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The Good Life – September-October 2017

Featuring West Fargo's new police chief - Heith Janke. Local Hero - Cultural liaison officer - Vince Kempf. Having a Beer with radio host Moose Johnson from The Fox and more in Fargo Moorhead's only men's magazine.

Featuring West Fargo's new police chief - Heith Janke. Local Hero - Cultural liaison officer - Vince Kempf. Having a Beer with radio host Moose Johnson from The Fox and more in Fargo Moorhead's only men's magazine.

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2 / THE GOOD LIFE / urbantoadmedia.com


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Competition in New York, NY.<br />

<strong>The</strong> Fifty Best recently hosted a Gin Tasting, where 62 contenders were evaluated<br />

for the distinguished “Best Gin” awards for <strong>2017</strong>.<br />

Since beginning production in early 2015, Proof Artisan Distillers has received<br />

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Festival and <strong>The</strong> Fifty Best.<br />

www.proofdistillers.com<br />

urbantoadmedia.com / THE GOOD LIFE / 3


Volume 5 • Issue 2<br />

SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER <strong>2017</strong><br />

06<br />

THE DISTINGUISHED<br />

GENTLEMAN'S RIDE<br />

10<br />

WEIRD FACTS<br />

ABOUT CATS<br />

12<br />

NOT IN MY FAMILY<br />

PART TWO<br />

A MOTHER DEALS WITH LOSS<br />

16<br />

CAR CARE<br />

CAR NOISES YOU<br />

SHOULDN'T IGNORE<br />

ON THE COVER - HEITH JANKE<br />

18 NEW WEST FARGO POLICE CHIEF<br />

BRINGS BIG-CITY EXPERIENCE BACK HOME<br />

24<br />

24<br />

HAVING A BEER WITH<br />

MOOSE JOHNSON<br />

28<br />

MR. FULL-TIME DAD<br />

TERRIBLE TWO'S?<br />

BRING IT ON!<br />

4 / THE GOOD LIFE / urbantoadmedia.com<br />

06<br />

30<br />

LOCAL HERO - VINCE KEMPF<br />

CULTURAL LIAISON<br />

POLICE OFFICER


PUBLISHED BY<br />

Urban Toad Media LLP<br />

www.urbantoadmedia.com<br />

OWNER / GRAPHIC DESIGNER<br />

Dawn Siewert<br />

dawn@urbantoadmedia.com<br />

OWNER / PHOTOGRAPHER<br />

Darren Losee<br />

darren@urbantoadmedia.com<br />

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS<br />

Meghan Feir<br />

Alexandra Floersch<br />

Brittney <strong>Good</strong>man<br />

Ben Hanson<br />

Matt Lachowitzer<br />

Krissy Ness<br />

ADVERTISING INQUIRIES<br />

Darren Losee / 701-261-9139<br />

darren@urbantoadmedia.com<br />

READ A PAST ISSUE<br />

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LIKE<br />

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TWEET<br />

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<strong>The</strong> <strong>Good</strong> <strong>Life</strong> Men’s Magazine is distributed six times<br />

a year by Urban Toad Media LLP. Material may not be<br />

reproduced without permission. <strong>The</strong> <strong>Good</strong> <strong>Life</strong> Men’s<br />

Magazine accepts no liability for reader dissatisfaction<br />

arising from content in this publication. <strong>The</strong> opinions<br />

expressed, or advice given, are the views of individual<br />

writers or advertisers and do not necessarily represent<br />

the views or policies of <strong>The</strong> <strong>Good</strong> <strong>Life</strong> Men’s Magazine.<br />

urbantoadmedia.com / THE GOOD LIFE / 5


“<br />

IT IS VERY EXCITING<br />

THAT FARGO/MOORHEAD<br />

CAN PLAY A ROLE IN AN<br />

INTERNATIONAL EFFORT<br />

TO DO GOOD FOR<br />

MEN’S HEALTH AND<br />

SUICIDE PREVENTION.<br />

<strong>–</strong> JIM BOLLUYT<br />

6 / THE GOOD LIFE / urbantoadmedia.com


WRITTEN BY: KRISSY NESS • PHOTOGRAPHY BY: J. ALAN PAUL<br />

Throw on your best suit and grab your vintage bike because <strong>The</strong><br />

Distinguished Gentleman’s Ride is coming your way. Founded<br />

in 2013, <strong>The</strong> Distinguished Gentleman’s Ride has raised over<br />

8 million dollars for men’s health charities. Mark Hawwa of<br />

Sidney, Australia established this event to raise awareness and<br />

provide funding for male suicide prevention and prostate cancer<br />

programs on behalf of the Movember Foundation.<br />

This year 70,000 debonair men and women in over 600 cities will<br />

ride through their communities in hopes of meeting their target<br />

goal of 5 million dollars for men’s mental and physical health.<br />

<strong>The</strong> members who raise the most money for the Movember<br />

Foundation are rewarded by winning motorcycles by Triumph,<br />

luxury watches by Zenith and a helmet by Hedon. Participation<br />

is open to anyone although there are specific guidelines you<br />

must follow if you want to partake.<br />

I had the opportunity to sit down with Jim Bolluyt, an active<br />

member of <strong>The</strong> Distinguished Gentleman’s Ride, and gather a<br />

little information about this event.<br />

“It is very exciting that Fargo/Moorhead can play a role in an<br />

international effort to do good for Men’s health and Suicide<br />

Prevention,” said Bolluyt.<br />

First, you must register on their website, gentlemansride.com.<br />

You will not be given the full information until you do, this is a<br />

niche charity group and they want to keep the information for<br />

the members only. “Ride organizers do have strict criteria for<br />

participants. This all ensures the integrity of the ride not only<br />

from an “image” perspective, but also for the matter of safety. It is<br />

urbantoadmedia.com / THE GOOD LIFE / 7


crucial that all riders go through the<br />

signup process online to understand<br />

the goals and mission and the as well<br />

as emphasis on having a safe and fun<br />

event,” stated Bolluyt.<br />

Next, you are required to dress<br />

nicely and are only able to ride a<br />

specific kind of bike. <strong>The</strong> theme for<br />

this event falls in the 1920-30s era<br />

of clothing style and a well-groomed<br />

moustache. This group really focuses<br />

on the riders’ appearance - the word<br />

distinguished is in the name after all.<br />

When it comes to the kind of bike<br />

you can ride there are 10 different<br />

options you must abide by if you want<br />

to ride with this group. If you own a<br />

chopper, bobber, café racer, modern<br />

classic, tracker, brat style, classic,<br />

scrambler, sidecar or a scooter then<br />

8 / THE GOOD LIFE / urbantoadmedia.com<br />

you are eligible to participate in this<br />

event.<br />

Finally, you are to follow all the<br />

safety guidelines. It is very important<br />

for the riders and the people in<br />

the community that each rider is<br />

responsible, respectful, and attentive.<br />

This means all riders need to keep a<br />

safe distance between them to avoid<br />

collisions. Inappropriate riding will<br />

not be tolerated; anyone who attempts<br />

to ruin the event will have their plate<br />

numbers given to local authorities.<br />

All riders must wear appropriate<br />

safety equipment including helmets<br />

and goggles. Intoxicated riders will<br />

absolutely not be tolerated, and<br />

again your information will be given<br />

to local authorities. For the full list of<br />

rules you may visit their website.<br />

From 2013 to 2015 DGR main<br />

fundraising goal was prostate cancer<br />

awareness but in 2016 after losing<br />

one if their rider hosts to depression<br />

they have shifted their goals to<br />

include mental health awareness as<br />

well. It is great to see a charity ride<br />

like this happening all over the world<br />

and it is even better that this ride<br />

takes place in Fargo, North Dakota.<br />

Raising funds and awareness for<br />

not only cancer that affects men<br />

but also the mental wellbeing of<br />

men is truly inspiring. <strong>The</strong> amount<br />

of participation has nearly doubled<br />

every year and the amount of money<br />

raised started in the high 200,000 in<br />

2013 has jumped to 3.6 million that<br />

was raised last year.<br />

If this is an event that sounds fun or


interesting to you, head over to their<br />

website and take a look around.<br />

<strong>The</strong>y offer statistics, photos<br />

and videos from previous rides<br />

and general information about<br />

their goals and sponsors. <strong>The</strong>se<br />

particular events really resonate<br />

within the Fargo Moorhead area,<br />

as we are a very charity driven<br />

community.<br />

Not only does this event help the<br />

community and men’s health<br />

awareness but you can also win<br />

some stellar prizes for raising<br />

the most money. So do yourself<br />

and men’s health a favor and<br />

consider becoming a sponsored<br />

rider and if that isn’t your thing,<br />

contemplate donating to a rider<br />

in your community to help make a<br />

difference in men’s lives. •<br />

urbantoadmedia.com / THE GOOD LIFE / 9


Cat owners who are male<br />

tend to be luckier in love,<br />

as they are perceived as more<br />

sensitive.<br />

Cats can drink sea water<br />

in order to survive. Cats have<br />

crazy kidneys that filter out the<br />

salt from the water so they can<br />

re-hydrate themselves.<br />

A cat in a hurry can<br />

sprint about<br />

31 mph.<br />

A cat can jump<br />

7 times its height.<br />

Cats are North America's<br />

most popular pets:<br />

there are 73 million cats<br />

compared to 63 millions dogs.<br />

In the UK,<br />

more than<br />

two thirds<br />

of cat owners<br />

are men.<br />

A cat's brain is biologically more like a<br />

human brain than a dog's. Both humans<br />

and cats have identical regions of their<br />

brains that are responsible for emotions.<br />

A cat's nose pad<br />

is ridged with a<br />

unique pattern,<br />

just like the<br />

fingerprint<br />

of a human.<br />

Cats are sometimes<br />

born with extra<br />

toes. This is called<br />

polydactyl.<br />

In Japan, cats are thought to have<br />

the power to turn into super spirits<br />

when they die. This may be because<br />

according to Buddhist religion, the<br />

body of the cat is the temporary<br />

resting place of very spiritual people.<br />

<strong>The</strong> cheetah is the only cat in the<br />

world that can't retract its claws.<br />

Cats sweat through<br />

their paw pads.<br />

Female cats<br />

are typically right pawed<br />

while male cats<br />

are typically left pawed.<br />

10 / THE GOOD LIFE / urbantoadmedia.com


PHOTOGRAPHY BY: URBAN TOAD MEDIA<br />

Ear furnishings are the hairs<br />

that grow inside a cat's ears.<br />

Owning a cat can<br />

reduce the risk<br />

of a heart attack and<br />

stroke by more than<br />

a third. Scientists<br />

say that having a cat<br />

helps relieve stress<br />

and anxiety, which is<br />

known to help protect<br />

against heart disease<br />

by lowering blood<br />

pressure and<br />

reducing heart rate.<br />

A female cat<br />

is called a<br />

queen or a<br />

molly.<br />

Cat urine<br />

glows<br />

under a<br />

black light.<br />

A group of<br />

cats is<br />

called a<br />

clowder.<br />

REFERENCES:<br />

www.jukani.co.za/Cat-trivia_article_op_view_id_55<br />

www.independent.co.uk/life-style/men-getting-pet-cats-rise-a7659926.html<br />

www.buzzfeed.com/chelseamarshall/meows?utm_term=.beppLQjPlB#.cnNJD8pvGM<br />

www.factretriever.com/cat-facts<br />

www.brainjet.com/random/2101/12-weird-cat-facts/<br />

Abraham Lincoln<br />

kept four cats<br />

in the White house.<br />

urbantoadmedia.com / THE GOOD LIFE / 11


NOT IN MY FAMILY // PART TWO<br />

WRITTEN BY: BRITTNEY GOODMAN<br />

PHOTOGRAPHY BY: URBAN TOAD MEDIA<br />

Lori Morse lost her son, Tyson Chaney, to a fentanyl<br />

overdose on March 6, 2016. She tells her story to<br />

increase understanding and awareness. And it is, sadly,<br />

just one of the many stories, as families deal with the<br />

increased opioid overdose deaths of their loved ones.<br />

Originally from Jamestown, Morse has lived in Fargo for<br />

almost 30 years. A retired nurse, she and her husband,<br />

Michael, live in West Fargo with one of her children,<br />

Garrett.<br />

Chaney, 24 at the time of his overdose death, worked<br />

at Porter Creek, on his way to becoming a chef. Morse<br />

described his passion for life: “He absolutely loved<br />

working there. And he had an amazing amount of<br />

friends. When over 500 people show up for a 24 year<br />

old’s funeral, you know he had made quite an impact for<br />

someone that age.<br />

“He was just really finding his way in life,” Morse said.<br />

She continued, “He had stopped drinking 18 months<br />

12 / THE GOOD LIFE / urbantoadmedia.com


“<br />

I THINK ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT THINGS IS THAT THIS CAN HAPPEN TO ANYBODY,<br />

TO ANY FAMILY, AND THAT PEOPLE NEED TO STOP JUDGING. YOU NEVER KNOW WHEN IT WILL<br />

BE YOU WHO GETS THAT PHONE CALL OR COME TO THE REALIZATION THAT SOMEONE IN YOUR<br />

FAMILY NEEDS HELP. WE ARE LOSING VERY WONDERFUL, SMART YOUNG PEOPLE THAT ARE<br />

LOVED — TOO MANY YOUNG, INTELLIGENT PEOPLE. <strong>–</strong> LORI MORSE<br />

before his death. He had come to realize he couldn’t<br />

handle alcohol. He was smart enough to realize he<br />

couldn’t drink and he quit it on his own. I was proud of<br />

him for that. He was a normal 24 year old single guy. He<br />

was still my boy.”<br />

According to Morse, it was a fentanyl overdose but he<br />

was “not an addict”: “He hated heroin. We talked about<br />

it. It was a complete shock to everyone. He would have<br />

never wanted to die. He loved life. He would never have<br />

wanted to put us through this.” She asserted: “Who<br />

would ever thought this would happen to us?”<br />

Morse stressed that it was accidental: “Although he did<br />

make the decision to take a drug, he did not make the<br />

decision to die. He would take full responsibility for his<br />

decision to use drugs, but dying was not a part of it.”<br />

Morse asserted: “People have no idea. It can be the<br />

person next to you in the cubicle at work or in the pew<br />

urbantoadmedia.com / THE GOOD LIFE / 13


NOT IN MY FAMILY // PART TWO<br />

“<br />

IT CAN BE YOUR<br />

FIRST TIME. THE PERSON<br />

TAKING THE DRUG OFTEN JUST<br />

DOES NOT KNOW WHAT THEY<br />

ARE TAKING. THE DEALERS DON’T<br />

KNOW WHAT THEY ARE SELLING.<br />

THEY ARE NOT CHEMISTS <strong>–</strong><br />

THEY ARE JUST THROWING<br />

A BUNCH OF STUFF<br />

TOGETHER.<br />

at church. You just<br />

don’t know. Back in<br />

the day we thought of<br />

heroin users as junkies<br />

living in the streets. That<br />

is just not the case now. No.<br />

Definitely not.”<br />

<strong>The</strong> judgment hurts. Encountering some “cruel”<br />

Facebook comments about her son and others, Morse<br />

said: “<strong>The</strong>y need to wake up. I can’t think of how anyone<br />

can be so cruel as to say such stupid, uninformed things.”<br />

Addicts are not the only overdose victims. Morse said: “It<br />

can be your first time. <strong>The</strong> person taking the drug often<br />

just does not know what they are taking. <strong>The</strong> dealers<br />

don’t know what they are selling. <strong>The</strong>y are not chemists<br />

<strong>–</strong> they are just throwing a bunch of stuff together.”<br />

Morse described the night she found out: “<strong>The</strong>y<br />

called at 2:30 in the morning. As a mother, you always<br />

answer the phone, even in the middle of the night,<br />

because you never know. An officer said his name<br />

and he was with the police department. He wanted<br />

my address so that he could come and talk with me.<br />

But I didn’t want to tell the officer, because, in the<br />

state I was in, I thought ‘if they can’t find me, then<br />

they can’t tell me.’ I finally gave the phone to my<br />

husband.” She then called her son’s phone and it was<br />

turned off. It started to sink in: “Your whole world<br />

just kind of stops.”<br />

Morse goes to his cemetery plot “at least five times a<br />

week.” “I know he’s not there. I feel him everywhere<br />

that I go, though. I’m still taking care of his spot. I<br />

make sure the flowers are all watered — because I’m<br />

still taking care of him.”<br />

14 / THE GOOD LIFE / urbantoadmedia.com


Although this was not the case with Chaney,<br />

many people become addicted after taking opioid<br />

pain medication. Morse describes her own<br />

experience with pain medication after a back<br />

surgery: “I had to wean myself off of it because<br />

I found that my body started really ‘needing’ it.<br />

My body ached for it. People think that it’s okay<br />

to take pain medication because they’ve got a<br />

prescription. But they need to be careful. Some<br />

of the doctors just prescribe too much. I have<br />

heard stories of dentists prescribing a month’s<br />

worth of medication for their wisdom teeth.<br />

Nobody needs that. It’s dangerous. Who in their<br />

right mind wants to become an addict? Nobody.<br />

But it can easily happen.”<br />

While Morse is thankful for the police’s efforts,<br />

she finds the judicial system lacking. She<br />

called for follow-up: “What is happening to the<br />

dealers, the people who are selling it? What<br />

kind of sentences are they getting? Why aren’t<br />

we dealing with this? We have to do something.<br />

I won’t sit still while this happens in our town.”<br />

She is frustrated that in the case of one of her<br />

son’s friends who overdosed, “they had the<br />

people responsible” but they are “all back in<br />

Minneapolis and not in jail.”<br />

She appealed for community involvement: “For a<br />

while, we had some community action, but what<br />

is happening now? How many more have passed<br />

away this year? We need a better community<br />

dialog. We need to keep it in the news... It’s<br />

everywhere and is affecting everyone.” She<br />

supports naloxone training to reverse overdoses:<br />

“Anything that can be done to save someone’s<br />

life should be done.”<br />

Morse’s main message resonated: “I think one<br />

of the most important things is that this can<br />

happen to anybody, to any family, and that people<br />

need to stop judging. You never know when it<br />

will be you who gets that phone call or come<br />

to the realization that someone in your family<br />

needs help. We are losing very wonderful, smart<br />

young people that are loved — too many young,<br />

intelligent people.”<br />

And the loss of young life continues. According<br />

to Morse, “at least three or four of Tyson’s good<br />

friends who were at his funeral have died from<br />

drug overdoses since his passing.”<br />

In the next article, we will focus on another<br />

family’s story, community resources and ways to<br />

be a part of the solution. •<br />

urbantoadmedia.com / THE GOOD LIFE / 15


WRITTEN BY: MATT LACHOWITZER<br />

How often do you listen to the noises coming from your vehicle? When you get in your car in the morning to head<br />

to work, you might hear the engine starting when you turn the ignition, and if it’s raining, you’ll hear your wiper<br />

blades on your windshield. What if it’s a hot day, you turn on your A/C and hear a loud thumping coming from<br />

your dash somewhere. Wait? That last one can’t be right. While some of those everyday noises in your vehicle<br />

are fine, others such as loud thumping or squealing noises probably aren’t. So instead of turning your music up<br />

to avoid listening to the uneasy noises coming from your vehicle, continue reading to learn what some of those<br />

noises may mean.<br />

Hissing<br />

When you hear your vehicle hissing, it could indicate a sign of engine<br />

overheating or your exhaust system and/or catalytic converter is<br />

plugged. Another reason for your vehicle hissing, in idle particularly,<br />

it could indicate a vacuum leak. If it’s one of those reasons or any<br />

other, it’s a good indication that it’s time to bring your vehicle into<br />

your automotive service center.<br />

Grinding<br />

One of the most common noises most people hear is grinding, and it’s<br />

an indication that two pieces of metal are touching when they shouldn’t<br />

be. <strong>The</strong> grinding could be coming from several different areas: brakes,<br />

powertrain, suspension or something else. <strong>The</strong> most common type of<br />

grinding noise is from brakes. When brakes are worn down past the<br />

material on a brake pad, all that is left is metal. That metal is then<br />

grinding against the metal brake rotors, thus the term “metal on metal”<br />

brakes. No matter what is causing the grinding, it’s a sign that you need<br />

to bring your vehicle into your automotive service center for further<br />

inspection.<br />

Squeaking<br />

Like any other sound, this could be<br />

caused because of different reasons.<br />

<strong>The</strong> high-pitched squeaking can let<br />

you know that it’s time to get your<br />

brake pads checked or replaced. If<br />

the high-pitched squeak is from the<br />

front of your vehicle when you’re not<br />

braking, it could be a sign of a worn<br />

out or cracked serpentine belt. In any<br />

case, it’s important to get a squeak<br />

checked out before it turns into<br />

another, possibly more serious noise<br />

and more costly repairs.<br />

Humming<br />

If you’re driving at faster speeds and you hear humming, it could be<br />

a sign of some wear on your tires. It could also be an indication of an<br />

issue beyond your tires such as a wheel bearing or differential problem<br />

and can be difficult to diagnose or inspect on your own.<br />

Growling<br />

Unlike monsters, your vehicle isn’t supposed to growl. If you encounter<br />

this noise, while it can change when turning or the weight of your vehicle<br />

shifting, it can be caused by a worn bearing in any number of moving<br />

components of your vehicle and should be a sign to get it inspected by<br />

your automotive service center.<br />

16 / THE GOOD LIFE / urbantoadmedia.com


Whining/Creaking<br />

If you are hearing a whining or creaking noise while you<br />

are backing up, turning, or while driving, it could be an<br />

indication that you may have a worn suspension part<br />

such as a ball joint or shock or strut. It could also be<br />

an indication that something may be wrong with your<br />

steering system and sometimes a whine while turning<br />

could as simple as being low on power steering fluid.<br />

While your vehicle could make twenty different noises<br />

and mean 100 different things, it’s important to be<br />

attentive and just listen. If you listen to your vehicle<br />

closely, you’ll know when something isn’t right and<br />

when it’s time to bring it into your automotive service<br />

center. Try to remember where the noise is coming<br />

from, what were you doing when you heard it, when<br />

was the first time you heard it and it’s always a bonus<br />

when you remember what the noise sounds like.<br />

Another piece of advice is to take a video of what you<br />

are doing when the noise occurs and try to capture the<br />

noise itself, which cannot only help the service center<br />

identify the noise quicker, but can save you money in<br />

testing time as well. Always talk with a professional at<br />

your automotive service center when it comes to any<br />

unusual noises you’re hearing from your vehicle, and<br />

if possible, go for a ride with the service technician<br />

that will be working on your vehicle so you can help<br />

point out the noise to them as well. Like all things on a<br />

vehicle, proper maintenance and regular visits to your<br />

service center can usually help find these items before<br />

they turn into a costlier repair down the road. •<br />

urbantoadmedia.com / THE GOOD LIFE / 17


COVER // HEITH JANKE<br />

“<br />

BEING ON THE STREETS<br />

AND IN LEADERSHIP<br />

POSITIONS,<br />

I FOUND I ENJOY<br />

LEADERSHIP<br />

THE BEST.<br />

<strong>–</strong> HEITH JANKE<br />

18 / THE GOOD LIFE / urbantoadmedia.com


WRITTEN BY: ALEXANDRA FLOERSCH • PHOTOGRAPHY BY: URBAN TOAD MEDIA<br />

Whether we like to admit it or not, there’s<br />

something about the Fargo-Moorhead-West<br />

Fargo community that sticks. Many people leave,<br />

but most tend to make their way back. West<br />

Fargo’s newly sworn-in police chief, Heith Janke,<br />

is the newest member of that club.<br />

Growing up in Madison, S.D., Janke got his first<br />

taste of "North Dakota nice" nearly two decades<br />

ago, when he came to North Dakota State<br />

University to pursue an undergraduate degree in<br />

criminal justice. It was NDSU that also gave him<br />

his first taste of leadership. Janke was a standout<br />

on the Bison track team. He rose quickly through<br />

the collegiate ranks, capping off a hall of fame<br />

career in 1998 with an 800-meter national<br />

championship title. (In humble, Midwestern<br />

fashion, he's quick to point out that his wife,<br />

Brenna—a member of the 1996 women’s<br />

basketball national championship team—is also<br />

a member of the Bison Athletic Hall of Fame.)<br />

After graduating from NDSU, Janke attended<br />

law school at the University of North Dakota. In<br />

2004, his childhood dream came true when the<br />

FBI came calling with a job offer. <strong>The</strong> leadership<br />

experience on the track field was soon to be put<br />

to the test in the field. "One of the reasons I went<br />

to law school was to help get into the FBI,” he<br />

said. “Growing up, it's one of those things I had<br />

admired."<br />

Climbing the Ranks<br />

With the FBI, Janke was first stationed in Kansas<br />

City for four years before being transferred to<br />

San Antonio—investigating white collar crimes—<br />

and then to Washington, D.C. where he was<br />

promoted to civil rights unit supervisor.<br />

"After that, I got promoted back to Kansas City<br />

where I was a supervisor of public corruption<br />

and civil rights,” he said. “At the end, I ran a child<br />

exploitation task force and a human trafficking<br />

task force, dealing with child pornography, the<br />

exploitation of children and human trafficking of<br />

all people. I also had hate crimes on the squad."<br />

Though Janke covered sensitive, high profile<br />

cases that often challenged his skills, the<br />

experience was undoubtedly like no other with<br />

exposure to both local and national cases.<br />

"I kind of have a unique perspective,” he said.<br />

“I worked on the streets in Kansas City when<br />

(trafficking) was new. We hadn't even processed<br />

a human trafficking case before—back in 2005.”<br />

When he transferred to the U.S. capitol city, he<br />

gained national perspective on human trafficking<br />

while supervising in the civil rights unit, which<br />

followed by his return to Kansas City where he<br />

lead a task force that combatted it. “It's one of<br />

those things that’s a hidden crime and people<br />

don't think it's everywhere,” he said. “But it more<br />

than likely is if you go looking for it."<br />

No matter where on the map he landed, Janke<br />

knew he preferred one position best. "Being<br />

out on the streets and in leadership positions, I<br />

found I enjoy leadership the best,” he said. “You<br />

urbantoadmedia.com / THE GOOD LIFE / 19


COVER // HEITH JANKE<br />

This picture<br />

was taken in November<br />

of 2015, in Kansas City, when<br />

Former Director James Comey<br />

presented Janke with the FBI's High<br />

Impact Leadership Award. It was<br />

a new award designed by Director<br />

Comey recognizing the top FBI<br />

leaders who were leading their<br />

people well and effectively<br />

managing their work.<br />

PHOTO SUBMITTED BY: HEITH JANKE<br />

not only get to teach and help mentor—which is<br />

what I really enjoy—but also participate in all the<br />

different investigations.”<br />

It was that love of teaching—and opportunities<br />

through the FBI—that led him to share his<br />

knowledge with people across the world. “I gave<br />

about 85 different presentations throughout the<br />

country, Budapest, Hong Kong and Canada,” he<br />

said. “It gave me the opportunity to really see the<br />

country and other parts of the world."<br />

Back in Bison Country<br />

Throughout all of the excitement, Janke knew<br />

he’d eventually need to shift priorities. "We have<br />

two kids: Max (13) and Reese (11), so they've<br />

been around for the journey. But that's one of the<br />

reasons we're back here,” he said. “With the FBI,<br />

there wasn't always free-time. You're reacting to<br />

those crimes and it's not something you can put<br />

on hold, so work really was first.”<br />

When work turned chaotic, his wife and kids<br />

bore the burden. Not only did Janke miss his kids’<br />

events, he lacked time to participate in hobbies<br />

of his own. “Things kind of get unbalanced,” he<br />

said. “So that's what I'm looking forward to: being<br />

back here, being able to attend my daughter's<br />

volleyball and basketball games, Bison football,<br />

basketball and track meets."<br />

<strong>The</strong> father of two is also happy to take a<br />

promotion that doesn’t require him to move<br />

across the country anytime soon. "One of the<br />

issues with management in the FBI is that I was<br />

at the point where we were essentially moving<br />

every two years to keep rising through the ranks,<br />

which means continuing to move kids to new<br />

schools,” he said. “We had already done that<br />

several times."<br />

Not to mention, the police station is four minutes<br />

away—instead of 45—and grandma and grandpa<br />

are just a couple blocks down the street. "My son<br />

is special needs, so it's important to be back with<br />

family and not have to keep moving him,” he said.<br />

“He can have stability, too.”<br />

Above all, Janke is looking forward to the sense<br />

of community he experienced nearly 20 years<br />

ago. “If you grow up in the Midwest, you're used<br />

to the niceness of opening doors and everyone<br />

waving or saying 'hi,'" he said. "When you get to<br />

big city living, people are always in a rush and<br />

honking horns. Even in grocery stores: heads are<br />

down, people are rude... but not here. You don't<br />

appreciate Midwest values until you've lived<br />

across the country."<br />

<strong>The</strong> Labor of Law Enforcement<br />

Talk to anyone in law enforcement—whether<br />

it’s the police department or the FBI—everyone<br />

agrees on one thing: no day is ever the same. And<br />

that’s what Janke loves most about his job.<br />

"You wake up, something new happens and you<br />

20 / THE GOOD LIFE / urbantoadmedia.com


“<br />

YOU DON'T APPRECIATE MIDWEST<br />

VALUES UNTIL YOU'VE LIVED<br />

ACROSS THE COUNTRY.<br />

<strong>–</strong> HEITH JANKE<br />

react to it. That's one thing that's fascinating<br />

about law enforcement: there's a wide variety,” he<br />

said. “<strong>The</strong>re's obviously a lot of different criminal<br />

violations you can work, so if you get burned out<br />

on one thing you can move to the next."<br />

But no matter which way you spin the<br />

story, law enforcement is a dangerous job.<br />

"Literally every time you're stopping<br />

someone or going to a door, you<br />

don't know what that threat is.<br />

That is stress that over time can<br />

take a toll on officers," he said.<br />

"It's easy to second-guess law<br />

enforcement when you're<br />

watching a video, but you're<br />

not in those shoes, having<br />

to make that decision in a<br />

second.”<br />

In <strong>2017</strong>, horrifying headlines of police<br />

brutality are rampant. But Janke has the<br />

inside scoop, having investigated excessive<br />

force cases with the FBI as part of the civil<br />

rights unit. What he found was just a minor<br />

statistical population of offenders.<br />

“When it's a 24/7 news cycle, it sometimes<br />

misleads the public that there are so many<br />

bad officers out there. And that's really not<br />

the case," he said. "Here in West Fargo, we've<br />

got incredible officers, and I've already learned<br />

that.”<br />

Witnessing communities divide as a result<br />

of the these stories, Janke has learned that<br />

great leadership in today’s world involves a<br />

three-tier formula of trust, cooperation and<br />

transparency—none of which can be achieved<br />

sitting behind a desk.<br />

"Having been through some of those cases—<br />

urbantoadmedia.com / THE GOOD LIFE / 21


COVER // HEITH JANKE<br />

“<br />

CRIME DOESN'T STOP AT<br />

A CITY BORDER; IT DOESN'T<br />

STOP AT A RIVER THAT<br />

CROSSES THE STATE. IF WE'RE<br />

NOT ALL WORKING TOGETHER,<br />

ALL WE'RE DOING IS PUSHING<br />

THE CRIME ELEMENT TO<br />

ANOTHER CITY.<br />

<strong>–</strong> HEITH JANKE<br />

being down in Missouri during the Ferguson<br />

case—seeing how certain communities have<br />

reacted, the important thing is figuring out<br />

transparency within the community and building<br />

relationships,” he said. “<strong>The</strong> key to transparency<br />

is having that trust—making sure I can pick up<br />

the phone and contact a leader so we can have<br />

an open discussion and they can contact us and<br />

address it."<br />

In moving forward, Janke aims to instill a sense of<br />

trust within the department, leading by example.<br />

“My proposal is to build the family chemistry<br />

back again,” he said. “It's about figuring out<br />

our structure and—as the city keeps growing—<br />

making sure our police department is adequately<br />

growing to serve all the citizens of West Fargo."<br />

Besides battling scrutiny and shocking headlines,<br />

law enforcement is still expected to stay focused<br />

on their primary duties. "We don't get in this<br />

business to get rich, to get fame or those types of<br />

things,” Janke said. “It's a calling to serve. That's<br />

why we do it and we can't ever lose track of that."<br />

A United Force Moving Forward<br />

Accepting his new position as the West Fargo<br />

police chief, Janke is confident in his new<br />

role. "I'd like to think with what I've done and<br />

accomplished, I've got a whole lot of experience<br />

for my young age," the 41-year-old said. "From<br />

an investigative standpoint, I worked some very<br />

large and significant cases—cases that I hope we<br />

never have here in West Fargo."<br />

Janke hopes he can use those investigative skills<br />

to help mentor some of the 54 officers and 13<br />

civilian staff he now oversees. "Having the<br />

leadership from both the national level in D.C.<br />

and the local level in Kansas City, I've worked for<br />

some incredible leaders,” he said. “I hope to have<br />

gained their knowledge—how they lead—to use<br />

22 / THE GOOD LIFE / urbantoadmedia.com


in leading this department forward."<br />

Janke is aware that teamwork means uniting<br />

as one across the board. Not only will the West<br />

Fargo Police Department have to band together,<br />

Janke plans to also work closely with other<br />

local law enforcement agencies. "Crime doesn't<br />

stop at a city border; it doesn't stop at a river<br />

that crosses the state,” he said. “If we're not all<br />

working together, all we're doing is pushing the<br />

crime to another city.”<br />

Even with a jam-packed schedule during his first<br />

few days of work, Janke remained optimistic<br />

about the department’s future. “While there has<br />

been negative publicity in the last few months,<br />

the men and women in this police department<br />

are incredible,” he said. "<strong>The</strong> past is in the past<br />

and these men and women are great. That's the<br />

message I want to get out there: we're here to<br />

serve and protect the citizens of West Fargo and<br />

we will do it honorably.”<br />

Awakening to ‘<strong>The</strong> <strong>Good</strong> <strong>Life</strong>’<br />

For Janke, accepting the role of police chief<br />

means more than just a new job and a new place<br />

to call home for his family. It’s a fresh start in<br />

a great community filled with “Midwest nice”<br />

people and family close by.<br />

"<strong>The</strong> good life to me is finally having a work and<br />

family balance,” Janke said. “I can lead this great<br />

organization but also raise my family into the<br />

future, attend those sporting events and maybe<br />

even help coach. Being in a smaller community<br />

with less stressors going on—that's going to be<br />

the good life for me."<br />

As for the future, Janke hopes to be done moving<br />

for awhile. "We came back for this endeavor to be<br />

here. I'm not using this as a stepping stone. This<br />

is going to be home," he said. "Had I wanted to<br />

keep moving up and moving across the country,<br />

it would have made sense to stay where I was.<br />

Hopefully, we'll be here for a very long time." •<br />

urbantoadmedia.com / THE GOOD LIFE / 23


HAVING A BEER WITH // MOOSE JOHNSON<br />

WRITTEN BY: MEGHAN FEIR • PHOTOGRAPHY BY: URBAN TOAD MEDIA<br />

24 / THE GOOD LIFE / urbantoadmedia.com


Moose (not his real name) Johnson, the program director<br />

for 107.9 <strong>The</strong> FOX and a radio host for “<strong>The</strong> FOX Morning<br />

Show with Robbie, Dave and Moose,” has been in the<br />

industry for 23 years after graduating from a DJ school<br />

out of Hollywood and being a staple radio personality for<br />

stations in various cities.<br />

Before his days on the air, Johnson lived in southern<br />

California and moved to Dickinson, N.D., toured with his<br />

bands, met his wife at Taco Bell, and had already met one<br />

of his teenage idols: Nikki Sixx.<br />

Now he’s at the point in his career where he’s getting<br />

interviewed for men’s magazines, which is exactly what<br />

happened on a semi-lovely day in August when I had the<br />

chance to chat with Johnson over a beer, a water and a<br />

table at Drekker Brewing Company in Fargo.<br />

<strong>Good</strong> <strong>Life</strong>: Are you glad the ‘90s are back?<br />

Moose Johnson: Sure. I graduated in 1990 and played in<br />

a band. Anything that resembled ‘80s hair and metal was<br />

out and grunge was in. My band and I went from spandex<br />

and long poufy hair to flannels and stayed away from<br />

hairspray. I like both eras. I probably played more during<br />

the ‘90s grunge stuff, but I grew up in the ‘80s.<br />

GL: Are you going to get some frosted tips?<br />

MJ: If I had hair, sure!<br />

urbantoadmedia.com / THE GOOD LIFE / 25


HAVING A BEER WITH // MOOSE JOHNSON<br />

GL: What’s your favorite TV show of all time?<br />

MJ: I’d have to go with “Seinfeld.” I own every season<br />

and have seen every episode at least three or four times.<br />

It was must-see TV. I was in radio when the last episode<br />

aired, and it was such a big deal that we actually threw a<br />

promotion at a bar for the final episode. Everybody pretty<br />

much loved that show, and for good reason; it was wellwritten<br />

comedy about nothing, which is everything that<br />

you did in normal life.<br />

GL: Based on the actors who have played them, who has a<br />

better voice for radio, Batman or Superman?<br />

MJ: Christian Bale probably has the best voice, so Batman.<br />

GL: And he has a slight overbite, which makes his voice<br />

more distinct.<br />

GL: What was one thing you used to hate that you love<br />

now?<br />

MJ: I’m going to say routine. When I was younger, I hated<br />

routine. I wanted every day to be different than yesterday.<br />

Now that I’m older, I kind of like the routine—not that I still<br />

don’t like trying different things. I was always the life of the<br />

party, and now I like kicking back.<br />

GL: What’s your favorite article of clothing?<br />

MJ: Shoes. I love shoes. I have a weakness for them, and<br />

I’ve passed that on to my boys. I know it doesn’t sound<br />

manly, and I hate that, but I have so many pairs of shoes.<br />

My wife says I have more shoes than she does, so I say I<br />

don’t and try to hide them.<br />

GL: Whom did you want to grow up and be like when you<br />

were in junior high?<br />

MJ: You’re going to hear the geekiest story ever. Growing<br />

up in the ‘80s, I was a huge, huge fan of Mötley Crüe, and<br />

the guy I liked the most was Nikki Sixx. I liked a lot of<br />

bands, but three out of the four walls in my bedroom were<br />

covered in nothing but Mötley Crüe posters. All the other<br />

bands had one wall and the ceiling. I had this really cool<br />

poster of Nikki Sixx by my light switch, and every day,<br />

before I had to go catch the bus, I’d go to turn off my light<br />

switch, look at Nikki and say, “I hope someday I’m half as<br />

cool as you, man!” I’ve met him a few times now and told<br />

him this story. He probably just thinks I’m a geek.<br />

GL: Moose. What happened in 1996?<br />

MJ: I got married!<br />

26 / THE GOOD LIFE / urbantoadmedia.com


GL: I’m glad I asked about<br />

1996. How did your wife and<br />

you meet?<br />

MJ: I was working at Pizza<br />

Hut, she was working at Taco<br />

Bell, and I was sick of pizza, so<br />

I called over to Taco Bell and<br />

said, “Hey, wanna trade some<br />

tacos for some pizza?” and she<br />

said, “Sure! Bring them over.”<br />

So I brought them over, saw her<br />

and went, “Wow.” I had a buddy<br />

who worked over there, so I<br />

said, “Hey, you’ve got to help me<br />

here.” Little did I know, he was<br />

trying to get her number and<br />

ask her out. So I gave him three<br />

weeks. He never got anywhere<br />

with her. When the three weeks<br />

were up, I asked her out and she<br />

said no. But then a week or so<br />

later I asked her out to a movie<br />

and she said yes.<br />

GL: What does living “the good<br />

life” mean to you?<br />

MJ: This is one of those<br />

questions where I would’ve had<br />

a hard time answering years ago<br />

or said something about living<br />

on an island or a mansion, but<br />

as I get older, I just like simple<br />

things. Having all the buds over<br />

to watch football and have a<br />

beer, that’s awesome. It’s sitting<br />

out on the deck having one,<br />

talking to my wife and talking<br />

about life, and watching my<br />

boys grow up. •<br />

“<br />

HEY, WANNA TRADE<br />

SOME TACOS FOR<br />

SOME PIZZA?<br />

<strong>–</strong> MOOSE JOHNSON<br />

urbantoadmedia.com / THE GOOD LIFE / 27


FATHERS // MR. FULL-TIME DAD<br />

TERRIBLE TWO'S?<br />

BRING IT ON!<br />

WRITTEN BY: BEN HANSON • PHOTOGRAPHY BY: URBAN TOAD MEDIA<br />

It’s 8:15 p.m. on Sunday night. I’ve just resettled my son,<br />

Macklin, for the second time after arriving home from a<br />

weekend at the lake. He’s fighting sleep not just because<br />

he hates Mondays as much as the rest of us, but because<br />

he’s riding a weekend-long sugar high and can’t help but<br />

continue jumping on the bed. In the dark. While singing.<br />

Why the rush? Well, he just turned 2, so we took the<br />

opportunity to throw a three-day party that featured an<br />

endless buffet of his favorite foods, people and high-impact<br />

aerobics. While a normal person would be exhausted to<br />

the point of collapse after such a binge, our newly-minted<br />

2-year-old appears unfazed as if his internal engine runs<br />

on birthday cake and parental yawns.<br />

bodily functions. His favorite word is “toot,” and he’s yet to<br />

find an audience that makes him self-conscious. Consider<br />

this your warning.<br />

POTTY TRAINING<br />

I’m sure the worst is yet to come with learning how to be<br />

independent in the bathroom, but so far the only drama<br />

has been over what form of chocolate will be provided<br />

as incentive. (Hint: stock up on M&Ms, as they melt in<br />

your mouth, not in your hand.) <strong>The</strong>re’s been some dispute<br />

about books versus YouTube videos while sitting on the<br />

throne, but we quickly gave up that fight. We’ve agreed<br />

to let him watch whatever he wants, and he’s agreed to<br />

focus on aiming.<br />

Welcome to the terrible twos, I hear in my head. “Bring it<br />

on!” I say back. My inner dialogue is astonishingly basic.<br />

I’ve been told to beware of the terrible twos by every<br />

parenting blog, book and bogus expert out there, and while<br />

I typically exude a healthy sense of pessimism, I’m not at<br />

all convinced trying times are ahead. Mack has proven<br />

himself awesome at every opportunity. Messy, sure. But<br />

awesome. I have to believe most 2-year-olds are similarly<br />

awesome, so allow me to break a few stereotypes and talk<br />

some fellow parents off the ledge.<br />

LEARNING TO TALK<br />

I don’t know how the average kid learns to talk, but<br />

Macklin has chosen to tackle the task in the third-person.<br />

It’s thrilling. We get a play-by-play of everything that’s<br />

happening both to him and within him. For example,<br />

when he wants to read a book, he doesn’t just carry a<br />

book over to the couch and sit down. He narrates it for all<br />

to hear. “Mack-in… lay down… right here… this one.”<br />

With a 2-year-old, it’s rare to have to guess what’s going<br />

on. <strong>The</strong>y have no filter, so everything is announced and<br />

celebrated. <strong>The</strong>re’s no qualifying or calculating—if he’s<br />

got a word remotely relatable to the situation, it’s coming<br />

out of his mouth.<br />

While mostly amusing, this does present one notable<br />

challenge… you can’t get away with anything. Because you<br />

carry it everywhere you go, it’s second nature to use your<br />

body as show-and-tell to teach language. Thus, Macklin’s<br />

vocabulary is heavily skewed towards body parts and<br />

28 / THE GOOD LIFE / urbantoadmedia.com


at home, flinging himself to the ground in a soupy pile of tears, but it<br />

never lasts more than a minute or two.<br />

But what about when you’re out in public? Simple… just stay home. I<br />

mean that both seriously and slightly sarcastically. <strong>The</strong> main rule of<br />

parenting as far as I’m concerned is to simply pay attention. That’s it.<br />

Pay attention to your kid. If you do even a mediocre job of this, you will<br />

be able to sense when your kid has had enough and would do well to<br />

stay in. Errands can always wait. <strong>The</strong> sale on laundry detergent is not<br />

worth public humiliation.<br />

ALL EYES ON HIM<br />

As an admitted introvert, having a talking 2-year old to bring with me<br />

everywhere I go is a serious blessing when timed right (see above). All<br />

I have to do is introduce him and away he goes, diverting all attention<br />

away from me. It’s magical… especially around family. <strong>The</strong> day Mack<br />

learns to talk on the phone might literally be the last time I have a<br />

conversation with anyone outside my immediate family.<br />

Though it’s still early in the game, the terrible twos have started off<br />

quite smoothly. I’m choosing to focus on the perks, the hilarity and the<br />

less-obvious upsides. Compared to midnight feedings and teething,<br />

toddlerhood is actually proving to be more tolerable than previous<br />

epochs. He’s old enough to get cake for his birthday, but so far unaware<br />

of what happens to the leftovers after he (eventually) falls asleep. I’ll<br />

embrace this stage as long as I can. •<br />

My main advice with potty training<br />

is to win the game of not caring. If<br />

you can prove to your toddler that<br />

you care less about the bathroom<br />

than he does, you immediately<br />

remove all the stress from the<br />

situation. I’ll ask Mack if he wants<br />

to go potty throughout the day, and<br />

if he says yes, we go. If he says<br />

no (or ignores me altogether),<br />

we don’t. Trust me, diapers are<br />

10 times more convenient than<br />

undressing a balance-challenged<br />

2-year-old, so it’s in your best<br />

interest not to rush things.<br />

MELTDOWNS<br />

Again, maybe we’re just lucky to<br />

have the greatest kid in the world,<br />

but we’ve largely avoided the<br />

meltdown stage thus far. Yes, he<br />

does throw a fit from time to time<br />

urbantoadmedia.com / THE GOOD LIFE / 29


LOCAL HERO // VINCE KEMPF<br />

WRITTEN BY: BRITTNEY GOODMAN • PHOTOGRAPHY BY: URBAN TOAD MEDIA<br />

30 / THE GOOD LIFE / urbantoadmedia.com


City of Fargo Police Department’s Cultural Liaison<br />

Officer, Vince Kempf welcomes New Americans to Fargo<br />

with a focus on parents and helping them adjust to our<br />

culture and laws.<br />

Since August, 2016, Kempf has served in this role,<br />

following after a seven-year stint by Christie Jacobsen.<br />

Kempf has spent a great deal of his career on a Narcotics<br />

task force but welcomes this shift in focus: “I will close<br />

out my career with this position.”<br />

Kempf became a part of the Fargo Police Department<br />

in 1991, starting out as a patrol officer. A graduate of<br />

St. John’s University with a degree in business, Kempf<br />

moved to Fargo and, after spending some time with a high<br />

school friend who was a Fargo police officer, he thought<br />

it would be a good fit for him. He did some coursework<br />

at Minnesota State University Moorhead in the Criminal<br />

Justice program in preparation for the Minnesota Police<br />

Academy. He was eventually was hired by Fargo Police<br />

Department. He then attended the North Dakota Police<br />

Academy.<br />

When asked why the Cultural Liaison position appealed<br />

to him, Kempf said: “I thought this would be a position<br />

where my work would have long-term impact. I want<br />

to see that down the road families can benefit from the<br />

impact I can have in this position -- even if it is just one<br />

or two families who learned how to parent and become<br />

better adjusted to the laws here, even that is a big deal<br />

urbantoadmedia.com / THE GOOD LIFE / 31


LOCAL HERO // VINCE KEMPF<br />

to me. So when the position opened up, I thought that would<br />

be a good fit for me. I also really like history and geography and<br />

learning about other cultures. I’m currently studying the Nepali<br />

language. I want to become fluent but have been working at it<br />

for 8 months. It is more difficult than some other languages I<br />

studied like German and Spanish.”<br />

Kempf’s position is quite different than his previous work on<br />

patrol or with Narcotics. He is part of a small team of police<br />

officers in Fargo. He partners with the Community Trust<br />

Officers. <strong>The</strong> other two officers focus more on at-risk youth<br />

while Kempf’s emphasis is mostly on New American parents:<br />

“We often are dealing with the same families.”<br />

Kempf is part of two-session orientation program for immigrants<br />

new to our area to explain the differences in laws here and help<br />

them fit in and become productive community members. His<br />

session can have anywhere from 7 <strong>–</strong> 30 people depending upon<br />

the month. In his law enforcement presentation he goes over<br />

laws and the role of law enforcement including the city, sheriff,<br />

and high patrol offices and how it may differ from their home<br />

countries. He does this in partnership with Shanda Hakk, a<br />

Family Strengthening Specialist at Lutheran Social Services.<br />

<strong>The</strong>ir presentation often takes more time because they may<br />

be dealing with several languages and need interpreters to<br />

translate numerous times. Other orientations the immigrants<br />

have include Family Health, apartment rental specialists, FM<br />

32 / THE GOOD LIFE / urbantoadmedia.com


“I WANT TO SEE THAT DOWN THE ROAD FAMILIES CAN BENEFIT FROM THE IMPACT I CAN HAVE IN<br />

THIS POSITION <strong>–</strong> EVEN IF IT IS JUST ONE OR TWO FAMILIES WHO LEARNED HOW TO PARENT AND<br />

BECOME BETTER ADJUSTED TO THE LAWS HERE, EVE THAT IS A BIG DEAL TO ME. <strong>–</strong> VINCE KEMPF<br />

Ambulance, Rob Kupec talking about the difference in<br />

weather, and more: “It is all to help them adjust to their<br />

new surroundings and be successful.”<br />

Kempf described his role working primarily with<br />

parents as proactive: “I’ve found after over 26 years of<br />

law enforcement that if most people have continued<br />

problems with the law, often they haven’t been parented<br />

well, so I am hoping that by explaining how parenting can<br />

be done legally and what the expectations are to get the<br />

children on the right path <strong>–</strong> it will empower the parents.<br />

<strong>The</strong> children adjust quickly and learn the language. <strong>The</strong><br />

parents are much slower to adjust to the surroundings.<br />

If they had not known English before, they may be more<br />

isolated than we would like. Rather than have them<br />

feel they need to depend on their children for all of the<br />

information, I give them my card and tell them I’m here<br />

for them. New Americans have to quickly learn all the<br />

things we have been learning our entire lives. It is difficult<br />

to not make mistakes if you do not know the rules.”<br />

In contrast to his former work with Narcotics, Kempf said<br />

that the Cultural Liaison focus has provided him with a<br />

chance to “see more positive outcomes.” He explained:<br />

“When I worked in Narcotics, I rarely got to work with<br />

anyone who was not already in trouble. I did not get to<br />

see the people who got off of drugs and moved on to a<br />

better life. With the Cultural Liaison position, I am now<br />

working during the daytime and with people who have<br />

some problems but usually not legal issues <strong>–</strong> much of<br />

my work is proactive <strong>–</strong> referrals, helping with parenting<br />

issues, attending community events.”<br />

He talked about how much things have changed locally<br />

regarding working with drug use: “When I was working<br />

with Narcotics, I only saw heroin twice. I was mostly<br />

concerned with methamphetamine and the dangers of<br />

anhydrous ammonia. If you came into contact with that <strong>–</strong><br />

you had four minutes to get to water before it penetrated<br />

your protective suit. Now, if carfentanil gets blown on<br />

you, you can die.”<br />

urbantoadmedia.com / THE GOOD LIFE / 33


LOCAL HERO // VINCE KEMPF<br />

Kempf described drugs as a continuing problem:<br />

“I know that many people say that drugs are not<br />

hurting anybody and want to make them legal <strong>–</strong><br />

but I know people who have taken harder drugs<br />

long-term, and they are permanently changing<br />

their body, burning out the dopamine receptors<br />

that enable them to feel pleasure. So they need<br />

more as time goes on to reach a certain level.<br />

<strong>The</strong>y need more in order to feel the level of<br />

normal pleasure that the rest of us always feel.<br />

So I do think it is a big deal and it does hurt<br />

people.” He continued, “And if the addict is<br />

lucky enough to break free of the addiction, he<br />

or she will likely to have continuing depression<br />

problems <strong>–</strong> problems that are not likely to go<br />

away.”<br />

Kempf does leather work in his spare time,<br />

and has been working on a design based upon<br />

Nepali folklore, which he is studying. He hopes<br />

to take the design and make a leather holder for<br />

34 / THE GOOD LIFE / urbantoadmedia.com


the police officer badge stickers he gives out to children.<br />

He described: “It is based on a story about a demon (a<br />

lakhe) that fell in love with a girl in a Nepali village but<br />

wreaks havoc there. <strong>The</strong> story goes that the demon gets<br />

to ultimately stay in the village if it would protect its<br />

residents from other demons.”<br />

Kempf said: “When I am stressed, I’ve got a stress ball.<br />

But I’d much rather be hunting.” Kempf hunts deer,<br />

ducks and pheasant. He enjoys spending time with his<br />

wife, who works as a Pharmacy Technician. He owns<br />

and likes riding several motorcycles—his favorite is<br />

his Victory cycle—and said his wife is also becoming<br />

interested in motorcycles: “But I think she’d be more<br />

interested and comfortable if I bought a full bagger<br />

(touring motorcycle).”<br />

He described as his “number one contribution” of his<br />

life as “raising our two children successfully. I would<br />

not change a thing about either one of them. It was my<br />

kids who got me into Narcotics work. And my current<br />

position’s focus on parenting is because of my experience<br />

being a parent.”<br />

Kempf credited an incident in school with his son with<br />

fueling his initial focus on Narcotics work: “Once when<br />

my son was in elementary school he was shown some<br />

marijuana by another student. And after the incident, it<br />

did not seem the kid who showed him the drug suffered<br />

any repercussions from that. And I thought that I do not<br />

want my son to think that a person having drugs is less of<br />

a big deal than someone getting a parking ticket. So after<br />

that experience, I signed myself up for my first six-month<br />

Narcotics rotation. I just did not want my son to think<br />

that possessing drugs was ‘no big deal.’”<br />

When asked “What does ‘the good life’ mean to you?,”<br />

Kempf replied: “I think that if you are able to talk about<br />

your life with people and not have to edit a whole lot<br />

out of it because you’re ashamed of things, you’ve led<br />

a good life. To me, ‘the good life’ is about spending<br />

time with friends and family, and also about trying to<br />

make a positive difference. I’m not about the awards I<br />

have or what I wear on my police uniform to show my<br />

accomplishments. I just want to help people. I think if<br />

you focus on helping other people you are going to be<br />

happy, but if you focus only on making yourself happy,<br />

you won’t be happy. I think a good life is about helping<br />

other people.”<br />

Kempf continued, “It is kind of like the saying that<br />

you hear a lot <strong>–</strong> that money can’t make you happy. But<br />

actually, money can make you happy <strong>–</strong> but only<br />

if you are giving it away. No Maserati is<br />

ever going to make you happy. But giving<br />

something away to a friend or stranger<br />

in need — that will make you happy.” •<br />

urbantoadmedia.com / THE GOOD LIFE / 35

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