 Iron your tea towels first to get

rid of any creases.

2 To make the circular ring

patterns, make small pinches in

the fabric of the tea towel and

other wool length.

5 Tie the two pieces of threaded wool together in a

knot to secure and trim. Continue to do the same with

all your pom-poms, working in circles until the canvas

is completely filled.

secure them with rubber bands.

To make bigger rings, secure larger

amounts of the fabric with the

elastic bands.

3 Follow the instructions on

your fabric dye and prepare it

in the plastic basin. Once ready,

submerge the tea towels and

leave them in the dye for the

recommended amount of time.

If you want to create a paler colour,

take them out sooner.

4 Follow the drying instructions

but be sure to keep the bands

secure until the towel is

completely dry.

5 Once dry, give them another iron

to remove the crinkles and they’re

ready to use!

Tip: To make a striped pattern, roll the tea towel

into a tube shape and wrap the bands about 5cm (2in)

apart, all the way along

PICS: BAUER, DECOUPAGE PLANT POTS, © LOUPE IMAGES/HOLLY JOLIFFE,

KNITTED POT HOLDER, T© LOUPE IMAGES/CAROLINE ARBER

98 YOURS n EVERY FORTNIGHT

YOURS n EVERY FORTNIGHT 99


DAYS

Dressed up or dressed down,

denim is an easy-to-wear

wardrobe staple, says

Fashion Editor

Michelle Nightingale

THE SKIRT

Team with a jumper, tights

and boots in winter, or with

a pretty top and wedges

in summer – a trusty denim

skirt will last years. For

the most flattering fit

look for A-line styles

that fall to the knee.

Kerry wears: Jumper,

£12.50, 8-24, M&S |

skirt, £26, 8-22, M&Co |

necklace, £12, M&Co

fashion edit

The jacket

For a smart choice, opt

for a blazer-style denim

jacket or a sleeveless

number like this one. Or,

go for a casual yet classic

denim jacket and wear

over a pretty floral dress

for a look that will see you

through the year.

Selina wears: Sleeveless

jacket, £100, 8-20, Laura

Ashley | top, £35, 6-22, Next

| trouser, £30, 8-20, Wallis

THE SHIRT

We love a denim or chambray

shirt and this one proves that

you can be smart and elegant in

denim. Ruffles are also a big style

statement this year so this blouse

ticks all the boxes!

Kerry wears: Blouse, £60, 8-18,

Laura Ashley | jeans, £15, 8-22,

Peacocks

The jeans

Bootcut styles work perfectly

for any occasion and the fit

is flattering and slimming.

When you try them on, wear

your shoes to check the

length’s OK.

Selina wears: Top,

£10, 8-22, George

at Asda | jeans,

£20, 8-22, M&Co

| wedges, £14,

3-8, Matalan

THE

DRESS

Another versatile

wardrobe staple that

can be worn all year

round. Play around

with different shades

of denim and different

sleeve lengths, but

for a slimming fit go

for a belted style that

finishes at the knee.

Selina wears: Shirt

dress, £20, 8-20,

Matalan


FASHION EDITOR

LO VES

Stockists: George at Asda 0800 952 0101; Laura Ashley 0333 200 8009; M&Co 0333 202 0720; M&S 0333 014 8555; Matalan 0333 004 4444;

Next 0333 777 8000; Peacocks 0292 027 0222; Wallis 0344 984 0266

PHOTOGRAPHY RUTH JENKINSON; STYLIST DANIELLE ELMES-HUGHES;

HAIR AND MAKE-UP SARAH JANE GREEN

30 YOURS n EVERY FORTNIGHT

YOURS n EVERY FORTNIGHT

31


GOOD to KNOW

MEET

OUR

EXPERTS

Elizabeth

Kuhnke is a

communications

skills specialist

and bestselling

author,

www.kuhnke

communication.

com

Deborah

McPhilemy is

a relationship

empowerment

coach and author

72

YOURS n EVERY FORTNIGHT

5 STEPS FOR DEALING WITH

Difficult

conversations

How to raise tricky issues with loved ones By Lizzy Dening

Tricky conversations are a

natural part of life. It can be

tempting to put off awkward

chats – whether it’s mentioning

to an elderly parent that they

might need some form of care, or telling

grown-up children that you’re getting a

divorce. But it’s so important to be honest

and open with our loved ones and also to

realise that there will never be a perfect

time to raise an issue.

It’s common to leave things unsaid

because we’re worried about upsetting our

family or friends, but getting things out in

the open can make everyone feel better –

and for all you know, they may have been

worrying about it, too.

“Talking to family and friends about

potential ‘what ifs…’ before a crisis

happens will help ensure their wishes are

acknowledged and ensure safeguards can

be put in place,” says Elizabeth Kuhnke, a

communications skills specialist and bestselling

author.

Whatever the topic you need to broach,

there are five general steps that can help.

‘Getting

things out

in the open

can make

everyone

feel better

– they may

have been

worrying

about it, too’

Plan ahead

1 It might help to

reframe the moment in

your mind beforehand as

a positive one. “Approach

the conversation as though

it is a gift,” says Elizabeth.

“You are concerned about

the welfare and well-being

of your loved one, and you

want to come up with the

best solution for everyone

involved.”

Be clear in advance

what you’d like to say –

you can even practice it

out loud before you go.

Then set up a meeting

somewhere private

and comfortable and,

assuming you’re both calm

and relaxed, you can raise

the topic. “Start with a nice

chat, then open with:

‘I’d like to talk to you about

something important,

is that OK?’,” says

Deborah McPhilemy, a relationship

empowerment coach and author.

“Think about how what you’re saying

will affect them. You might want to

add. ‘This may be hard for you to

hear’, or ‘this is difficult for me to

talk about’, to demonstrate that you

understand their feelings and that it’s

a sensitive topic for you both.”

Offer options

2 and give examples

The most important thing is to make

it feel like a two-way discussion,

rather than a lecture. Ask what your

loved one wants and offer choices

when possible.

“Be clear and concise,” says

Elizabeth, “and if it’s appropriate to

the conversation, give examples.

If, for example, you’re worried that

the time has come for your parents

to stop driving, you could back up

your concern with proof, ‘Dad, when

you were driving this morning, I

noticed that you ran through a red

light’. Explain the situation in a

straightforward, factual way.”

Listen carefully

3 “Allow your friend

or relative to express

how they feel and try to

listen without becoming

defensive, although this

can be a challenge!” says

Deborah. “Once they’ve

said their piece, reassure

and comfort them. You

could say, ‘I wish this didn’t

have to happen and things

could be different. But let’s

try to make the best of a

bad situation.’ A hug goes

a long way too.” Check

your body language to

make sure you don’t seem

defensive or hostile. Try to

look relaxed yet attentive,

keeping eye contact and

nodding and smiling

where appropriate.

Dealing with

4 their emotions

Sensitive topics often prompt strong

reactions, so you might need to steel

yourself for an outburst. “Emotion is

just energy being released, so don’t

be fearful of it, or get caught up in it,”

‘The most important thing

is to make it feel like a

two-way discusssion’

says Deborah. “If your loved one reacts

emotionally, just allow it to happen. Let

them feel what they need to feel and

then validate it. For example: ‘I see you

are upset,’ or ‘you seem very sad.’

“Whatever you do, never say: ‘I

5 Consider

the outcome

If your loved one refuses

to talk, ask if there’s

someone they might

prefer to talk to instead,

such as another friend or

relative, or a professional

counsellor or doctor,

depending on the issue.

As nice as it would be

“If having

a face-to-face

conversation fills

you with dread...

...write a note to the person instead,” says

Elizabeth. “When writing you can choose

your words without getting thrown

off course by emotional reactions.

Plus it gives them time to process

what you’ve said and decide

on their reply.”

understand how you feel.’ Even if

you’ve been through the exact same

situation, no two people feel exactly

the same and you might make them

feel alienated. Instead consider, ‘I can

only imagine how angry/sad/frustrated

this makes you feel’ and then you

could tell a similar story from your own

experience if need be.”

to wrap everything up

with one chat, you may

need to leave some issues

unresolved for a time.

“Some people take longer

than others to process

information so before you

leave, reassure them that

you are there for them,

you love them and that

if they want to talk more

about it you’re available.”

It’s more than possible

that, despite your best

efforts, you don’t get

the end results you were

hoping for. “Don’t think of

this opportunity as

‘The Conversation’ but

rather as an ongoing

series of conversations,”

says Elizabeth.

PICS: MASTERFILE, SHUTTERSTOCK


‘The

animals

are the

real

stars!’

Actress Keeley Hawes chats about the new series of

The Durrells, just started on ITV, and why the

Corfu-living clan remind her of her own family

By Alison James

It may boast a cast

of supremely

talented actors

and be set on the

beautiful Greek

island of Corfu but as

ITV’s The Durrells is

an adaptation of the

late Gerald Durrell’s

memoir, My Family

and Other Animals, it’s

only fitting that it’s the

animals taking centre

stage in series two.

“People love the

animals,” says Keeley

Hawes who plays mother-

of-four Louisa Durrell.

“There is one scene in this

series where I had to take

a puppy off young Gerry

and for the rest of the scene

I’m holding it. There was

a discussion because the

director said, “Nobody’s

going to listen to anything

you’re saying,” and I knew

that! Even with the other

cast, if there’s a scene and

someone else is holding a

cute puppy, or hedgehog,

or any animal, no one is

looking at you. This show is

not about the actors; we’re

way down the list, and that’s

quite good!”

Animals are hardly the

most co-operative of

co-stars, though? “It is

difficult, but it’s always

funny,” Keeley goes on.

“In this series we have

an episode where it rains

endlessly, so Gerry wants to

bring the animals into the

house because he thinks

they look depressed. So

we have the donkey and

the pelicans in the house,

hedgehogs, the dog, goats

and a chicken. . . When you

read it in the script, you

think, ‘That’s going to look

fantastic’ but filming it isn’t

easy – ten hours later we’re

still filming! Then I was

filming a scene with lots

of dialogue and my hands

were on the table. A chicken

decided to come over and

just sit on my hands! You

just have to carry on and act

like you are used to having

chickens sitting on your

hands while you’re talking

to people!

“You can train an animal

as much as you like, but

you can’t train it to tell you

when it needs the bathroom,

so there’s lots of dustpans

and brushes and it’s a rather

smelly set!

“The animals are such a

massive part of the series,

though, and this time the

quota has gone through the

roof. Last series there were

barely any in comparison but

Inset, clockwise from above: Louisa (Keeley)

with Leslie (Callum Woodhouse) and a donkey

friend; Keeley with husband, actor Matthew

Mcfadyen; with her on-screen family, Josh

O’Connor, Daisy Waterstone and Milo Parker

this series is full of them.’”

Does Keeley (41) have a

favourite creature? “I liked

the hedgehog,” she smiles.

“That was really cute and

very sweet. I’ve never really

seen a hedgehog up close

like that before. The pelicans

are beautiful, too. Last year

they were babies but they’re

fully-grown now. They are

called Peli-can and Peli-can’t!

I have more to do with them

this time – at one point I had

to take one for a walk on

a lead. I also have a oneway

conversation with the

seagull called Steven Seagal

plus we have magpies who

have a starring role, canaries

and a falcon.”

Animals apart, we get the

impression that love may be

in the air for Louisa – with

charming new Englishman

Hugh, perhaps?

“Louisa is still slightly

heartbroken after her

doomed relationship with

Swedish goat herder Sven

from the last series, but there

is an attraction between

her and Hugh, who has

Greek grandparents and

who owns an olive oil press

in Corfu,” Keeley replies.

“Anyway, Louisa and Hugh

try to make some money.

‘I was filming a

scene and my hands

were on the table

when a chicken just

decided to come

over and sit on them’

They go to market and that

ends in disaster! They try to

introduce Corfu to Spotted

Dick, Toad in the Hole and

Scotch Eggs – nobody gets

it! In series one, the Durrells

were discovering and

exploring and getting used to

life on Corfu but now they’re

trying to make life work for

them.”

Keeley, who’s married to

actor Matthew Mcfadyen,

says she thinks the series

is so popular because

star chat

– in addition to

the animals and

stunning setting - it

reflects family life.

“You see people

having stand up

rows and running

away from home, or

whatever they are

doing. It’s all very

real. It’s so close to

real life sometimes

that it makes me

laugh out loud

when I read it – and

definitely reminds

me of my own

family. Our brilliant

writer, Simon Nye,

has four children and you

can tell. It’s written in a way

that children and adults

can respond to. It’s a period

drama and the attention to

detail is extraordinary but, at

the same time, it’s not a roddown-your-back

costume

drama where everyone is

behaving impeccably all the

time. It’s real life.”

For Keeley, an added

bonus to starring in The

Durrells, which has already

been commissioned for a

third series, is that her four

screen children and the

three she has in real life have

become close.

“My family came out

while we were filming in

Corfu and they were very

impressed by my Durrell

family,” she reveals. “They

think they are very cool

while my on-screen family

are very kind and generous

with my own family. They

all get on very well. We all

go out for dinner and things.

It’s really, really good.”

As is series two of The

Durrells!

n The Durrells is on Sunday

evenings on ITV. If you missed

the first episode you can catch

up on the ITV hub at ITV.com

14 YOURS n EVERY FORTNIGHT

YOURS n EVERY FORTNIGHT 15

PICS: ITV, CAMERA PRESS, REX/SHUTTERSTOCK, GETTY IMAGES

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