Dirt and Trail Magazine October 2017 issue

RobRidefast

SA's only Adventure and Dirtbike magazine

Ride More Stress Less

www.dirtandtrailmag.com

OCTOBER 2017

BIKE OF

THE YEAR

KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE R WINS 2017 PIRELLI BIKE OF THE YEAR

OCTOBER 2017 RSA R29.50

17010

9 771815 337001

2018

YAMAHA

ENDURO

250’S

2018 SUZUKI

V-STROMS

MX OF AFRICA

2017 HONDA

NATIONS QUEST

ELECTRIC

POWER

ALTA DIRTBIKE


Official Dealer

2018 Yamaha WR450F

R104 950

THE ALL-NEW

2018 YAMAHA

ENDURO RANGE

AT ALL NEW

PRICING

2018 Yamaha YZ450FX

R104 950

2018 Yamaha YZ250FX

R99 950

2018 Yamaha YZ250X

R79 950

2017 Yamaha YZ125X

R69 950

E&OE

(t) 011 251 4000

(e) info@linexyamaha.co.za

Cnr. Malibongwe Drive & Tungsten Road

Strydom Commercial Park, Randburg


Made in Spain

Since 1968

Reflexion Gloss

White

OPTIMUS SV

Available in Flour Yellow

Alpha Gloss black/

white/Fluor Blue

Alpha Gloss black/

white/Fluor Green

BLADE SV

Alpha Gloss black/

white/Fluor Orange

Quest Gloss

White

Quest Matt

Black

Vapor Gloss

Black/Yellow

Vapor Gloss

Black/ White

Vapor Gloss

Black/ Red

Vapor Gloss

Black/ Blue

MUGELLO

Vapor Gloss

Black/ Green

FOR TRADE ENQUIRIES CONTACT

JHB 011 879 6470

CPT 021 552 1859

DBN 031 533 5300


S

@FOXRACINGSOUTHAFRICA

@FOXRACINGSOUTHAFRICA


TRAP

IN.

The all new 180 boot was developed

off of our championship proven

Instinct boot. It features a precise fit,

maximum support, and long lasting

durability in an affordable package.

The exclusive silicone closure strap

system makes getting into and out

of the boots even easier. The Fox 180

boot truly redefines the boundaries of

what is possible with performance and

value. Strap in and see for yourself .

FOXRACING.CO.ZA


EDITOR: ROLEY FOLEY

On his 74th birthday, a motorcyclist got a

gift certificate from his wife. The certificate

paid for a visit to a Sangoma living in Natal

who was rumoured to have a wonderful

cure for erectile dysfunction.

After being persuaded to go, he drove to

the place, handed his ticket to the Sangoma

and wondered what he was in for.

The old man handed a potion to him, and

with a grip on his shoulder, warned, “This

is a powerful medicine. You take only a

teaspoonful and then say ‘1-2-3.’ When

you do, you will become more manly than

you have ever been in your life and you can

perform as long as you want.”

The man was encouraged. As he walked

away, he turned and asked, “How do I stop

the medicine from working?”

“Your partner must say ‘1-2-3-4,’” the

medicine man responded, “but when she

does, the medicine will not work again until

the next full moon.”

The man was very eager to see if it worked

so he went home, showered, shaved, took

a spoonful of the medicine and then invited

his wife to join him in the bedroom. When

she came in, he quickly took off his clothes

and said, “1-2-3!”

Immediately, he was the manliest of men.

His wife was excited and began throwing

off her clothes as she asked, “What was the

1-2-3 for?”

And that is why we should never end our

sentences with a preposition because we

could end up with a dangling participle.

Thats for the people who pick up on all of

our typo’s.

Have a great Riding month!

CONTENTS: OCTOBER 2017

THE TEAM:

EDITOR:

Glenn Foley

foleyg@mweb.co.za

DESIGN:

Rob Portman

rob@ridefast.co.za

ADVERTISING:

Sinead Foley

foleyg@mweb.co.za

Kyle Lawrenson

lawrensonk@mweb.co.za

ACCOUNTS &

SUBSCRIPTIONS:

Anette

anette.acc@mweb.co.za

Office no (011) 979-5035

(011) 979-0053

CONTRIBUTORS:

Kurt Beine

Richard Sutherland

Zygmund Brodalka

Byron Rudman

Sean Hendley

Tristan Foley

Mike Wessels

Dries vd Walt

11: COVER STORY: BIKE OF THE YEAR

16: FIRST RIDE: 2018 YAMAHA 250’S

24: TESTED: ALTA ELECTRIC MX BIKE

42: FEATURE: MX OF AFRICA NATIONS

TO SUBSCRIBE

CALL 011 979 5035 OR EMAIL

anette.acc@mweb.co.za

Digital or hard copy.

46: TESTED: 2018 SUZUKI V-STROM 1000’S

62: ADVENTURE: HONDA QUEST

4 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017


Piston and Gasket Sets

Cranks, Conrods and Camshafts

Cylinder Kits, Rebores, Main Bearings and Clutch Plates

VALVES,STEM SEALS AND SPRINGS

Email:G124@mweb.co.za

no 4 Fifth avenue

Northmead

Benoni

011 425 1081/4


ought to you by

Triumph SA News

Lots of gossip surrounding this brand at the moment

and here is the real story. Triumph is not leaving SA

– in fact – South Africa is one of their very important

global markets. All that has happened is that Triumph

UK is looking for a new distributor for the brand in

order to match their global CI, and in order to do this,

the current importers took the opportunity to sell their

stock at never to be seen again prices. We sure hope

that you bought one. The current guys and dealer

network will still support the brand until the new

distributor is appointed and all that. So have a little

faith, this great British Bike is not going anywhere.

www.triumphmotorcycles.co.za

Bikings piles of Plastics

For a huge variety of motorcycles. These guys have

just brought in a Joblot of body kits, headlights,

tailpieces and fenders… Piles and piles of the stuff.

Take along your plastics as a sample and they will

match for the paltry sum from R50.00 per item.

Biking Accessories (012)

Race Shop in VD Byl

We stopped in at this lot on our travels last month.

You’ll all know the enthusiastic Ryan Shapiro who

runs around in the Sunoco race van at events all over

the place? He and his team have a very well stocked

retail outlet in the industrial Metropolis of Edison

Boulevard in Van Der Byl. Lots of accessories always

on the shelves, a fair amount of clean motorcycles on

the floor and a large workshop and fitment centre. If

you are out and about on your breakfast run – or if

you live in the area – go pop in and say Huzzit! The

coffee is great. (016) 931-1100

The boys... Fritz Lebherz, Cloete Van Rensburg, Dean

Warner, Ryan Shapiro.

distributed by

6 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017


www.kiska.com

KTM 1050 ADVENTURE

R 129,999.00

KTM 1190 ADVENTURE

R 168,999.00

Promotion valid until stocks last T’s and C’s apply.

Phone 011 462 7796 for your nearest KTM dealer.

The illustrated vehicles may vary in selected details from the production models and some illustrations feature optional

equipment available at additional cost. Some parts are not approved for use on public roads in certain circumstances (varies

from country to country). Further information can be obtained from your specialist KTM dealer.


ought to you by

Acerbis X Tarmac handguard

The X-TARMAC handguard combines style,

safety, and convenience into a modern and sleek

design. Designed for on-road and dual sport

motorcycles, this unique handguard features an

electroluminescent flat light that is easy to connect

to a (12v) lighting system. It is trimmed with a semi

transparent, removable spoiler that is designed

to deflect cold air and rain. A large hinge allows

the front cover to be rotated horizontally ensuring

a precise fit with most levers and controls. The

aerodynamic design is also co-injected with a

metal insert to provide considerable rigidity. The

X-TARMAC is compatible with handlebars that have

an internal diameter of 13.6mm to 19mm. LED light

strips are integrated into the handguard shield.

Available at dealers Nation-Wide.

Octane Clarino Gloves

just unpacked

DMD has launched a new glove for adventure

riding and Summer commuting. The Clarino glove

has hard knuckle and PU finger protection. The

glove also has a leather wrist cuff protector as

well as a convenient pull-tag. It also has superior

impact and abrasive protection for the palm and

has conductive touch fabric for the use of touch

screen devices. Price comes in at a very attractive

R545.00 incl VAT. Available in sizes XS to 3XL.

At Dealers.

Trade enquiries: DMD: www.dmd.co.za or phone

011 792 7691

RaceStar Graffix

If you are in need of a very custom styled factory

looking sticker kit for your adventure, off road or MX

bike, then get in touch with RaceStar Graffix.

Multiple SA champ and current factory Husqvarna

MX rider, Richie van der Westhuizen is the man

behind RaceStar Graffix, and their work is world

class! The even have a really cool new range of RS

MX kit available, and you can now also get your own

custom made MX kit. Call 072 545 1471 or email

rich@racestargraffix.com.

Ravens Racing moves

To fantastic premises on the outskirts of Pretoria, in

Kameeldriftjust down from the famous Roodeplaat

Dam. Master Machy Quinton Ackerman has taken

over a massive warehouse in order to service and

rebuild bike, quads and side by sides. It’s a family

business – Dad Dirk is on hand and helping out

and by the by, he builds and erects shadeports

– so if you looking for one, support the guys in our

industry.

Ravens racing 082-897-2230 racing@ravensest.

co.za

distributed by

8 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017


ought to you by

bLU cRU Yamaha supports all

riders at this years Roof of Africa

If you have entered the Roof of

Africa on a Yamaha, Yamaha

tells us that you can expect to be

treated like a factory racer for the

duration of the event.

bLU cRU Yamaha’s Roof support

program is there to take the

pressure off you and your crew by

offering all Yamaha Roof entrants

the following services:

• The bLU cRU Yamaha Roof

Support Centre will be set up at

the official Roof start/Finish area,

in a massive 300sqm marquee

tent!

• Here, as you finish your

day’s ride, bLU cRU Yamaha’s

technicians will greet you, fill out

a job card listing your necessary

bike maintenance – and then wish

you well as you depart to your

accommodation for some wellearned

R & R!

• The next time you will see your

fully prepped race bike will be

on the start line the following

morning!

• During that time, bLU cRU

Yamaha technicians will:

• Clean your bike

• Change your tyres/ mousses

• Air filters

• Oil changes

• Chain lubes

• Set up adjustments

• In fact, whatever you require,

they will be able to do it for you.

• AND – all of this is a FREE for

Yamaha racers.

• You will not pay for any labour,

lubes, tyre changes, bike washes,

or security – it has all been laid

on for you courtesy of bLU cRU

Yamaha!

• You will only have to pay for

any parts that you may require,

of which they say that they will

have stock of most key items right

there in the Maluti Mountains!

• And don’t stress about the

safety of your bike overnight - a

have a full blown security system

in place, and your bike will be

secure inside the marquee on

each night.

bLU cRU Yamaha will have

a dedicated service crew at

each DSP, offering mechanical

and refuelling assistance to

any Yamaha rider (or their

crew) requiring these services.

Gazebos, lubes, enviro-mats,

fire extinguishers, and selected

spares will be available to keep

your race going! All your crew will

have to do is ensure that your

race fuel and body fuel arrives at

the bLU cRU Gazebo situated at

each DSP – the bLU cRU boys

will do the rest for you!

Any questions or queries can be

sent through to markr@yamaha.

co.za.

New Just 1 J34 Adventure

lids just unpacked

Henderson Racing Products are the official importer

of the Just 1 helmet brand in SA, and they have just

landed the new range of J34 Adventure helmets.

Really cool looking lids that are well priced and offer

all you would want/need in an adventure helmet.

Thermo plastic and carbon fibre options are

available. Call HRP on 011 708 5905 for nearest

dealer.

distributed by

10 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017


RACING THE ROOF?

YAMAHA HAS YOU COVERED

If you have entered the Roof of Africa on a Yamaha, you can

expect to be treated like a Factory Racer for the duration of the event.

The bLU cRU Yamaha Roof Support Centre will be set up at the official Roof start/Finish area, in a massive 300sqm marquee tent!

Here, as you finish your day’s ride, bLU cRU Yamaha’s technicians will greet you, fill out a job card listing your necessary bike

maintenance – and then wish you well as you depart to your accommodation for some well-earned R & R!

The next time you will see your fully prepped race bike will be on the start line the following morning!

During that time, bLU cRU Yamaha technicians will:

Clean your bike

Change your tyres/ mousses

Air filters

Oil changes

Chain lubes

Set up adjustments

General bike maintenance

AND – all of this is a FREE service provided to you, our loyal Yamaha “Roof Factory RIDER”, by bLU cRU Yamaha.

You will not pay for any labour, lubes, tyre changes, bike washes, or security – it has all been laid on for you courtesy of

bLU cRU Yamaha!

You will only have to pay for any spares that you may require, of which we will have stock of most key items right

there in the Maluti Mountains!

And don’t stress about the safety of your bike overnight! We have a full blown security system in place, and your bike will be secure

inside the marquee on each night.


ADVENTURE BIKES

RULE IN BIKE OF THE YEAR 2017

With adventure bikes arguably being the most popular biking category in South Africa it was good news

that once again an adventure bike was named the Pirelli Bike of the Year. The 2017 KTM Super Adventure

R turned out to be the judges’ favourite. Words by Dries vd Walt

The other good news was that the adventure

bike category was the best represented on

in the competition, with five of the fifteen

finalists being adventure bikes in various

guises: the KTM 1290 Super Adventure R,

the BMW R 1200 GS Rallye, the KTM 1090

Adventure R, the Ducati Multistrada 950 and

the Kawasaki Versys 300.

The inclusion of the latter two in the

category may be contentious, as the ‘Strada

is more of a road bike in combat fatigues,

and the Baby Versys may be viewed

by some as little more than a glorified

commuter. However, with suitable tyres they

will be capable of venturing at least onto

soft roads, and in my opinion, that means

they meet the criteria for inclusion.

In fact, the little Versys impressed me more

than I had expected, both on the open road

and at Gerotek, west of Pretoria, where

we put the finalists through their paces.

It is surprisingly eager and easy to ride,

which means it might be a wise choice for

beginner riders who harbour ambitions of

carrying on riding where the tarmac ends.

On the downside, I found its seat to be

uncomfortably hard.

The ‘Strada impressed me when I reviewed

it for another publication. It represents a

lighter, simpler version of its bigger sibling,

which makes it all the more appealing in

my opinion. Handling and braking is fairly

typical for adventure sport bikes – the firm

suspension is offset by long suspension

travel. Despite the travel, though, the

‘Strada tracks true under hard cornering

with a surprisingly rapid turn-in for a bike

sporting a 19-inch front wheel.

Like the Ducati, the KTM 1090 is lighter

and nimbler than its older brother, and

consequently less of a handful during

adventure ridings. In addition to Bike of

the Year, I recently tested the 1090 quite

extensively and I was extremely impressed

with its sprightly performance and

12 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017


esponsiveness. At a considerably lower

cost than the 1290, the smaller bike is

competent both as an adventure machine

and as a long-distance tourer. If you feel

adventure bikes are becoming to big, heavy

and complex, the 1090 might be just what

you are looking for.

The GS Rallye represents something of

a departure for BMW, also being lighter

and simpler than its predecessors, but

benefiting from new electronics. In addition

to the existing two riding modes, Rain

and Road, the R 1200 GS now comes

standard with, among others, Enduro and

Enduro Pro modes. It also has bank-angle

aware Dynamic Traction Control (DTC),

Automatic Stability Control (ASC) and

optional Dynamic Electronic Suspension

Adjustment (ESA). BMW describe the

Rallye version as the sportiest GS, with a

number of unique details such as a low-cut

sports windshield, stainless steel radiator

trim, a radiator guard and wide enduro

footrests. In my opinion, this bike will do

nothing to hurt BMW’s position as Kings of

the Adventure Bike Hill.

But ultimately it was the 1290 Super

Adventure that wooed the judges with

its category-defining power, suspension

and electronics. It offers everything bar

the kitchen sink, and I wouldn’t be half

surprised if the latter were available as an

optional extra. My own fondness of the

Super Adventure stems from its lean-angle

aware ABS saving my bacon on a very

uncompromising piece of road, but partisan

loyalty aside, the fact is that the big KTM

is close to being the pinnacle of adventure

bikes. Hugely powerful, hugely comfortable

and hugely... well... huge, it is the kind of

bike that gives you the confidence to take

on any road, no matter how long, twist or

boulder-strewn. And if the road is absent

altogether, it will just make you smile that

much wider.

The Pirelli Bike of the Year award has never

been without heated disagreements from

the fans of specific brands, and I expect

that this year’s award will be no exception.

But that’s not a bad thing, because it gets

us talking about our favourite machines,

and hopefully sparks a bid of interest

among potential new bikers. Whether you

agree with the judges’ decision or not, the

fact is that this year it has done a sterling

job of highlighting the adventure bike

category.

Get to your dealer and check them out!

The judges

were generally

impressed with

the KTM 1090

Adventure R’s

simplicity and

nimbleness.

BMW also too

the bold step in

the direction of

a lighter, simpler

bike with the R

1200 GS Rally.

They don’t get much lighter and simpler than

this: the surprisingly impressive Kawasaki

Versys 300.

The Ducati Multistrada

950 shows off its

sporty side.

KTM’s designed-to-take-on-anything

1290 Super Adventure R, the 2017

Pirelli Bike of the Year.

14 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017


BIKE OF THE YEAR

BIKE OF THE

YEAR!

Foto: R. Schedl

KTM 1290 SUPER ADVENTURE R

WINS PIRELLI BIKE OF THE YEAR 2017

KTM Group Partner


16 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017


HOW FAST

IS FAST?

We took the 2018 250 Yamaha’s out to find out

Yamaha really seems to be on point in the dirt bike department at the moment. For

2018 they have made some subtle changes to their 250 enduro lineup to make

them even better. We took them for a good long ride…

Walking around.

Before we rode, we took a proper look at the new models to see what changes we

could notice.

Four-Stroke YZ250FX

Quite a lot is obvious when we compare it to our 2015 model.

· No kickstarter. This is to make the bike lighter. In all fairness, we have never used

the kickstart on ours, the battery technology these days is so good.

· Remoulded rear plastics. On the early models, the electrics are quite exposed

behind your left leg. Once again, we have to say that in the literally thousands of

kilometres that we’ve ridden it has never been an issue, but it was not all covered.

On the new model, the electrics are neatly hidden away and protected by the

sidecover.

· Fuel and oil warning light. A nice touch that the older model does not have.

In 2017, the 250FX had some serious technological revisions and we’ll list them

here so you get the idea.

New Cylinder Head and Intake System:

The four-valve cylinder head features revised intake geometry for additional

downdraft effect, matched to shorter intake funnel in the air box, for improved topend

power. Inside the head, more aggressive camshaft profiles and valve springs

boost output further, while larger valve seats .

New Piston

A new lightweight forged two-ring piston uses a flat piston crown surface with

additional strengthening ribs and a shorter, more durable piston pin with diamond

like carbon (DLC) coating. The new piston is lighter, significantly stronger and

together with revised EFI mapping, improves combustion performance for a faster,

more thorough burn.

New Crank and Connecting Rod

Optimized crankshaft and counterbalancer designs feature a revised balance ratio,

predictive power delivery and reduced vibration. A new nickel-chromoly steel

connecting rod is used.

Stronger Crankcase

The crankcase features a new heat treating process to increase strength, for

protection, the frame welcomes the addition of a rugged plastic skid plate.

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017 17


Bigger 270mm Front Brake

270mm front disc (up from 250mm) brake coupled with new

pad material offers better braking.

Revised Suspension Systems

Both front and rear dampers feature optimized settings for

2017 to further boost overall suspension performance, while

the front fork utilizes a stronger oil seal system for enhanced

durability in the toughest conditions.

Did all of the updates make a difference?

Yes. In a really nice way. We made a really cool route – a fast

loop with badly rutted, whooped out flats, a lekker quarry

section with steepish inclines and errr more ruts, Twisty

forest single spoor and then an MX track.

There is a reason that we bought our FX. It’s a fun, exciting

bike to ride. Having the two models at the track on the

same day and riding them back to back gave us a good feel

for what Yamaha has done. The good news is that the new

bike still feels just like an FX.

The most noticeable difference is that Yamaha has a

machine that is even smoother and more user friendly. Just

as fast, but the revisions have made a really good bike just

that much better.

As you guys all know, the modern bikes can all be

adjusted via the Yamaha Tuning tool, to change the power

characteristics. Yamaha told us that this is how the bike

comes out of the box.

Ride impressions:

Our bike had a knack of stalling quite a lot until we used the

tuning tool to remap it. This one did not stall. Ever. So that

tells us that the bottom end is improved. And we did point it

at some medium gnarly stuff, she climbs beautifully.

We are very impressed with the suspension revisions – KYB

is top notch stuff in our books – on the rutted sections,

18 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017


THE ALL-NEW

2018 YAMAHA

ENDURO RANGE

AT ALL NEW

PRICING

2018 Yamaha WR450F

R104 950

2018 Yamaha YZ450FX

R104 950

2018 Yamaha YZ250FX

R99 950

2018 Yamaha YZ250X

R79 950

2017 Yamaha YZ125X

R69 950

www.yamaha.co.za • +27 11 259 7600 • Facebook: Yamaha Southern Africa • Instagram: YamahaMoto_SA • YouTube: YamahaMoto_SA • E&OE


she felt incredibly forgiving with the bouncers soaking

it all up. Quite plush and soft and they offer a very

confidence inspiring ride – even over the whoops which

our fat editor is allergic to. Thankfully the brakes are top

notch or we might have had some extra fun as he got

more and more confident.

Power wise, Yamaha Really has smoothed the bike out

quite a lot. The earlier model feels a bit more snappy

than this one, but the 2018 is quicker. It just delivers the

power in a more linear fashion – a bit less motocrossy

which is what you want for enduro application. Most

manufacturers are focussed on controllability rather

than power generation. That’s what makes bikes like

this so good.

Through the tight twisty loop in the forest, one of our

favourite sections, we loved the way she carves. MX

genes do shine through in the handling department,

she turns beautifully – all you need to do is have the

confidence to open the throttle.

So here’s our verdict in a nutshell:

Forgiving, huge fun, controllable, Nimble, great

handling. Lots of updates have made this bike even

more refined. Experience tells us that EFI bikes are

almost ridiculously economical, so you can get very

decent mileage from a tank of fuel.

This one is fitted with loads of aftermarket extras,

from the Acerbis handguards, front and rear PSP disc

protectors, GYTR levers, Pro series radiator guards and

a Yamaha cooling fan. Tyres – Metzeler 6-day extreme

with mousses.

Go and ride it for yourself.

The Yamaha YZ250FX: R99950.00

• Engine Type: 250cc liquid-cooled DOHC 4-stroke; 4

titanium valves

• Fuel Delivery: Keihin® fuel injection, 44mm

• Transmission: Wide-ratio constant-mesh 6-speed;

multiplate wet clutch

• Final Drive: O-ring chain

• Suspension Front: KYB spring-type fork with speed

sensitive damping; fully adjustable, 12.2-in travel

• Suspension Rear: KYB single shock; fully adjustable,

12.5-in travel

• Brake Front: Hydraulic disc, 270mm

• Brake Rear: Hydraulic disc, 245mm

• Tyre Front: 90/90-21 Dunlop AT81F

• Tyre Rear: 110/100-18 Dunlop AT81

• L x W x H: 216.4 cm x 82.55cm x 128.016cm

• Seat Height: 96.5cm

• Wheelbase: 146.5 cm

• Ground Clearance: 32.5cm

• Fuel Capacity: 7.57litres

• Wet Weight: 113KG’s

20 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017


BIKING

Pretoria

2018 YZ ENDURO RANGE

ALL 2017/2016 MODELS ON SPECIAL

THE BIGGEST RANGE OF ACCESSORIES IN PRETORIA

BELL MOTO9

R4500

LIMITED STOCK

BRAND NEW

2017 FX450 R89 9000

CORDURA ADV

JACKETS FROM

R995.00

SELECTED

SHOEI HELMETS

FROM R2500.00

HYDE HANDGUARDS

LEATT 5.5 NECK BRACE

LEVERS, FILTERS, CHAINS, SPROCKETS, BAKE PADS

MX & PADDOCK STANDS

MX STANDS FROM R530.00

PADDOCK STANDS FROM R470.00

Sales: 012 342 7474 / Spares: 012 342 6422

1212 Pretorius Street (Between Gordon And Duncan Streets) Hatfield, 0083, Pretoria


The Two Stroke YZ250X:

Whats it all about:

MX Champ for Enduro racing…

Unique among the Japanese

manufacturers, Yamaha was the only

company to offer an enduro, motocrossbased,

two-stroke, off-road machine.

Yamaha took its tried and proven YZ250,

gave it the bare-bones necessities to meet

the basic requirements (18-inch rear wheel,

sidestand), and then altered the powerband

to make it smoother and more tractable.

Then Yamaha took the KYB suspension

and gave the suspension manners that

changed the YZ250X into a very effective

off-road machine. In 2017 Yamaha kept its

hands off the machine, fitting it with one

update—a larger 270mm front rotor.

Then they thrust it into a market dominated

by Austrian-built super-two-strokes.

Walk About:

There are no obvious changes from the

2017 to the 2018 model, only a few small

cosmetic updates like the Svelte blue

anodized rims.

Here’s the skinny:

Based on the YZ250 motocross model, the

YZ250X features a revised compression

ratio, revised exhaust port, revised power

valve timing, and model specific CDI unit

for improved trail performance. All these

features are focused on creating a wide,

controllable power character for enduro

application.

· Two- Stroke Power, Tuned for Cross-

Country and Hare Scrambles Racing. The

YPVS equipped 249cc two-stroke engine

is combined with a wide-ratio five-speed

tranny.

· Motocross-Derived Aluminum Frame

lightweight YZ250-spec frame features

carefully engineered combination of

aluminum castings, forgings and extrusions

for balance of rigidity and flex,

· Fully adjustable, KYB speed sensitive

spring-type suspension tested and tuned

specifically for the needs of cross-country

racers.

· Aggressive styling from front fender to

the rear brake protector, and is ready to

race out of the crate, complete with an

aluminum tapered handlebar, YZ-F-style

foot pegs, gripper seat, and off-road

specific Dunlop tyres.

· 18-inch rear wheel, sealed O-ring chain,

wide ratio transmission, narrow expansion

chamber, off-road focused tyres and

suspension

· Standard side stand and fuel tank petcock

with reserve position.

· New 270mm Front Brake.

· Larger 270mm front disc brake coupled

with new pad material.

The ride:

Right away we noticed the compact feel of

the chassis and ergos. For riders familiar

with KTM/Husky ergos, the YZ250X tends

to feel more compact. The bar bend is

comfy, the seat-to-peg height is tighter

than on the Austrian machines. No happy

button, but the kick-start lever feels long

and allows for lots of leverage, so the X

starts quite easily. In fact, first time every

time. For our time in the saddle, the bike

was just perfect.

22 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017


Hitting the hills demonstrates that the X

is all about smooth power and is nearly

hitless. It definitely has meat to the

powerband when you wring her, but it lacks

the big hit of the YZ Motocrosser.

The gearbox is a perfect combo of ratios

for a five-speed (third gear being tight) and

matches nicely to an overdrive fifth gear,

which gives it a lot of legs for off-road. First

gear runs out fairly quickly, with second

and third being used the most.

On the tight twisties on the single spoor

through the trees, the handling is magic.

The bike changes directions extremely

easily, and the front end goes where you

point it. It has poise and feels planted,

which means the wheels hook up; the front

end doesn’t tuck or push.

The clutch pull is very smooth and effort is

light, especially considering that it’s cableactuated.

We’ve said it before – and we’ll say it

again, Yamaha has really made a bike

for everyone. If you are a social rider, you

can ride her slowly, clamber up and down

donga’s – and if you want to go fast, you

can take her out onto the MX track, wring

her ear and go for it.

This bike was so at home on our test

loop, huge fun, exciting power, light and

nimble. Both Kyle and Mike came away

raving about the performance and the

racey nature of the bike when you open the

throttle.

The biggest feature that kept commenting

on is the inherent lightness, fun and

nimbleness of this machine. On the down

side – Yamaha has not fitted a large

fuel tank so you’ll need to watch your

distances.

This one is fitted with aftermarket Acerbis

Hand guards, Pro series radiator brace and

a rear disc protector. Tyres – Metzeler 6-day

extreme with mousses.

The Yamaha YZ250X: R79950.00

• Engine Type: 249cc liquid-cooled

2-stroke; reed-valve inducted

• Fuel Delivery: Keihin PWK38S

• Transmission: Constant-mesh 5-speed;

multiplate wet clutch

• Final Drive: Chain

• Suspension Front: KYB Speed-Sensitive

System inverted fork; fully adjustable, 11.8-

in travel

• Suspension Rear: KYB single shock; fully

adjustable, 12.4-in travel

• Brakes Front: Hydraulic disc, 270mm

• Brakes Rear: Hydraulic disc, 245mm

• Tyre Front: 90/90-21 Dunlop AT81F

• Tyre Rear: 110/100-18 Dunlop AT81

• L x W x H: 218.44cm x 82.55cm x 129cm

• Seat Height: 97cm

• Wheelbase: 148.5cm

• Ground Clearance: 36cm

• Fuel Capacity: 7.9 litres

• Wet Weight: 103.8KG’s

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017 23


ELECTRIC

PERFORMER

The Alta Redshift E-Bike

It’s been the talk of the town since the

2016 Red Bull Straight Rhythm, as Josh

Hill contested in the Open class aboard

the Alta Redshift MX dirt bike; the world’s

first “Proper” electric dirt bike.

All you have to do is look at the Alta

Motors Redshift MX to know: New

tech electric device or not, the Redshift

was designed by people who know

motorcycles. It may have no exhaust

system, no fuel tank, no kick starter, no

traditional sub frame and no engine, but

this bike looks like a badass MXer—just

one that happens to be from the future.

Or at least a future.

Alta Motors was started more than nine

years ago with an insight on the part

of two friends, Derek Dorresteyn and

Jeff Sand, that electric technology was

ready—at least in the narrow world of

motocross and off road—to potentially

offer a better motorcycle.

Sand is a longtime amateur off-road

rider, participating in Hare & Hounds and

scrambles events, while Dorresteyn has

been a national plate holder in speedway

and had raced flat-track and supermoto.

Almost every design decision for the

Redshift sprang from the desire to build

a bike that was fully competitive with

conventional motorcycles. Over the

many years from concept to production

realization, the battery design evolved, but

what stayed constant was that it offered a

little under 6 kWh of capacity (enough for

a 30-minute pro moto or about two hours

of trail use) and weighed less than 70

pounds. That meant everything else had

to be light.

With electric bikes, the question is one of

range and energy:

Could you put enough batteries in an

electric MX’er to last a pro moto and

a little bit more? Dorresteyn did the

numbers and found you could—if you

were careful with the design and kept the

weight of everything else low. By 2009,

the two had a design on screen for a

250cc-class e-bike that looks very much

like the machine you see in the pictures

here and had begun to put together a

company to realize it.

With electric powertrains, low weight

comes from high efficiency, high speeds,

and good cooling. We’re all used to

internal combustion engines, and here is

something interesting:

Typically less than a third or less of the

energy in fuel goes to the ground. Another

third heats the air that goes through the

cooling system, and the final third is in

the superheated gasses coming out the

exhaust.

With electric, efficiencies are much, much

higher everywhere, but the temperature

limits are lower. Lithium-ion batteries

24 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017


DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017 25


deteriorate quickly at temperatures above 150 degrees

Fahrenheit, power transistors bake at 185 degrees, magnets

demagnetize as low as 200 degrees, and motor wiring

insulation fails as you exceed 350. Enter the world of electric

machine trade-offs: The more efficient your system, the less

heat it generates, and the more power you can push through

it. Cool it better, and you can pump even more through.

Alta chose to design a 350-volt electric system to keep

operating currents relatively low and efficiency high, even

if that required more sophisticated, automotive-style safety

circuits. Its motor is a custom, brushless, permanent

magnet AC (PMAC) design only 4 inches in diameter

that spins to 14,000 rpm, putting out either 25 or 40 hp

depending on whether you’re looking at the continuous

or short-term power rating. Fortunately, motocross is all

about short-term power, with more than a few seconds at

full throttle the exception rather than the rule. The motor is

actively cooled by circulating oil, but, most importantly, it

weighs only 11 pounds—clawing back weight lost to the

battery pack. The torquey e-motor drives the countershaft

through a single, direct reduction gear, as it offers peak

torque from zero rpm and has no need to idle and no need

for a clutch.

The motor is water cooled and it only weighs 7

kilogrammes. Alta claims that it puts out 40 hp and 36 ft-lbs

of torque but the crazy thing about electric motors is that

they make 100 percent of their torque 100 percent of the

time, from 0 to 14,000 rpm. Also, the Redshift’s motor was

placed where it is on purpose by Alta to minimize the small

amount of inertia it has.

The Redshift Bulkhead—the

chassis core—functions as the

outer motor casing, the cooling

circuit for the motor and inverter,

as well as the transmission case

for the gear reduction.

26 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017


Traveling the road

less Traveled

tsr200

200cc’s of pure power

ready for any jungle

all terrain vehicles

32 Hulbert Street

New Centre

Johannesburg

2001

011 493 6001

011 493 6101

www.kazuma-sa.co.za


Alta developed its own motor

controller, a water-cooled unit that

uses the upper frame for its radiator.

The advantages of Alta rolling its own

here were several; the water-cooled

controller could be a lot lighter and

more compact than the air-cooled

units on Victory and Zero e-bikes,

and Alta would be directly in charge

of the firmware that maps throttle

position onto motor response. This

has been one of the major areas of

development for the company, as

it writes code that controls throttle

response, motor braking, traction

control, and all the myriad of

functions that dictate machine feel.

They’ve been using a wide variety of

test riders, from Supercross stars to

EnduroCross vets, to tune this.

Motor response when twisting the

grip had to feel familiar to riders with

a lifetime of experience.

As for the chassis, the emphasis

was on sticking with geometry

and chassis stiffness numbers

that were equivalent to the best of

current production machines. The

main frame consists of two parts

that bolt together: the steering

head and upper beam welded from

CNC-machined aluminum forgings

and a lower casting that houses

the e-motor, reduction gear, and

countershaft. The countershaft

is in the same place as it is on a

conventional 250, so the anti-squat

forces and rear suspension behavior

remains similar to well-developed

current bikes.

Dorresteyn emphasizes that Alta

didn’t want to reinvent everything—

taking on the powertrain was more

than enough. So he and his team

studied the best of contemporary

moto crossers carefully. Steering

geometry is very similar to a Honda

CR250, while the rear swingarm is

a one-piece casting that would look

at home on a KTM. Suspension is

WP at both ends, while brakes are

Brembo, the rear controlled by a

conventional foot pedal.

Looking at other electric bikes on

the market, and even dual-sports for

that matter, some of the “standard

dirt bike parts” aren’t present. That’s

why we want to show what is the

same on a Redshift, as on any other

Japanese or European off-road/

motocross bike…

Starting at the front of the bike, the

grips and bars are Neken. The triple

clamp is Alta branded but looks very

similar to what KTMs/Husqvarnas

use.

Moving on to the suspension, the

Redshift has WP front and back. The

4CS fork out front is built to what

they call the “Alta” spec which they

want to be clear is not the same,

off-the-shelf 4CS fork that you

could buy form WP. The WP 5018

shock is attached to linkage which is

connected to the very KTM-looking

swingarm. Since they are building a

bike from scratch they could the bars

and pegs anywhere, yet, with most

things on the Redshift, Alta’s thought

process was, “If you don’t have to

reinvent the wheel, don’t.” Therefore,

Alta took measurements of modern

dirt bikes and put together a sort of

average placement of rider contacts

and built their frame to that spec.

Brakes are Brembo units, wheels are

Warp 9 and tyres are Bridgestone

Battlecross X30s.

The point is, while owners will have a

steep learning curve when it comes

to the powerplant, a vast majority

of the bike is interchangeable/thesame-as

many other dirt bikes on

the market and aftermarket parts.

The same cannot be said for other

electric bikes that use a bunch of

proprietary parts.

The only area of substantial chassis

innovation is the two-piece plastic tail

section. Without an exhaust system

having to snake through the rear of

the bike and heating things beyond

the structural limits of plastics, it was

possible to forego an aluminium sub

frame and design one that relied on

a particularly tough, fiber-reinforced

plastic that could be injection

moulded. Not only did that save

weight and piece cost, but it also

was more resilient than a metal sub

frame, actually acting as a secondary

suspension on big jump landings.

One other feature the Redshift has

that’s unlike any other motocrosser

is its dash. Without engine noise

as a cue, the Alta relies on its

dash flashing green to let its rider

know that the throttle is live and to

communicate the state of battery

charge.

In the end, though, the Redshift is

about the smooth, seamless delivery

of power possible with an e-motor

and delivering performance that can

match or even exceed that of a fourstroke

250.

28 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017


30 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017


Does it succeed at those goals?

At 121 KG’s, it is heavier than a

250 even with a full tank of petrol,

but it delivers more and smoother

torque. It offers equivalent range to

a machine with the small fuel tank of

a moto crosser but takes a couple of

hours to recharge even if you have

the 220-volt charger and a suitable

outlet to plug it into. It’s the quietest

dirt bike ever and could end noise

complaints and track closings if it

were to become popular (imagine

urban motocross tracks).

And at around 150k, it’s among the

most expensive dirt bikes around,

though the company promises it

will make up for a lot of that cost

differential by requiring essentially

zero maintenance.

It’s too soon to say, but if this first

serious electric motocrosser is this

good, the future probably holds a lot

more of the same…

Recently at the ISDE, SA’s own

Charan Moore got to take this bike

for a little spin. Here is his take on

the electric bike:

My impression of the Alta:

I had no idea what to expect when

I was given the opportunity to get

onto the electric ALTA, but after just

5 minutes on the bike I had a new

perspective on what the future of

bike riding could be.

Firstly getting onto the bike the most

notable difference is that there is no

clutch. As a rider the first thing I grab

when I put my hands onto the bars

is the clutch, which is not needed on

the ALTA.

Next is the process of starting the

bike, again you look for the kickstart

or maybe an electric start button

but on the ALTA it has a key on the

left side of the chassis, close to the

steering head. So you turn the key on

and it turns on a digital display which

is situated on the handle bars, kind of

like a bar pad on a normal bike.

So now the bike is on but will not

run yet, it has a safety feature that

requires you to activate the battery

pack first. There is a small switch

on the left side of the bar. Once

activated the digital display will flash

green and you are ready to go.

So you open the throttle and the bike

jolts forward. The first impression

riding the bike was like I had gone

back to my roots, starting out riding

on an automatic PW50. I took it easy

just to try and figure out what it was

all about and immediately found that

I was trying to clutch and change

gears. Once you get used to the fact

that all you have to do is twist the

throttle and use the brakes, then you

start having fun on the bike.

It has 4 power settings. Which

were explained to me as follows,

1 - Sunday cruise, 2 - trail riding, 3 -

serious riding and 4 - Bat shit crazy!

So naturally I started on 1 to get

a feel for the bike and once I was

comfortable cranked it to level 4.

I honestly could not believe the

power delivery on the bike. It was

so strong bottom, middle and top.

To me it had better torque than

any current 450 model. It was

unbelievable how they had managed

to create such a smooth power

delivery that is so potent.

Another aspect that is very strange

is the fact that there is no sound - all

you hear is a funny buzz from the

battery pack. Then without any motor

sound you hear the chain running

on the chain slider kind of like on a

bicycle and once you start to hit a

few jumps or braking bumps you can

really hear the suspension working.

What is absolutely incredible about

this bike is the fact that it can be

changed to suit anyone’s riding. So

for example as a professional rider

I can put it onto level 4 and ride it

super hard and feel that the bike is

capable of anything I would want to

do. Then I could put it back to level

1 and put my wife onto the bike and

feel at ease that she will not hurt

herself on the bike because firstly it

is super easy to ride without a clutch

or gears and with the power mode

being so tame it is really ideal for

beginner riders.

So now I had ridden the bike for

about an hour and had become more

comfortable with the idea of throttle

and brake only, so I started to push

the bike harder and harder. Trying to

go faster through corners and “get

on the gas” earlier and the bike just

got better and better.

The one thing that is noticeable is

the lack of clutch or engine idle. As

you come into a corner and hit the

brakes - usually mid corner, there

is a point where you are not on the

gas or on the brakes. You are kind

of free-wheeling through the corner

on a normal bike but it stills feels like

you are moving forward because of

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017 31


the inertia of the motor plus the natural idle

of the motor.

On the electric bike the power is either on

or it is off.

It is an experience I am very fortunate to

have had and am super grateful for the

opportunity.

I think that these type of bikes might just be

the future, but they still require a lot of work

and development before they can compete

against the current combustion engines.

Once the technology becomes available

to create lighter and more powerful battery

packs with longer durations between

charges then these bikes will become a lot

more appealing to the general public. At

the moment I think it is a bit of a gimic that

only a select few are able to afford, kind of

like the Tesla of the bike industry.

But this lot have the potential to be a

market leader in the future.

Regards, Charan.

We know you have more questions and

we tried to think of as many of them that

we could. Here is what we asked Alta

and their answers.

Is the bike waterproof?

For all practical purposes, absolutely.

Without the physical limitations of air

box /exhaust, why not use a different

kind of shock or swing arm, like

mountain bikes?

To allow Alta to use proven off-the-shelf

hardware from WP.

Can it be stored on its side or upsidedown?

It is not recommended as both the primary

case and cooling system are vented to

atmosphere. Prolonged storage other than

vertical could result in fluid loss.

32 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017


What don’t you want to cover with

protection because of air flow?

The battery.

Is there a way to take an extra (smaller

hopefully) battery with you on a ride to

extend your range?

Not at this time.

Worst case scenario, how can I shock

myself?

By violating Alta protocol. Example:

Breaking the manufacturers seal and

accessing areas of high voltage.

Most Japanese bikes, overall, stick to a

8mm, 10mm, or 12mm hex bolt. KTM/

Huskies are similar but they use a lot of

Torx bolts as well. How about the Alta?

Most fasteners are combination head (Both

Hex and Torx on a single fastener).

What is the maintenance of the power

plant/battery/motor?

Zero.

Any fluids that need to be replaced?

Initial service primary oil and coolant

change.

Any taking apart/cleaning/replacing

needed?

Only consumables such as tyres, brakes,

chain, sprockets, etc.

What is actually creating movement?

Opposing magnetic lines of flux between

the stator and rotor. Alta Redshift liquidcooled,14K

rpm, AC Permanent Magnet

Motor (ACPM).

What is in the battery pack?

Waterproof Li-Ion 350V / 5.8KW/H Battery

Pack.

Can the battery be removed?

The battery can be removed and takes

roughly fifteen minutes.

What happens if the battery pack is

punctured?

Should the battery pack become punctured

it is safe to operate the motorcycle only

long enough to get back to a safe place.

That said, any sign of smoke / fire will

see you placing the motorcycle in an

area free of combustible material without

operating the motorcycle and standing

back for prolonged observation. In short,

a punctured battery is serious and should

be handled with extreme care just as one

would do with a fuel tank full of fuel.

How hot does the battery get?

70C / 158F

How hot does the motor get?

90C / 194F

How much would it cost to replace a

physically broken battery?

Around 35k

How much would it cost to replace a

physically broken motor/bulkhead?

Motor Assembly = around 90k

Rear Bulkhead Assembly = $609.86

What is the difference between the four

maps?

The maximum torque, maximum rate of

acceleration (flywheel), and max regen

(simulated engine braking).

Map-1 = Low traction / entry level

Map-2 = Trail application / reduced traction

Map-3 = Performance / good traction

Map-4 = Scary!

Can the owner change map settings?

Not at this time.

Is all the tuning electronic?

Power output related, yes.

Are there physical things that can be

changed by aftermarket companies to

boost performance?

Yes: Gearing, Suspension, etc.

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017 33


BOULDERS

FOURIESBURG

A COOL PLACE TO STAY

On our recent trip to Fouriesburg with the Adventure

Company Crew, we noticed the Boulders Off-Road

Riding academy, just out of town on the Clarens road.

We stopped in to have a chat and a looksee…

A short ride from the majestic Golden Gate Nature

Reserve and only 9Kms from the Lesotho Border.

What a cool place – The Grimsteds have created a little

piece of heaven – not just for motorcyclists. Comfy Chalets,

cool gardens, a lekker dam – well worth a Kuier even if you

don’t ride Adventure Motorcycles.

Mike is a qualified Motorrad instructor and was at the

Swartkops training facility for years. He decided to get out

of the Big Smoke and this farm is now one of the coolest

training facilities that we have seen.

We took the liberty of exploring his farm – and it is fantastic

– everything from mild gravel roads to some more technical

offerings.

Tight twisty routes through the forests. A big sand pit.

Twisty log sections, a cool rickety bridge – mud crossings

– everything that the adventure traveler might encounter on

their travels.

Boulders Adventure Academy, caters for both novice and

advanced riders. Not only is Boulders Adventure Academy

a great training facility, but offers numerous guided outrides

for both the novice and more experienced rider, a great

base to spend a weekend and explore the surrounding

areas, and even venture into neighbouring Lesotho.

Mike will take you on rides generally not accessible by

the general public. All are welcome, stop in for a chat and

coffee.

Mike will only be too happy to show you around, and you

may even have the opportunity of doing some riding… All

adventure bike brands are welcome!

Another very cool spot.

www.boulderssa.co.za

Mike and the boss, Nadine Grimsted

They can sleep about

12 people - and its

beautiful!

34 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017


WAREHOUSE SALE

30 SEPTEMBER - 1 OCTOBER 2017

OPEN FROM 8AM - 4PM

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SCHUBERTH SR1

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Stock is limited.

Strictly no returns. E&OE.

GPS coordinates: S26°01´57˝ E27°51´45˝ (find us on google maps)


MOTOKIDS

Junior motocross development program

Thisgrassroots initiative is a Motocross

SA, Motorsport SA collaboration including

sponsors like KTM SA, Husqvarna SA ,

Honda Westrand and KTM Centurion. This

program began last year with four race

events being hosted around Gauteng at

venues like NutBush in Hekpoort and Dirt

Bronco in Mogale.

The program is in its third year.

A minimum of an MSA Moto Kids Social

Licence or higher is required to participate.

The cost is R100.00 (once off) and paid

to Motorsport South Africa (MSA).No

competitor is allowed to participate without

medical cover. A competitor’s parent has

to submit a certificate from the medical aid

that clearly states that the participant is

covered to participate in extreme sports.

What makes this series different?

It does not only provide a fun racing day

for beginner and amateur kids in both MX

and off road but they are prepared for more

formal racing by teaching them what they

need to know.

Everything from flags, to following race trail

markings, to how race days’ work.

Youngsters aged 5 to 10 on any make of two

wheeled motorcycle are eligible for the series.

Neil VD Ross’s, team Ikagengs comments :

Our last race event was held on 20 August

at Dirt Bronco. There were 42 juniors

entered for the day. This has been the

biggest entry for the series since it began

which is promising.

The race day format was an enduro race

and two motocross heats with two practice

sessions. My involvement with Motokids

development motocross started in 2016.

MXSA sponsored two PW50’s and I

acquired two bikes namely a CRF50

and CRF110 for 2016/17 seasons from

the very generous Helena Harrison from

Honda Westrand. These bikes provide the

ideal platform into beginners racing. From

these two bikes at least 9 riders have been

given opportunities to learn, train and race

junior motocross. Some of our racers have

progressed to KTM 50/65’S which makes

them ready for club/regional racing level.

The level of interest in the program has

been steadily growing, as we receive calls

and emails continuously.

I host two training session a month. It is

free of charge, the cadets only pay a track

fee. Interested parents can email me at

neilv5@iburst.co.za or check my FaceBook

page Team Ikageng or via MXSA.

Go to www.mxsa.co.za/motokids.html for

more info on the classes and what Moto

Kids is all about.

36 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017


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RAZOR-SHARP AGILITY

DAR E T O TA

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destinations that few others would dare to aim for. The 2016 Husqvarna Mo

2-stroke enduro bikes rely on exceptional agility, a broad powerband and l

weight – letting you easily explore wherever you choose to go.

Please make no attempt to imitate the illustrated riding scenes, always wear protective clothing and observe the applicable provisions of the road traffic regulations!

The illustrated vehicles may vary in selected details from the production models and some illustrations feature optional equipment available at additional cost.

Photo: H. Mitterbauer

FREESTATE - Husqvarna Central, Bloemfontein – (051) 430 1237

Holeshot Motorcycles, Boksburg – (011) 823-5830

Belville (021) 945 8019

MPUMALANGA - Vans Husqvarna, Middleburg – (013) 282 0766


ADVERTORIAL

Need a tyre Steve with.... The warehouse manager...

Metzeler tyres on a Roll

The distributorship of the famous Metzeler

brands was fairly recently granted to the

Timoto range of companies under the

direction of long time motorcycle man

Steve Theron.

Guys, Timoto is quite a firm – owned by

companies like old Mutual and overseas

investors – they know how to turn rubber.

They have an extensive and established

distribution network and decades of proven

performance as the sole Southern African

distributor of a number of big-name wheel,

tyre and automotive battery brands. They

tell us that this translates into greater,

more widespread and more immediate

availability of the full variety of Metzeler

tyres, throughout the Southern African

motorcycle dealer network.

Metzeler was reportedly one of the first

companies to make specialised motorcycle

tyres, back in 1892 when motorcycles

were first being built. In fact, the company

is credited with playing a major role in tyre

development for not only the motorcycle

but also the bicycle and automotive

industries. Since 1978/79, however,

the company focusses exclusively on

motorcycle tyres.

We went to visit their warehouse for a visit

and to have a looksee.

Guys – the warehouse is ridiculously large –

and everywhere we looked were motorcycle

tyres stacked – literally to the roof.

“More than 2000 tyres in stock” Says Steve

– “with more on the water”.

“We deliver every day – so a customer can

place an order and the tyre will be at the

retailer either on the day, or on the following

day at the latest. That’s nationally”, he says.

And they appear to have everything from

those big ass wide tyres for bikes like the

Suzuki Boulevard and the Triumph Rocket

– all the way down to old classic bike tyres

– which are quite unique.

Literally hundreds of adventure tyres litter

the place.

On the dirtbike side of things, we saw piles

of knobblies all over the place both for

MX and enduro, with heaps of the 6 days

extreme lurking around just waiting for the

Rock hoppers.

Quite an operation. And looking at how

pro-active these guys are, we reckon that

this brand is going places.

Available at dealers nationally.

Trade enquiries: www.timoto.co.za

Roof Of Africa Ready...

Steve with Whitey who has been in the

tyre trade for more than thirty years...

Tyres for vintage

motorcycles...

38 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017


11 OF SA’S TOP

MOTORCYCLE

DEALERSHIPS

WITHIN 3KM OF

EACH OTHER!

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New and used BMW Motorcycle sales

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New Honda Motorcycles.

Quality used motorcycles.

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Quality used motorycle sales

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AFRICA DOES

BATTLE

42 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017


The annual FIM Africa MX of African

Nations was held at Wings Moto Park in

Gaborone Botswana over the weekend

of 26 & 27 August 2017. What a cool

event, MX is alive and kicking on the

African continent.

The FIM Africa Motocross of African

Nations Championship is one of the

few motorcycle events recognised as a

“Team” event, where the points of the

official riders are tallied to determine who

the winning African Nation will be for that

particular year.

The local organising committee, which

was led by John Carr-Hartley, staged a

flawless event on Saturday and Sunday

in Botswana. It was arguably one of the

best organised events held to date and

they managed to overcome a number

of challenges one of which was turning

a piece of bushveld into a race ready

Motocross Track in just 5 months.

The two-day Continental Championship

attracted a record number of competitors

from various African countries but team

South Africa managed to win the team

event for the fourth time.

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017 43


Eight eight African countries competed to

take the championship trophy home. The

President of Bostwana, his Excellency

Mr. Ian Khama also attended, in support

of the event.

The pics were all kindly provided by the

talented Franziska Brandl.

The following country teams participated

in the event:

Botswana, Zambia, DRC, Uganda,

Zimbabwe, Kenya, Namibia, Swaziland,

South Africa.

The Racing consisted of 3 heat races

spread over Saturday and Sunday, racing

was intense in most classes.

Team South Africa took top honours.

1st – South Africa

2nd – Zimbabwe

3rd – Zambia

4th - Botswana

The following riders rode for team SA:

50cc – SA won the class.

Neil van der Vyver, Jordan van Wyk,

Aiden Henley, Andrea Mynhardt, Thor

Johnson.

65cc – SA, 2nd:

Lucca Mynhardt, Luke Grundy, James

Thompson, Barend du Toit, Wian du

Plooy.

Lites – SA won the class.

AJ Visagie, Miguel de Waal, Dalton

Venter, Jonathan Mlimi.

125cc SA won the class.

Keegan Hickson-Mahony, Richardo

Raaff, Matthew Kruger, Cameron

Thompson, Travis Goosen.

MX1 SA won the class.

Anthony Raynard, David Goosen,

Wade Den.

MX2 SA won the class.

Joshua Mlimi, Johan Vogelesang,

Keegan Barnard, Tyron Beverly,

Nicholas Phelps.

VMX - Vets SA won the class.

Brett Bircher, Ian Topliss, Dax Hunt.

VMX - Masters

Geoff Den, Gary Killian.

WMX - 2nd:

Natasha Rugani, Kayla Raaff, Yanke

Pieterse, Bianca Prout-Jones.

Well done guys!

44 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017


All the fast ladies...

Franziska with Team Swaziland.

Team SA

Ross with Jack Cheney, Race Director.

Team Namibia

Team Uganda

Team Zimbabwe

Team Botswana Team Kenya Team Zambia

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017 45


2018 Suzuki V-Strom 1000

and 1000XT On The Way

46 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017


You would have seen our feature on the new

650XT, a fantastic motorcycle at a fantastic price.

The new 1000’s are on their way - and with a bit of

luck, we’ll get our mitts onto them pretty soon.

For now - here are some highlights on the new

models...

After skipping updates for 2017, Suzuki brings back

the V-Strom 1000 and 1000XT (the XT replaces the

similar Adventure) with important updates that bring

them up to modern spec. At the same time, Suzuki

has not forgotten what has made the previous V-Strom

1000 adventure motorcycles appealing.

1. Electronics lead the way for the 2018 Suzuki

V-Strom 1000 changes. The big news is the three-axis

Bosch Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) that ties in

with a new braking system. There’s ABS, of course,

but now it has access to the V-Strom’s yaw (left and

right), roll (left and right), and pitch (down only). To add

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017 47


functionality, there’s a new combined braking system that

works differently than you expect.

C

M

Y

2. The braking system is almost invisible in action. They tell

us that when riding you still have independent control of the

front and the rear brakes. However, if the Combined Braking

System senses over-enthusiastic use of either the front or

the rear discs, it will reduce the pressure of the offending

brake, while adding braking at the opposite end. This works

in both straight-line riding, as well as while cornering. ABS is

almost completely transparent. In many ways, you have to

work on faith as it all happens so smoothly.

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

3. The 1037cc motor is cleaner than before, but has virtually

the same power. The exhaust was reworked to be lighter

with dual catalyzers, along with other small changes, and

the result is a motor with the same peak horsepower and a

loss of about 1.4 ft/lbs of torque. In the real world of riding,

the 90-degree V-twin feels completely unchanged, but

now the Euro4 tailpipe sniffers are satisfied. As before, the

excellent Suzuki EFI system is an important part of why the

smooth Suzuki V-Strom 1000 motor is a winner.

4. The 2018 Suzuki V-Strom 1000 and 1000XT are quite

close. The big difference is that the 1000XT gets wire-spoked

dual-ridge tubeless rims, with the 1000 getting the typical

cast aluminum wheels (which are actually a bit lighter). The

1000XT also get tapered aluminum bars, compared to the

consistent 7/8-inch bars on the standard 1000.

5. Both V-Strom 1000s get a bit more aggressive adventureready

rubber. Having said that, riding a V-Strom 1000 in

the dirt is still a challenge, even with the Bridgestone Battle

Wing tires. The bike is fine on a hard dirt road, but the

handling and suspension aren’t ready for hard pounding or

sandy conditions.

48 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017


GSX250R | GSX-R1000 | DL650 | DL1000 | SV650


The 17-/19-inch wheel combination allows you to

choose tyres that suit your needs, though dirt-road

riders will want the 1000XT due to its wire-spoked

wheels and tapered bars. Both the standard V-Strom

1000 and the 1000XT get a lower cowl, making them

more suitable for gravel roads where you want to

protect the engine’s soft underbelly.

6. Consider the 2018 Suzuki V-Strom 1000 bikes to be

sport-tourers with benefits. You can tour the world, and

you aren’t restricted to paved roads. You’ll want to stick

to pavement for most of your riding, but it’s always nice

to have options.

7. A new fairing and windscreen are solid improvements

in air management. New this year is a taller windscreen

that allows you to easily adjust it to any of three angles.

I liked the swept back position for most riding, though

higher speed or rain may make the forward position

tempting. There’s also height adjustment that requires

an Allen wrench. Really, picking the right position is

about your height and wind-protection preferences.

The fairing is also new, and it keeps things quieter and

more stable. There is definitely less buffeting and more

protection than before—a nice improvement that means

you can ride longer with reduced fatigue.

8. Traction control returns, but there’s still no cruise

control. We are big fans of Suzuki’s easily adjusted

three-position (high, low, and off) traction control. It’s

not an intrusive system, though you can turn it off if

you want to do wheelies. Low intervention is a good

default position, with high ready for rain. Off-roaders

can go with no traction control, though I liked the highsensitivity

option on the hard-pack dirt roads and the

street-friendly Bridgestones—it’s definitely a taste thing.

9. Touring riders will love the new mounting system

for luggage. Putting bags on V-Stroms was a hassle

in the past. Now, Suzuki has a saddlebag mounting

system that is common to all 1000 and 650 flavours.

This makes life easier for the consumer, dealer, and

aftermarket purveyor of accessories. We’ll check that

out when we get the bikes.

10. The chassis and suspension are unchanged. The

V-Strom 1000 had already established itself as having

predictably neutral handling and suspension that was

highly capable on paved routes of all types, while being

acceptable on well-groomed dirt roads. The ergonomics

remain fantastic, and it is no problem to go through the

20 litre fuel tank.

11. It’s a better Suzuki V-Strom 1000 and 1000XT for

2018. Although most of the improvements are difficult

for the rider to feel, the increased safety of expanded

electronic riding aids are always an enhancement.

The new tyres and the XT’s wire-spoked wheels are

an upgrade, as is the updated plastic. Rather than

reinventing the V-Strom 1000s for 2018, Suzuki wisely

settled for refining the adventure-touring litre-bikes.

Get to your local Suzuki dealer for more details...

50 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017


The most comfortable, quiet,

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YOUR ADVENTURE STARTS HERE!

Break free from all the boundaries of todays life with the new HORNET ADV.

With all the advantages an offroad helmet has for exploring new terrains, yet with

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Optimum Safety. SRP from R7400.00 excl VAT

At Dealers across South Africa

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Photography by Wasabi Foto www.wasabi-foto.com

The origin of power

b a s e f i t C O R E T R A I N I N G

“You are only as powerful or as quick as your core is both strong and stable”

Understanding everything

pertaining to ‘core strength’ is

extremely beneficial to dirt bike

riders. A strong core is imperative

to maximising your power output,

while giving you the stability

to perform complex athletic

movements over difficult terrain,

which requires coordination,

balance, and technical skill.

The core of the body in broad

strokes is your midsection, front

back and sides. The muscles

involved are responsible for

stabilizing the spine and pelvis as

well as generating and transferring

energy from the centre of the body

to its extremities. It’s this transfer

of energy which is the key to your

riding fitness.

The problem with most fitness

training programs are that they

place to much emphasis on other

muscle groups. When the core is

weak relative to the body, the rider

becomes accustomed to overusing

other muscle groups to produce

the required force when riding.

Generally, this puts more strain

on the muscles further down the

extremities in order to generate

energy, and on the joints to transfer

it, such as the shoulders and knees.

Many riders with knee injuries show

weak hip muscles or tight hip flexors,

improperly shifting the load from

the trunk to the knee and anterior

cruciate ligament (ACL) that is prone

to tearing. This is just one reason

Base Fit programs emphasize core

strength which gives our clients

greater stability, controlled body

movement, and proper muscle

recruitment while in action.

Another critical reason we places

emphasis on core strength is that

you are only as powerful or as

quick as your core is both strong

and stable. Your core is what

enables you to start a motion in

your legs and carry it through to

your arms, or vice versa, with the

most efficient transfer of energy

possible. Therefore for optimal

riding performance, you not only

need to include total body strength,

quickness, endurance, etc, but you

need to spend time training your

core with flexion, extension, and

rotational mid-section exercises.

Pay attention to your training and

build a core that will help you excel

in your sport!

The two exercises I have chosen

to illustrate to you in this article

have been designed by Base Fit

specifically for dirt bike riders.

Neither are easy as they require

isometric control while working

though movements which

challenge stability, coordination

and balance as you would when

tackling tricky off camber sections

for example.

Caterpillars (pic 1 & 2)

Lie in a side bridge position with

your feet in TRX straps, resting on

one elbow, hips off the floor. While

holding this position bring your leg

which is closest to the floor up to

your chest, the return.

Core Cross Overs (pic 3 & 4)

Lying on your back (preferably on

a bench for added difficulty), with

your legs vertically upright towards

the ceiling. Hold a dumbbell in your

right hand, arm held straight up

above you, palm facing towards

the left. Now drop your right

hand down towards the floor

keeping your arm straight, and

simultaneously lower your legs to

the left.

If you have any queries with regards

correct training for dirt bikes or

would like to sign up with Base

Fit training please contact me on

mandy@basefit.co.za.

www.basefit.co.za.

52 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017


PERFORMANCE AND

DURABILITY

//STRIKE250 //STRIKE1000

//SECTOR450 //SECTOR750 //SECTOR1000CREW

R67 500 R195 000

R119 900 R147 500

R225 000

WWW.HISUN.CO.ZA

Andre 082 771 3040 / Sales: Avril 083 284 4201

Technical: Fernando 071 895 9567


54 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017


A STONKING GOOD

ORANGE TIME

KTM’s 2017 Adventure Rally

By definition, adventure is an exciting, unusual or

even bold undertaking.

For the first time, KTM invited South Africans to

experience exactly what that’s like at their 2017

Adventure Rally. The annual event was hosted at

Champagne Valley Sports Resort in the majestic

Central Drakensberg last month.

Guests checked in on Thursday night and enjoyed a

casual dinner and welcoming ceremony. And then the

action began! Early on Friday morning an orange family

set off in biking paradise for the fun.

Entrants could choose between three skill level routes

– the 300km easy but scenic green route, the 90km

technical and physically demanding red route, or a

tougher 80km black route for the hardcore rider wanting

to put their machines to the test.

Riders experienced open dirt roads, single track and

riverbeds. A few serious climbs were also thrown in the

mix, which had heart rates sky rocketing and took some

sweat to conquer!

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017 55


After a long day out in the field, riders were greeted

by pizza truck and beer tent when they arrived back

at the venue. The evening’s festivities included a live

performance by Ballyhoo and prize giving, with the main

prize being a full set of KTM Powerwear kit, Alpinestar

Tech 8 boots and an Airoh helmet. Every rider’s dream!

Saturday started in a similar fashion, but came with a

twist. Riders arrived back slightly earlier for an exciting

Red Bull skills challenge. This was a showstopper and

non-other than the Dakar and off road legend himself,

Alfie Cox, walked away with top honours.

Sharing the terrain with world-class athletes was a huge

highlight of the event. Other racing personalities included

Joey Evans (2017 Dakar finisher), Darryl Curtis (two time

Dakar finisher and Hard Enduro star) and Ross Branch

(multiple National Offroad Champion and 2019 Dakar

hopeful).

With great sadness, the orange mist dispersed on

Sunday after a great experience. Planning stages are

already in place for next year’s rally, with plans foran even

bigger and better mountain adventure.

One parting shot from Alfie Cox: “If all these fire breathing

orange bikes descending on biking paradise in the

Drakensberg mountains doesn’t get your heart racing,

then I’m afraid you need to urgently find an organ donor!”

If you missed out, be sure to sign up in 2018. For more

information visit http://www.ktm-adventure-rally.com/

56 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017


DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017 57


ADVerTORIAL

Brought to you by

Tyre Choice for

Technical

With Goldentyre South Africa

Which tyre and mousse combination is best for you?

As a follow up to the informative article that you ran a few

issues back, we thought that this might interest the rock hoppers

and technical riders out there.

Let`s be honest, not everyone can ride like Graham Jarvis or Wade

Young. Many of us are there for the adventure and thrill of competing

and of course to do better than we did last year. But we still

want to use the best equipment to achieve the best advantage we

can. If you are anything like us, you need all the help you can get.

There are so many tyre and mousse options available it makes you

feel like you need an engineering degree to understand them all.

So maybe we can learn from the top riders and look at what the

top guys used at this year`s Erzberg Rodeo.

This year`s winner Alfredo Gomez was on a factory sponsored

KTM.

His front tyre combo was a Goldentyre 216AA 90/100-21 with a

90/100 G-Mousse. On the rear he used a Goldentyre 216X 140/80-

18, but opted for an undersized 120 X-Mousse that was already

pre ridden. Gomez uses this set up for most of his hard enduro

events.

Graham Jarvis finished second on his factory Husqvarna.

Jarvis also used the Goldentyre 216AA 90/100-21 up front but he

matched it with a 90/90 G- Mousse. He also used the Goldentyre

216X 140/80-18 rear but his Mousse was a modified X-Mousse

that he had also pre- run. He uses an extra rim lock on his rear to

keep the tyre in place.

Another KTM factory rider Cody Webb came in third.

Webb`s front tyre was a Dunlop Geomax 90/90-21 and he used 10

PSI tyre balls instead of a front mousse. On the rear he had a Dunlop

sports 110/100 coupled with a modified and pre run mousse.

South Africa`s own Wade Young finished in 4th place on the factory

Sherco. Young ran a Michelin Comp VI 90/100-21 front combined

with a Mitas EF07 140/80-18 rear. Unfortunately no mousse

information was available.

In 5th place was KTM factory rider Jonny Walker,

Walker chose a Goldentyre 216AA 80/100-21 front with a same

sized G-Mousse. He made a controversial choice of rear tyre

with a Goldentyre 523KX (controversial as this is more usually

suited to MX) He used this with a pre run 120 X Mousse.

The top riders choose different combinations

to suit the surface, conditions

and their specific riding style. Lesotho conditions will be very different

to the typical European forestry terrain so tyre and mousse

choices may be even more tricky.

Marco Caribotti, President of Goldentyre, trainer and close friend

of Graham Jarvis gave us his suggestions for this years Roof of

Africa.

Tyres:

The front needs to have an oversized rolling diameter to overcome

large rocks and ledges with a good footprint and a strong flexible

sidewall. This will ensure great traction and improved downhill grip

and braking confidence.

Recommendation

- GT216AA 90/100-21 (Fatty) at 12-13 psi

- G-mousse 80/100-21 13 psi or 90/100-21 15 psi

The rear is all about grip which comes from the correct combination

of contact with the road surface and tyre compound. A flexible

sturdy carcass will provide a good foot print but this needs to

be coupled with the correct compound choice to maximise grip.

A further consideration with the typical Roof of Africa surface is

tyre life. A compromise in grip may be required to ensure tyre life is

sufficient to complete each day.

Recommendation

- GT216HBN 140/80-18 or GT369X 110/100-18

- G-mousse 120X pre run if softer pressure required

If the region is dry or experiences light rain, the above recommendations

remain, possibly with a slightly softer rear mousse. If there

is heavy rain along with very low temparatures, below 25° C the

recommendation would be to use a softer compound tyre, like the

GT216X Gummy rear.

Whatever tyre, mousse combination you choose, make sure the

tyre pressure suits the conditions and remember that clutch control

rather than throttle control will improve your traction and tyre life.

See you at The Roof.

Richard Vaughan Goldentyre SA

richard@goldentyre.co.za

Alfredo Gomez

1st Erzberg Rodeo

2017

Paul Bolton came in 6th on his KTM

On the front he had a Goldentyre 216AA 90/100-21 with a

Mefo MOM Mousse. His rear choice was a Mitas EF07

Double Green and a Mefo 18-1EX Mousse.


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Pics by Zygmund Brodalka

Holeshot Harries

NATIONAL MX HARRYSMITH RACE REPORT

The sixth round of the Monster Energy

TRP Distributors SA MX National

Championship saw the competitors return

to Holeshot Harries in Harrismith. Despite

some heavy winds the two days before the

event, the sun was out and the weather

played along for a superb race day. The

club did a great job once again hosting

approximately 180 competitors for both

the National and Northern Regions MX

Championship.

Everyone anticipated excellent racing

and also the possibility of some

championships to be wrapped up but the

event concluded with every single one

of the championships having to wait for

the Round 7 Final at Terra Topia on the

14thOctober. We are in for an incredible

racing spectacle to end off the 2017

season.

In the Premier MX1 class Tintswalo Out

of Africa Yamaha’s David Goosen put

in two solid performances getting a 1-2

for first overall but it was GAC Laser

Ace Sports’ Anthony Raynard that stole

the show in the second heat taking

the 4-1 for the day sealing his second

overall position. Husqvarna Racing’s

Richard van der Westhuizen continued

his consistent racing with a 2-3 for third

overall and despite the intense battles

taking place, Tintswalo Out of Africa’s

Yamaha’s Tristan Purdon has not given up

125cc High School start with 58 Cameron Durow edging infront

of 151 Dalton Venter for the holeshot

Dalton Venter had

an expectional

weekends of racing

in the Pro Mini’s and

even in the High

School class

50cc Pro points leader

Neil van der vyver

Camden Mc Lellan

on the way to yet

another victory

Zambian laides pilot

Jenna Bholing

Tristan Purdon

MX 1 ,the final will

make for a great

racing between the

top 3, meaning the

Championship is

still wide open

Team mates Tiegen Reed 24 and Kyla Raaff 22 side by side in

the Ladies cless

KOM MAAK N DRAAI,ONS PRAAT OOK ENGELS


his fight and retains his points lead going

into the final round after a 3-4 for fourth

overall for the day. This leaves the points

standings close enough that spectators

are guaranteed one of the most intense

battles for a Premier Championship we

have seen in years at the final in October.

In the Premier MX2 class, the day

belonged to GAC Laser Ace Sports’

Anthony Raynard, crowning off a

memorable racing day for him as he took

a 1-2 for first overall with Tintswalo Out

National Motorcross

Proudly Brought to you by:

of Africa Yamaha’s David Goosen taking

a consistent 2-3 for second overall and

retaining the points lead. We saw Red

Bull KTM’s Kerim Fitz-Gerald win back

a third overall after a 7-1 performance,

ending the day with a great finish after a

tough start to the day. Many commented

that the racing in this class was the best

they had seen all year with the top 4

riders within a bike length of each other.

Undoubtedly this is another class that will

not disappoint at Terra Topia.

2017 SA Motocross Nationals

Holeshot Harry’s Results

MX1

1st David Goosen

2nd Anthony Raynard

3rd Richard van der Westhuizen

MX2

1st Anthony Raynard

2nd David Goosen

3rd Kerim Fitz-Gerald

MX3

1st Ian Topliss

2nd Brett Bircher

3rd Kevin Moran

Joshua Mlimi at the

start of MX 2

125 High School

1st Cameron Durow

2nd Regan Wasmuth

3rd Slade Smith

Ladies

1st Leah Heygate

2nd Nanda Clowes

3rd Kayla Raaff

Caleb Tennant MX1

Kerim Fitz Gerlad

on the gas

Pro Mini

1st Camden Mc Lellan

2nd Davin Cocker

3rd Miguel de Waal

85cc Juniors

1st Hayden Tully

2nd Blake Young

3rd Dylan Kirk

Richie van Der

Westhuizen railing the

loose soil of Holeshot

Harry’s and on his way

to the MXon with Kerim

Fitz Gerlad and joined

by Neville Bradshaw in

the UK

65cc

1st Daiyaan Manuel

2nd Troy Muraour

3rd Lucca Mynhardt

Ross Branch took one

Moto Holeshot in MX 1

David Goosen

Start of MX 1

Anthony Raynard

50cc

1st Neil van der Vyver

2nd Jordan van Wyk

3rd Liam Botha

Anthony Raynard and Richie van der Westhuizen

batteling it from the gate drop to the finnish

Willow Rock Shopping Centre, Solomon Mahlangu Drive, Equestria,

Pretoria East LANDLINE: 012 111 0190 / 012 809 1670


ADVENTURE

Honda Quest True Adventure 2017

We first heard about this initiative from Honda at the launch of the little CRF250 rally.

We were so keen to participate, but woefully, getting magazines out sometimes takes

precedence. We’ve been watching it all with great interest and is looks as though it was

an enormous success. Here is what it was like and what it’s all about.

What is Quest?

A 2500 km adventure biking expedition that took 20 finalists

through the Namibian Wilderness, each geared with a Honda

CRF1000 L Africa Twin. This 12 day adventure included a variety of

challenges to test perseverance as man and machine teamed up

to take on Africa.

The first Honda Quest:

Ten teams were selected via a process of elimination run through

Honda’s dealer network. The participants all had to qualify at a

Boot Camp run earlier this year.:

Team 1:Johannes Haasbroek, Gerrit Visser

Team 2:Cornelius Nelson, Angus Welch

Team 3: Clinton Pienaar, Andries Haasbroek

Team 4: Charl du Plessis, Barbara Muszynski

Team 5: Glenn Koch, Grant Pentelow

Team 6: Andrew Johnstone, Phillip Groenewald

Team 7: Frederik Dreyer, Marcel Vladar

Team 8: Charl Potgieter, Hennie

van Heerden

Team 9: Pieter Lourens, Francois

Ebersohn

Team 10: Gerrit du Toit, Kobus

Myburgh.

Here’s a run down of what the event entailed and how it all

rolled out.

By Jaco Kirsten, Media Manager for Specialised Adventures:

The ten two-person teams for Honda Quest 2017 were announced

around the campfire at the foot of the majestic Spitzkoppe

mountains. The following day, they kitted up and headed north for

Palmwag in the heart of the Damaraland.

This was their first day of riding together as team mates. While the

ride wasn’t technically that hard, the 350km of dirt road was in a

terrible state, with serious corrugations, making for a very trying

experience.

62 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017


DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017 6 3


The biggest challenge was the dust, which made for

extremely taxing conditions with visibility sometimes down

to 30 metres. Added to that was the hazard of foreign

tourists used to driving on the right side of the road,

creating dangerous situations for all in involved.

The convoy suffered two punctures, which were a direct

result of the bad road surface. The competitors also came

to the rescue of two Dutch tourists who were stranded

in the middle of nowhere with their rental car with two

punctures.

The Quest convoy eventually settled down in the camp at

Palmwag, serviced their motorcycles and support vehicles.

They also continued with their daily routine of individual

competitors having to give presentations to the rest of the

group about African subjects they were briefed on before

the start of Quest.

Day 3

Things did not get any easier as contestants battle soaring

temperatures and team dynamics are being tested. The

adventurers have been practicing their mental toughness

techniques, battling to stay focused rather than being

distracted by negative thoughts and of course, dust! The

nature of Honda Quest, , is that you’re not in this alone,

and if you play as a team, then the attitudes of your team

mate can be just as important as your own.

Get to know the two-person teams and see how they cope

with harsh elements and survive punctures all in a day.

Day 4

When the Honda Quest convoy left Opuwo, the capital of

Namibia’s Kaokoland area at 09:00 with the mercury already

at 29? C, everyone suspected that the 225km ride from

Opuwo to Epupa Falls was going to be quite a challenge.

Thanks to fairly open terrain, the first 130km to

Swartbooisdrif was relatively easy going. After a quick

stop at the memorial for the Dorsland Trekkers - the hardy

group of pioneers that trekked to Angola and back at the

beginning of the previous century - the riders donned their

riding gear and headed for the Kunene River, the border

between Namibia and Angola.

64 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017


Here they turned left on a trail that headed

westwards and had to negotiate numerous

dry riverbed crossings, steep climbs

and descents - and the all-too-normal

rocks that never ceased to threaten the

motorcycle’s tyres.

It soon became apparent that this 95km

section was going to require huge amounts

of skill, concentration - and hydration -

because the different riders’ CRF 1000 L

Africa Twins on-board computers indicated

temperatures of anything between 41 and

47 degrees Celsius!

The teams had to concentrate hard to

maintain the proper following distances in

the scorching, dusty conditions, as well as

having to negotiate the obstacles and try

to maintain enough speed to be able to

cool down. Eventually, a tired and sweaty

group of riders rode into the tiny settlement

of Epupa Falls, where they got rid of their

riding gear and had the opportunity to

marvel at the sights and sound of the

waterfall, an oasis in an otherwise barren

and unforgiving terrain.

Day 5

The “whoooooooooaaaaah!” that Glenn

Koch, one of the competitors screamed

from the top of his lungs when he

succeeded in riding up a particularly steep,

rocky climb, best summed up today’s riding.

When the Honda Quest competitors

left Epupa Falls at 07:00 after the rider’s

briefing they all had a swarm of butterflies

in the stomach, because what lay ahead

was undoubtedly the toughest riding of the

whole event: The 73km from Okangwati to

the Van Zyl’s Pass community camp.

Their excitement was warranted, because

soon after turning west from Okangwati,

the first riders succumbed to the thick

sandy tracks and regular river crossings.

But the real action still lay ahead. Because

for a couple of kilometres the riders would

have to negotiate extremely rocky and

uneven climbs and descends.

When one of the lead bike instructors’

voice crackled over the radio: “The gala

has just started.” everyone in the support

convoy knew that the moment of reckoning

had come.

Over the next few hours they had to

tackle rocky trails, helping one another

up and down these daunting obstacles,

picking up fellow riders and assisting with

punctured tyres.

At exactly 15:45 the group rolled into the

Van Zyl’s Community Camp, sweaty, dirty

and tired. But they were in very high spirits,

because never before has a group of 22 big

bore adventure bikes managed to complete

this hazardous journey…

Day 6

The Honda Quest managed to do what

few others have done: Not only did they

conquer the notoriously difficult Van Zyl’s

Pass, but they did it as a group of 22 riders

on big adventure bikes suffering no damage

or injury to anyone.

When the group departed at the Van Zyl’s

Pass Community Camp, little did they know

exactly how hard it was going to be. After

all, they thought that the previous day’s ride

from Okangwati to the camp was going

to be the hardest of the trip. It turned out

that the organisers had another surprise in

stall for the riders as the approach to Van

Zyl’s Pass turned out to be just as hard as

anything they experienced the previous day.

Then they had to tackle the nerve-wracking

descend down the notorious steps at

the top of the pass. However, team work

and discipline saw to it that all 22 riders

and bikes made it through without any

problems. Once they arrived at the bottom

of the pass and headed out into the

Marienfluss, there were more trails waiting

as they once again had to contend with

challenging sandy conditions.

Turning south they headed for the famous

Rooidrom beacon in the middle of

nowhere, before heading for the overnight

stop at Marble Camp in the Orupembe

Communal Conservancy.

But there was one final surprise in store:

Joubert Pass. The steep, loose rocky climb

presented a huge challenge to everyone,

but finally everyone made it and headed for

the night’s camp.

It took the riders almost nine hours to

complete a mere 62 km. Their tired, but

happy faces confirmed just what they

went through.

Day 7, sandy riverbeds…

After the elation of having conquered the

notorious Van Zyl’s Pass – including the

distinction of Barbara Muszynski being the

first female ever to do it on a big adventure

bike – the Honda Quest competitors

thought that it would be a rather easy day’s

ride. Unfortunately for them the organisers

had different plans.

At first, they rode down the Otjiha Plains

and marvelled at the wide-open expanses

DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017 65


opening up to the south of them. But when they reached

the Khumib riverbed, things got serious. Here the thick

sand proved many rider’s undoing, especially with

temperatures in the high 30s. In fact, the sand was so

challenging that the organisers gave the group the option

of riding next to the riverbed for some distance until

there was no other option but to get back down into the

riverbed as this was the only route south.

After nearly 40km of sandy riverbed riding they were

finally able to exit the river and turn left towards the

southeast in order to reach Puros, where they would stay

for the next two days.

The time would be used to rest, do some washing and

perform important vehicle maintenance on their Africa

Twins, as well as on the trusted fleet of convoy vehicles

that transport the support staff, tools, food and precious

extra fuel for the whole group. By now the contestants

were digging deep, having spent seven days in the

saddle, of which the last three were enormously taxing.

But more importantly, the organisers were starting to get

a better picture of who the real contenders are to win the

inaugural Honda Quest.

Day 8

After having spent seven days in the saddle, of which the

last three were enormously taxing physically, the Honda

Quest competitors spent two days in Puros.

The rest days ended with an exercise called Solitude

where the competitors were made to park their Africa

Twins in different, remote locations in the desert. They

then had to spend an hour in total solitude before they

were allowed contact with anyone else. They didn’t

know beforehand how long the exercise would last and

after having to spend more than a week with 19 other

competitors, many found the solitude both overwhelming

and inspiring.

Day 9, Elephants and rough roads…

When they started their engines on Day Nine, the

excitement was palpable. For this day meant a trip

down the Puros river canyon – and the possibility of

encountering elephants.

After a thorough safety briefing the convoy of competitors

set off, led by a guide vehicle who scouted for a particular

female and her calf who were spotted heading down the

canyon just a day earlier. Elephants are very protective of

their young, creating a serious safety risk for those who

inadvertently stumble into these magnificent animals.

After eight kilometres of hard sand riding, combined with

numerous little river crossings, the convoy stopped when

the elephant and her a calf was spotted in the company of

an aggressive male. In the interest of safety, the decision

was made to turn back to Puros, from where the teams

would ride south towards Palmwag. But first they had to

retrace their steps back through up the riverbed, now a

churned up mass of deep, soft sand.

To describe the D3707 road heading south through

the Giribes Plains towards Fort Sesfontein merely as

“corrugated” would be like describing that Mike Tyson

as “not feminine”. Because few actual off-road sections

are harder on vehicles and riders than this particular

107km stretch of “road”. Predictably enough, it caused

havoc with tyres, with the riders suffering no less than six

punctures.

66 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017


YOUR ADVENTURE

AWAITS

HONDA CRF1000A AFRICA TWIN

R

186 500

HONDA CRF1000D AFRICA TWIN DCT

R

208 500

Visit your nearest Honda Dealer for full range:

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www.honda.co.za / care@hondasa.co.za / Toll Free: 0800 466 321 / Facebook - Honda SA / Twitter - Honda SA.


just before sunset, the Honda Quest group rode

into the campsite at Palmwag, to be informed

that an elephant had just walked through their

campsite. The footprints were clearly visible and if

that wasn’t enough, the group also noticed large

lion footprints in and around the campsite.

After unloading the gear and setting up camp,

the competitors and crew sat down for the usual

night-time routine of presentations. Prior to Honda

Quest every competitor was given a subject on

the African continent they had to prepare and do

a presentation on. Tonight would be no different.

Except that everyone would also keep their eyes

and ears open for night time visitors…

Honda Quest 2017: Here’s the winning team!

Twelve days after leaving Windhoek, the capital of

Namibia, the Honda Quest convoy finally arrived

back at their starting point, tired, happy, content

and richer for the experience.

The Honda Quest did not aim to pick purely the

most skilled riders, but instead set out to pick

the most versatile team. They were looking for

people who showed a keen sense of adventure

and who were curious about their surroundings.

They also wanted to know who would get along

with their fellow competitors and could contribute

to team spirit, as well as taking the initiative with

special tasks.

Looking back, there were some interesting

characters. Johannes Haasbroek, a Namibian

local with a huge beard and a collection of never

ending stories, always elicited a chuckle or two

from his fellow competitors. Then there was Glenn

Koch who was able to fix any flat tyre in a record

time, even if the actual rider of the bike sometimes

objected! Barbara Muszynski, the lone female

competitor, impressed everyone with her positive

approach and managed to silence quite a few

doubters in the process. And then there was Grant

Pentalow who, despite taking quite a few tumbles

in the deep sand, never once considered giving

up, earning him the nickname of “the Terminator”.

Andrew Johnstone amused people with his

psychological profiling of his fellow competitors.

After putting their heads together, comparing

points and interviewing everyone a couple of

times, the instructors and organisers of Honda

Quest declared Charl Potgieter from Pretoria and

Hennie “Tyres” van Heerden from Victoria-West

as the winners. They impressed everyone with

their calm, yet enthusiastic approach, as well

as the thorough way in which they approached

the special tasks. Both will be excellent brand

ambassadors for the Honda CRF 1000 L Africa

Twin, both becoming proud owners of the

motorcycles on which they competed.

The winners of the Quest Spirit Award are Grant

Pentalow and Glenn Koch. They were always in

good spirits, no matter how tough the conditions,

and remained loyal and supportive teammates

right to the very end.

So how cool is that?

See you there next year?

Charl Potgieter from Pretoria and

Hennie “Tyres” van Heerden from

Victoria West.

68 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017


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TRIAL’S BIKE RIDING

what’s the all the fuss about?

Our Cape Town Correspondent

(Howzaat for Fancy ne’?) Renette Rauch

heads out to see whats happening in the

world of trials riding daar onder in die

Kaap...

If you are in the Cape and you have

something going on that is of interest,

give us a shout - we’ll see if she can get

along to cover...

She says:

I had the pleasure of attending the

monthly Cape Trials Bike competition

at Welgelegen, Kuils River and taking

some photographs. Not only was the

course beautifully set up to hold the most

challenges for the riders, but it had rained

in the morning, so the course was muddy

and the rocks had a layer of clay on to test

their skills to the utmost.

The Origin of Trials Bikes.

Brian Barson, Expert rider from the Cape

Trials Club says that Trials riding originated

during last century from British Motorcycle

manufacturers testing their new production

bikes’ performance on steep slopes. The

test riders enjoyed this so much that they

developed a sport from it called Observed

Trials riding, also called Foot -Ups. This

involved riding though rivers, up and down

steep hills and over obstacles by executing

tight, controlled turns on the bikes without

putting a foot down.

Initially the Trials bikes were 4 stroke 500

CC engines, but they have evolved into

smaller, leaner machines, typically a 2

stroke 250 CC engine weighing 70 kg or

less making them lighter than most riders

and thus easier to control than other

bikes. The bikes have 6 gears, three very

low gears situated close together and the

rest taller for riding between sections. The

bottom end power and torque ensures

the tracks are not damaged and they are

quiet and environmentally friendly bikes.

The bikes’ soft tyres and suspension help

to soak up the bumps. The engine is very

small and there is no seat. There are also

smaller bikes for children who love to ride

with their parents .

How to get started:

Trials bikes are relatively cheap to pick

up second hand and with minimal gear

requirements one can start attending

weekly practice at any of the four major

centres in Gauteng , Kwa Zulu Natal , East

London or Cape Town as well as start

participating in the monthly competitions

typically held from March to October to

Eric Pannaye

70 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017


avoid the heat . It doesn’t matter how old

you are , the youngest riders can barely

walk and the older riders are pushing 80.

Brian Barson is 68 and has been riding

since 1970. It is also a fantastic family

sport . Mark Shearer , age 65 rides with

his grandson , Stephen Shearer , age 15 ,

both very competent riders who ride in the

Intermediate Class. Riding the more casual

children’s section were Jack and Jamie

who tagged along with their dad , Shaun

Matthews, as well as Ddohu , age 12, who

comes along with her father Eric Pannaye ,

also a Clubman rider like Shaun.

Novice riders start in the Clubmen class,

but ride the same course , just on different

lines and wider lanes . The beauty is that all

the riders first walk the course together in a

group and discuss and plan their lines , so

the newer riders learn from the old hands.

The riders ride the section one at a time

so riders have the opportunity to get input

from more advanced riders. The 8 to 10

sections are ridden 4 times each, so the

riders are able to work on improvements

all the time and correct their faults

immediately.

After the first round the field is spread and

riders can choose their own sections. I was

fascinated to see so much going on at the

same time. It is not like other bike races

where you only see and talk to the riders at

the finish line . This is very much a social,

interactive sport and it is as challenging as

you want to make it . Yet very safe , due to

the slow riding and one person at a time

riding each section.

Kobus Potgieter, aka Superman , Amageza

veteran and Dakar 2016 finisher says

when he first started riding Trials bikes

a year ago, he had to go back to basics

and practice throttle and clutch control,

braking , balancing on the bike, and

coordinating everything with the terrain you

encounter. He says that riders often pick

up errors along the way and use speed

and momentum to hide their faults. Trials

Riders have no such luxury ,because of

their slow speeds, but have to rely purely

on their skills. He says that he loves that

there is so much scope for bettering

your skills in Trials riding, as you receive

immediate feedback every time you ride.

He also noted how cheap the sport is and

very low maintenance on the bikes that you

can keep going forever and his back tyre

has lasted him this whole year. Petrol is

also cheap because of the small area you

ride in .

The great thing for new riders is that it

doesn’t matter how old your bike is you

can start participating in competitions

immediately. There are at least four

categories of riders, from Novice riders ,

Clubman class, Intermediate, Experts and

Masters. The Trials Clubs welcome new

riders and it is so easy to slot in.

The scoring system is very easy . You get

penalties and for putting a foot down once

, you get penalized one point, and up to

three points for thee dabs of more . You get

a 5 point fault if you fall, or fail to finish . The

rider with the least points wins.

Mostly it is good fun and not that

competitive, the focus is on selfimprovement

and not showing off . Some

of our local men are really good like Master

rider Michael Krause riding over big

obstacles such as cars and big boulders

with ease .

Anyone can do it , you don’t have to

wheelie the 60 km around The Isle of Man

like Dougie Lampkin or ride up a tree or

house like Toni Bou or hop from rock to

rock like Laia Sanz , you can enjoy it all

the same . Even if you are a complete

novice , you can and will improve on your

general bike riding skills while still having

a lot of fun in beautiful surroundings with a

fantastic group of supportive riders .

Jamy with

Dhohu

looking on...

Trials riding is increasing in popularity in

South Africa and once the bug has bitten

many riders never stop, but keep coming

back for more.

Go to one of the monthly competitions

in your area and see what the fuss is all

about . They welcome new riders , and also

spectators and Observers to help score.

This is also the ideal event to sponsor

your Company by claiming one of the

sections for your banners. Do watch out

particularly for the Nationals events, the

next one is also at the same gorgeous

Vergelegen venue , Kuils River on 16 and

17 September 2017. Take the children with

for a fun day .

Check out the Cape website at capetrials.

co.za or the Gauteng website at nrtc.co.za

for more details .

Happy Trials Riding .

72 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017


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BOER AND BRIT

PILLION FRIENDLY

ADVENTURE

BIKE WEEKEND...

9TH NOVEMBER,

WAKKERSTROOM

The guys from Dirt And Trail Magazine and

Dirt Maniacs are hosting a pillion friendly

adventure bike weekend with a difference:

Come and learn a little bit about South

Africa’s history - and have a great ride.

All brands are welcome! Trax KTM will be

along with some demo bikes for you to try

out.

Thursday 9th November Wakkerstroom.

Arrive in the afternoon and settle in.

Braai at Weavers Country Estate.

On Friday we’ll visit loads of battlefield

sites:

Genl PJ Joubert gravesite, Gert vd

Westhuizen Boer War museum, Potters

Hill, Majuba battle site, Visit Potters

Hill gravesite, O’ Neil’s Cottage, Mount

Prospect and Genl Colley’s grave and back

to Wakkerstroom

via Zaaihoek Dam.

Total distance for

the day: 250 -

300km.

Dinner, buffet style.

Saturday 11th

November

Ride Day2

Battle of Kambula

site visit, Battle of

Ntombi, and up to

Klingenberg’s farm

for lunch. This was

the post war Magistrate Court where some

War criminals were tried.

We’ll visit a point overlooking the Pongola

Valley where the Zulus clashed and 30

000 men died between sunrise and sunset.

Jantjieshoek Pass. We will split in 2 groups

here. The braver ones will take a “technical

route” back to Wakkerstroom.

• The alternative is a slightly longer but

easier route back to Wakkerstroom.

Evening braai, slide-show, prize giving.

Total Distance: 360km and 380km.

Sunday 12th November

Ride to the top of Ossewa Mountain.

• Coffee and tea on Scotch Hill

• Visit Anglo-Boer War gravesite in

Wakkerstroom

Head for home.

All brands welcome. for details:

Foleyg@mweb.co.za

COMPETITION TIME! Win a MOTUL Hamper

For free and Niks and Gratis!

All you have to do is send us your MOTUL Moment.

Wearing a MOTUL tee or topping up with Motul oils or Lubing

your chain with MOTUL spray…

Got MOTUL stickers on your bike? Send us a few snaps.

That simple!!

Entries to foleyg@mweb.co.za

Title MOTUL Moment.

We’ll publish your pic and the winning shot gets a hamper*!

*Cap, Keyring, Mousepad, Tee Shirt, Mechanix gloves, Mc

Care kit. Engine oil.

74 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017


TIPPED TO WIN

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Delivering on

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TSR250 R23,499.00

TSR125 R21,499.00

• Road-legal

• 200cc 4-stroke motor

• 5 Litres/100km at 70km/h

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IMPORTED AND DISTRIBUTED BY

Join Big Boy on

Prices include VAT and pre-delivery inspection only. Prices exclude licence, registration and any service costs unless specified. Prices are correct at the time of going to print and may

change without notice due to currency fluctuations or at dealers who are located in outer-lying areas. All advertised models are available at the time of going to print unless specified.

BBS D&T Oct '17.indd 1

2017/09/13 2:26 PM


COME COME JOIN JOIN

THE THE FUN FUN

Some pics from the Maluti Mountain Ride, the guys were treated to some awesome trails

with lots of technical for the rock hoppers and smooth flowing stuff for the family riders.

Awesome fun.

The next events:

Durban 2 JHB is underway as you look at this here mag.

Then Suikerbosrand day ride on Sat the 28th Oct a 100 km route on the outskirts of JHB -

east rand. Always huge fun and - its rained, so its going to be green and beautiful.

The last weekend away for 2017 is to Luneburg *(Natal Spa on the weekend of the 24th Nov)

Always Magic!! mountains, Rivers, Forests and a fantastic family venue. Details and booking

forms go out soon.

In December - The Sunfields ride is on Saturday the 9th November. A great start to the Christmas

Season!

The first ride for 2018 (Gulp) in January is the weekend 26th January Waterberg mountain ride,

Naboom.

www.adventurecompany.co.za

(011) 979-5035/0053

(011) 979-0053

www.facebook.com/theadvco

www.adventurecompany.co.za

www.adventurecompany.co.za


VELOCITY

Racing

MALUTI MOUNTAINS

2017


H a n g i n w i t h t h e o r i g i n a l

FLYING DUTCHMAN

We know quite a few fast Dutchmen –

but if you’ve been in racing circles at all

over the last couple of decades, you’ll

know the first that held that title, and that is

Sherco’s Ian Venter.

When we met him for our li’l test on

the two bikes for this issue, we came to

understand just how long this guy has been

around. He’s a wealth of information having

ridden and raced since many of you lot

were still in Bagdad.

He’s now the man tasked with running

the Sherco South Africa team.

It’s a great team this year with “Wadeo”

Wade Young doing his bit for the brand

locally at National Enduro level and abroad

at all of the red Bull Extreme events. Tim

Young is flying the flag in OR1 and Enduro.

Scott Woods is running with the seniors

in Enduro. Justin Broughton is running

Offroad and Enduro in Masters, Eduan

Bester is running in National enduro – and

Nardus Rabe is competing in the high

School class Offroad and GXCC.

Ian still races – well everything. Wherever

a Sherco is needed for points, you’ll find

Ian dicing against the youngsters… in fact

in his last OR1 outing he came in 5th… Not

too shabby for a bullet ne’?

He appears to be quite an unassuming

guy, he casually pointed us towards

the bikes, and shared a bucketload of

knowledge that can only be gleaned from

years in the saddle. We found out a bit

more about him…

To be fair he could not remember all of

the exact details – it’s been a great career

so far, but here is the gist of it – and proof

that motorcycles do keep you young!

Started racing an air-cooled Red Rocket

80 in 1982,.

· His first MX race was at Mahem.

· He moved to Yamaha and raced under

Bobby Scott Motorcycles. In between he

started flat tracking with Brad Annasis at

Acacia and Corobrick.

· In ’86, he started racing for Russel

Campbell in the support MX team.

· In ’89, he was invited to ride with team

Green and went to his first fun enduro with

Willie Ireland at Rhino park. The following

weekend he was entered into the Sun City

400, he did one lap and called it quits –

hated life. What’s with all the mud and the

rocks? Kawasaki’s John Moore asked him

why he was loafing and told him to get

going again – he was ahead of all of the

official Kawasaki riders… He came 4th in

the 200 class. And that was the start – an

MX boy was converted to enduro. He

earned a place on team Green no bike

sponsorship – but he raced under their

banner.

· When Ralph Pitchford joined Pro

Action, he poached Ian to race a KTM125

in the support class. He was up against the

likes of Willie Ireland, Jeremy Davis, and

Hilton Beatty, the man who started parts

Unlimited in the USA.

· In ’92 he won the regional

championship.

· In ’93 he went back to Yamaha with

78 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017


Russel Campbell Yamaha.

· In ’94 he moved to Honda with Lesotho

Office Equipment on a CR125.

· At the end of ’94, Butch from KTM

poached him back.

· In 95 he got a full ride with Team Green

hardcore/No fear on a KDX 200. 3rd overall

for the year. At that time he was up against

guys like Darryl Curtis, Brian Bontekoning

and Richard Manning.

· In ’97 it all stopped when Uri Human

was tragically killed during a race….

· In 2010 he was approached – again by

Pro Action to run the – wait for it – Beta

team. That lasted 8 months until KTM

South Africa took over the dealership. He

was back on KTM as team manager.

· From there Ian has gone on to run

teams for RAD KTM, The Roost and for

Centurion. While at centurion, they won

4 high school championships, 2 national

enduro champs, 2 Offroad champs, and a

Masters championship.

Last Year, Ian was approached by Sherco

– that little brand is determined to make an

impact. Currently Wade young is leading

the national Enduro championship as well

as the global Red Bull Extreme series.

Watch this space… he’s still very fast –

soon at a race near you!

80 DIRT & TRAIL MAGAZINE OCTOBER 2017


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